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View Full Version : D&D 3.x Other Aelsif rule changes, new version



Avianmosquito
2017-09-15, 05:36 AM
The old thread is so immensely out of date that I feel a new one is needed. This is primarily to benefit my players. I should say for those reading I don't have any interest in arguing about the AC nerf, I did plenty of that in my last thread on the subject.

The great NPC buff:
Humanoid characters have been heavily boosted by the rules changes, and NPCs got the best of it.

Unarmed strikes function as weapons:
When unarmed, you do not provoke attacks of opportunity, can make attacks of opportunity and deal lethal damage primarily with the standard -4 for nonlethal. NPCs fighting will usually take the -4 to avoid killing eachother. Improved unarmed strike removes the penalty for nonlethal strikes and increases unarmed strike criticals to x3.

There is no commoner class:
Commoner and aristocrat have been scrapped. That nobody NPC in front of you is probably an expert.

NPCs are higher level:
What it says.

Profession pays much better:
This skill was so ludicrously underpowered it served absolutely zero purpose in-game, so it was overhauled. I somehow doubt players are going to be using profession for long-term employment, unless they're filling the gap between campaigns. Mostly, this is a way to drum up quick cash through temp work and single shifts. And since I never, EVER use Wealth By Level under ANY circumstances, that's not as far fetched as you might think. You can still use profession for other purposes as well.

You have the option to look for a single shift, temp work or long-term work. Looking for a single shift takes one day, looking for temp work takes one week, looking for long-term work takes one month with the option to look for part-time only, full-time only or both (roll separately). It has a chance of success based on the economy, your skill and your faith. A roll within your profession/faith bonus is always in your chosen profession, a roll outside of it never is. When you find an employer, roll 1d20 and add a bonus based on the local economy and your profession to determine your wages at that job (in pence/hour), and roll percentile dice to see how many hours your shift is. At this point, you can either take the job or try again. Additionally, you must make a constitution check after each shift to avoid exhaustion, on a success another save must be made to avoid fatigue, and if you are working long-term you make a faith-modified profession check every month to avoid termination. Single shifts pay at the end of the shift, temp work pays at the end of each work week, and long-term jobs also pay on a weekly basis.

Roaring economy: 20+Proffession+Fth% job search success. Termination DC 0.
Booming economy: 15+Profession+Fth% job search success. Termination DC 5.
Average economy: 10+Profession+Fth% job search success. Termination DC 10.
Recession: 5+Profession+Fth% job search success. Termination DC 15.
Depression: Profession+Fth% job search success. Termination DC 20.

Excellent wages: +25p, +5p per rank of profession
Great wages: +20p, +4p per rank of profession
Good wages: +15p, +3p per rank of profession
Average wages: +10p, +2p per rank of profession
Poor wages: +5p, +1p per rank of profession
Terrible wages: +0p, +0p per rank of profession

Single shift hours:
76-00: 8 hours
51-75: 6 hours
26-50: 4 hours
01-25: 2 hours

Temp work hours:
81-00: 12 hours, 1d6 days/week, 1d6 weeks
61-80: 10 hours, 1d6 days/week, 1d6 weeks
41-60: 8 hours, 1d6 days/week, 1d6 weeks
21-40: 6 hours, 1d6 days/week, 1d6 weeks
01-20: 4 hours, 1d6 days/week, 1d6 weeks

Long-term (full time) work hours:
61-00: 12 hours, 1d4+2 days/week
31-60: 10 hours 1d4+2 days/week
11-20: 8 hours, 1d3+3 days/week
1-10: 6 hours, 1d2+4 days/week

Long-term (part time) work hours:
61-00: 10 hours, 1d2 days/week
31-60: 8 hours 1d3 days/week
11-20: 6 hours, 1d4 days/week
1-10: 4 hours, 1d6 days/week

Fatigue check DC:
Hard manual labour: 10+ 2x shift hours
Average: 10+ shift hours
Desk work: 10+1/2 shift hours

Weapons are stronger due to material types:
The standard material that functions as in SRD is iron. There are many other materials now, all of which inflict more damage by increasing the size of the weapon's damage dice. The best you can get is four sizes larger, which makes a 1d4 dagger inflict 1d12, a 1d8 sword inflict 2d10, and a 2d6 greatsword inflict 4d8. While the material required for that leap (celestial steel) is exceptionally uncommon, most weapons will have dice 1-2 sizes larger than normal. A dagger will deal 1d6 or 1d8, a sword 1d10 or 1d12, a greatsword 2d8 or 2d10. Better materials also have more hit points and hardness, and enhancement also exists to add up to +5 to each of those.


Scrap: Standard, hardness 10, 1x hp, £/10
Iron: Damage dice increased one size, hardness 15, 2x hp, £x1
Steel: Damage dice increased two sizes, hardness 20, 3x hp, £x10
Royal steel: Damage dice increased three sizes, hardness 25, 4x hp, £x100
Celestial weapon steel: Damage dice increased four sizes, hardness 30, 5x hp, £x1,000

Copper: Damage dice decreased two sizes, hardness 5, 1x hp, immune to rust and half acid damage, £x1
Bronze: Standard, decreased one size, hardness 10, 2x hp, immune to rust and half acid damage, £x10
Jungle bronze: Hardness 15, 3x hp, immune to rust and half acid damage, £x100
Celestial bronze: Damage dice increased two sizes, hardness 25, 5x hp, immune to rust and half acid damage,£x1,000

Wood: Standard, hardness 5, 1x hp, immune to rust, cannot be repaired except by magic, £/10
Stone: Damage dice increased two sizes, hardness 5, 1x hp, immune to rust, cannot be repaired except by magic, £
Obsidian: Damage dice increased four sizes, hardness 0, 1x hp, immune to rust, cannot be repaired except by magic, £x10



Fixed damage
d2
d3
d4
d6
d8
d10
d12
2d8
2d10
2d12
4d8
Etcetera


Firearms exist and are useful:
Firearms in Aelsif come in a variety of designs, ranging from simple muzzle-loaders to early semi-automatic weaponry, though semi-automatic weapons are exceedingly rare, expensive and require an exotic proficiency. The muzzle-loaders are extremely powerful shot for shot and are fairly cheap, but they get a single shot with a lengthy reload, and their alternate versions have better range but deal less damage. The manually-operated weapons deal much less damage but they hold more shots and have a similar reload time. The semi-automatic weapons deal even less damage, but they hold more shots and have a shorter reload. These do not benefit from material types, however, so they must rely on special ammunition later in the game.

Notably, some of these guns are shotguns. Shotguns fire 10 projectiles at once, but you only make a single attack roll for all of them and then roll a d10 to see how many hit. Shotguns gain damage for every single pellet from enhancement and feats, making them massively powerful. However, DR counts against every projectile individually, they have terrible criticals and they only deliver sneak attack damage, enchantment damage and similar with the first projectile to hit.

Firearms also have a special melee property, which is universal to them: Contact shots. Hitting with a melee touch attack (provokes an attack of opportunity) allows you to press the barrel to a target. You must make a concentration check if you take damage while doing this. Firing your weapon (still requires an attack, but does not provoke a second attack of opportunity) will result in an automatic hit and if the melee touch attack was a critical then your shot is also a critical. This does mean using two attacks to fire one shot and getting into melee range where your firearm does not belong, but being able to use your firearm as a touch attack can be worth it for a single-shot firearm or a firearm that isn't effective against an enemy due to their AC or DR (as a touch attack has an easier time confirming critical hits as well).

One-handed firearms can also be used while grappled at a -4 penalty, something that can't be done with other ranged weapons.


Musket:
Proficiency: Simple
Critical: 20, x3
Damage: 2d12, pierce
Range increment: 60ft
Reload: Two rounds, one round with a paper cartridge
Hardness: 5
HP: 25
Weight: 10lbs
Cost: £50*
Ammunition type: Musket ball
Requires two hands to reload, but can be fired one-handed at a -4 penalty to hit.

£ = GP, p = CP

While considered obsolete by the developed nations, muskets are very common civilian and militia weapons throughout the world, and poorer nations continue to use them as their primary weapon. This weapon's .94 ball deals impressive damage, but its lack of range and accuracy make it an inferior weapon in most cases.

(This weapon is based off the Long Land Pattern Musket, or "Brown Bess". It fires a substantially larger ball than Bess did, a cheap attempt by the manufacturers of this obsolete weapon to make up for its inadequacies.)

Rifle:
Proficiency: Simple
Critical: 20, x3
Damage: 2d10, pierce
Range increment: 120ft
Reload: Two rounds, one round with paper cartridges
Hardness: 5
HP: 25
Weight: 10lbs
Cost: 100£
Ammunition type: Miniť ball
Requires two hands to reload, but can be fired one-handed at a -4 penalty to hit.

