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Bharaeth
2016-11-06, 04:53 PM
/homebrewery.naturalcrit.com/share/rypillall (homebrewery.naturalcrit.com/share/rypillall)

See the link for a set of alternative lingering injury rules I made for 5e dnd. The background for their existence is that, soon after picking up the DMG, my DM expressed a desire for more variety and an expansion in the lingering injury rules that he was interested in. I stepped up, because I frankly have too much time on my hands, and I like the lingering injury rules in old Games Workshop games like Bloodbowl and, particularly Necromunda. My injury results are different depending on what damage type takes the character down, and also cover a range of devestating, to mildly inconvenient, with even a tiny chance of surprisingly beneficial!

These rules have never been playtested though, for whatever reason. I never did get next to any feedback from that DM, so thought I would put this up here, to see other people's thoughts. This is something like my third version of them, and I am gravitating towards the conclusion that I need to simplify it all bit more, again

Oh, and you can probably tell, that my homebrew injury tables attempt to insert a bit of grit into the game. Make of that what you will

GENERAL DESIGN NOTES

* The linked document has a lot of information, and is on the complex side for 5e standards. However, there is room for complex tables in the game, as shown in the Wild Mage class and various bits and pieces in the DMG - so it's not completely out of place...
* I made a bit of an effort throughout the various injury results to reward training in the Medicine skill, and uses of mundane equipment like the healer's kit (although logic dictated that magic healing is still useful). This is largely a result of the types of campaigns in which I have so far been embroiled, where no one ever trains in Medicine, and divine magic is the order of the day
* Also, something that bugs me about later versions of dnd is the by-and-large uselessness of odd numbers in the ability scores. Aside from a few feats and multiclassing that have prerequisites for ability values at a 13 threshold, and, with the exception of Strength (where every point does it least have some impact on encumbrance capacity) - other than these examples, there is no reason for a points-buy character to ever have anything other than even numbers in their abilities, and it gets a bit samey. So my recovery time mechanic does reward granularity in the Constitution score
* My recovery time rules is my attempt to put in some non-RP reason to ever spend more than the absolute minimum on lifestyle costs. I think it is too bitty and fiddly, but there is the reason why I put it in

Bharaeth
2016-11-08, 04:15 AM
Just to be clear, I was looking for ideas or feedback.

Also, it's the first time I have tried to use the Homebrewery page - perhaps the link doesn't work? If that's the case, someone let me know.

Ninja_Prawn
2016-11-08, 04:19 AM
Just to be clear, I was looking for ideas or feedback.

Also, it's the first time I have tried to use the Homebrewery page - perhaps the link doesn't work? If that's the case, someone let me know.

The link works, you don't need to worry about that.

I'll see if I can find time to review this... it's a long document but it deserves a proper going-over.

Bharaeth
2016-11-08, 05:13 AM
Ah, nice. I realise the document is very long. It's kind of the nature of the beast, as it seemed to make sense to have a separate section for all the damage types.

Ninja_Prawn
2016-11-08, 03:41 PM
I've had a bit of a look now, and the first issue is in the first sentence. There are no negative hit points in 5e. If your stuff is using negative hit points, you need to start by presenting them as a variant rule and explaining how they work.

The second major issue I have is that the lists are too long. By which I mean longer than they need to be. There are too many possible injuries... some of them only have a 1% chance of happening. Many of them are the same for different damage types. There's long-winded fluff all over the place. It all combines to make the document feel unreadable.

I would either cut the tables down to d20s, or have only one generic table, with a couple of entries that are like 'damage-type-specific injury A' and 'damage-type-specific injury B' so you just have two that are unique to each damage type. Though you'd probably need a separate table for psychic damage even then -every other damage type could leave a scar or cost you an arm, but psychic probably wouldn't.

The other thing is that you haven't really added anything that isn't already in the DMG. A 'lingering injuries supplement' should include new ways to inflict and cure lingering injuries. Well I guess you have the recovery thing, but that's it. You could write up rules for torture devices, combine it with expanded madness/insanity rules, salves that remove or preserve scars, proper rules for helmets... that sort of thing would make the document valuable and interesting. As it is, it's just a massive d100 table.

Sorry if that's demoralising. :smallfrown: I just see potential here that isn't being fulfilled.

Bharaeth
2016-11-08, 06:35 PM
Hmm. My clumsy terminology about 'negative hit points' was an attempt to reference the same sort of mechanic in the PHB with massive damage and instant death. They don't specifically say 'negative hit points' there, but they talk about leftover damage when below 0 hit points being equal to your maximum hit points total, or something thereabouts... But, I think I will do away with my two categories of 'injured' and 'severely injured', in this case. That will get rid of some of the bloat.

I have also become aware that the tables are too long. On my pdf that I have formatted on my home computer, the font size had to get pretty damn small to all fit on one page per table. So, yeah, I can see the need to get cut away some bits - but it will be a bit of a struggle! As it is, though, whether it's a d100 or a d20 on the table is neither really here or there - it's still one dice roll. And I don't see it as a massive issue that some of the results turn up much more rarely than others.

In terms of presentation. I think I'm okay with tables sharing some similar results, and I also feel like they would be a bit bizarre to remove the fluff describing why the various effects were coming in to play.

Mostly, my plan was just for an extension of the damage possibilities compared to the DMG - I don't think I really had it in mind as a whole supplement (that would lead to even more bloat!). And as for helmets - I always figured that some would be included in the basic armour that you acquire anyway - I wouldn't want to include a retrospective coin and encumbrance tax just to reflect my rules. I kinda figured that players would naturally envision their characters with or without helms in their sketches, and call it done. Sure, a power gamer would react to these rules and say "my characters has a helmet, and has always had one," but that's okay, I figured.

I suppose I can remove some text in the entries which talks about the specific recovery times involved, maybe based just on the severity or the dice result they were linked to... but it seemed to me to make sense that certain bad effects would stick around for longer based on whether they were cracked ribs or a broken ankle, and that certain spells would have more application with some than they would with the other. Hmm. I can think on this.

Also, I will cut out the section about 'damage inflicted by powerful outsiders' I think; that was mostly a nod to a specific character in our campaign who walks with a limp, even though he hangs out with powerful divine magic users, and has access to healing... Yeah

Thank you for the suggestions, and the feedback, though.

Bharaeth
2016-11-22, 08:47 AM
Okay, so I've revisited my rules ever so slightly, and removed some of the complications that I could bare to do. See below:

"LINGERING INJURIES

If the character is at 0 hit points or less, the character is injured, and the player rolls a d100 on the relevant Lingering Injuries table, applying the character's Constitution modifier to the roll. Results should be written onto the character's sheet as a new flaw (rerolling illogical duplicates at the Dungeon Master's discretion). Also, unless the result is “I'm... I'm Alright!”, the character must still make death saving throws as usual. If a result doesn't specify any lasting injury to the character, assume that, in the long-term, they recover with no adverse lingering effects.
Which Lingering Injuries table they roll on depends on the damage type of the attack that pushed the character to the 0 hit points threshold. If the injuring attack combined two or more damage types (such as slashing and fire damage), either go with the damage table that makes most sense, or roll once and cross reference the result on both (or all) tables, and go with what is most fun or interesting: the Dungeon Master has the final say. Should the character be resistant to the injuring attack's damage type, they gain advantage on the roll.
For example:
Bharaeth the dragonborn paladin has a Constitution modifier of +2, and a maximum of 28 hit points. A brutal blow from an orc beserker's great axe knocks him to 0 hit points – assuming that he is later stabilised, his player (Steve) rolls a d100 on the Slashing Damage column of the Lingering Injuries chart, adding Bharaeth's Constitution modifier to the roll: the result will be from 03 to 102. Let's hope that Steve doesn't have a history of low rolls!
On the other hand, if the injuring attack was of some kind of fire damage, Steve would instead roll on the Fire Damage column, and have advantage on the roll, as the dragonborn paladin is resistant to fire.

Recovery

Several of the Lingering Injury results give a base recovery time, often expressed in increments of days or weeks, after which the worst effects of an injury diminish. However, as different individuals recover at different rates, the base recovery times given in the various entries should be modified by deducting the character's Constitution score. For example:
Bharaeth the dragonborn paladin heroically fell down some stairs, knocked himself cold, and received the Broken Ribs flaw. As Broken Ribs have a base recovery time of 50 days, and Bharaeth's Constitution score is 15, he will suffer debilitating pain for 35 days – unless the party cleric comes back from the inn and heals him.
The character can choose to focus on recuperating during their downtime, with each whole day of recuperating activity counts as two days of base recovery time. And as well as the character's general vigour, factors such as lifestyle can have an impact on how quickly a character can recuperate during downtime. Particularly bad living conditions can drag a recovery out for longer, whereas good food and surroundeds can have a character up on their feet in no time!
Consult the list below and, depending on the recovering character's lifestyle, apply a positive or negative adjustment to the character's effective Constitution score for recovery purposes. If a character undergoes a variety of lifestyles while recuperating, average out the modifier according to logic; for example, a character who spends almost all their convalescence in a squalid hovel, and then upgrades to an aristocratic palace for the last day still suffers the -4 adjustment, but someone that spends the first half in a comfortable home and the second half in a wealthy one will adjust by +2.

Lifestyle Effective Constitution Score Adjustment
Wretched, Squalid or Poor -4
Modest or Comfortable no adjustment
Wealthy or Aristocratic +4

Using the example above, imagine that thrice-cursed Bharaeth got cheated out of his share of the treasure by the back-stabbing party rogue, and could only afford a Squalid lifestyle while trying to recover from his Broken Ribs: it would actually take him 39 days to recover, rather than his usual 35. But if, for argument's sake, Bharaeth did hold onto his share of the loot (and didn't squander it all on silly temple donations) and lounged around in Aristocratic luxury during his recovery, he would be back to normal in 31 days."

And here follow the tables for each damage type:

