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username1
2019-01-23, 05:28 PM
For all the years of have played dnd I have never been a player, just dm. And now I finally will be getting a chance to be a PC. However Iím very worried. Iíve played many one shots and such, but I always have a problem with my character. I always do something stupid with the character that I know I shouldnít do, and I tell myself itís because Iím only using them for one session. I really worried Iím going to do something stupid with a character I care about, running other players games.

Man_Over_Game
2019-01-23, 06:55 PM
For all the years of have played dnd I have never been a player, just dm. And now I finally will be getting a chance to be a PC. However Iím very worried. Iíve played many one shots and such, but I always have a problem with my character. I always do something stupid with the character that I know I shouldnít do, and I tell myself itís because Iím only using them for one session. I really worried Iím going to do something stupid with a character I care about, running other players games.

Talk to your DM about the possibility of retraining your levels.
Plan the next couple levels in advance, just to see if it meets your expectations.
Characters may retire, but players don't. If it dies or does something that excludes it from the adventures, you can just roll up a new one.


The most important thing is, though, is to determine what it is you have fun doing, and do it. If you like providing in social/RP environments, don't play a Barbarian. If you want to be the strongest guy in the room, don't play a Wizard.

mucat
2019-01-25, 12:36 AM
Are you worried about doing something tactically stupid, or that you'll cause a roleplay fiasco that disrupts the story for everyone?

In the former case, don't sweat it. Do your best to pull your weight, but if you make mistakes and take them in stride, they become a memorable part of the story, and the game is all the better for it.

In the latter case...well, any useful answer depends on exactly how you're worried that things might go wrong. In all cases, though, communication goes a long way. Tell the other players and DM in advance, "I'm worried that my character could end up disrupting things in such-and-such a way. Please let me know if it starts to look like a problem?" And keep that conversation going as the game advances.

One of my favorite characters of all time came with a permanent caveat: It's clear that if things go wrong in a specific way, this guy could become a villain. If that happens, we'll make him a temporary or permanent NPC, and I'll step into some other character. It never did happen -- the good (or, arguably, not all that good) Doktor managed to earn a surprisingly heartwarming ending -- but I felt better knowing that we had addressed the possibility in advance, and the other players knew that I cared more about the game as a whole than about "playing my guy."

Mada
2019-01-25, 01:15 AM
The only way you can ruin a game for anyone without being interrupted is by being a "That guy" at the table.
So step one is don't be "That guy".

The only other real foreseeable problem I can imagine is you've been separated from the party and suddenly you've made this huge decision that effects the entire world.

If your friends are invested enough, they'll roleplay in character that they don't want you to do whatever you're about to do that would ruin it for them.

Otherwise, small player-made hurdles can lead to great side-quests, epic campaigns and great stories to laugh about later down the line.

Don't sweat it.

Particle_Man
2019-01-25, 01:42 AM
One issue some DMs I know have is that they spend so much time organizing a world/setting/campaign (lawful behaviour) and being City Guard like foils for those wild and crazy and unpredictable PCs that when it is their turn to be a PC they are like a kid set free in a sandbox. So yeah, you may need to figure out the boundary between having fun and wrecking others' fun. But the above posters have ways and you seem to be mindful of it. If all else fails, treat your character as if they were an Important (to the plot) NPC that you were as DM hoping to keep around for a long time. Maybe that will crossover to you as PC.

Jama7301
2019-01-25, 11:49 AM
I feel like the fact that you've made a distinction between one shot behavior helps. You're aware that this game isn't a one-shot, so you already know that this is a character you need to play longer. That itself might help tamp down some of the wild impulses. That awareness is what I feel is helpful here, and a helpful building block.