The standard military weapon of most nations in Aelsif is the musket rifle, usually loaded with paper cartridges. While its .79 Miniť ball doesn't as much punch as the musket's .94 ball, musket rifles have much better range.

(This weapon classification includes both musket-rifles and muzzle-loading rifles. The difference being musket-rifles are converted muskets and muzzle-loading rifles were built that way. It is most closely based off the P1851 Miniť Rifle, a muzzle-loading rifle in .71 calibre.)

Repeating rifle:
Proficiency: Martial
Critical: 19-20, x2
Damage: 1d12, pierce
Range increment: 120ft
Reload: Full reload in two rounds, reloads two cartridges in one round
Special: Can fire six rounds before needing to reload.
Hardness: 5
HP: 25
Weight: 8lbs
Cost: 500£
Ammunition type: Repeater cartridge
Requires two hands to reload, but can be fired one-handed at a -4 penalty to hit.

The lever-action repeating rifle is considered a state of the art weapon in most parts of the world, able to rapidly fire .47 calibre cartridges. While only the Gnomelands give these out as standard-issue weapons, several developed nations issue these to elite units and wealthy private citizens often purchase repeating rifles for personal use.

(This weapon is based off the Winchester Model 1873. Its .47 has case dimensions of 12x36mm compared to the .44-40's case dimensions of 11x33mm, and is a slightly harder hitting weapon.)

Automatic* rifle:
Proficiency: Exotic
Critical: 19-20, x2
Damage: 1d10, pierce
Range increment: 120ft
Reload: Full reload in one round
Special: Can fire ten rounds before needing to reload.
Hardness: 5
HP: 25
Weight: 8lbs
Cost: 2500£
Ammunition type: Automatic cartridge
Requires two hands to reload, but can be fired one-handed at a -4 penalty to hit.

*This is using "automatic" in the historical sense. In modern terminology, this is a semi-automatic weapon.

While too new to have been adopted by any military, even in the Gnomelands, the .39 Automatic Rifle is produced by a private Gnomish manufacturer, loading with a detachable 10-round box magazine. While it is considered treason to willfully allow automatics to leave the country, there is a thriving black market charging exorbitant prices for these impressive weapons.

(This weapon is based off the Winchester Model 1905. Its .31 calibre round has case dimensions of 10x30mm, compared to the .32 Winchester's 8.9x30, and it is a very similar weapon in use.)

Pistol:
Proficiency: Simple
Critical: 20, x3
Damage: 2d8, pierce
Range increment: 30ft
Reload: Full round action, move action with paper cartridges
Hardness: 5
HP: 25
Weight: 2lbs
Cost: 25£
Ammunition type: Pistol ball
Requires two hands to reload, but can be fired one-handed without penalty.

A common civilian weapon, the obsolete smoothbore pistol has a large .63 bore but very little range.

(Based most directly off of Queen Anne style Duelling Pistols, old 18th century English pistols most prominently manufactured in .58 calibre.)

Dueling pistol:
Proficiency: Simple
Critical: 20, x3
Damage: 2d6, pierce
Range increment: 60ft
Reload: Full round action
Hardness: 5
HP: 25
Weight: 2lbs
Cost: 50£
Ammunition type: Pistol Miniť
Requires two hands to reload, but can be fired one-handed without penalty.

The dueling pistol features a rifled barrel at the cost of a smaller .47 bore, which made it the go-to choice of duelists until it was supplanted by the revolver.

(This is based off of later, 19th century percussion cap Duelling Pistols. The rifling here is much heavier than the scratch rifling of the era, but that's because in real life using a rifled pistol was considered "unsporting" and the cheaters had to hide it. Pistols of this type were most commonly .45, so this is a very normal pistol.)

Revolver:
Proficiency: Martial
Critical: 19-20, x2
Damage: 1d10, pierce
Range increment: 60ft
Reload: Two rounds, one round with speedloader.
Special: Can fire six rounds before needing to reload.
Hardness: 5
HP: 25
Weight: 2lbs
Cost: 200£
Ammunition type: Revolver cartridge
Requires two hands to reload, but can be fired one-handed with no penalty.

Much more common than the repeating rifle, the revolver is widely issued as an officer's sidearm and is a favourite weapon of wealthy private citizens. Accurate and able to sustain a good rate of fire, the revolver's only real drawback is poor stopping power.

(This weapon is based off of the Colt M1892, a very early double-action revolver. Its .39 has case dimensions of 10x30, compared to the .38 Long Colt's 9x26mm, giving it better stopping power, something the M1892 legendarily lacked.)

Automatic* pistol:
Proficiency: Exotic
Critical: 19-20, x2
Damage: 1d8, pierce
Range increment: 60ft
Reload: Full-round action.
Special: Can fire ten rounds before needing to reload.
Hardness: 5
HP: 25
Weight: 2lbs
Cost: 1000£
Ammunition type: Automatic cartridge
Requires two hands to reload, but can be fired one-handed with no penalty.

*Again, this is using the historical sense.

Often just referred to as "The Automatic", the Gnomish pistol is the most expensive handgun in the world, and widely considered to be the best. While manufactured in a variety of sizes and calibres, such as the .31 listed above, the most common is the Gnomish .24, awkwardly small in the hands of men but perfect for Gnomish officers.

(This weapon is based off the Mauser C96, its case dimensions of 8x24 being slightly larger than the 7.63x25mm Mauser and packing a little more punch, though that's not saying much.)

Blunderbuss:
Proficiency: Simple
Critical: 20, x2
Damage: 1d8, pierce
Range increment: 30ft
Reload: Two rounds
Special: Fires 10 pellets. If an attack successfully hits, it hits 1d10 times.
Hardness: 5
HP: 25
Weight: 10lbs
Cost: 50£
Ammunition type: Shot
Requires two hands to reload, but can be fired one-handed at a -4 penalty to hit.

The blunderbuss is a dangerous muzzle-loading firearm commonly used to hunt game and for civilian self-defence. Unfortunately, its short range and poor performance against even the lightest armour prevents it from seeing military use, even in poor nations.

(Based off the Harper's Ferry blunderbuss, as used by the Lewis & Clark expedition.)

Repeating shotgun:
Proficiency: Martial
Critical: 20, x2
Damage: 1d6, pierce
Range increment: 30ft
Reload: Two rounds reloads fully, one round reloads two shells.
Special: This weapon can be fired six times before needing to reload. Fires 10 pellets. If an attack successfully hits, it hits 1d10 times.
Hardness: 5
HP: 25
Weight: 8lbs
Cost: 500£
Ammunition type: Shotshell
Requires two hands to reload, but can be fired one-handed at a -4 penalty to hit.

Rarely produced, even more rarely issued, the lever-action repeating shotgun is mostly a weapon for sport hunting amongst wealthy private citizens and royalty in particular. Its low capacity, short range and poor stopping power make it unsuited to combat, however, and the price doesn't help.

(Based off of the Winchester 1887, a 12-guage lever-action shotgun.)

Dragon:
Proficiency: Simple
Critical: 20, x2
Damage: 1d6, pierce
Range increment: 30ft
Reload: One round
Special: Fires 10 pellets. If an attack successfully hits, it hits 1d10 times.
Hardness: 5
HP: 25
Weight: 2lbs
Cost: 50£
Ammunition type: Dragon shot
Requires two hands to reload, but can be fired one-handed with no penalty.

The dragon is a pistol blunderbuss, known for its great kick and questionable stopping power. While against unarmoured opponents it is very effective, the dragon is ineffectual against even the lightest armour and has no military applications as a result.

(Based off the Royal Mail Blunderbuss, a short-barrelled late 18th century flintlock.)

Repeating shotpistol:
Proficiency: Martial
Critical: 20, x2
Damage: 1d4, pierce
Range increment: 30ft
Reload: Two rounds reloads fully, one round reloads two shells.
Special: This weapon can be fired six times before needing to reload. Fires 10 pellets. If an attack successfully hits, it hits 1d10 times.
Hardness: 5
HP: 25
Weight: 2lbs
Cost: 500£
Ammunition type: Shotshell
Requires two hands to reload, but can be fired one-handed with no penalty.

For good reason, this is the least popular firearm in the world. It has great potential damage at close range due to its rate of fire and the combined damage of its shot, but it is often defeated by heavy clothing in a way no firearm should be. Still sees niche use for small game hunting and as a personal self defence weapon against animal attacks, though most people who need something for that purpose can't afford to spend 500£.