Acid Damage Lingering Injuries

(d100 roll) result
(01) Instant Death. Your brain or other major organs are dissolved, killing you instantly.
(02) Fatal Wound. Either you suffer massive tissue damage, or major organs are part eaten away. Even if you succeed at the normal death saving throws, you remain unconscious and will die after 1d6 turns have passed, at the end of your turn, unless you are magically healed above 0 hit points, or stabilised with a DC 17 Wisdom (Medicine) check using a healer's kit.
(03) Melted Arm. Your arm or hand is eaten away, pumping arterial blood and yellow ichor everywhere. You automatically fail your death saving throws, unless you receive magical healing to seal the stump, it is cauterised by fire or radiant damage, or another character uses an action to apply a tourniquet. Following recovery, you can no longer hold anything with two hands, and can hold only a single object at a time. If the lost arm was your dominant arm (50% chance), unless you are trained in the Dual Wielder feat or the Two-Weapon Fighting Style, you have disadvantage with weapon attacks until you train your off-hand; and, if you attempt to cast a spell with somatic components, you must first succeed on a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or lose your action – the spell slot, if any, is not lost. You learn to train your off-hand after a base recovery time of 40 days (see Recovery above).The limb can be restored by either regenerate or wish.
(04) Melted Leg. Your leg or foot is eaten away, pumping arterial blood and yellow ichor everywhere. You automatically fail your death saving throws, unless you receive magical healing to seal the stump, it is cauterised by fire or radiant damage, or another character uses an action to apply a tourniquet. Following recovery, your speed on foot is halved and you must use a cane or crutch to move, unless you receive a prosthesis of some kind. Additionally, you fall prone after using the dash action, and have disadvantage on Dexterity checks made to balance. The limb can be restored by either regenerate or wish.
(05-13)Frail. You recover, but your health is never quite the same again. Roll 1d3: 1: you lose 1 point from your Strength score; 2: you lose 1 point from your Dexterity score; 3: you lose 1 point from your Constitution score. This flaw can be removed by greater restoration or wish.
(14-20) Ruined Eye. If you wear a helmet, you must make a DC 17 Dexterity saving throw – if you fail (or have no helmet), one of your eyes is destroyed. From now on, you have disadvantage on Wisdom (Perception) checks that rely on sight, and on ranged attack rolls. If a subsequent injury damages your other eye, you are permanently blinded. Magic such as regenerate or wish can restore the lost eye.
(21-26) Pelvic Injury. The attack destroys your nethers. Whenever you attempt a Strength (Athletics) check or take any action in combat (other than casting a spell), you must succeed at a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or lose 1d6 hit points. You also can't ride a horse without suffering 1d10 hit points. Finally, this injury renders you permanently infertile. This flaw ends after a base recovery time of 70 days (see Recovery above), or if you receive magic such as heal, regenerate or wish, although the infertility can only be reversed by greater restoration or remove curse.
(27-32) Leg Wound. Your leg is badly damaged. Until a base recovery time of 40 days has passed (see Recovery above), you must use a cane or crutch to move at half speed, you fall prone after using the dash action, and you have disadvantage on Dexterity checks made to balance. Even after the worst of the damage has passed, your speed on foot is reduced by 5 feet. The limb can be restored by either heal, regenerate or wish.
(33-38) Hand Injury. The attack costs you several fingers. There is a 50% chance of the affected hand being your dominant hand, and your weapon attacks suffer a -2 penalty, unless you are trained in either the Dual Wielder feat or the Two-Weapon Fighting Style. Also, if you attempt to cast a spell with somatic components, you must first succeed on a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or lose your action that turn – the spell slot, if any, is not lost. These penalties last a base recovery time of 40 days (see Recovery above). This flaw can be removed by magic such as regenerate or wish.
(39-44) Ruined Armour. Unless your protective gear is enchanted or made of adamantine, the attack leaves it badly damaged, affording little protection and fitting badly. If you have a shield, it is destroyed; otherwise, your AC is reduced by-2. This penalty lasts until your armour is replaced, repaired (costing half the the total cost of the item) or subject to a mending spell. If you have no shield or armour, treat this result as Minor Scar instead.
(45-50) Infected Wounds. The damage refuses to properly heal, and instead becomes swollen and leaks a noisome pus. Your hit point maximum is reduced by 1 for every 24 hours the wound persists. If your hit point maximum drops to 0, you die. The wound heals if you receive magical healing or, alternatively, someone can tend to the wound and make a DC 14 Wisdom (Medicine) check once every 24 hours. After ten successes, the wound heals. Characters who are immune to disease treat this result as Minor Scar instead.
(51-55) “I'm Melting!” Unless you are immune to being frightened, you frantically stumble towards an ally, grasping at them, pleading for help and dripping acid, before passing out. You immediately move up to half your speed towards a random friendly creature and attempt a grapple; this movement can result in opportunity attacks. If the grapple succeeds, you also inflict 1d6 acid damage. At the beginning of your next turn, you fall unconscious as usual.
(56-60) Fixation. Following recovery, you develop an unhealthy fixation. Roll 1d6: on a 1-3, you nurture a bitter enmity; on a 4-6, you develop an overpowering phobia. If you are immune to being frightened, then this result is bitter enmity. You should work with the Dungeon Master on the phrasing of the new flaw: your hatred or phobia may focus on some element of the attacker's identity (for example, a mindless hatred towards dragons or sorcerers) or even the type of attack (such as a fear of acid). This flaw can be removed by magic such as greater restoration or wish.
(61-69) Horrible Scar. If you wear a helmet, you must make a DC 14 Dexterity saving throw – if you fail (or have no helmet), you are disfigured to the extent that the wound can't be easily concealed, or palated. You have disadvantage on Charisma (Persuasion) checks and advantage on Charisma (Intimidation) checks. Magic like heal, regenerate or wish can remove the scar.
(70-95) Minor Scar. The scar doesn't have any adverse effect, and can be removed by magic such as heal, regenerate or wish.
(96-98) Scarred Nerves. Bathed in a mist of acid droplets, the pain is so intense it proves transcendental, ruining almost all your nerve endings. Following a long rest, you feel almost no pain, and can reroll a failed Constitution saving throw to maintain concentration on spells due to receiving damage; you must accept the second result. Also, in future, when you are reduced to 0 hit points but not killed outright, you can drop to 1 hit point instead. You can't use this feature again until you finish a long rest. This flaw can only be removed by magic such as regenerate or wish.
(99 or higher) “I'm... I'm Alright!” The gods must be smiling today – the blow seemed worse than it actually is, and you are assumed dead. Rather than making any death saving throws, you are instead stabilised and returned to 1 hit point and, at the beginning of your next turn, regain 1d10 hit points and can act as normal, gaining advantage on your first attack that turn.



Bludgeoning Damage Lingering Injuries

(d100 roll) result
(01) Instant Death. Your skull is crushed, or you suffer massive internal injuries, killing you instantly.
(02) Fatal Wound. Either your back is broken or your internal organs are ruptured. Even if you succeed at the normal death saving throws, you remain unconscious and will die after 1d6 turns have passed, at the end of your turn, unless you are magically healed above 0 hit points, or stabilised with a DC 17 Wisdom (Medicine) check using a healer's kit.
(03) Paralysis. Spinal damage leaves you unable to move or feel anything from the waist down. You will need carrying or some sort of device to allow mobility (otherwise you can only crawl 5 feet per turn), and are restrained. Still, there is always hope for a particularly strong person: at the beginning of every week, you can make a DC 20 Constitution saving throw – on a success, you miraculously recover. Otherwise, this flaw only ends if you receive magic such as greater restoration, heal, regenerate or wish.
(04) Shattered Arm. Your arm or hand is smashed beyond recovery, and will require amputation. Following recovery, you can no longer hold anything with two hands, and can hold only a single object at a time. If the lost arm was your dominant arm (50% chance), unless you are trained in the Dual Wielder feat or the Two-Weapon Fighting Style, you have disadvantage with weapon attacks until you train your off-hand; and, if you attempt to cast a spell with somatic components, you must first succeed on a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or lose your action – the spell slot, if any, is not lost. You learn to train your off-hand after a base recovery time of 40 days (see Recovery above). The limb can be restored by either regenerate or wish.
(05) Shattered Leg. Your leg or foot is smashed beyond recovery, and will require amputation. Following recovery, your speed on foot is halved and you must use a cane or crutch to move, unless you receive a prosthesis of some kind. Additionally, you fall prone after using the dash action, and have disadvantage on Dexterity checks made to balance. The limb can be restored by either regenerate or wish.
(06-10)“I Can't See!” If you wear a helmet, you must make a DC 11 Constitution saving throw – if you fail (or have no helmet), then one too many blows to the head has damaged your brain in a strange and horrible way. You are temporarily blinded. This flaw ends when you receive magic such as lesser restoration, greater restoration, heal, regenerate or wish, or you succeed at a DC 14 Constitution saving throw, which you can make after every long rest.
(11-17) Frail. You recover, but your health is never quite the same again. Roll 1d3: 1: you lose 1 point from your Strength score; 2: you lose 1 point from your Dexterity score; 3: you lose 1 point from your Constitution score. This flaw can be removed by greater restoration or wish.
(18-24) Head Injury. Head trauma threatens your mental faculties. If you wear a helmet, you must make a DC 11 Constitution saving throw – if you fail (or have no helmet), then roll 1d3: 1: you lose 1 point from your Intelligence score; 2: you lose 1 point from your Wisdom score; 3: you lose 1 point from your Charisma score. This flaw is often accompanied by speech or memory problems, requiring you to relearn basic skills and social niceties. This flaw can be removed by greater restoration or wish.
(25-29) Multiple Fractures. You take a thorough beating, and several broken bones. Roll 1d6 twice (rerolling duplicates), and you suffer both flaws: 1: Broken Ribs; 2: Broken Arm; 3: Broken Jaw; 4: Hand Injury; 5: Pelvic Injury; 6: Leg Wound.
(30-34) Broken Ribs. Your rib cage is partly caved in. Whenever you attempt a Strength (Athletics) check or attempt to take any action in combat (other than casting a spell), you must succeed at a DC 11 Constitution saving throw. If you fail the save, you lose your action and can't use reactions until the start of your next turn. This flaw ends after a base recovery time of 50 days (see Recovery above), or if you receive magic such as heal, regenerate or wish.
(35-39) Broken Arm. With an audible 'crack', your arm is shattered. There is a 50% chance that the broken arm is your dominant arm and if so, unless you are trained in the Dual Wielder feat or the Two-Weapon Fighting Style, you have disadvantage with weapon attacks. If it is your other arm, you cannot wear a shield. This flaw ends after a base recovery time of 30 weeks (see Recovery above), or if you receive magic such as a greater restoration, heal, regenerate or wish.
(40-44) Broken Jaw. Your jaw is smashed, scattering teeth. Unless you are wearing a helmet and succeed at a DC 11 Constitution saving throw, you find eating and speaking very painful, and have disadvantage on most Charisma checks. Additionally, if you attempt to cast a spell which uses verbal components, you must first succeed on a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or lose your action that turn – the spell slot, if any, is not lost. This flaw ends after a base recovery time of 90 days (see Recovery above), or if you receive magic such as greater restoration, heal, regenerate or wish.
(45-49) Hand Injury. The attack costs you several fingers. There is a 50% chance of the affected hand being your dominant hand, and your weapon attacks suffer a -2 penalty, unless you are trained in either the Dual Wielder feat or the Two-Weapon Fighting Style. Also, if you attempt to cast a spell with somatic components, you must first succeed on a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or lose your action that turn – the spell slot, if any, is not lost. These penalties last a base recovery time of 40 days (see Recovery above). This flaw can be removed by magic such as regenerate or wish.
(50-54) Pelvic Injury. Either your pelvis is struck a crippling blow, or the attack destroys your nethers. Whenever you attempt a Strength (Athletics) check or take any action in combat (other than casting a spell), you must succeed at a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or lose 1d6 hit points. You also can't ride a horse without suffering 1d10 hit points. Finally, this injury renders you permanently infertile. This flaw ends after a base recovery time of 70 days (see Recovery above), or if you receive magic such as heal, regenerate or wish, although the infertility can only be reversed by greater restoration or remove curse.
(55-59) Leg Wound. Your leg is badly damaged. Until a base recovery time of 40 days has passed (see Recovery above), you must use a cane or crutch to move at half speed, you fall prone after using the dash action, and you have disadvantage on Dexterity checks made to balance. Even after the worst of the damage has passed, your speed on foot is reduced by 5 feet. The limb can be restored by magic such as heal, regenerate or wish.
(60-66) Ruined Armour. Unless your protective gear is enchanted or made of adamantine, the attack leaves it badly damaged, affording little protection and fitting badly. If you have a shield, it is destroyed; otherwise, your AC is reduced by-2. This penalty lasts until your armour is replaced, repaired (costing half the the total cost of the item) or subject to a mending spell. If you have no shield or armour, treat this result as Minor Scar instead.
(67-69) Forceful Collision. The force of the attack sends you haplessly flying through the air towards another unsuspecting creature. You are pushed up to 10 feet towards a random creature and, if in range to strike it, knock it prone, unless that other creature succeeds at a DC 11 Dexterity or Strength saving throw (creature's choice). This roll is made with disadvantage if you are bigger than the dodging creature. If you are huge or gargantuan, you are too heavy to be thrown, and this result has no effect.
(70-98) Minor Scar. The scar doesn't have any adverse effect, and can be removed by magic such as heal, regenerate or wish.
(99 or higher) “I'm... I'm Alright!” The gods must be smiling today – the blow seemed worse than it actually is, and you are assumed dead. Rather than making any death saving throws, you are instead stabilised and returned to 1 hit point and, at the beginning of your next turn, regain 1d10 hit points and can act as normal, gaining advantage on your first attack that turn.




