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View Full Version : D&D 5e/Next [5e] Wizard, Arcane Tradition: School of Embers



GramPositive
2018-06-13, 05:10 AM
Hello everybody

I wanted to create a (good) blasting type wizard but it didn't really like the Evocation subclass. My GM announced that he is cool with UA and homebrew stuff if he could have a look at it first. So I thought I would try to create a cool one :smallbiggrin:
I was inspired by Warhammer: Vermintide 2's Sienna and thought that the heat mechanic might be a cool thing to try to include.
This is the first draft and numbers are not fix yet. I included some of my thoughts in spoiler tags.
This is the first subclass that I tried to design and I really would appreciate some feedback! :smallsmile:

Edit: 17.06.2018 Updated version

School of Embers:

Burning blood (2nd lvl)

Beginning when you select this school at 2nd level, you gain resistance to fire damage.
Additionally, you may use any adjacent open flame as arcane spell focus.

One with the Flame (2nd lvl)

Beginning at 2nd level, when you cast a spell that deals fire damage, you channel the flames through your body to produce Heat within yourself equal to the spells level. Cantrips produce 1 point of Heat.

Based on your Heat level, your fire damage dealing spells have additional effects:



Heat level
Bonus effect


2-4
If the spell deals area of effect damage you may choose a number of creatures up to Intelligence modifier to take no damage from that spell.


5-10
You add your Intelligence modifier to one damage roll of the spell.


11+
If the spell involves an attack roll, you make that roll with advantage and if the spell forces a saving throw, that saving throw is made with disadvantage.




Your body can comfortably suffer Heat equal to the sum of your Intelligence and Constitution modifiers.
Every point of Heat above your body's heat limit is called Overheat. If you have any Overheat you take fire damage each time you cast a spell equal to 1d6 per point Overheat. The damage you take as part of this feature ignores resistance and immunity but does not require you to make a Constitution saving throw to maintain your concentration.

You automatically lose all Heat and Overheat during a short or long rest.

Searing Conflagration (6th lvl)

Starting at 6th level, fire damage from your spells ignores fire resistance and deals half damage to creatures with fire immunity. You need at least 1 point of Heat to benefit from this feature.

Ignite (10th lvl)

Beginning at 10th level, you may use a bonus action to deal fire damage equal to your current Heat to creatures within 30ft that have taken fire damage this turn. This consumes half of your Heat.
Once you use this feature, you canít use it again until you finish a short or long rest.

Phoenix Fire (14th lvl)

Starting at 14th level, when you are reduced to 0 hit points, your body turns immediately into ash. All Heat generated before death is consumed and deals 1d4 fire damage per Heat to all creatures in a 10ft radius.
At the beginning of your next turn, you rise from the ashes. You return to life at 1 hit point plus 1d4 additional health per Heat previously consumed. Once this feature is used you can't use it again until you finish a long rest.

Composer99
2018-06-13, 10:18 AM
I'm going to look at features in reverse order by level.

Phoenix Fire is fine apart from nitpicks. Presumably the effect deals fire damage? Also, your rise from the ashes part should probably specify that it happens at the start or end of your next turn, instead of the nebulous "1 round later".

If I recall correctly, most bonus damage effects for spells apply to one creature on each of your turns, so I would say that Ignite should do the same, or it would be overpowered. I would remove the clause that the spell has to generate heat to proc the extra damage: just being a spell that does fire damage should be enough. Nitpick: you should tie the effect to fire damage inflicted by spells, rather than to "fire spells".

Searing Conflagration has the same nitpick as Ignite. I would say that you could just have fire damage from your spells treat fire immunity as if it were resistance, and ignore resistance, as long as you have at least 1 point of heat. That's a simple mechanic that ties the feature to the heat mechanic, while also remaining distinct from the feat.

As for the 2nd level features, most wizard subclasses offer one minor thematic "ribbon" feature at 2nd level along with the principal subclass-defining feature. The bladesinger gives some proficiencies, and the war mage a bonus to initiative rolls, but those still aren't that hefty. All that's to say that you're giving out way too much at 2nd level. Either give Seething Embers or One with the Flame, and since One with the Flame has the heat mechanic that other features use down the road, you can ditch Seething Embers. (It's probably overpowered, anyway.)

In it's place, I'd suggest giving resistance to fire damage, becoming immunity at, say, 10th level.

As for One with the Flame, it is an interesting feature. It could do with some toning down. Let's break it down.

First off, I think all the effects should trigger on having heat, rather than triggering when you accumulate it. Each effect can require a different amount of accumulated heat.

As for storing heat, I would say that you are able to store too much heat. With a typical 1st-level build, you can store 7 heat without overheating (2 for proficiency bonus, 2 for Constitution, 3 for Intelligence).

The overheat mechanic is annoying to track and could be horribly lethal late in an adventuring day if you're out of Hit Dice and the party healers are out of resources.