(Not directly based off of any particular weapon, but revolvers made for small-bore shotshells do exist, and are usually called "backpacker" shotguns. And yes, they're designed for small game hunting and emergency defence against animal attacks, which is a thing they are actually pretty good at.)


Pistol balls: 5£/20 (4lbs)
Pistol minie: 8£/20 (4lbs)
Revolver cartridge: 20£/30 (3lbs)
Automatic cartridge: 20£/30 (3lbs)

Musket balls: 10£/20 (8lbs)
Minie balls: 15£/20 (8lbs)
Repeater cartridge: 40£/30 (6lbs)
Automatic rifle cartridge: 40£/40 (6lbs)

Grapeshot: 30£/20 (16lbs)
Repeater shotshell: 40£/30 (12lbs)
Dragon shot: 30£/20 (8lbs)
Revolver shotshell: 40£/30 (6lbs)

Heavy weapons can destroy an entire party:
There exist crew-served weapons in Aelsif, primarily cannons and mortars but also including hand-cranked gatling guns. These weapons, poorly approached, can easily result in a TPK. They are located below. Please note they all have an exotic proficiency and take multiple people for best usage.


Field gun:
Bonus restriction*: No ability bonus
Movement restriction: Turning a field gun around takes a full-round action
Damage: 20d6 pierce
Canister: 2d12 pierce
Critical: 20, x2
Range increment: 300ft
Canister increment: 30ft
Reload time: 10 rounds w/ 1 crewmen, 5 rounds w/ 2 crewmen, 3 rounds w/ 3 crewmen
Special: Great cleave, straight line only
Canister special: 1d20 projectiles per hit
Weight: 3,000lbs
Cost: £1200

Field guns are carriage-mounted artillery, typically firing 18-pound spherical shot or a canister shell filled with many smaller projectiles, excellent at killing infantry at close range.

Light field gun:
Bonus restriction*: None
Movement restriction: Turning a light field gun around takes a move action
Damage: 10d6 pierce
Canister damage: 1d12 pierce
Critical: 20, x2
Range increment: 300ft
Canister increment: 30ft
Reload time: 5 rounds w/ 1 crewmen, 3 rounds w/ 2 crewmen, 2 rounds w/ 3 crewmen
Special: Cleave, straight line only
Canister special: 1d20 projectiles per hit
Weight: 1,200lbs
Cost: £800

Light field guns are a smaller guns, generally turret or swivel-mounted, designed for effective anti-personnel usage.

Naval gun:
Bonus restriction: No ability bonus, no BaB
Movement restriction: You cannot turn a naval gun
Damage: 20d6 pierce
Critical: 20, x2
Range increment: 300ft
Reload time: 10 rounds w/ 1 crewmen, 5 rounds w/ 2 crewmen
Special: Great cleave, straight line only
Weight: 2,500lbs
Cost: £1000

Naval guns are heavy cannons designed for ship to ship warfare. They are lighter and cheaper than field guns due to the lack of a gun carriage, but cannot be turned without turning the entire ship and are even harder than field guns to hit a target with.

Deck gun:
Bonus restriction: No ability bonus, no BaB
Movement restriction: Turning a deck gun is a full-round action
Damage: 10d6 pierce
Critical: 20, x2
Range increment: 300ft
Reload time: 5 rounds w/ 1 crewmen, 3 rounds w/ 2 crewmen
Special: Cleave, straight line only
Weight: 1,000lbs
Cost: £600

Mortar:
Movement restriction: Turning a mortar around is a full-round action
Damage: 10d6 pierce
Spread: 20ft
Save DC: 10
Incendiary damage: 2d6/round contact and area for 10 rounds
Spread: 10ft
Incendiary DC: 15
Range: 1/2 mile
Reload time: 10 rounds w/ 1 crewmen, 5 rounds w/ 2 crewmen, 3 rounds w/ 3 crewmen
Weight: 2,000lbs
Cost: £1000

Mortars fire long-ranged explosive shells that detonate on impact to deal great damage in an area. They can either fire a conventional explosive shell for a great deal of immediate damage, or an incendiary shell for by far more damage over time, setting targets on fire for one minute for 2d6 damage per round, and setting fire to the area they detonate in to deal additional damage to anything inside it, excellent at destroying stationary targets.

Light mortar:
Movement restriction: Turning a light mortar around is a movement action
Damage: 5d6 pierce
Spread: 20ft
Save DC: 15
Incendiary damage: 1d6/round contact and area for 10 rounds
Spread: 10ft
Incendiary DC: 20
Range: 1/2 mile
Reload time: 5 rounds w/ 1 crewmen, 3 rounds w/ 2 crewmen, 2 rounds 3/ 3 crewmen
Weight: 1,000lbs
Cost: £500

A much smaller, lighter mortar designed to be more portable and cheaper. It's rather a lot faster to fire too.

Howitzer:
Movement restriction: Turning a howitzer around is a full-round action
Damage: 10d6 pierce
Spread: 20ft
Save DC: 10
Incendiary damage: 2d6/round contact and area for 10 rounds
Spread: 10ft
Incendiary DC: 15
Range: 2 miles
Reload time: 15 rounds w/ 1 crewmen, 10 rounds w/ 2 crewmen, 5 rounds w/ 3 crewmen
Weight: 3,000lbs
Cost: £5000

Howitzers are the gnomish artillery piece of choice, arranged in batteries at every mile one mile behind their border. These weapons embody the relentless horror of the battlefield, an invisible enemy miles away, who can kill you at random, beyond your reach, unable to be conquered and not truly aware of your existence despite their efforts to end it. It is as callous, unfair, destructive and evil as war itself. Only the gnomes have this weapon. Other soldiers have to see the horrors they inflict.

Gatling gun:
Movement restriction: Turning a gatling gun around is a move action
Bonus restriction: None
Damage: 1d12 pierce
Critical: 20, x2
Range increment: 120ft
Capacity: 30
Reload time: 2 rounds w/ 1 crewman, 0 with 2 crewmen (loaded as it is fired)
Special: Fires 6 bullets, successful attacks hit 1d6 times. Can get up to 5 iterative attacks.
Weight: 350lbs
Cost: £1500

The gatling gun is a relatively new weapon that was until recently an exclusively gnomish weapon, now available to dwarves, elves, humans, and the people Sohei's eastern islands. It uses a hand crank to turn six barrels and fire .39 calibre bullets at up to 300 rounds per minute. Positively lethal against infantry, fairly light for a heavy weapon, and not overly expensive either.

Machine gun:
Movement restriction: Turning a machine gun around is a move action
Bonus restriction: None
Damage: 1d10 pierce
Critical: 20, x2
Range increment: 120ft
Capacity: 300
Reload time: 5 rounds w/ 1 crewman, 3 with 2 crewmen
Special: Fires 12 bullets, successful attacks hit 2d6 times. Can get up to 5 iterative attacks.
Weight: 200lbs
Cost: £7500

The machine gun is a relatively new weapon for the Gnomtaller, water cooled and recoil-operated, firing .31 calibre bullets at up to 600 rounds per minute. The standard border defence weapon of the Gnomtaller, it's a terrifying force on the battlefield that easily shreds infantry and cavalry alike.

*Bonus restrictions only prevent bonuses, penalties still apply.


Grenades are a thing:
Want a grenade? You can have a grenade. These are old-school fuse-lit grenades, resembling a metal sphere the size of a fist. They deal decent damage in an area, though casters can easily exceed their damage. Firebombs are much the same, only a smaller area and they deal their damage over time to everything in that area, largely acting as an obstacle rather than a functional weapon unless the target can't move and has really low fire resistance.


Molotov:
Range: 30ft + 5ft/STR
Spread: 10ft
Damage: 1d6/round
Duration: 10 rounds
Save: Reflex, 20
Craft DC: 10
Cost: £5
Weight: 2lbs

A molotov cocktail is a glass bottle filled with flammable material, typically petroleum. You must have a means of lighting a molotov to make use of it. You may throw it a distance of up to 30ft plus 5ft for each point of strength bonus. Throwing it at a particular space sets everything currently within that area on fire for 1d6 fire damage per round for 10 rounds. Anything within the area affected by the molotov cocktail takes an additional 1d6 fire damage, as does anything that grapples or is grappled by a creature set on fire by the molotov. If desired, the target can use a full-round action to attempt to extinguish the flames before taking additional damage. Extinguishing the flames requires a DC 20 Reflex save. Rolling on the ground provides the target a +4 bonus on the save. Leaping into a lake or magically extinguishing the flames automatically smothers the fire.