Cold Damage Lingering Injuries
(d100 roll) result
(01) Shattered Pieces. You are frozen solid, and the impact as you hit the floor shatters you into hundreds of pieces. You can now only be brought back by powerful magic like reincarnate, true resurrection or wish.
(02) Instant Death. You are frozen solid, dying instantly.
(03) Fatal Wound. Either you suffer massive tissue damage, or your major organs are necrotised by the cold. Even if you succeed at the normal death saving throws, you remain unconscious and will die after 1d6 turns have passed, at the end of your turn, unless you are magically healed above 0 hit points, or stabilised with a DC 17 Wisdom (Medicine) check using a healer's kit.
(04) Destroyed Arm. Your arm or hand is frozen solid and then shattered, leaving only a blackened stump. Following recovery, you can no longer hold anything with two hands, and can hold only a single object at a time. If the lost arm was your dominant arm (50% chance), unless you are trained in the Dual Wielder feat or the Two-Weapon Fighting Style, you have disadvantage with weapon attacks until you train your off-hand; and, if you attempt to cast a spell with somatic components, you must first succeed on a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or lose your action – the spell slot, if any, is not lost. You learn to train your off-hand after a base recovery time of 40 days (see Recovery above). The limb can be restored by either regenerate or wish.
(05) Destroyed Leg. Your leg or foot is frozen solid and then shattered, leaving only a numb, blackened stump. Following recovery, your speed on foot is halved and you must use a cane or crutch to move, unless you receive a prosthesis of some kind. Additionally, you fall prone after using the dash action, and have disadvantage on Dexterity checks made to balance. The limb can be restored by either regenerate or wish.
(06-10) Lung Trauma. Your lungs are withered, placing you dangerously close to death. While this flaw remains, you can only stabilise naturally after five death saving throws, rather than three. Following recovery, even routine activity leaves you breathless, and you are wracked with coughing fits when the air is thin or smoky. For every four hours spent walking (or eight hours riding), and when reduced to half your maximum hit points or less, you must succeed at a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or suffer one level of exhaustion. Exhaustion levels gained from this flaw are lost during a short or long rest, or can be removed by a character equipped with a herbalism kit with which they are proficient. Finally, this flaw ends if you succeed at a DC 17 Constitution saving throw rolled at the beginning of every month, or if removed by heal, greater restoration, regenerate or wish.
(11-17) Severe Hypothermia. Reduced core body heat leaves you with pale puffy skin, blue extremities and lips, and confusion. Your speed is halved (rounded up) and, in combat, you count as if you are subject to the confusion spell (although you cannot make Wisdom saving throws to end the effect as in the standard spell). This flaw ends if you succeed at a DC 11 Constitution saving throw rolled after a long rest, or you receive magic such as greater restoration, protection from energy (cold) or wish. At the Dungeon Master's discretion, sources of intense heat may allow you to make an additional saving throw.
(18-26) Frail. You recover, but your health is never quite the same again. Roll 1d3: 1: you lose 1 point from your Strength score; 2: you lose 1 point from your Dexterity score; 3: you lose 1 point from your Constitution score. This flaw can be removed by greater restoration or wish.
(27-35) Frost Bite. Some of your digits rot away, leaving painful blackened stumps. Roll 1d3: 1: you lose 1d3 toes; 2: you lose 1d3 fingers; 3: you lose 1d3 fingers and 1d3 toes. If you lose toes, your foot speed is reduced by 5 feet. If you lose fingers, there is a 50% chance of the affected hand being your dominant hand. You can just about carry a shield, but if it's a weapon hand, your weapon attacks suffer a -2 penalty, unless you are trained in either the Dual Wielder feat or the Two-Weapon Fighting Style. Also, if it is your dominant hand, if you attempt to cast a spell with somatic components, you must first succeed on a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or lose your action that turn – the spell slot, if any, is not lost. These penalties last a base recovery time of 40 days (see Recovery above). This flaw can be removed by magic such as regenerate or wish.
(36-42) Deep Freeze. Shaking violently with the cold, your strength is sapped for days. After a long rest, you can make a DC 17 Constitution saving throw (with advantage if resistant to cold damage): on a success, this flaw ends – otherwise, it remains until you succeed on a future roll, or until you are the subject of magic such as heal, greater restoration, protection from energy (cold) or wish.
(43-48) Ruined Armour. Unless your protective gear is enchanted or made of adamantine, the attack leaves it badly damaged, affording little protection and fitting badly. If you have a shield, it is destroyed; otherwise, your AC is reduced by-2. This penalty lasts until your armour is replaced, repaired (costing half the the total cost of the item) or subject to a mending spell. If you have no shield or armour, treat this result as Minor Scar instead.
(49-53) Wave of Ice. A freak burst of elemental ice blossoms where you fall. All other creatures within 10-foot range of you must succeed on a DC 11 Constitution saving throw, or suffer 2d6 cold damage. Additionally, this 10 feet radius of floor is frozen for up to one minute, counting as difficult terrain. A creature attempting to move across this area before it thaws must succeed on a DC 11 Dexterity saving throw or fall prone.
(54-60) Fixation. Following recovery, you develop an unhealthy fixation. Roll 1d6: on a 1-3, you nurture a bitter enmity; on a 4-6, you develop an overpowering phobia. If you are immune to being frightened, then this result is bitter enmity. You should work with the Dungeon Master on the phrasing of the new flaw: your hatred or phobia may focus on some element of the attacker's identity (for example, a mindless hatred towards dragons or sorcerers) or even the type of attack (such as a fear of snow). This flaw can be removed by magic such as greater restoration or wish.
(61-69) Horrible Scar. If you wear a helmet, you must make a DC 14 Dexterity saving throw – if you fail (or have no helmet), you are disfigured to the extent that the wound can't be easily concealed, or palated. You have disadvantage on Charisma (Persuasion) checks and advantage on Charisma (Intimidation) checks. Magic like heal, regenerate or wish can remove the scar.
(77-96) Minor Scar. The scar doesn't have any adverse effect, and can be removed by magic such as heal, regenerate or wish.
(97-98) Cold Heart. By some freak coincidence, the intensity of the frost opens the briefest of rifts to the Plane of Elemental Water and you are permanently infused with the smallest fragment of energy from that plane. Your body becomes icy cold to the touch and, from now on, you reduce fire damage that you suffer by -3 per attack, and your own unarmed attacks inflict an additional 1 point of magical cold damage. Additionally, once per long rest, upon striking a foe within 10 feet, you can choose to channel an additional 2d6 magical cold damage against the target. This costs no action. This flaw can only be removed by magic such as remove curse or wish.
(99 or higher) “I'm... I'm Alright!” The gods must be smiling today – the blow seemed worse than it actually is, and you are assumed dead. Rather than making any death saving throws, you are instead stabilised and returned to 1 hit point and, at the beginning of your next turn, regain 1d10 hit points and can act as normal, gaining advantage on your first attack that turn.



Fire Damage Lingering Injuries

(d100 roll) result

(01) Disintegrated. The conflagration burns unnaturally hot, killing you instantly and leaving nothing but ash. You can now only be brought back by powerful magic like true resurrection or wish.
(02) Instant Death. Your major organs are incinerated, or your brain boils inside your skull, killing you instantly.
(03) Fatal Wound. You suffer massive burns, or internal burn damage to major organs. Even if you succeed at the normal death saving throws, you remain unconscious and will die after 1d6 turns have passed, at the end of your turn, unless you are magically healed above 0 hit points, or stabilised with a DC 17 Wisdom (Medicine) check using a healer's kit.
(04) Incinerated Arm. Your arm or hand is almost entirely disintegrated. Following recovery, you can no longer hold anything with two hands, and can hold only a single object at a time. If the lost arm was your dominant arm (50% chance), unless you are trained in the Dual Wielder feat or the Two-Weapon Fighting Style, you have disadvantage with weapon attacks until you train your off-hand; and, if you attempt to cast a spell with somatic components, you must first succeed on a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or lose your action – the spell slot, if any, is not lost. You learn to train your off-hand after a base recovery time of 40 days (see Recovery above). The limb can be restored by either regenerate or wish.
(05) Incinerated Leg. Your leg or foot is almost entirely disintegrated. Following recovery, your speed on foot is halved and you must use a cane or crutch to move, unless you receive a prosthesis of some kind. Additionally, you fall prone after using the dash action, and have disadvantage on Dexterity checks made to balance. The limb can be restored by either regenerate or wish.
(06-10) Lung Trauma. Your lungs are scorched or withered, placing you dangerously close to death. While this flaw remains, you can only stabilise naturally after five death saving throws, rather than three. Following recovery, even routine activity leaves you breathless, and you are wracked with coughing fits when the air is thin or smoky. For every four hours spent walking (or eight hours riding), and when reduced to half your maximum hit points or less, you must succeed at a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or suffer one level of exhaustion. Exhaustion levels gained from this flaw are lost during a short or long rest. Finally, this flaw ends if you succeed at a DC 17 Constitution saving throw rolled at the beginning of every month, or if removed by greater restoration,heal, regenerate or wish.
(11-18) Frail. You recover, but your health is never quite the same again. Roll 1d3: 1: you lose 1 point from your Strength score; 2: you lose 1 point from your Dexterity score; 3: you lose 1 point from your Constitution score. This flaw can be removed by greater restoration or wish.
(19-25) Leg Wound. Your leg is badly damaged. Until a base recovery time of 40 days has passed (see Recovery above), you must use a cane or crutch to move at half speed, you fall prone after using the dash action, and you have disadvantage on Dexterity checks made to balance. Even after the worst of the damage has passed, your speed on foot is reduced by 5 feet. The limb can be restored by either heal, regenerate or wish.
(26-32) Hand Injury. The attack costs you several fingers. There is a 50% chance of the affected hand being your dominant hand, and your weapon attacks suffer a -2 penalty, unless you are trained in either the Dual Wielder feat or the Two-Weapon Fighting Style. Also, if you attempt to cast a spell with somatic components, you must first succeed on a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or lose your action that turn – the spell slot, if any, is not lost. These penalties last a base recovery time of 40 days (see Recovery above). This flaw can be removed by magic such as regenerate or wish.
(33-39) Ruined Armour. Unless your protective gear is enchanted or made of adamantine, the attack leaves it badly damaged, affording little protection and fitting badly. If you have a shield, it is destroyed; otherwise, your AC is reduced by-2. This penalty lasts until your armour is replaced, repaired (costing half the the total cost of the item) or subject to a mending spell. If you have no shield or armour, treat this result as Minor Scar instead.
(40-47) Infected Wounds. The damage refuses to properly heal, and instead becomes swollen and leaks a noisome pus. Your hit point maximum is reduced by 1 for every 24 hours the wound persists. If your hit point maximum drops to 0, you die. The wound heals if you receive magical healing or, alternatively, someone can tend to the wound and make a DC 14 Wisdom (Medicine) check once every 24 hours. After ten successes, the wound heals. Characters who are immune to disease treat this result as Minor Scar instead.
(48-52) “Aaaaaaarghhhhh!” Unless you are immune to being frightened, you panic as the flames consume you, slamming bodily into a creature that interrupts your maddened flight. You immediately move up to half your speed (rounded up) towards a random creature and attempt a shove (either to knock prone or push, your choice); this movement can result in opportunity attacks. If the shove succeeds, you also inflict 1d6 fire damage. Following this attack, you then fall unconscious, and begin making death saving throws as usual.
(53-59) Fixation. Following recovery, you develop an unhealthy fixation. Roll 1d6: on a 1-3, you nurture a bitter enmity; on a 4-6, you develop an overpowering phobia. If you are immune to being frightened, then this result is bitter enmity. You should work with the Dungeon Master on the phrasing of the new flaw: your hatred or phobia may focus on some element of the attacker's identity (for example, a mindless hatred towards dragons or sorcerers) or even the type of attack (such as a fear of fire). This flaw can be removed by magic such as greater restoration or wish.
(60-69) Horrible Scar. If you wear a helmet, you must make a DC 14 Dexterity saving throw – if you fail (or have no helmet), you are disfigured to the extent that the wound can't be easily concealed, or palated. You have disadvantage on Charisma (Persuasion) checks and advantage on Charisma (Intimidation) checks. Magic like heal, regenerate or wish can remove the scar.
(77-96) Minor Scar. The scar doesn't have any adverse effect, and can be removed by magic such as heal, regenerate or wish.
(97-98) Fire-Touched. By some freak coincidence, the intensity of the flame opens the briefest of rifts to the Plane of Elemental Fire and, you become permanently infused with the smallest fragment of energy from that plane. Your body radiates heat and, from now on, you reduce cold damage that you suffer by -3 per attack, and your own unarmed attacks inflict an additional 1 point of magical fire damage. Additionally, once per long rest, upon striking a foe within 10 feet, you can choose to channel an additional 2d6 magical fire damage against the target. This costs no action, but if a nonmagical wooden weapon is used to channel this flame, it is destroyed. This flaw can only be removed by magic such as remove curse or wish.
(99 or higher) “I'm... I'm Alright!” The gods must be smiling today – the blow seemed worse than it actually is, and you are assumed dead. Rather than making any death saving throws, you are instead stabilised and returned to 1 hit point and, at the beginning of your next turn, regain 1d10 hit points and can act as normal, gaining advantage on your first attack that turn.