Because you choose to accumulate heat (or not), there's no way to overheat, really. There's also no incentive to accumulate more than 4 heat the way you have written the feature, except for inflicting some extra fire damage when you do your phoenix thing at 14th level. If you want players to build up heat and live dangerously, there needs to be a reason to do so. You either need effects that scale with the amount of heat you have, or effects that require expending accumulated heat, or both. Also, I would make accumulating heat non-optional.

On to the effects themselves:

Guided Inferno is fine as long as you have at least 1 heat.

Blazing Fire is way too powerful. Getting a free upcast every time you cast a spell that deals fire damage, even if you don't have those spell slots yet? It's too much. I would think you need more heat to upcast higher-level spells, and a limit on how often you can use this feature on top of that. I would also not allow upcasting beyond 5th-level spells.

Irresistible Flames should affect one die roll on each of your turns.

Stoke the Embers is just too much. I would modify it so that when you use your Arcane Recovery feature, you recover one extra level worth of spell slots for every 4 heat you possess, or spend heat to recover slots during Arcane Recovery, or something like that.

Hope that all helps.

GramPositive
2018-06-14, 08:58 AM
So first, thanks for the feedback.

You have some valid points. I changed a few things you mentioned.

Some points I would like to argue: :smalltongue:


If I recall correctly, most bonus damage effects for spells apply to one creature on each of your turns, so I would say that Ignite should do the same, or it would be overpowered. I would remove the clause that the spell has to generate heat to proc the extra damage: just being a spell that does fire damage should be enough. Nitpick: you should tie the effect to fire damage inflicted by spells, rather than to "fire spells".

So I was basically comparing this to the Evokers 10th lvl feature where he gains his INT mod to the damage of all evocation spells. I am under the impression that most people don't think this is a strong bonus at that level. I wanted to give it a bit more power than that. I was also a bit inspired by the 10th lvl ability from the Circle of Spores druid, where he can use a bonus action to spread his spores in a 10ft cube (up to 30ft away) and then deal 9 or 18 dmg (if in "spore shape") to all creatures inside.
However, I also redesigned this feature anyway (see below).


As for the 2nd level features, most wizard subclasses offer one minor thematic "ribbon" feature at 2nd level along with the principal subclass-defining feature. The bladesinger gives some proficiencies, and the war mage a bonus to initiative rolls, but those still aren't that hefty. All that's to say that you're giving out way too much at 2nd level. Either give Seething Embers or One with the Flame, and since One with the Flame has the heat mechanic that other features use down the road, you can ditch Seething Embers. (It's probably overpowered, anyway.)

In it's place, I'd suggest giving resistance to fire damage, becoming immunity at, say, 10th level.

I think I agree that giving both features at lvl 2 is probably too much. I disagree however that the Initative bonus of the War Mage could be called a "ribbon" ability. I actually think it's one the best features of the entire subclass. In a game where a combat takes 3 rounds on average, the ability to strike frist is very strong and adding your INT mod to initative is quite the bonus.
However, I think your suggestions would be a good thematic replacement. Would you add anything special if the character already had fire resistance?


As for One with the Flame, it is an interesting feature. It could do with some toning down. Let's break it down.

First off, I think all the effects should trigger on having heat, rather than triggering when you accumulate it. Each effect can require a different amount of accumulated heat.

As for storing heat, I would say that you are able to store too much heat. With a typical 1st-level build, you can store 7 heat without overheating (2 for proficiency bonus, 2 for Constitution, 3 for Intelligence).

The overheat mechanic is annoying to track and could be horribly lethal late in an adventuring day if you're out of Hit Dice and the party healers are out of resources.

Because you choose to accumulate heat (or not), there's no way to overheat, really. There's also no incentive to accumulate more than 4 heat the way you have written the feature, except for inflicting some extra fire damage when you do your phoenix thing at 14th level. If you want players to build up heat and live dangerously, there needs to be a reason to do so. You either need effects that scale with the amount of heat you have, or effects that require expending accumulated heat, or both. Also, I would make accumulating heat non-optional.


I think a lot of what you said makes sense here. I revamped the feature to be non-optional heat generation and give actual incentive to go into Overheat.

I put the changed version in the spoiler tags:
School of Embers:

Burning blood (2nd lvl)

Beginning when you select this school at 2nd level, you gain resistance to fire damage, which turns to fire immunity at the 10th level.
Additionally you may use any adjacent open flame as arcane spell focus.

One with the Flame (2nd lvl)

Beginning at 2nd level, when you cast a spell that deals fire damage, you channel the flames through your body to produce Heat within yourself equal to the spells level. Cantrips produce 1 point of Heat.

Based on your Heat level, your spell produce additional effects:



Heat level
Bonus effect


2-4
If the spell deals area of effect damage you may choose a number of creatures up to Intelligence modifier to take no damage from that spell.


5-10
You add your Intelligence modifier to one damage roll.


11+
If the spell involves an attack roll, you make that roll with advantage and if the spell forces a saving throw, that saving throw is made with disadvantage.