(Yes, this renders alchemist's fire completely obsolete. It is supposed to.)

Grenade:
Range: 30ft + 5ft/STR
Spread: 20ft
Damage: 5d6 Piercing
Delay: 1-2 rounds
Save: Reflex, 15
Craft DC: 15
Cost: £25
Weight: 2lbs

A grenade is an iron sphere loaded with gunpowder and shot, detonated by a fuse. You must have a means of lighting a grenade to make use of it. You may throw it a distance of up to 30ft plus 5ft for each point of strength bonus. At the start of the next combat round, the grenade will detonate and pelt everything within 20ft with shrapnel for 5d6 points of piercing damage.

Dynamite:
Range: 30ft + 5ft/STR
Spread: 10ft
Damage: 10d6 bludgeon
Delay: 1-5 Rounds
Save: Reflex, 20
Craft DC: 20
Cost: £50
Weight: 2lbs

Dynamite is an explosive consisting of nitroglycerin soaked into diatomaceous earth and encased in a paper tubing. Fairly new to Aelsif, dynamite has revolutionized the mining industry and almost immediately seen use an an improvised explosive weapon. You must have a means of lighting a grenade to make use of it. You may throw it a distance of up to 30ft plus 5ft for each point of strength bonus. At the start of the next combat round, the grenade will detonate and blast within 10ft with a powerful shockwave for 10d6 points of bludgeon damage.



Shields also add their bonus to your reflex save:
What it says. Also, bucklers need a hand because bucklers are ALWAYS centre-grip shields, shields no longer cause spell failure (at all) but still have a check penalty, and otherwise shields are just generally less garbage than they were before. Shields use the same materials as weapons, with the same effects.

Improvised weapons don't suck:
They no longer get a -4. They don't receive enhancement bonuses, but as long as they are reasonably sized they make decent weapons. That NPC thief with the crowbar? They will smash your skull straight open.

Other new content:
There's a lot of it. Creatures, weapons, feats, vessels, an entire creature type, this is a full-sized setting and there's plenty added to it.

The great creature nerf:
Creatures, animals in particular, have been nerfed. There's only three parts to this.

The AC nerf:
Most animals cannot block or dodge. As such, they have lost their base 10 AC. This means most animals will have 10 less AC than they used to. That is, a wolf's AC drops from 14 to 4, a brown bear's AC drops from 15 to 5. That AC isn't completely irrelevant, but most attacks aimed at animals will hit, since they can't block or dodge. Any animal that can dodge but couldn't block (that is, any biped without arms or less than 3 intelligence, and any animal flying that is rated average or better) gets base 5 AC. Any animal that could block but couldn't dodge (any non-biped with arms and at least 3 intelligence) also gets base 5 AC. Only characters who can both block and dodge (bipeds with arms and at least 3 intelligence) get base 10 AC.

Bites now provoke attacks of opportunity:
Any bite attack provokes and cannot make attacks of opportunity. This means any animal that has no other offensive option eats a shot to the skull each time it tries to attack. This nerf is partly for realism and party because the pierce/slash/bludgeon trifecta would be super OP against armour in ways a real bite simply isn't and that needed balancing.

Animals are animals:
Anything with an intelligence of 2 or lower no longer gets skill points from hit dice, only from racial modifiers.

CR adjustments to compensate:
CR needs to be adjusted for these changes, both the creature nerf and the new content make animals a lot weaker, and the changes are pretty simple. If a creature loses all 10 points of base AC, reduce its CR by 1. If it only has a bite attack, again reduce its CR by 1. If it would be reduced below 1, reduce it to 1/2, then to 1/3, 1/4, 1/8, 1/10 and finally to 0. This means a rat is CR 0, a wolf is CR 1/3, a dire wolf is CR 1, a brown bear is CR 3, a dire tiger is CR 7, so on.

Animal armor:
To prevent rangers from being hit too hard, animals can now wear armour. It is identical to human armor, you use tricks to make them proficient. Making them proficient with animal clothing is a trick with DC 10, light armour is DC 15, medium armour is DC 20, heavy armour is DC 25 and assault armour is DC 30, which allows it to wear the armour proficiently. Pushing an animal to wear armour it isn't proficient in does allow it to wear the armour, but it will suffer a penalty despite this for not being proficient. You can only teach an animal how to proficiently wear armour if you are also proficient.

Miscellaneous:
There are some other changes, as well.

Wisdom is now faith:
Faith is the new, more appropriately named replacement for wisdom. It represents the strength of a character's convictions, and is closely related to belief and willpower. While high-faith characters suffer in terms of behaviour, largely due to their inherent closed-mindedness, their stats definitely benefit. Faith steals the concentration skill from constitution and stays vital to profession, but otherwise affects no skills. All of wisdom's skills have been moved to intelligence or charisma. Faith's new benefit is spell resistance, characters now gain spell resistance equal to their character level (NOT hit dice) plus their faith modifier. It isn't much spell resistance, but it's not a bad amount.

Crit immunity is not a thing:
Anything can be critically hit and sneak attacked, end of story.

You now die at -100%:
This is straight forward. See your max HP? You now die at negative that. If you have 13hp, you die at -13. If you have 150hp, you die at -150. However, you cannot regain consciousness without first recovering all of your negative hit points, you don't have a 10% chance of just miraculously getting back up after stabilising. Instead, all it means is you won't actually die. Any damage while under 0 HP will start you dying again.

Magic doesn't stabilize:
Being healed by a spell does not automatically stabilize you, ot even if you are healed to 0 or into a positive hit point total. You are still disabled at 0 while dying, and still fully functional above 0 while dying. Only a heal check, natural stabilization, restoration (including lesser) or returning to full HP will stop you from dying. The heal DC is now 10 plus how far below 0 the target is, and stabilisation chance is 1%.

Alternative massive damage:
The new massive damage threshold is equal to twice your hit dice. There is no save. Failure causes you to start dying, but you don't immediately lose consciousness. See above. Creatures immune to wounding, bleeding or critical hits are immune to massive damage as well.

SR is voluntary:
It only applies when you want it to, as it is fluffed as stemming from mental focus against magic. A "Reject your reality" kind of thing. It will not prevent buffs or healing.

Cantrips and orisons are infinite use:
See Pathfinder for details. In exchange, cure and inflict minor wounds have been removed entirely. And virtue never stacked, by the way, don't try and pull that.

There are NO alignments:
Alignments do not exist. If you want to make a LG character, you can, but it has no bearing on the game. You can't detect it, you can't target it, enemies aren't going to hit you with word of chaos or blasphemy, there is no alignment listing anywhere in the game so it's just your opinion and your ideal of your character's behaviour. That's it.

There are no outer planes:
Summoning and calling work radically differently, at least in lore, and plane shift is replaced with greater teleport, which is a seemingly infinite range teleport, its stated range is so far above and beyond (10,000 miles per level) you can effectively teleport anywhere. Well, anywhere on THIS planet, that is. Word of Recall also has a range limit applied of 10,000 miles per level. There's a damn good lore reason for that, I assure you.

There's no resurrection, either:
Technically you can resurrect things in a very limited and restricted manner in-game, but we're talking a good-length quest to bring back one reasonably fresh dead guy. You are not just casting a spell and making death utterly meaningless.

Pounds sterling:
The pound sterling (£) replaces the gold piece, with the pence sterling (p) being a hundreth of that. It is a more modern setting, after all.

Pricey food:
Food, drink and many other small goods are 10x as expensive to keep up with pay.

Education:
Education in Aelsif is kindof a big deal. Education is not determined by class any more, but it has an enormous effect on a character. Basically, education is responsible for your ability to make knowledge,spellcraft and craft checks. An uneducated character has a -20 on knowledge and spellcraft checks, -4 on craft and profession. A character with only a primary education has a -10 on knowledge and spellcraft checks and a -2 on craft and profession. A character with only a secondary education has a -5 on knowledge and spellcraft and a -1 on craft and profession. A character with a tertiary education has no penalty. It also contributes to learning languages, see below. Not everybody is going to have tertiary education, though it is almost universal for PCs, and many characters you encounter will have far fewer skill points than they really should have. Education also has an intelligence and age guidelines that PCs once more do not have to follow if they don't want to. See below.