Bharaeth
2016-11-22, 08:54 AM
And for the ones I couldn't fit!:

Force Damage Lingering Injuries

(d100 roll) result
(01) Hole in Time and Space. Uh oh. The energy of the rogue magic contracts into a super-dense point at your heart and begins to drag all ambient magic inwards – seconds later, your remains crumple silently inward, and all that remains is an orb of impenetrable dark force – a sphere of annihilation! You die instantly and your remains and equipment are destroyed (with the possible exception of any artifact in your possession) and, at the beginning of what would be your next turn, a sphere of annihilation occupies your former space. You can now only be brought back by a wish.
(02) Instant Death. Your skull is crushed, or you suffer massive internal injuries, killing you instantly.
(03) Fatal Wound. Either your back is broken, or your internal organs are ruptured. Even if you succeed at the normal death saving throws, you remain unconscious and will die after 1d6 turns have passed, at the end of your turn, unless you are magically healed above 0 hit points, or stabilised with a DC 17 Wisdom (Medicine) check using a healer's kit.
(04) Shattered Arm. Your arm or hand is smashed beyond recovery, and will require amputation. Following recovery, you can no longer hold anything with two hands, and can hold only a single object at a time. If the lost arm was your dominant arm (50% chance), unless you are trained in the Dual Wielder feat or the Two-Weapon Fighting Style, you have disadvantage with weapon attacks until you train your off-hand; and, if you attempt to cast a spell with somatic components, you must first succeed on a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or lose your action – the spell slot, if any, is not lost. You learn to train your off-hand after a base recovery time of 40 days (see Recovery above). The limb can be restored by either regenerate or wish.
(05) Shattered Leg. Your leg or foot is smashed beyond recovery, and will require amputation. Following recovery, your speed on foot is halved and you must use a cane or crutch to move, unless you receive a prosthesis of some kind. Additionally, you fall prone after using the dash action, and have disadvantage on Dexterity checks made to balance. The limb can be restored by either regenerate or wish.
(06-15) Frail. You recover, but your health is never quite the same again. Roll 1d3: 1: you lose 1 point from your Strength score; 2: you lose 1 point from your Dexterity score; 3: you lose 1 point from your Constitution score. This flaw can be removed by greater restoration or wish.
(16-25) Head Injury. Head trauma threatens your mental faculties. If you wear a helmet, you must make a DC 11 Constitution saving throw – if you fail (or have no helmet), then roll 1d3: 1: you lose 1 point from your Intelligence score; 2: you lose 1 point from your Wisdom score; 3: you lose 1 point from your Charisma score. This flaw is often accompanied by speech or memory problems, requiring you to relearn basic skills and social niceties. This flaw can be removed by greater restoration or wish.
(26-31) Broken Ribs. Your rib cage is partly caved in. Whenever you attempt a Strength (Athletics) check or attempt to take any action in combat (other than casting a spell), you must succeed at a DC 11 Constitution saving throw. If you fail the save, you lose your action and can't use reactions until the start of your next turn. This flaw ends after a base recovery time of 50 days (see Recovery above), or if you receive magic such as heal, regenerate or wish.
(32-37) Broken Arm. As the attack slams home, an audible 'crack' renders an arm close to useless for a time. There is a 50% chance that the broken arm is your dominant arm and if so, unless you are trained in the Dual Wielder feat or the Two-Weapon Fighting Style, you have disadvantage with weapon attacks. If it is your other arm, you cannot wear a shield. This flaw ends after a base recovery time of 30 weeks (see Recovery above), or if you receive magic such as greater restoration, heal, regenerate or wish.
(38-43) Deafened. If you wear a helmet, you must make a DC 14 Constitution saving throw – if you fail (or have no helmet), then either through brain damage or damage to the ears, the attack leaves you deafened. This flaw is removed if you receive magic such as greater restoration, heal, lesser restoration, regenerate or wish.
(44-49) Leg Wound. Your leg is badly damaged. Until a base recovery time of 40 days has passed (see Recovery above), you must use a cane or crutch to move at half speed, you fall prone after using the dash action, and you have disadvantage on Dexterity checks made to balance. Even after the worst of the damage has passed, your speed on foot is reduced by 5 feet. The limb can be restored by either heal, regenerate or wish.
(50-55) Shell-Shock. Either due to brain damage or a lifetime of facing horrors and death, you are somewhat indecisive and slow to react. You suffer a penalty of -2 to your Initiative. This flaw can be removed through magic such as greater restoration or wish.
(56-65) Ruined Armour. Unless your protective gear is enchanted or made of adamantine, the attack leaves it badly damaged, affording little protection and fitting badly. If you have a shield, it is destroyed; otherwise, your AC is reduced by-2. This penalty lasts until your armour is replaced, repaired (costing half the the total cost of the item) or subject to a mending spell. If you have no shield or armour, treat this result as Minor Scar instead.
(66-69) Forceful Collision. The force of the attack sends you haplessly flying through the air towards another unsuspecting creature. You are pushed up to 10 feet towards a random creature and, if in range to strike it, knock it prone, unless that other creature succeeds at a DC 11 Dexterity or Strength saving throw (creature's choice). This roll is made with disadvantage if you are bigger than the dodging creature. If you are huge or gargantuan, you are too heavy to be thrown, and this result has no effect.
(70-95) Full Recovery. You seem to be fine.
(96-98) One with the Magic. Although the spell takes effect as normal, the mystic energy refuses to ebb away but instead weaves around and intoyou. Following recovery, you soon learn a couple of ways of harnessing this magic for simple telekinetic effects. Once per long rest, you can cast either mage hand or shield. These function as the standard spell (including being cancelled by antimagic field, counterspell, dispel magic and the like), but don't use up any spell slot. This flaw can only be removed by magic such as remove curse or wish.
(99 or higher) “I'm... I'm Alright!” The gods must be smiling today – the blow seemed worse than it actually is, and you are assumed dead. Rather than making any death saving throws, you are instead stabilised and returned to 1 hit point and, at the beginning of your next turn, regain 1d10 hit points and can act as normal, gaining advantage on your first attack that turn.
Lightning Damage Lingering Injuries

(d100 roll) result

(01) Disintegrated. The conflagration burns unnaturally hot, killing you instantly and leaving nothing but ash. You can now only be brought back by powerful magic like true resurrection or wish.
(02) Instant Death. You suffer a massive overload of your nervous system, or your brain is shorted out, killing you instantly.
(03) Fatal Wound. You suffer massive burns, or internal burn damage to major organs. Even if you succeed at the normal death saving throws, you remain unconscious and will die after 1d6 turns have passed, at the end of your turn, unless you are magically healed above 0 hit points, or stabilised with a DC 17 Wisdom (Medicine) check using a healer's kit.
(04) Incinerated Arm. Your arm or hand is almost entirely disintegrated. Following recovery, you can no longer hold anything with two hands, and can hold only a single object at a time. If the lost arm was your dominant arm (50% chance), unless you are trained in the Dual Wielder feat or the Two-Weapon Fighting Style, you have disadvantage with weapon attacks until you train your off-hand; and, if you attempt to cast a spell with somatic components, you must first succeed on a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or lose your action – the spell slot, if any, is not lost. You learn to train your off-hand after a base recovery time of 40 days (see Recovery above). The limb can be restored by either regenerate or wish.
(05) Incinerated Leg. Your leg or foot is almost entirely disintegrated. Following recovery, your speed on foot is halved and you must use a cane or crutch to move, unless you receive a prosthesis of some kind. Additionally, you fall prone after using the dash action, and have disadvantage on Dexterity checks made to balance. The limb can be restored by either regenerate or wish.
(06-10) Lung Trauma. Your lungs are scorched or withered, placing you dangerously close to death. While this flaw remains, you can only stabilise naturally after five death saving throws, rather than three. Following recovery, even routine activity leaves you breathless, and you are wracked with coughing fits when the air is thin or smoky. For every four hours spent walking (or eight hours riding), and when reduced to half your maximum hit points or less, you must succeed at a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or suffer one level of exhaustion. Exhaustion levels gained from this flaw are lost during a short or long rest, or can be removed by a character equipped with a herbalism kit with which they are proficient. Finally, this flaw ends if you succeed at a DC 17 Constitution saving throw rolled at the beginning of every month, or if removed by greaterrestoration, heal, regenerate or wish.
(11-18) Frail. You recover, but your health is never quite the same again. Roll 1d3: 1: you lose 1 point from your Strength score; 2: you lose 1 point from your Dexterity score; 3: you lose 1 point from your Constitution score. This flaw can be removed by greater restoration or wish.
(19-27) Brain Damage. The attack damages your mental facilities somehow. Roll 1d3: 1: you lose 1 point from your Intelligence score; 2: you lose 1 point from your Wisdom score; 3: you lose 1 point from your Charisma score. This flaw is often accompanied by speech or memory problems, requiring you to relearn basic skills and social niceties. This flaw can be removed by greater restoration or wish.
(28-34) Blasted Eye. One of your eyes is destroyed by the burst of electricity. From now on, you have disadvantage on Wisdom (Perception) checks that rely on sight, and on ranged attack rolls. If a subsequent injury damages your other eye, you are permanently blinded. Magic such as regenerate or wish can restore the lost eye.
(35-41) Pelvic Injury. Either your pelvis is struck a crippling blow, or the attack destroys your nethers. Whenever you attempt a Strength (Athletics) check or take any action in combat (other than casting a spell), you must succeed at a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or lose 1d6 hit points. You also can't ride a horse without suffering 1d10 hit points. Finally, this injury renders you permanently infertile. This flaw ends after a base recovery time of 70 days (see Recovery above), or if you receive magic such as heal, regenerate or wish, although the infertility can only be reversed by greater restoration or remove curse.
(42-49) Ruined Armour. Unless your protective gear is enchanted or made of adamantine, the attack leaves it badly damaged, affording little protection and fitting badly. If you have a shield, it is destroyed; otherwise, your AC is reduced by-2. This penalty lasts until your armour is replaced, repaired (costing half the the total cost of the item) or subject to a mending spell. If you have no shield or armour, treat this result as Minor Scar instead.
(50-53) Chain Discharge. The electricity crackles over you for a moment and then, as you silently collapse, arcs out towards others nearby. All other creatures within 10-foot range of you must succeed on a DC 11 Dexterity saving throw or suffer 2d6 lightning damage.
(54-60) Fixation. Following recovery, you develop an unhealthy fixation. Roll 1d6: on a 1-3, you nurture a bitter enmity; on a 4-6, you develop an overpowering phobia. If you are immune to being frightened, then this result is bitter enmity. You should work with the Dungeon Master on the phrasing of the new flaw: your hatred or phobia may focus on some element of the attacker's identity (for example, a mindless hatred towards dragons or sorcerers) or even the type of attack (such as a fear of storms). This flaw can be removed by magic such as greater restoration or wish.
(61-69) Hideous Scar. You are scorched to the extent that the wound can't be easily concealed, or palated. You have disadvantage on Charisma (Persuasion) checks and advantage on Charisma (Intimidation) checks. Magic such as heal, regenerate or wish can remove the scar.
(70-95) Minor Scar. The scar doesn't have any adverse effect, and can be removed by magic such as heal, regenerate or wish.
(96-98) Storm Blood. By some freak coincidence, the intensity of the electricity opens the briefest of rifts to the Plane of Elemental Air and you become permanently infused with the smallest fragment of energy from that plane. Your body flickers with static, and from now on anyone who hits you in melee must succeed at a DC 11 Dexterity saving throw or suffer 1d6 magical lightning damage, and your unarmed attacks inflict an additional 1 point of magical lightning damage. This flaw can only be removed by magic such as remove curse or wish.
(99 or higher) “I'm... I'm Alright!” The gods must be smiling today – the blow seemed worse than it actually is, and you are assumed dead. Rather than making any death saving throws, you are instead stabilised and returned to 1 hit point and, at the beginning of your next turn, regain 1d10 hit points and can act as normal, gaining advantage on your first attack that turn.