Your body can comfortably suffer Heat equal to the sum of your Intelligence and Constitution modifiers.
Every point of Heat above your body's heat limit is called Overheat. If you have any Overheat you take damage each time you cast a spell equal to 1d6 per point Overheat. The damage you take as part of this feature ignores resistance and immunity but does not require you to make a Constitution saving throw to maintain your concentration.

You automatically lose all Heat and Overheat during a short or long rest.

Searing Conflagration (6th lvl)

Starting at 6th level, fire damage from your spells ignores fire resistance and deals half damage to creatures with fire immunity. You need at least 1 point of Heat to benefit from this feature.

Ignite (10th lvl)

Beginning at 10th level, you may use a bonus action to deal fire damage equal to your current Heat to creatures within 30ft that have taken fire damage this turn. This consumes half of your Heat.
Once you use this feature, you canít use it again until you finish a short or long rest.

Phoenix Fire (14th lvl)

Starting at 14th level, when you are reduced to 0 hit points, your body turns immediately into ash. All Heat generated before death is consumed and deals 1d4 per Heat to all creatures in a 10ft radius.
At the beginning of your next turn, you rise from the ashes. You return to life at 1 hit point plus 1d4 additional health per Heat previously consumed. Once this feature is used you can't use it again until you finish a long rest.


What do you think? :smallbiggrin:

Composer99
2018-06-14, 07:05 PM
So first, thanks for the feedback.

You have some valid points. I changed a few things you mentioned.

Some points I would like to argue: :smalltongue:

[...]


I put the changed version in the spoiler tags:
School of Embers:

Burning blood (2nd lvl)

Beginning when you select this school at 2nd level, you gain resistance to fire damage, which turns to fire immunity at the 10th level.
Additionally you may use any adjacent open flame as arcane spell focus.

One with the Flame (2nd lvl)

Beginning at 2nd level, when you cast a spell that deals fire damage, you channel the flames through your body to produce Heat within yourself equal to the spells level. Cantrips produce 1 point of Heat.

Based on your Heat level, your spell produce additional effects:



Heat level
Bonus effect


2-4
If the spell deals area of effect damage you may choose a number of creatures up to Intelligence modifier to take no damage from that spell.


5-10
You add your Intelligence modifier to one damage roll.


11+
If the spell involves an attack roll, you make that roll with advantage and if the spell forces a saving throw, that saving throw is made with disadvantage.




Your body can comfortably suffer Heat equal to the sum of your Intelligence and Constitution modifiers.
Every point of Heat above your body's heat limit is called Overheat. If you have any Overheat you take damage each time you cast a spell equal to 1d6 per point Overheat. The damage you take as part of this feature ignores resistance and immunity but does not require you to make a Constitution saving throw to maintain your concentration.

You automatically lose all Heat and Overheat during a short or long rest.

Searing Conflagration (6th lvl)

Starting at 6th level, fire damage from your spells ignores fire resistance and deals half damage to creatures with fire immunity. You need at least 1 point of Heat to benefit from this feature.

Ignite (10th lvl)

Beginning at 10th level, you may use a bonus action to deal fire damage equal to your current Heat to creatures within 30ft that have taken fire damage this turn. This consumes half of your Heat.
Once you use this feature, you canít use it again until you finish a short or long rest.

Phoenix Fire (14th lvl)

Starting at 14th level, when you are reduced to 0 hit points, your body turns immediately into ash. All Heat generated before death is consumed and deals 1d4 per Heat to all creatures in a 10ft radius.
At the beginning of your next turn, you rise from the ashes. You return to life at 1 hit point plus 1d4 additional health per Heat previously consumed. Once this feature is used you can't use it again until you finish a long rest.


What do you think? :smallbiggrin:

Looks good, to me at least.

I daresay you could make the following edits:
(1) To which damage roll do you add your Intelligence modifier? A spell that does fire damage? Any spell that does damage? A weapon attack? Any of those things? (That's probably appropriate when you have fiery power coursing through your body.)
(2) What kind of damage does overheat deal? Necrotic, ŗ la Overchannel? Or fire damage, because heat?
(3) Phoenix Fire, presumably, will do fire damage to creatures in the area of effect, yes?

Sariel Vailo
2018-06-17, 05:26 AM
So could you put the new version up in place of the original. Im verry intrested to play a thematic elementally inclined wizard.(even if its fire, go go ice)

GramPositive
2018-06-17, 09:30 AM
Looks good, to me at least.

I daresay you could make the following edits:
(1) To which damage roll do you add your Intelligence modifier? A spell that does fire damage? Any spell that does damage? A weapon attack? Any of those things? (That's probably appropriate when you have fiery power coursing through your body.)
(2) What kind of damage does overheat deal? Necrotic, ŗ la Overchannel? Or fire damage, because heat?
(3) Phoenix Fire, presumably, will do fire damage to creatures in the area of effect, yes?

Thanks for pointing those out! :D


So could you put the new version up in place of the original. Im verry intrested to play a thematic elementally inclined wizard.(even if its fire, go go ice)

Done :D