Infant: Uneducated 0-63, primary 64-127, secondary 128-255, tertiary 256+
Toddler: Uneducated 0-31, primary 32-63, secondary 64-127, tertiary 128+
Child: Uneducated 0-11, primary 12-19, secondary 20-27, tertiary 28+
Adolescent: Uneducated 0-3, primary 4-11, secondary 12-19, tertiary 20+
Young adult: Uneducated 0-3, primary 4-7, secondary 8-11, tertiary 12+
Adult: Uneducated 0-3, primary 4-5, secondary 6-7, tertiary 8-9+
Middle age: Uneducated 0-3, primary 4, secondary 5, tertiary 6+
Elder: Uneducated 0-3, primary 4, secondary 5, tertiary 6+
Senior: Uneducated 0-3, primary 4, secondary 5, tertiary 6+
Ancient: Uneducated 0-3, primary 4, secondary 5, tertiary 6+

Note that these are just guidelines. Not everybody has the opportunity to receive education (especially not among the poor), not everybody who has the opportunity takes it (see previous), and PCs are often educated a little beyond these limits. (Though not too much. An infant with 3 intelligence and a college education should earn you a dope slap from your DM.) The reason why intelligence isn't always enough to stay educated according to this chart comes down to money, like everything else in life. It's a matter of being able to pay for a school to teach you, get a government to pay them to teach you, or getting the school to teach for free. Wealth is an enormous unfair advantage in all three methods, as you can simply pay for private schooling, bribe a politician to give you a grant, or bribe the school into giving you a scholarship. Everybody else will just have to convince one of these bodies they're worth it with actual evidence that they are.


Language points:
Language is not a standard skill anymore, though you can still spend skill points on it. Instead, you gain "language points" based on your age and your intelligence. The basic amount of language points for ages can be found below, and your intelligence will either increase these or hold them back. Language points are spent on a language to learn to use it properly. One point is used to become a non-fluent speaker, one to become a fluent speaker and one to become literate (only for languages you speak). If a character comes from an educated background, they may gain 1-3 new language points depending on their degree of education. It goes without saying barbarians are no longer illiterate to start with under this system, but it probably also should be noted this is never a class skill now. This means that spending regular skill points will always take two for each step towards a new language. Your first language is also selected for you, based on your nation or origin rather than your race. If a nation has two languages (IE: the United Nations of Marakiz have both Marakiziy and Boreal as options), you may pick one.

For example, regardless of your character's race, if they are born in Dwarven territory their first language is Norse. If they have an intelligence score of 10 or 11 and are uneducated, they won't speak at all as an infant, speak non-fluently as a toddler, either become fluent or literate (but not both) as a child, be literate and fluent as an adolescent, and remain that way the rest of their life with no further advancement. If their intelligence is 8-9, they won't speak until they're a child, will only become fluent or literate as an adolescent, and never become both fluent and literate. If their intelligence is 6-7, they won't speak until they're an adolescent and will never be literate or fluent. If their intelligence is 4-5, they will never speak without education and never fluently.

New age categories:
Aelsif revamps the age category system. Age category primarily affects stats, but at the high and low end it affects movement speed and at the low end it also affects size.


Infant: (Unplayable)
Stats: -6 Str, -6 Fth, +6 Cha
Special: Size decreased by 2.
Speed: 10ft
Language points: 0
This is an actual infant, anywhere from birth to two years. The stats above are based off an infant of around one year old, a fast crawler but unlikely to be walking or talking much just yet. This age category is not meant to be playable. They're weak, they're slow, and while they're certainly cute it doesn't make up for the burden they place on the party. Give mom some maternity leave, you don't want baby in the party.

Toddler: (DM discretion)
Stats: -4 Str, -4 Fth, +6 Cha
Special: Size decreased by 1.
Speed: 15ft
Language points: 1
This is a toddler, anywhere from two years to four years. The stats are based off a toddler of about two years. A toddler may be a severely underpowered party member, but they make an adorable mascot. Unfortunately, that's about all they're good for early on. They aren't as much of a burden as an infant because they can walk at a decent-ish speed and have better stats, but they are a burden. That charisma bonus does have some uses, though, especially with a few particular classes like sorcerer and favored soul.

Child:
Stats: -2 Str, -2 Fth, +2 Dex, +4 Cha
Special: Size decreased by 1.
Speed: 20ft
Language points: 2
Children are about what you'd expect, ranging from four years to ten years. The stats are based off a child of about six years. These characters are competent enough, but you may consider giving them adult supervision. Their movement speed is reasonable, in the sense that a halfling's movement speed is reasonable, their stats are overall decent and unlike other small, slow-moving party members they're unlikely to be offended if you have to carry them.

Adolescent:
Stats: -2 Fth, +2 Cha
Speed: 30ft
Language points: 3
Adolescents are in the awkward years between ten and sixteen. The stats are based off a 12-year old preteen. These characters may be considered children or adults depending on jurisdiction. The fact that age of consent and age of majority are frequently 12 or below says some really unpleasant things about Aelsif, but it's important to keep in mind when you go travelling. They are also definitely competent enough not to need you to hold their hand. Their stat adjustments are all fairly negligible and they have no speed penalty.

Young adult:
Stats: Default.
Speed: 30ft
Language points: 3
Young adult is also exactly what it sounds like, ranging from sixteen to twenty-six. The stats are based off somebody around age 20. This is the default age for a reason, it's the most common age for new soldiers, mercenaries, couriers, missionaries, explorers and just about everything else. Very few of the adventurer professions hire older than this, if you're just starting out you're probably a kid.

Adult:
Stats: -1 Str, -1 Dex, -1 Con, +2 Fth
Speed: 30ft
Language points: 3
Adult is one of the largest age groups, ranging from twenty-six to thirty-six. Its effects are fairly simple, a -1 on all physical attributes, but +2 faith. While this is simple, a lot of variables will determine if that's worth it. Like whether you care about all three of those stats, and how long the campaign is. In the short-term it's definitely a strong starting point, but in the long run those stat penalties may be more significant.

Middle Age:
Stats: -2 Str, -2 Dex, -2 Con, +4 Fth
Speed: 30ft
Language points: 3
Middle age is the dreaded years from 36 to 50, where you're not as strong, as spry or as tough as you used to be, men lose almost all of their testosterone, women go into menopause, your hair starts falling out, you're sick half the year and you're ALWAYS tired. At the very least, it's better than what happens next. Sure, you're still good to do your job, but that won't last.

Elder: (DM discretion)
Stats: -2 Str, -2 Dex, -4 Con, +6 Fth
Speed: 20ft
Language points: 3
As an elder between fifty and sixty-five, you know being old really, REALLY sucks. Take all the issues of middle age and add on "performance" issues and incontinence, a rapidly degrading mental state and even worse physicality than you already had. This is the point where your body is out of warrantee, and predictably you're falling apart. Age is definitely a net negative by this point, but in a faith-based class you may still be useful, so if you think you still have it in you grab your cane and start walking.

Senior: (DM discretion)
Stats: -2 Str, -2 Dex, -4 Con, -2 Int, -2 Cha, +8 Fth
Speed: 15ft
Language points: 3
This is the senior citizen zone, from sixty-five to eighty. The stats above reflect pretty well the collapse of one's mind and body, as there's very little worthwhile left within you. But you do have one thing, you're stubborn and your faith is stronger now than it's ever been. Granted, that's because the smart part of your brain is failing and the dumb part is trying to compensate, but the people around you will mistake your animalistic ritualism for wisdom and it does genuinely make you a better caster in a few classes.

Ancient: (Unplayable)
Stats: -2 Str, -2 Dex, -4 Con, -4 Int, -4 Cha, +10 Fth
Speed: 10ft
Language points: 3
This is the age class for people who really should be dead by now. Year-wise, it ranges from eighty on up. There's no true maximum age in this game, but suffice to say as an adventurer your life is over. You've degraded too far now, senility is in full swing and you can barely walk. It's about time to quit. This age category is not meant to be playable. Stop pushing the wheelchair and put grandad in a home.

Adjusting age for the 16 player races is easy, though they adjust much less than in other settings.

Lizardfolk, Sahuagin, Orcs & Kobolds: -25%
Humans, Hobgoblins, Goblins & Halflings: Listed ages
Dwarves, Gnomes, Korobokuru & Nezumi: +25%
Elves & Spirit Folk (bamboo, sea and river): +50%

This does not affect starting level.

If your race has a listed speed of 20ft, than:
Fast ages move at 20ft
Medium ages move at 15ft
Slow ages move at 10ft
Very slow ages move at 5ft

If you are a barbarian and at a load that makes you subject to fast movement:
If your speed was 30ft, it is now 40ft.
If your speed was 20ft, it is now 30ft.
If your speed was 15ft, it is now 20ft.
If your speed was 10ft, it is now 15ft.
If your speed was 5ft, it is now 10ft.