Necrotic Damage Lingering Injuries

(d100 roll) result

(01) Hole in Time and Space. Uh oh. The energy of the rogue magic contracts into a super-dense point at your heart and begins to drags all ambient magic inwards – seconds later, your remains crumple silently inward, and all that remains is an orb of impenetrable dark force – a sphere of annihilation! You die instantly and your remains and equipment are destroyed (with the possible exception of any artifact in your possession) and, at the beginning of what would be your next turn, a sphere of annihilation occupies your former space. You can now only be brought back by a wish.
(02) Restless Death. Your life is snuffed out, and you don't even get the relief of the afterlife. You die instantly, and at the beginning of what would be your next turn (if you have not been magically revived somehow), a spectre rises in your space. You can now only be brought back by powerful magic like reincarnate, true resurrection or wish.
(03) Instant Death. The dark energy withers you utterly, leaving only a mummified husk – you are killed instantly.
(04) Fatal Wound. Either you suffer massive tissue damage, or major organs are part eaten away. Even if you succeed at the normal death saving throws, you remain unconscious and will die after 1d6 turns have passed, at the end of your turn, unless you are magically healed above 0 hit points, or stabilised with a DC 17 Wisdom (Medicine) check using a healer's kit.
(05) Shrivelled Arm. Your arm or hand is withered beyond recovery, and will require amputation. Following recovery, you can no longer hold anything with two hands, and can hold only a single object at a time. If the lost arm was your dominant arm (50% chance), unless you are trained in the Dual Wielder feat or the Two-Weapon Fighting Style, you have disadvantage with weapon attacks until you train your off-hand; and, if you attempt to cast a spell with somatic components, you must first succeed on a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or lose your action – the spell slot, if any, is not lost. You learn to train your off-hand after a base recovery time of 40 days (see Recovery above). The limb can be restored by either regenerate or wish.
(06) Shrivelled Leg. Your leg or foot is withered beyond recovery, and will require amputation. Following recovery, your speed on foot is halved and you must use a cane or crutch to move, unless you receive a prosthesis of some kind. Additionally, you fall prone after using the dash action, and have disadvantage on Dexterity checks made to balance. The limb can be restored by either regenerate or wish.
(07-18) Frail. You recover, but your health is never quite the same again. Roll 1d3: 1: you lose 1 point from your Strength score; 2: you lose 1 point from your Dexterity score; 3: you lose 1 point from your Constitution score. This flaw can be removed by greater restoration or wish.
(19-25) Ruined Eye. If you wear a helmet, you must make a DC 17 Dexterity saving throw – if you fail (or have no helmet), one of your eyes is destroyed. From now on, you have disadvantage on Wisdom (Perception) checks that rely on sight, and on ranged attack rolls. If a subsequent injury damages your other eye, you are permanently blinded. Magic such as regenerate or wish can restore the lost eye.
(26-32) Pelvic Injury. Either your pelvis is struck a crippling blow, or the attack destroys your nethers. Whenever you attempt a Strength (Athletics) check or take any action in combat (other than casting a spell), you must succeed at a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or lose 1d6 hit points. You also can't ride a horse without suffering 1d10 hit points. Finally, this injury renders you permanently infertile. This flaw ends after a base recovery time of 70 days (see Recovery above), or if you receive magic such as heal, regenerate or wish, although the infertility can only be removed by greater restoration or remove curse.
(33-39) Crippling Fatigue. You can never shake your sense of tiredness, and gain one level of exhaustion. This can be removed normally. However, following every long rest, you must succeed at a DC 11 Constitution or Wisdom saving throw (your choice), or gain a level of exhaustion. If you fail this saving throw by 5 or more, you gain two levels. Accumulating enough exhaustion levels can lead to your death. However, if you roll an unmodified 20, this flaw ends, and can also be removed by magic such as greater restoration or wish.
(40-43) Stolen Life. Unless you are immune to magical ageing, you physically age by 1d6 years, and are rendered infertile. For every year you age, you suffer an additional 1d4 necrotic damage: this damage may lead to instant death. If this flaw is inflicted by a creature (or a spell cast by one), then that creature gains temporary hit points equal to the additional necrotic damage inflicted. The infertility can only be reversed by magic such as either remove curse or wish.
(44-54) Infected Wounds. The damage refuses to properly heal, and instead becomes swollen and leaks a noisome pus. Your hit point maximum is reduced by 1 for every 24 hours the wound persists. If your hit point maximum drops to 0, you die. The wound heals if you receive magical healing or, alternatively, someone can tend to the wound and make a DC 14 Wisdom (Medicine) check once every 24 hours. After ten successes, the wound heals. Characters who are immune to disease treat this result as Minor Scar instead.
(55-62) Fixation. Following recovery, you develop an unhealthy fixation. Roll 1d6: on a 1-3, you nurture a bitter enmity; on a 4-6, you develop an overpowering phobia. If you are immune to being frightened, then this result is bitter enmity. You should work with the Dungeon Master on the phrasing of the new flaw: your hatred or phobia may focus on some element of the attacker's identity (for example, a mindless hatred towards undead or sorcerers) or even the type of attack (such as a fear of germs). This flaw can be removed by greater restoration or wish.
(63-69) Horrible Scar. If you wear a helmet, you must make a DC 14 Dexterity saving throw – if you fail (or have no helmet), you are disfigured to the extent that the wound can't be easily concealed, or palated. You have disadvantage on Charisma (Persuasion) checks and advantage on Charisma (Intimidation) checks. Magic like heal, regenerate or wish can remove the scar.
(70-95) Minor Scar. The scar doesn't have any adverse effect, and can be removed by magic such as heal, regenerate or wish.
(96-98) Dead One. The necrotic energy fails to overcome your will to live, but instead somehow alters you into a being not undead, but not entirely living either. Diminutive plants and beasts (with 1 hit point or less) die within 5 feet of you, and the condition of the sick, elderly and young in your presence worsen. People with whom you have regular contact begin to find you 'wrong' in some intangible way. You reduce necrotic damage that you suffer by -3 per attack. Additionally, most undead fail to perceive you as a living being, and unintelligent undead (such as zombies or skeletons) tend to ignore you, unless you take hostile action. This flaw can only be removed by magic such as remove curse or wish.
(99 or higher) “I'm... I'm Alright!” The gods must be smiling today – the blow seemed worse than it actually is, and you are assumed dead. Rather than making any death saving throws, you are instead stabilised and returned to 1 hit point and, at the beginning of your next turn, regain 1d10 hit points and can act as normal, gaining advantage on your first attack that turn.



Piercing Damage Lingering Injuries

(d100 roll) result

(01) Instant Death. You are pierced through the heart, or suffer some other grievous wound which kills you instantly.
(02) Fatal Wound. You are are gutted, or stabbed through the lung or throat. Even if you succeed at the normal death saving throws, you remain unconscious and will die after 1d6 turns have passed, at the end of your turn, unless you are magically healed above 0 hit points, or stabilised with a DC 17 Wisdom (Medicine) check using a healer's kit.
(03) Severed Arm. Your arm or hand is hacked off, pumping arterial blood everywhere. You automatically fail your death saving throws, unless you receive magical healing to seal the stump, it is cauterised by fire or radiant damage, or another character uses an action to apply a tourniquet. Following recovery, you can no longer hold anything with two hands, and can hold only a single object at a time. If the lost arm was your dominant arm (50% chance), unless you are trained in the Dual Wielder feat or the Two-Weapon Fighting Style, you have disadvantage with weapon attacks until you train your off-hand; and, if you attempt to cast a spell with somatic components, you must first succeed on a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or lose your action – the spell slot, if any, is not lost. You learn to train your off-hand after a base recovery time of 40 days (see Recovery above). The limb can be restored by either regenerate or wish.
(04) Severed Leg. Your leg or foot is hacked off, pumping arterial blood everywhere. You automatically fail your death saving throws, unless you receive magical healing to seal the stump, it is cauterised by fire or radiant damage, or another character uses an action to apply a tourniquet. Following recovery, your speed on foot is halved and you must use a cane or crutch to move, unless you receive a prosthesis of some kind. Additionally, you fall prone after using the dash action, and have disadvantage on Dexterity checks made to balance. The limb can be restored by either regenerate or wish.
(05-07) Punctured Lung. Your lungs are pierced and part collapsed, placing you dangerously close to death. While this flaw remains, you can only stabilise naturally after five death saving throws, rather than three. Following recovery, even routine activity leaves you breathless, and you are wracked with coughing fits when the air is thin or smoky. For every four hours spent walking (or eight hours riding), and when reduced to half your maximum hit points or less, you must succeed at a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or suffer one level of exhaustion. Exhaustion levels gained from this flaw are lost during a short or long rest. Finally, this flaw ends if you succeed at a DC 17 Constitution saving throw rolled at the beginning of every month, or if removed by greater restoration, heal, regenerate or wish.
(08-16) Frail. You recover, but your health is never quite the same again. Roll 1d3: 1: you lose 1 point from your Strength score; 2: you lose 1 point from your Dexterity score; 3: you lose 1 point from your Constitution score. This flaw can be removed by greater restoration or wish.
(17-22) Gouged Eye. If you wear a helmet, you must make a DC 14 Dexterity saving throw – if you fail (or have no helmet), one of your eyes is pierced, either by the foe's weapon or the dent in your helm. From now on, you have disadvantage on Wisdom (Perception) checks that rely on sight, and on ranged attack rolls. If a subsequent injury damages your other eye, you are permanently blinded. Magic such as regenerate or wish can restore the lost eye.
(23-28) Pelvic Injury. Either your pelvis is struck a crippling blow, or the attack destroys your nethers. Whenever you attempt a Strength (Athletics) check or take any action in combat (other than casting a spell), you must succeed at a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or lose 1d6 hit points. You also can't ride a horse without suffering 1d10 hit points. Finally, this injury renders you permanently infertile. This flaw ends after a base recovery time of 70 days (see Recovery above), or if you receive magic such as heal, regenerate or wish, although the infertility can only be reversed by greater restoration or remove curse.
(29-34) Agonizing Wound. The injury plagues you with flashes of searing pain from time to time. Whenever you attempt a Strength (Athletics) check, you must succeed at a DC 11 Constitution saving throw. If you fail the save, you lose your action and can't use reactions until the start of your next turn. This flaw ends after a base recovery time of 70 days (see Recovery above), and is also removed by magic such as heal, regenerate or wish.
(33-38) Leg Wound. Your leg is badly damaged. Until a base recovery time of 40 days has passed (see Recovery above), you must use a cane or crutch to move at half speed, you fall prone after using the dash action, and you have disadvantage on Dexterity checks made to balance. Even after the worst of the damage has passed, your speed on foot is reduced by 5 feet. The limb can be restored by either heal, regenerate or wish.
(39-46) Hand Injury. The attack costs you several fingers. There is a 50% chance of the affected hand being your dominant hand, and your weapon attacks suffer a -2 penalty, unless you are trained in either the Dual Wielder feat or the Two-Weapon Fighting Style. Also, if you attempt to cast a spell with somatic components, you must first succeed on a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or lose your action that turn – the spell slot, if any, is not lost. These penalties last a base recovery time of 40 days (see Recovery above). This flaw can be removed by magic such as regenerate or wish.
(47-55) Ruined Armour. Unless your protective gear is enchanted or made of adamantine, the attack leaves it badly damaged, affording little protection and fitting badly. If you have a shield, it is destroyed; otherwise, your AC is reduced by-2. This penalty lasts until your armour is replaced, repaired (costing half the the total cost of the item) or subject to a mending spell. If you have no shield or armour, treat this result as Minor Scar instead.
(56-59) Infected Wounds. The damage refuses to properly heal, and instead becomes swollen and leaks a noisome pus. Your hit point maximum is reduced by 1 for every 24 hours the wound persists. If your hit point maximum drops to 0, you die. The wound heals if you receive magical healing or, alternatively, someone can tend to the wound and make a DC 14 Wisdom (Medicine) check once every 24 hours. After ten successes, the wound heals. Characters who are immune to disease treat this result as Minor Scar instead.
(60-62) Shish Kebab. The attacker impales you, and the force of the blow drives the protruding tip towards another creature, too. Another creature of the attacker's choice within 5 feet (or within 10 feet, if the attacker is huge or gargantuan) is also targeted, and the attacker makes another attack roll for free. This second target does not need to be within normal attacking range for the attacker, but they will gain the benefit of cover from the impaled character! If you are huge or gargantuan, you are too heavy to be moved, and this result has no effect.
(63-69) Horrible Scar. If you wear a helmet, you must make a DC 14 Dexterity saving throw – if you fail (or have no helmet), you are disfigured to the extent that the wound can't be easily concealed, or palated. You have disadvantage on Charisma (Persuasion) checks and advantage on Charisma (Intimidation) checks. Magic like heal, regenerate or wish can remove the scar.
(70-98) Minor Scar. The scar doesn't have any adverse effect, and can be removed by magic such as heal, regenerate or wish.
(99 or higher) “I'm... I'm Alright!” The gods must be smiling today – the blow seemed worse than it actually is, and you are assumed dead. Rather than making any death saving throws, you are instead stabilised and returned to 1 hit point and, at the beginning of your next turn, regain 1d10 hit points and can act as normal, gaining advantage on your first attack that turn.