Armor:
Encumbrance:
If you take an armor penalty (medium or heavy armor) to base move speed, than:
If your speed was 40ft, it is now 30ft.
If your speed was 30ft, it is now 20ft.
If your speed was 20ft, it is now 15ft.
If your speed was 15ft, it is now 10ft.
If your speed was 10ft, it is now 5ft.
If your speed was 5ft, it is still 5ft.
The heavy armor penalty to run speed still applies, characters in heavy armor can only run 3x speed, 4x with the run feat.

Encumbrance:
If you take an encumbrance penalty (medium or heavy load) to base move speed, than:
If your speed was 40ft, it is now 30ft.
If your speed was 30ft, it is now 20ft.
If your speed was 20ft, it is now 15ft.
If your speed was 15ft, it is now 10ft.
If your speed was 10ft, it is now 5ft.
If your speed was 5ft, it is still 5ft.

Avianmosquito
2017-09-17, 09:42 PM
I've run out of space above, so here we go with more.

Helmets:
Helmets actually do something. There's only five types, which are all extremely vague, but they are hats, coifs, helmets, full helmets and assault helmets. These, obviously, correspond to clothing, light armour, medium armour, heavy armour and assault armour. Helmets serve three purposes. The first is to increase your AC, though they aren't nearly as effective as your armour is for obvious reasons, they do work well in tandem with them. The second is to increase your energy resistance which they provide quite a bit of. (The ER is limited to that of your current armour.) The third is to allow your armour's damage reduction to function against critical hits. Helmets can be made of any material and will have the same stats. Details below.


Hat:
Proficiency: Clothing
AC: +1
ER: +1 (1-5, depending on material)
Special: DR from clothing now applies to critical hits.
ACP: -1
Weight: 1/2lbs
Cost: 1p

An ordinary hat or hood of cloth or leather. Provides almost no protection.

Light helmet:
Proficiency: Light armour
AC: +2
ER: +2 (2-10, depending on material)
Special: DR from clothing and light armor now applies to critical hits.
ACP: -2
Weight: 2lbs
Cost: 4p

An ordinary helmet or a coif. Doesn't provide much protection, but it's better than a hat and a good compliment to light armour.

Helmet:
Proficiency: Medium armor
AC: +3
ER: +3 (3-15, depending on material)
Special: DR from clothing, light and medium armor now applies to critical hits.
ACP: -3
Weight: 4lbs
Cost: 12p

Either a helmet with a coif, or just a larger helmet. Very solid headgear,

Full helmet:
Proficiency: Heavy armor
AC: +4
ER: +4 (4-20, depending on material)
Special: DR from clothing, light, medium and heavy armor now applies to critical hits.
ACP: -4
Weight: 5lbs
Cost: 32p

A helmet that covers the entire face. Usually has a visor, but some styles, like great helms and large nasal helms, do not.

Assault helmet:
Proficiency: Assault armor
AC: +5
ER: +5 (5-25, depending on material)
Special: DR from clothing and all armour now applies to critical hits.
ACP: -5
Weight: 10lbs
Cost: 80p

A very large, heavy helmet that covers the entire face. Very thick and strong, always with full face coverage and no visor, often bolted to one's armour for better results but that prevents the user from turning their head.


Armour expansion coming soon, which will bring the total up to 40 armour types, including 6 standard (AC, DR weak to one damage type), composite armour (heavier, no AC, DR with no type weakness) and mage armour (lighter, lower ACP, no DR, no arcane spell failure, built for casters) and each of the 5 weights. In exchange, the material grades will drop from 6 to 5, and for copper from 5 to 4.

Armour overhaul:
Armour now provides AC, DR and ER. In exchange, arcane spell failure has been increased and so has the armour check penalty. Helmets have been added (scroll up), and there are now far more types (a total of 40 armours and 5 helmets). Armour now has added to it clothing and assault armour. Clothing is basically light armour with less protection but no proficiency or spell failure. Assault armour is basically heavy armour with more protection but a special proficiency and it limits you to a double move. (It's meant for cavalry.)


Light clothing:
AC: +1
Dex: +9
DR: 0/Critical
ACP: -0
ASF: 0%
Material: Cloth
Weight: 2lb
Cost: 5p

Very light clothing, generally one layer, two in some places. For example, jeans with boxers. In other words, modern clothing. Provides almost no protection and will disintegrate within a year.

Cloth:
AC: +1
Dex: +9
DR: 1/Piercing, critical
ACP: -1
ASF: 0%
Material: Cloth
Weight: 5lbs
Cost: 10p

Thicker, more practical clothing. Each garment is multiple compact layers of fabric woven tightly together to create a durable, protective surface. For example, a doublet. More for scrapes and bruises than knives and bullets, but it's better than nothing.

Heavy cloth:
AC: +2
Dex: +8
DR: 1/Piercing, critical
ACP: -2
ASF: 0%
Material: Cloth
Weight: 10lbs
Cost: 20p

Ordinary cloth, with an extra layer, be it robes or an overcoat. Thick, heavy and very warm, keeps the rain off and prevents bumps and bruises. It still isn't armour, but it's often seen as a passable substitute.

Partial clothing:
AC: +1
Dex: +9
DR: 1/Slashing, critical
ACP: -1
ASF: 0%
Material: Fabric or leather
Weight: 5lbs
Cost: 15p

More fashion than sense, what this attire lacks in coverage, it makes up for in thickness. Short-sleeved and legged, often with sandaled feet and v-necks, this otherwise thick and well built, often indeed layered, clothing leaves much of the limbs and usually a bit of the chest covered by stocking-thick clothing, often indeed totally bare. Example articles for these outfits include tunics, vests and short pants. Very popular in elven territories, where thick short-sleeved tunics are in fashion at the moment, both with stockings and with bare legs and a variety of footware that at least they have the sense to keep low-heeled.

Heavy partial:
AC: +2
Dex: +8
DR: 1/Slashing, critical
ACP: -2
ASF: 0%
Material: Fabric and leather
Weight: 10lbs
Cost: 30p

Yet more proof than fashion can override practicality, heavy partial clothing is a cold weather adjustment to partial clothing only worn with frequency in elven territories. T-shirt thick fabric covers the torse and all fpur limbs in a two-piece set of thermals, over which is worn a heavy leather tunic with boots and gloves It manages to weigh 10lbs, but still leave both limbs exposed. At the very least, it's warm and the fabric is often treated for water resistance.

Leather:
AC: +1
Dex: +9
DR: 1/Bludgeon, critical
ACP: -1
ASF: 0%
Material: Leather
Weight: 5lbs
Cost: 20p

An outfit of solid, full-body leather, at least where it matters. Leather shoes or boots, a leather skirt or trousers, a leather blouse or shirt either long-sleeved or with gloves, and usually a buttoned or solid collar. Leather is reasonably tough to cut or pierce, but it provides no padding and certainly isn't a practical armour as it is.

Heavy leather:
AC: +2
Dex: +8
DR: 1/Bludgeon, critical
ACP: -2
ASF: 0%
Material: Leather
Weight: 10lbs
Cost: 40p

Leather clothing, with more leather. A thick vest, chaps, gloves and high boots is one possibility. A leather coat with some of the above is another, and a very long, heavy leather coat is by far the most common. Very strong and sturdy, this gear is often a poor man's body armour when actual armour is out of the question.

Layered clothing:
AC: +1
Dex: +8
DR: 2/Critical
ACP: -2
ASF: 0%
Material: Cloth and leather
Weight: 15lbs
Cost: 50p

A mixed layering of cloth and leather, clearly somebody's improvised armour. For example, a cloth robe over leather shirt over a cloth undershirt, perhaps with leather pants and thermal underwear, and heavy socks with leather boots. While ultimately a fairly soft outfit that deflects nothing, otherwise it would be unbearably stiff, there's no variety of damage that won't face some resistance. Unless they get you in the head, of course. (Wear a hat.)



Mage leather:
AC: +4
Dex: +6
DR: 0/Critical
ACP: -2
ASF: 0%
Material: Leather and cloth
Weight: 10lbs
Cost: 40p

A terrible armour, often ridiculed by serious warriors for its lack of coverage. Most of the body is wide open or covered by soft clothing, depending on style, getting this gear the nicknames "fanservice armor", "cleavage plate", "armoured lingerie" or "sexual fantasy armour", though only when women wear it, despite men wearing it too for all the same reasons. In terms of protection, it is 100% pure industrial-grade hot garbage. Its proponents often make the claim that it is very light, easy to wear, and provides hard protection with wax-boiled rawhide (or other hard organics) and padding on the areas it does cover, but it simply has too much open space. It does have one major advantage, though, that gives it its name: It does not significantly interfere with the movement or magical energy of arcane casters, the people it was, in fact, designed for. For everybody else, it is without merit.