Bharaeth
2016-11-22, 08:59 AM
And hopefully the last lot:

Poison Damage Lingering Injuries

(d100 roll) result
(01) Instant Death. The toxin sweeps through your system, stopping the heart cold, and killing you instantly.
(02) Fatal Poisoning. The venom burns through your system, systematically ruining one organ after another. Even if you succeed at the normal death saving throws, you remain unconscious and will die after 1d6 turns have passed, at the end of your turn, unless you are magically healed above 0 hit points and the poison is neutralised.
(03) Coma. You enter a death-like sleep from which nothing can seemingly awaken you, though dim life signs still remain. You remain unconscious, even after being stabilised. Following a long rest, make a death saving throw. Three failed saving throws result in death (possibly due to lack of fluids, amongst other complications), but a result of 15 or means the coma ends. If and when you awaken, you suffer three levels of exhaustion (these exhaustion levels can be removed normally). The coma can also be ended prematurely by magic such as dream, greater restoration, remove curse or wish.
(04) Shrivelled Arm. Your arm or hand is withered beyond recovery, and will require amputation. Following recovery, you can no longer hold anything with two hands, and can hold only a single object at a time. If the lost arm was your dominant arm (50% chance), unless you are trained in the Dual Wielder feat or the Two-Weapon Fighting Style, you have disadvantage with weapon attacks until you train your off-hand; and, if you attempt to cast a spell with somatic components, you must first succeed on a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or lose your action – the spell slot, if any, is not lost. You learn to train your off-hand after a base recovery time of 40 days (see Recovery above).The limb can be restored by either regenerate or wish.
(05) Shrivelled Leg. Your leg or foot is withered beyond recovery, and will require amputation. Following recovery, your speed on foot is halved and you must use a cane or crutch to move, unless you receive a prosthesis of some kind. Additionally, you fall prone after using the dash action, and have disadvantage on Dexterity checks made to balance. The limb can be restored by either regenerate or wish.
(06-09) Anaphylactic Shock. Your body reacts dramatically to the venom. Following recovery, you have disadvantage on saving throws against this specific venom. If you do become affected by this venom, as well as any other effects, you must succeed at a DC 14 Constitution saving throw or be immediately reduced to 0 hit points, and will die after 1d6 turns have passed, at the end of your turn, unless the poison is neutralised, or you are stabilised by another character succeeding at a DC 14 Wisdom (Medicine) check. This result overrides any existing resistance you may have to that venom.
(10-16) Destroyed Eyes. The virulent toxin destroys your eyes. From now on, you are permanently blinded, unless you are cured by magic such as greater restoration, heal, regenerate or wish.
(17-20) Lung Trauma. Your lungs are withered, placing you dangerously close to death. Until you are stabilised, you must make two death saving throws a turn. Following recovery, even routine activity leaves you breathless, and you are wracked with coughing fits when the air is thin or smoky. For every four hours spent walking (or eight hours riding), and when reduced to half your maximum hit points or less, you must succeed at a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or suffer one level of exhaustion. Exhaustion levels gained from this flaw are lost during a short or long rest, or can be removed by a character equipped with a herbalism kit with which they are proficient. Finally, this flaw ends if you succeed at a DC 17 Constitution saving throw rolled at the beginning of every month, or if removed by magic such as greater restoration, heal, regenerate or wish.
(21-33) Frail. You recover, but your health is never quite the same again. Roll 1d3: 1: you lose 1 point from your Strength score; 2: you lose 1 point from your Dexterity score; 3: you lose 1 point from your Constitution score. This flaw can be removed by greater restoration or wish.
(34-43) Impaired Mind. Unless you are immune to poison, the venom permanently damages your mental facilities somehow. Roll 1d3: 1: you lose 1 point from your Intelligence score; 2: you lose 1 point from your Wisdom score; 3: you lose 1 point from your Charisma score. This flaw is often accompanied by speech or memory problems, requiring you to relearn basic skills and social niceties. This flaw can be removed by greater restoration or wish.
(44-49) Pelvic Injury. Either your pelvis is struck a crippling blow, or the attack destroys your nethers. Whenever you attempt a Strength (Athletics) check or take any action in combat (other than casting a spell), you must succeed at a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or lose 1d6 hit points. You also can't ride a horse without suffering 1d10 hit points. Finally, this injury renders you permanently infertile. This flaw ends after a base recovery time of 70 days (see Recovery above), or if you receive magic such as heal, regenerate or wish, although the infertility can only be reversed by greater restoration or remove curse.
(50-56) Liver Failure. The poison was almost too much you, and from now on you suffer vulnerability to all poison damage, and can no longer tolerate other toxins, such as alcohol. No more tavern crawls for you! This flaw overrides any existing resistance you may have to poison, and can only be removed by magic such as greater restoration, heal, regenerate or wish.
(57-62) Crippling Fatigue. You can never shake your sense of tiredness, and gain one level of exhaustion. This can be removed normally. However, following every long rest, you must succeed at a DC 11 Constitution or Wisdom saving throw (your choice), or gain a level of exhaustion. If you fail this saving throw by 5 or more, you gain two levels. Accumulating enough exhaustion levels can lead to your death. However, if you roll an unmodified 20, this flaw ends, and can also be removed by magic such as greater restoration or wish.
(63-69) Fixation. Following recovery, you develop an unhealthy fixation. Roll 1d6: on a 1-3, you nurture a bitter enmity; on a 4-6, you develop an overpowering phobia. If you are immune to being frightened, then this result is bitter enmity. You should work with the Dungeon Master on the phrasing of the new flaw: your hatred or phobia may focus on some element of the attacker's identity (for example, a mindless hatred towards spiders or sorcerers) or even the type of attack (such as a fear of wine). This flaw can be removed by magic such as greater restoration or wish.
(70-95) Full Recovery. You seem to be fine.
(96-98) Mithraditic Resistance. Your body rapidly develops a resistance to the venom that borders on the miraculous! If you succeed at a DC 20 Constitution saving throw, you are completely immune to that venom. Whether you succeed or not, you have resistance to poison damage, and gain advantage on savign throws against poison. This result overrides any existing vulnerability they may have to that venom.
(99 or higher) “I'm... I'm Alright!” The gods must be smiling today – the blow seemed worse than it actually is, and you are assumed dead. Rather than making any death saving throws, you are instead stabilised and returned to 1 hit point and, at the beginning of your next turn, regain 1d10 hit points and can act as normal, gaining advantage on your first attack that turn.

Psychic Damage Lingering Injuries

(d100 roll) result

(01) Instant Death. Your brain explodes, killing you instantly.

(02) Shredded Psyche. You convulse with agony, and your shredded mind refuses to let normal bodily processes continue. Even if you succeed at the normal death saving throws, you remain unconscious and will die after 1d6 turns have passed, at the end of your turn, unless you are magically healed above 0 hit points.

(03) Coma. You enter a death-like sleep from which nothing can seemingly awaken you, though dim life signs still remain. You remain unconscious, even after being stabilised. Following a long rest, make a death saving throw. Three failed saving throws result in death (possibly due to lack of fluids, amongst other complications), but a result of 15 or means the coma ends. If and when you awaken, you suffer three levels of exhaustion (these exhaustion levels can be removed normally). The coma can also be ended prematurely by magic such as dream, greater restoration,remove curse or wish.

(04) Screaming Horror. Unless you are immune to being frightened, your mind is broken beyond redemption, and you spend your days alternating between empty-eyed stares and bouts of horrified screaming – death would be a kinder fate. You are almost entirely useless, though you can be persuaded to stumble along meekly when feeling more placid – however, there is a 50% chance (checked for after each short or long rest) that you will scream uncontrollably, unless drugged, knocked out or subject to a calm emotions spell. This flaw can only be removed by magic such as greater restoration or wish.

(05-08) “I Can't Move!” Brain trauma leaves you fully paralysed, at least for a short time. You can do little more than speak, but can still cast spells that don't require somatic components. However, as you can't feel much of your body, you gain advantage on any Constitution saving throw to maintain concentration on spells due to receiving damage. After every long rest, the character can make a DC 17 Constitution saving throw to end the paralysis. This flaw can also be removed by magic such as freedom of movement, greater restoration, lesser restoration, remove curse or wish.

(09-12) Horrors in the Dark. Your scrambled brain plays tricks on you, leaving your vision a deep blackness peopled by fleeting spirits and phantasms. You are temporarily blinded. This flaw ends when you receive magic such as dream, greater restoration, lesser restoration, remove curse or wish, or you succeed on a DC 14 Intelligence saving throw, which you can make after every long rest.
(13-22) Brain Damage. The attack damages your mental facilities somehow. Roll 1d3: 1: you lose 1 point from your Intelligence score; 2: you lose 1 point from your Wisdom score; 3: you lose 1 point from your Charisma score. This flaw is often accompanied by speech or memory problems, requiring you to relearn basic skills and social niceties. This flaw can be removed by greater restoration or wish.
(23-25) Recurring Possession. Even if the attacker is eventually destroyed, a fragment of its spirit burrows itself deep within your psyche, making you commit horrors when you suspect yourself safe. Every time you take a long rest, you must succeed at a DC 11 Charisma saving throw or be possessed by the attacking creature (or its spirit) for up to 1d10 minutes, in a manner similar to the dominate spell. As with the spell, you can repeat your saving throw if you suffer damage. When the possession ends, you have no memory of what you have done. This possession can typically be noticed by a change in your mannerisms when possessed, and also by a detect magic spell at any time. This flaw can only be removed by magic such as greater restoration, remove curse or wish, or possibly by destroying or confronting the possessing spirit, at the Dungeon Master's discretion.
(26-33) Debilitating Migraines. The attack permanently damaged your brain, and you become plagued with nosebleeds and nauseating headaches. These come most frequently in times of stress, or following loud noise. When rolling for initiative at the start of combat, or when you suffer thunder damage, you must make a DC 11 Constitution saving throw. If you fail the save, the migraines come again: you have disadvantage on future initiative and Wisdom (Perception) checks. The migraine attack ends when you take a short or long rest. This flaw can only be removed by magic such as greater restoration, heal, remove curse or wish.
(34-40) Crippling Fatigue. You can never shake your sense of tiredness, and gain one level of exhaustion. This can be removed normally. However, following every long rest, you must succeed at a DC 11 Constitution or Wisdom saving throw (your choice), or gain a level of exhaustion. If you fail this saving throw by 5 or more, you gain two levels. Accumulating enough exhaustion levels can lead to your death. However, if you roll an unmodified 20, this flaw ends, and can also be ended by magic such as greater restoration or wish.
(41-47) Shell-Shock. Either due to brain damage or a lifetime of facing horrors and death, you are somewhat indecisive and slow to react. You suffer a penalty of -2 to your Initiative. This flaw can be removed through magic such as greater restoration or wish.
(48-57) Troubled Sleep. Unless you are immune to being frightened, your sleep or trance becomes ravaged by inescapable nightmares, rarely affording much rest. You must succeed on a DC 11 Charisma or Wisdom saving throw (your choice) after every long rest, or only recover up to a quarter of your hit dice. If you beat the save DC by 10 or more, the flaw ends. It can also be removed by magic such as dream, greater restoration, remove curse or wish.
(58-63) Personality Change. In the aftermath of the attack, you soon exhibit a shift in personality. Roll 1d100 and consult the indefinite madness table (on page 260 of the Dungeon Master's Guide) to see what permanent flaw you gain. This flaw can only be removed by magic such as greater restoration or wish, or by long-term therapy, at the Dungeon Master's discretion.
(64-69) Fixation. Following recovery, you develop an unhealthy fixation. Roll 1d6: on a 1-3, you nurture a bitter enmity; on a 4-6, you develop an overpowering phobia. If you are immune to being frightened, then this result is bitter enmity. You should work with the Dungeon Master on the phrasing of the new flaw: your hatred or phobia may focus on some element of the attacker's identity (for example, a mindless hatred towards mind flayers or sorcerers) or even the type of attack (such as a fear of magic). This flaw can be removed by magic such as greater restoration or wish.
(70-95) Full Recovery. You seem to be fine.
(96-98) Steel Mind. Though the mental onslaught is agonizing, you reconstruct your mind by will alone – stronger than it was before. From now on, you reduce psychic damage that you suffer by -3 per attack and, if attacked with psychic damage by a creature, you can use a reaction to make an opposed contest against the attacker (using your choice of Wisdom or Charisma against the attacker's Charisma). If you win the contest, the attacker suffers the same amount of psychic damage as you. Finally, if a creature attempts to read your mind, the would-be intruder suffers disadvantage on their attempt, and you gain advantage on rolls to resist.

(99 or higher) “I'm... I'm Alright!” The gods must be smiling today – the blow seemed worse than it actually is, and you are assumed dead. Rather than making any death saving throws, you are instead stabilised and returned to 1 hit point and, at the beginning of your next turn, regain 1d10 hit points and can act as normal, gaining advantage on your first attack that turn.




Radiant Damage Lingering Injuries
(d100 roll) result
(01) Instant Death. Your major organs are incinerated, or your brain boils inside your skull, killing you instantly.
(02) Fatal Wound. You suffer massive burns, or internal burn damage to major organs. Even if you succeed at the normal death saving throws, you remain unconscious and will die after 1d6 turns have passed, at the end of your turn, unless you are magically healed above 0 hit points, or stabilised with a DC 17 Wisdom (Medicine) check using a healer's kit.
(03) Incinerated Arm. Your arm or hand is almost entirely disintegrated. Following recovery, you can no longer hold anything with two hands, and can hold only a single object at a time. If the lost arm was your dominant arm (50% chance), unless you are trained in the Dual Wielder feat or the Two-Weapon Fighting Style, you have disadvantage with weapon attacks until you train your off-hand; and, if you attempt to cast a spell with somatic components, you must first succeed on a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or lose your action – the spell slot, if any, is not lost. You learn to train your off-hand after a base recovery time of 40 days (see Recovery above).The limb can be restored by either regenerate or wish.
(04) Incinerated Leg. Your leg or foot is almost entirely disintegrated. Following recovery, your speed on foot is halved and you must use a cane or crutch to move, unless you receive a prosthesis of some kind. Additionally, you fall prone after using the dash action, and have disadvantage on Dexterity checks made to balance. The limb can be restored by either regenerate or wish.
(05-10) Burnt-Out Eyes. If you wear a helmet, you must make a DC 17 Dexterity saving throw – if you fail (or have no helmet), then the intense light gives you one last glimpse of beauty, before it takes your sight forever. From now on, you are permanently blinded – unless you are cured by magic such as greater restoration, heal, regenerate or wish.
(11-20) Frail. You recover, but your health is never quite the same again. Roll 1d3: 1: you lose 1 point from your Strength score; 2: you lose 1 point from your Dexterity score; 3: you lose 1 point from your Constitution score. This flaw can be removed by greater restoration or wish.
(21-30) Ruined Eye. If you wear a helmet, you must make a DC 17 Dexterity saving throw – if you fail (or have no helmet), one of your eyes is destroyed. From now on, you have disadvantage on Wisdom (Perception) checks that rely on sight, and on ranged attack rolls. If a subsequent injury damages your other eye, you are permanently blinded. Magic such as regenerate or wish can restore the lost eye.
(31-35) Pelvic Injury. Either your pelvis is struck a crippling blow, or the attack destroys your nethers. Whenever you attempt a Strength (Athletics) check or take any action in combat (other than casting a spell), you must succeed at a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or lose 1d6 hit points. You also can't ride a horse without suffering 1d10 hit points. Finally, this injury renders you permanently infertile. This flaw ends after a base recovery time of 70 days (see Recovery above), or if you receive magic such as heal, regenerate or wish, although the infertility can only be reversed by greater restoration or remove curse.
(36-41) Leg Wound. Your leg is badly damaged. Until a base recovery time of 40 days has passed (see Recovery above), you must use a cane or crutch to move at half speed, you fall prone after using the dash action, and you have disadvantage on Dexterity checks made to balance. Even after the worst of the damage has passed, your speed on foot is reduced by 5 feet. The limb can be restored by magic such as Heal, Regenerate or Wish.
(42-47) Hand Injury. The attack costs you several fingers. There is a 50% chance of the affected hand being your dominant hand, and your weapon attacks suffer a -2 penalty, unless you are trained in either the Dual Wielder feat or the Two-Weapon Fighting Style. Also, if you attempt to cast a spell with somatic components, you must first succeed on a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or lose your action that turn – the spell slot, if any, is not lost. These penalties last a base recovery time of 40 days (see Recovery above). This flaw can be removed by magic such as regenerate or wish.
(48-53) Ruined Armour. Unless your protective gear is enchanted or made of adamantine, the attack leaves it badly damaged, affording little protection and fitting badly. If you have a shield, it is destroyed; otherwise, your AC is reduced by-2. This penalty lasts until your armour is replaced, repaired (costing half the the total cost of the item) or subject to a mending spell. If you have no shield or armour, treat this result as Minor Scar instead.
(54-57) Blinding Refraction. The focused beam not only puts you down, but also, by sheer chance, reflects off a shiny surface to strike another creature. A random creature without total cover from you (possibly including the attacker) must succeed at a DC14 Dexterity saving throw (this roll is made with advantage if they have half or three-quarters cover), or be blinded until the end of their next turn.
(58-63) Fixation. Following recovery, you develop an unhealthy fixation. Roll 1d6: on a 1-3, you nurture a bitter enmity; on a 4-6, you develop an overpowering phobia. If you are immune to being frightened, then this result is bitter enmity. You should work with the Dungeon Master on the phrasing of the new flaw: your hatred or phobia may focus on some element of the attacker's identity (for example, a mindless hatred towards angels or sorcerers) or even the type of attack (such as a fear of sunlight). This flaw can be removed by Greater Restoration or Wish.
(64-69) Horrible Scar. If you wear a helmet, you must make a DC 14 Dexterity saving throw – if you fail (or have no helmet), you are disfigured to the extent that the wound can't be easily concealed, or palated. You have disadvantage on Charisma (Persuasion) checks and advantage on Charisma (Intimidation) checks. Magic like heal, regenerate or wish can remove the scar.
(70-95) Minor Scar. The scar doesn't have any adverse effect, and can be removed by magic such as heal, regenerate or wish.
(96-98) Sun-Blessed. Either due to some purity inherent in your nature, or as part of an unknowable divine plan, the holy radiance imbues itself permanently into your mortal shell. Your skin or eyes seem to glimmer with astral radiance, and you can use a bonus action to cause your skin to glow with a soft light, shedding bright light in a 5-foot radius and dim light for an additional 5 feet – this can be turned off with another bonus action, and also turns off if you fall unconscious. Additionally, once per long rest, you can cast the bless spell as a 1st level spell, without using up a spell slot. This flaw can only be removed by magic such as protection from evil and good or wish.
(99 or higher) “I'm... I'm Alright!” The gods must be smiling today – the blow seemed worse than it actually is, and you are assumed dead. Rather than making any death saving throws, you are instead stabilised and returned to 1 hit point and, at the beginning of your next turn, regain 1d10 hit points and can act as normal, gaining advantage on your first attack that turn.



Slashing Damage Lingering Injuries

(d100 roll) result

(01) Instant Death. You are decapitated, or suffer some other grievous wound which kills you instantly.

(02) Fatal Wound. Either you are disemboweled, your spine is severed, or something equally horrible happens. Even if you succeed at the normal death saving throws, you remain unconscious and will die after 1d6 turns have passed, at the end of your turn, unless you are magically healed above 0 hit points, or stabilised with a DC 17 Wisdom (Medicine) check using a healer's kit.

(03) Severed Arm. Your arm or hand is hacked off, pumping arterial blood everywhere. You automatically fail your death saving throws, unless you receive magical healing to seal the stump, it is cauterised by fire or radiant damage, or another character uses an action to apply a tourniquet. Following recovery, you can no longer hold anything with two hands, and can hold only a single object at a time. If the lost arm was your dominant arm (50% chance), unless you are trained in the Dual Wielder feat or the Two-Weapon Fighting Style, you have disadvantage with weapon attacks until you train your off-hand; and, if you attempt to cast a spell with somatic components, you must first succeed on a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or lose your action – the spell slot, if any, is not lost. You learn to train your off-hand after a base recovery time of 40 days (see Recovery above).The limb can be restored by either regenerate or wish.

(04) Severed Leg. Your leg or foot is hacked off, pumping arterial blood everywhere. You automatically fail your death saving throws, unless you receive magical healing to seal the stump, it is cauterised by fire or radiant damage, or another character uses an action to apply a tourniquet. Following recovery, your speed on foot is halved and you must use a cane or crutch to move, unless you receive a prosthesis of some kind. Additionally, you fall prone after using the dash action, and have disadvantage on Dexterity checks made to balance. The limb can be restored by either regenerate or wish.

(05-11) Frail. You recover, but your health is never quite the same again. Roll 1d3: 1: you lose 1 point from your Strength score; 2: you lose 1 point from your Dexterity score; 3: you lose 1 point from your Constitution score. This flaw can be removed by greater restoration or wish.