Short gambeson:
AC: +3
Dex: +7
DR: 2/Piercing, critical
ACP: -3
ASF: 25%
Material: Cloth
Weight: 15lbs
Cost: 60p

A gambeson is a quilted body armour made of layers of soft and hard fabrics, tightly woven. While good at catching cuts and cushioning blows, they aren't terribly effective at stopping stab wounds, and this particular gambeson is quite short, has an open collar and leaves the legs protected only by thick pants. Worn with short boots and no gloves. A favorite for militia musketeers.

Gambeson:
AC: +4
Dex: +6
DR: 2/Piercing, Critical
ACP: -4
ASF: 30%
Material: Cloth
Weight: 20lbs
Cost: 80p

A standard gambeson, reaching the knees and having a higher collar. Worn with taller boots and gloves. A favorite for militia archers.

Light vest armour:
AC: +3
Dex: +7
DR: 2/Slashing, critical
ACP: -3
ASF: 25%
Material: Cloth and leather
Weight: 15lbs
Cost: 90p

A thick vest made of tough, densely-woven textile, with a hard organic (likely cuir bouilli) plate inside to cover the chest and upper back. The armour is designed for a singular purpose, concentrating protection on the torso to defeat projectiles. It is worn over soft, ordinary clothing, a soft doublet being the most common choice to provide a little padding to an armour otherwise without any. Common armour for security and law enforcement in Boreas.

Vest armour:
AC: +4
Dex: +6
DR: 2/Slashing, critical
ACP: -4
ASF: 30%
Material: Cloth and metal
Weight: 20lbs
Cost: £1.20

A heavier vest, with a metal plate contained within for superior protection. Common armour for more serious security and law enforcement in Boreas.

Small scale lamellar:
AC: +3
Dex: +7
DR: 2/Bludgeon, critical
ACP: -3
ASF: 25%
Material: Metal and leather
Weight: 15lbs
Cost: £1.20

A light armour made of tiny pieces of metal and stitched together with metal, often in overlapping layers and worn over metal clothing. Extra pieces are often worn to shield the shoulders, forearms and shins. Provides no padding, but is hard and good at stopping projectiles. Very common armour in Sohei.

Large scale lamellar:
AC: +4
Dex: +6
DR: 2/Bludgeon, critical
ACP: -4
ASF: 30%
Material: Metal
Weight: 20lbs
Cost: £1.60

A thicker armour of larger metal scales over an extra leather backing, with additional armour pieces on the joints. Overall tougher, but more joint protection means more restriction.

Byrnie:
AC: +2
Dex: +6
DR: 2/Critical
ACP: -4
ASF: 30%
Material: Metal, cloth and leather
Weight: 25lbs
Cost: £2

A long-sleeved shirt of mail. Worn over a soft doublet with leather chaps, thick pants and tall leather boots. Has no easily exploitable weaknesses, being tough to cut, bludgeon and puncture, but it isn't good at deflecting attacks and weapons with the power to reliably punch through it, such as muskets, prevent it from being a popular military armour.



Mage plate:
AC: +6
Dex: +4
DR: 0/Critical
ACP: -3
ASF: 0%
Material: Metal and cloth
Weight: 20lbs
Cost: £1.20

A heavier version of the spellcaster's favourite violation of common sense, mage plate is made with metal instead of organic material, and has thicker padding. Unfortunately, this is enough to double its weight and increases the restriction, in the legs in particular, but it is at least more protective and it still does not interfere with magic.

Long gambeson:
AC: +5
Dex: +5
DR: 3/Piercing, critical
ACP: -5
ASF: 40%
Material: Cloth
Weight: 30lbs
Cost: £2

A large gambeson worn as a coat over regular clothing and padded trousers not entirely dissimilar from the gambeson itself. Reaches clear down to the ankles. Popular for militia regulars.

Reinforced gambeson:
AC: +6
Dex: +4
DR: 3/Piercing, critical
ACP: -6
ASF: 45%
Material: Cloth and leather
Weight: 35lbs
Cost: £2.40

A long gambeson worn with leather joint protection, thick gloves and tall boots. Militia pikemen used to use the stuff a lot, now it's really only common for adventurers.

Breastplate:
AC: +5
Dex: +5
DR: 3/Slashing
ACP: -5
ASF: 40%
Material: Metal and cloth
Weight: 30lbs
Cost: £3

All-metal torso protection, greaves and bracers, over a thick, softly padded outfit. A solid bullet stopper and the go-to for regular infantry.

Cuirass:
AC: +6
Dex: +6
DR: 3/Slashing
ACP: -6
ASF: 45%
Material: Metal and cloth
Weight: 35lbs
Cost: £3.60

A breastplate with a pronounced chest and faulds. The go-to for light and medium cavalry.

Banded lamellar:
AC: +5
Dex: +5
DR: 3/Bludgeon
ACP: -5
ASF: 40%
Material: Metal and leather
Weight: 30lbs
Cost: £4

Brigandine:
AC: +6
Dex: +4
DR: 3/Bludgeon
ACP: -6
ASF: 45%
Material: Metal and leather
Weight: 35lbs
Cost: £4.80

A vest of metal plates riveted between two sheets of leather, worn over a byrnie and a leather buff coat. Below, leather chaps and trousers are complimented by cuir boilli or other organic knee pads, codpiece and tall boots, and the hands have heavy gloves. Standard body armour for mercenary infantry.

Hauberk:
AC: +3
Dex: +4
DR: 3/Critical
ACP: -6
ASF: 45%
Material: Metal and cloth
Weight: 40lbs
Cost: £6

A full suit of mail, long-sleeved with hand protection, complete with mail leggings. Worn over soft padding for maximum protection. Excellent at trouncing smaller weapons, but its poor deflection makes it vulnerable to hard-hitters like muskets. A very common historical armour, rarely used today except by adventuring parties and primitives.



Heavy mage plate:
AC: +8
Dex: +2
DR: 0/Critical
ACP: -4
ASF: 0%
Material: Metal and cloth
Weight: 30lbs
Cost: £3.20

The most popular idiosymcratic protection for mages, worn by more sorcadins and fizards than you can shake a stick at. Basically "The same, but more!" to the medium mage plate, but with more complete chest protection and far more coverage on the legs, it works far better. Unfortunately, it's where this train of thought found its peak. Heavier mage plate exists, it's just really dumb.

Heavy gambeson:
AC: +7
Dex: +3
DR: 4/Piercing, critical
ACP: -7
ASF: 55%
Material: Cloth and leather
Weight: 45lbs
Cost: £5.60

A reinforced gambeson that is heavier. Not everything has to be complicated.

Plated gambeson:
AC: +8
Dex: +2
DR: 4/Piercing, critical
ACP: -8
ASF: 60%
Material: Cloth and metal
Weight: 50lbs
Cost: £6.40

More militia up-armouring, this heavy gambeson has had its hard leather joint protection replaced with metal. If they were just issued better armour to start with, this set would not exist.

Heavy vest:
AC: +7
Dex: +3
DR: 4/Slashing, critical
ACP: -7
ASF: 55%
Material: Cloth and metal
Weight: 45lbs
Cost: £8.40

Remember vest armour? This is the dire half-dragon version of that. Extra heavy and extra thick, extended to cover the pelvis with inches of fabric, with knee and elbow pads thrown in. Still not the heaviest vest, believe it or not.

Half plate:
AC: +8
Dex: +2
DR: 4/Slashing, critical
ACP: -8
ASF: 60%
Material: Metal and cloth
Weight: 50lbs
Cost: £9.60

A full set with breastplate, gorget, pauldrons, elbow-length gauntlets, faulds, knee-high greaves, sabatons and an assload of padding. A favourite of the elves for its aesthetic similarities to ancient armours, despite its extreme modernization. It is cheaper, lighter and thicker than full plate, and thus performs better against bullets and bludgeons, but the large openings (especially on the arms) for a blade to slip in and cut through padding are an issue.

Heavy brigandine:
AC: +7
Dex: +3
DR: 4/Bludgeon, critical
ACP: -7
ASF: 55%
Material: Metal and leather
Weight: 45lbs
Cost: £11.20

Excellent heavy armour, this brigandine is worn over a hauberk, with mail leggings replacing its leather chaps and gauntlets on its hands. Otherwise, it is unchanged. And in practice, let's just say there's a reason it is the #1 heavy armour for mercenaries.

Plated brigandine:
AC: +8
Dex: +2
DR: 4/Bludgeon, critical
ACP: -8
ASF: 60%
Material: Metal and leather
Weight: 50lbs
Cost: £12.80

A heavy brigandine with plate replacing all of its remaining leather. Common for mercenary officers, due to its almost unprecedented ability to stop blades and bullets.

Full plate:
AC: +4
Dex: +2
DR: 4/Critical
ACP: -8
ASF: 60%
Material: Metal and cloth
Weight: 55lbs
Cost: £16

Thin metal plating covering as much of the body as possible, over either a full hauberk with padding or just padding with mail where the plates don't cover (the latter allowing thicker plate, padding or both). While the metal is rather thin and much of the body is only protected by penetrable mail, the resistance posed by good quality full plate is extreme and with a helmet many enemies simply won't be able to hurt you at all. The problem is in the vulnerability to stronger weapons striking its mail, the gauntlets, or other more vulnerable areas, and some weapons may occasionally just penetrate lower-quality plate.



Mage assault plate:
AC: +10
Dex: +0
DR: 0/Critical
ACP: -5
ASF: 0%
Material: Metal and cloth
Weight: 40lbs
Cost: £8

Heavy mage plate with even more metal, now to the point of requiring special training to wear and restricting the legs too much. "Who cares, those aren't used in somatic components!", say the mages who buy it. Until they need to run. Mounted mages have a call for it, but they are rare for good reasons and everybody else is a fool.

Tournament padding:
AC: +9
Dex: +1
DR: 5/Piercing, critical
ACP: -9
ASF: 70%
Material: Cloth and metal
Weight: 60lbs
Cost: £14.40

A jousting armour for low-level tourneys, extremely heavily padded with a full metal left arm and jousting shield, extra metal across the right arm, pelvis and legs. Built to tank a jousting lance, but not as good for high-level tournaments, especially not as good for real battle, and mostly a cost saver.

Riot padding:
AC: +10
Dex: +0
DR: 5/Piercing, critical
ACP: -10
ASF: 75%
Material: Cloth and metal
Weight: 65lbs
Cost: £16

Gnomtaller riot armour is heavily padded with a lot of metal for the neck, shoulders, arms, pelvis and legs. Very heavy, and used with a tower shield and a helmet by riot police to allow them to withstand barrages of bricks, bottles and occasionally incendiary devices without serious risk of injury. Not effective against firearms, but that's fixed by the shield and helmet. It is also the only assault armour not designed for use on horseback.

Assault vest:
AC: +9
Dex: +1
DR: 5/Slashing, critical
ACP: -9
ASF: 70%
Material: Cloth and metal
Weight: 60lbs
Cost: £21.60

The heaviest vest armour around, a mainstay of the Gnomtaller armed forces. Thicker fabric protection is extended not just to the neck and pelvis, but to the shoulders and hips. Thicker knee and elbow guards, as well as heavier padding and upper arm protection, make this very heavy armour extremely effective against projectiles and blunt trauma.

Assault plate:
AC: +10
Dex: +0
DR: 5/Slashing, critical
ACP: -10
ASF: 75%
Material: Metal and cloth
Weight: 65lbs
Cost: £24

The extra heavy shock cavalry version of half plate, assault plate has smaller weak spots and a pronounced chest for better bullet deflection. This armour is the result of elves declaring that their half plate was the heaviest practical half plate design, and the dwarves accepting their challenge.

Cataphract armor:
AC: +9
Dex: +1
DR: 5/Bludgeon, critical
ACP: -9
ASF: 70%
Material: Metal and leather
Weight: 60lbs
Cost: £28.80

Banded lamellar for the torso, much of the arms and legs and the neck. A solid codpiece as well. All of this over a full hauberk and leather. Comes with riding boots and gauntlets. Damn near impenetrable, but provides no padding.

Assault brigandine:
AC: +10
Dex: +0
DR: 5/Bludgeon, critical
ACP: -10
ASF: 75%
Material: Metal and leather
Weight: 65lbs
Cost: £32

The ultimate in mercenary armour, the assault brigandine covers the arms and legs in plate armour. 15lbs in total weight is added, but the resultant armour is the strongest a brigandine will ever get.

Tournament armor:
AC: +5
Dex: +0
DR: 5/Critical
ACP: -10
ASF: 75%
Material: Metal and cloth
Weight: 70lbs
Cost: £40

Tournament armour is the heaviest armour built for actual use. Designed for high-level jousting tournaments with weapons that look real (they aren't, but they are less safe), and quite usable in battle for shock cavalry alone, this armour's weight is obscene and it is nearly impenetrable if made if good steel.


Materials are below, stats coming soon.


Standard

Grade 1: Tattered, 1x DR, 1x HP, 1x cost
This is more hole than fabric.

Grade 2: Cotton, 2x DR, 2x HP, 10x cost
Soft, weak and cheap. Discount clothing, basically.

Grade 3: Linen, 3x DR, 3x HP, 100x cost
Strong and dependable. Good protection, high quality.

Grade 4: Silk, 4x DR, 4x HP, 1,000x cost
The finest, strongest, most pretentious silk.

Grade 5: Cosmic fabric, 5x DR, 5x HP, 10,000x cost
The strongest known fabric. Synthetic. Origins uncertain.



Standard

Grade 1: Ragged, 1x DR, 1x HP, 1x cost
This leather has taken such a beating you'd think the animal could feel it in the grave.

Grade 2: Leather, 2x DR, 2x HP, 10x cost
Skin from an animal. Probably a cow.

Grade 3: Reptile skin, 3x DR, 3x HP, 100x cost
Skin from a reptile, probably a snake. Scutes and shells are also common.

Grade 4: Chitin, 4x DR, 4x HP, 1,000x cost
Somebody killed a big arthropod and took its exoskeleton. Enjoy.

Grade 5: Cosmic synthetic, 5x DR, 5x HP, 10,000x cost
Several synthetic materials of great resilience.

Wood: Cannot be repaired except by magic.

Grade 1: Paper, 1x DR, 1x HP, 1x cost
A major component of hot garbage.

Grade 2: Wood, 2x DR, 2x HP, 10x cost
Yew, yes yew, stand still laddie.

Grade 3: Hardwood, 2x DR, 3x HP, 100x cost
Ebony and ivory...

Grade 4: Ironwood, 3x DR, 4x HP, 1,000x cost
Wood enchanted with the ironwood spell.



Standard

Grade 1: Scrap, 1x DR, 1x HP, 1x cost
Probably made from household objects. Found at the city dump.

Grade 2: Iron, 2x DR, 2x HP, 10x cost
Wrought iron, cast iron or low steel. Discount armour.

Grade 3: Steel, 3x DR, 3x HP, 100x cost
High-carbon steel, hardened, military standard.

Grade 4: Royal steel, 4x DR, 4x HP, 1,000x cost
The best quality steel anybody knows how to make.

Grade 5: Cosmic steel, 5x DR, 5x HP, 10,000x cost
The best quality steel nobody knows how to make.

Cuprous, immune to rust and metal-targeting magic.

Grade 2: Copper, 1x DR, 1x HP, 10x cost
Regular old copper, solid green patina. Get the polish.

Grade 3: Bronze, 2x DR, 2x HP, 100x cost
Standard metal for humid environments.

Grade 4: Jungle bronze, 3x DR, 3x HP, 1,000x cost
Lizardfolk makes this for their elite warriors.

Grade 5: Cosmic bronze, 4x DR, 4x HP, 10,000x cost
Somebody makes bronze as strong as OUR best steel.

Stone, cannot be repaired except by magic, druid friendly
Grade 2: Stone, 3x DR, 1x HP, 10x cost
(Obsidian fills this spot for weapons, but making obsidian armour is a TERRIBLE idea.)

Wood: Cannot be repaired except by magic. Druid friendly.
Grade 1: Paper, 1x DR, 1x HP, 1x cost
A major component of hot garbage.

Grade 2: Wood, 2x DR, 2x HP, 10x cost
Yew, yes yew, stand still laddie.

Grade 3: Hardwood, 2x DR, 3x HP, 100x cost
Ebony and ivory...

Grade 4: Ironwood, 3x DR, 4x HP, 1,000x cost
Wood enchanted with the ironwood spell.


Mixed materials are always of matched grade. For example, the lowest quality breastplate would be "scrap and tattered", meaning that the breastplate is rusty scrap metal, the doublet is tattered. It may also be referred to as just "scrap" for short, following this assumption. Is it totally realistic for it all to be in the same state of disrepair? No, but it makes the rules simpler. Just like it's also entirely possible realistically to put a cosmic steel byrnie over a simple cotton doublet and plain leather pants, but it would be too complicated in the rules, so you must have all cosmic or no cosmic at all.