(12-17) Head Injury. Head trauma threatens your mental faculties. If you wear a helmet, you must make a DC 11 Constitution saving throw – if you fail (or have no helmet), then roll 1d3: 1: you lose 1 point from your Intelligence score; 2: you lose 1 point from your Wisdom score; 3: you lose 1 point from your Charisma score. This flaw is often accompanied by speech or memory problems, requiring you to relearn basic skills and social niceties. This flaw can be removed by greater restoration or wish.
(18-21) Broken Ribs. Your rib cage is partly caved in. Whenever you attempt a Strength (Athletics) check or attempt to take any action in combat (other than casting a spell), you must succeed at a DC 11 Constitution saving throw. If you fail the save, you lose your action and can't use reactions until the start of your next turn. This flaw ends after a base recovery time of 50 days (see Recovery above), or if you receive magic such as heal, regenerate or wish.
(22-27) Broken Arm. As the attack slams home, an audible 'crack' renders an arm close to useless for a time. There is a 50% chance that the broken arm is your dominant arm and if so, unless you are trained in the Dual Wielder feat or the Two-Weapon Fighting Style, you have disadvantage with weapon attacks. If it is your other arm, you cannot wear a shield. This flaw ends after a base recovery time of 30 weeks (see Recovery above), or if you receive magic such as greater restoration, heal, regenerate or wish.
(28-33) Leg Wound. Your leg is badly damaged. Until a base recovery time of 40 days has passed (see Recovery above), you must use a cane or crutch to move at half speed, you fall prone after using the dash action, and you have disadvantage on Dexterity checks made to balance. Even after the worst of the damage has passed, your speed on foot is reduced by 5 feet. The limb can be restored by magic such as heal, regenerate or wish.
(34-38) Hand Injury. The attack costs you several fingers. There is a 50% chance of the affected hand being your dominant hand, and your weapon attacks suffer a -2 penalty, unless you are trained in either the Dual Wielder feat or the Two-Weapon Fighting Style. Also, if you attempt to cast a spell with somatic components, you must first succeed on a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or lose your action that turn – the spell slot, if any, is not lost. These penalties last a base recovery time of 40 days (see Recovery above). This flaw can be removed by magic such as regenerate or wish.
(39-45) Scalp Cut. Unless you are wearing a helmet, you suffer the following flaw: it's only a shallow wound, but that doesn't seem to stop it bleeding profusely, and blinding you with your own blood. When you roll for initiative at the start of combat, on the result of an odd number, you are blinded. You can use a bonus action to wipe away the blood to avoid being blinded until the beginning of your next turn. This flaw ends either by receiving magical healing, or after a long rest.
(46-52) Ruined Armour. Unless your protective gear is enchanted or made of adamantine, the attack leaves it badly damaged, affording little protection and fitting badly. If you have a shield, it is destroyed; otherwise, your AC is reduced by-2. This penalty lasts until your armour is replaced, repaired (costing half the the total cost of the item) or subject to a mending spell. If you have no shield or armour, treat this result as Minor Scar instead.
(53-57) Infected Wounds. The damage refuses to properly heal, and instead becomes swollen and leaks a noisome pus. Your hit point maximum is reduced by 1 for every 24 hours the wound persists. If your hit point maximum drops to 0, you die. The wound heals if you receive magical healing or, alternatively, someone can tend to the wound and make a DC 14 Wisdom (Medicine) check once every 24 hours. After ten successes, the wound heals. Characters who are immune to disease treat this result as Minor Scar instead.
(58-62) Fixation. Following recovery, you develop an unhealthy fixation. Roll 1d6: on a 1-3, you nurture a bitter enmity; on a 4-6, you develop an overpowering phobia. If you are immune to being frightened, then this result is bitter enmity. You should work with the Dungeon Master on the phrasing of the new flaw: your hatred or phobia may focus on some element of the attacker's identity (for example, a mindless hatred towards orcs or sorcerers) or even the type of attack (such as a fear of knives). This flaw can be removed by magic such as greater restoration or wish.
(63-69) Horrible Scar. If you wear a helmet, you must make a DC 14 Dexterity saving throw – if you fail (or have no helmet), you are disfigured to the extent that the wound can't be easily concealed, or palated. You have disadvantage on Charisma (Persuasion) checks and advantage on Charisma (Intimidation) checks. Magic like heal, regenerate or wish can remove the scar.
(70-98) Minor Scar. The scar doesn't have any adverse effect, and can be removed by magic such as heal, regenerate or wish.
(99 or higher) “I'm... I'm Alright!” The gods must be smiling today – the blow seemed worse than it actually is, and you are assumed dead. Rather than making any death saving throws, you are instead stabilised and returned to 1 hit point and, at the beginning of your next turn, regain 1d10 hit points and can act as normal, gaining advantage on your first attack that turn.




Thunder Damage Lingering Injuries

(d100 roll) result

(01) Instant Death. Your skull is shattered, or you suffer massive internal injuries, killing you instantly.

(02) Fatal Wound. Either your back is broken, or your internal organs are ruptured. Even if you succeed at the normal death saving throws, you remain unconscious and will die after 1d6 turns have passed, at the end of your turn, unless you are magically healed above 0 hit points, or stabilised with a DC 17 Wisdom (Medicine) check using a healer's kit.

(03) Paralysis. Spinal damage leaves you unable to move or feel anything from the waist down. You will need carrying or some sort of device to allow mobility (otherwise you can only crawl 5 feet per turn), and count as restrained. Still, there is always hope for a particularly strong person: at the beginning of every week, you can make a DC 20 Constitution saving throw – on a success, you miraculously recover. Otherwise, this flaw only ends if you receive magic such as greater restoration, heal, regenerate or wish.

(04) Coma. You enter a death-like sleep from which nothing can seemingly awaken you, though dim life signs still remain. You remain unconscious, even after being stabilised. Following a long rest, make a death saving throw. Three failed saving throws result in death (possibly due to lack of fluids, amongst other complications), but a result of 15 or means the coma ends. If and when you awaken, you suffer three levels of exhaustion (these exhaustion levels can be removed normally). The coma can also be ended prematurely by magic such as dream, greater restoration, remove curse or wish.

(05-12) Frail. You recover, but your health is never quite the same again. Roll 1d3: 1: you lose 1 point from your Strength score; 2: you lose 1 point from your Dexterity score; 3: you lose 1 point from your Constitution score. This flaw can be removed by greater restoration or wish.
(13-20) Head Injury. Head trauma threatens your mental faculties. If you wear a helmet, you must make a DC 11 Constitution saving throw – if you fail (or have no helmet), then roll 1d3: 1: you lose 1 point from your Intelligence score; 2: you lose 1 point from your Wisdom score; 3: you lose 1 point from your Charisma score. This flaw is often accompanied by speech or memory problems, requiring you to relearn basic skills and social niceties. This flaw can be removed by greater restoration or wish.
(21-25) Broken Ribs. Your rib cage is partly caved in. Whenever you attempt a Strength (Athletics) check or attempt to take any action in combat (other than casting a spell), you must succeed at a DC 11 Constitution saving throw. If you fail the save, you lose your action and can't use reactions until the start of your next turn. This flaw ends after a base recovery time of 50 days (see Recovery above), or if you receive magic such as heal, regenerate or wish.
(26-33) Deafened. If you wear a helmet, you must make a DC 14 Constitution saving throw – if you fail (or have no helmet), then either through brain damage or damage to the ears, the attack leaves you deafened. This flaw is removed if you receive magic such as greater restoration, heal, lesser restoration, regenerate or wish.
(34-40) Debilitating Migraines. The attack permanently damaged your brain, and you become plagued with nosebleeds and nauseating headaches. These come most frequently in times of stress, or following loud noise. When rolling for initiative at the start of combat, or when you are hit by an attack causing thunder damage, you must make a DC 11 Constitution saving throw. If you fail the save, the migraines come again: you have disadvantage on future initiative and Wisdom (Perception) checks. The migraine attack ends when you take a short or long rest. This flaw can only be removed by magic such as greater restoration, heal, remove curse or wish.
(41-48) Punch Drunk. If you wear a helmet, you must make a DC 11 Constitution saving throw – if you fail (or have no helmet), then due to hearing impairment or brain trauma, your coordination is often disrupted. After every short or long rest, you must succeed at a DC 11 Constitution or Wisdom saving throw (your choice), or have disadvantage on Dexterity (Acrobatics) checks. This penalty lasts until the next short or long rest. Additionally, if you are knocked prone, it costs you double the standard movement to stand up. This flaw can be removed through magic such as greater restoration, heal, lesser restoration, regenerate or wish.
(49-54) Partially Deafened. If you wear a helmet, you must make a DC 11 Constitution saving throw – if you fail (or have no helmet), then either through brain damage or damage to the ears, the attack leaves your hearing permanently muffled. You have disadvantage on Wisdom (Perception) checks that rely on hearing. This flaw can be removed through magic such as greater restoration, heal, lesser restoration, regenerate or wish.
(55-60) Shell-Shock. Either due to brain damage or a lifetime of facing horrors and death, you are somewhat indecisive and slow to react. You suffer a penalty of -2 to your Initiative. This flaw can be removed through magic such as greater restoration or wish.
(61-63) Shrapnel. As the sound booms around you, its tones shatter nearby fragile objects (such as windows or a non-magic metal weapon), and the shards slice into an unfortunate witness. A random creature (possibly including the attacker) within 30 feet of you must succeed on a DC 14 Dexterity saving throw, or suffer 1d6 piercing damage; this damage may be higher at the Dungeon Master's discretion, depending on the size and weight of the shattered material.
(64-69) Fixation. Following recovery, you develop an unhealthy fixation. Roll 1d6: on a 1-3, you nurture a bitter enmity; on a 4-6, you develop an overpowering phobia. If you are immune to being frightened, then this result is bitter enmity. You should work with the Dungeon Master on the phrasing of the new flaw: your hatred or phobia may focus on some element of the attacker's identity (for example, a mindless hatred towards elementals or sorcerers) or even the type of attack (such as a fear of storms). This flaw can be removed by magic such as greater restoration or wish.
(70-95) Full Recovery. You seem to be fine.
(96-98) Thunder-Born. By some freak coincidence, the intensity of the sound opens the briefest of rifts to the Plane of Elemental Air and you become permanently infused with the smallest fragment of energy from that plane. In moments of anger or excitement, ambient thunder rolls protectively around you. You can use a reaction to gain resistance to thunder and lightning damage until the beginning of your next turn, but a growling wave of thunder sweeps out, audible up to 100 feet away, and creatures within 5 feet must succeed at a DC 14 Constitution saving throw or suffer 1d6 thunder damage. Finally, when you spend more than three nights in one area, it is likely that natural storms will begin to form in the vicinity. This flaw can only be removed by magic such as remove curse or wish.
(99 or higher) “I'm... I'm Alright!” The gods must be smiling today – the blow seemed worse than it actually is, and you are assumed dead. Rather than making any death saving throws, you are instead stabilised and returned to 1 hit point and, at the beginning of your next turn, regain 1d10 hit points and can act as normal, gaining advantage on your first attack that turn.

Bharaeth
2016-11-24, 04:17 AM
After reviewing some of the entries, I have changed the effects of 'Pelvic Injury' to no longer deal damage (which would vary between the trivial to the deadly depending on level, which I hadn't realised before!) and force constant saves in combat. It was also oddly damaging to horse riders, as opposed to someone riding a griffon or dog! It should now read as follows:

"Pelvic Injury. The attack destroys your nethers. Whenever you fail an ability check or attack in combat by 5 or more, you lose your action and can't use your reaction until the start of your next turn. You also suffer the stunned condition whilst riding a steed. Finally, this injury renders you permanently infertile. This flaw ends after a base recovery time of 70 days (see Recovery above), or if you receive magic such as heal, regenerate or wish, although the infertility can only be reversed by greater restoration or remove curse."

Also, I have swapped the 'Deep Freeze' result in the Cold damage table to 'Crippling Fatigue'. I have yet to update my document on here...