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Callos_DeTerran
2007-10-11, 08:32 PM
Big Picture: http://fc02.deviantart.com/fs4/i/2004/226/c/1/Tranquil_Aztec_Lagoon_Temple_.jpg

In the time before times there was only the darkness of the mortal world and the divine light of the god's realms. Bright and shining utopias that graciously bestowed their grace of light upon the barren dark husk that was our mortal realm. It was in these places that the gods conducted themselves beyond the grasping reaches of the underworld and the dark denizens living in depravity and debauchery beyond the scope of what we have seen in our age. There the great spirits Quetzalcoatl the just, Tezcatlipoca the dark, Chalchihuitlicue the beautiful, Tlaloc the ever-weeping, Tonatiuh the clever, Xipetotec the generous, and Cihuacoatl the wary dwelt with each other and the lesser spirits of the multiverse, basking in their own perfection and wholeness. But the warmth of their light touched upon the blemished land that no spirit saw fit to grace and coaxed from it's dry soil the first living thing not created by the gods themselves.

When this being was found all of the Great Spirits gathered around a raging bonfire to discuss this unheard of event, Tezcatlipoca and Tonatiuh urging it's destruction before it's impurity could stain them all, but Quetzalcoatl stayed their wrathful hands and visited this creature, the first man. A man named Huitzilopochtli who cowered before the Feathered Serpent, mightiest of the spirits, but then rose bravely to defend himself. Impressed by the mortal's audacity and courage Quetzacoatl conspired with his brother Tezcatlipoca to give this mortal a realm of his own. And to this end the brothers tricked Cihuacoatl and cast her down unto the barren earth with a clever ploy, and when she fell a great bounty sprung up all across the land. A verdant paradise that offered a menagerie of creatures and plants to reward Huitzilopochtli for his bravery in the face of the Feathered Serpent. Among the many new creatures the man discovered more like himself, new humans with which to populate the world and to live with as the spirits lived.

All was not well though and some among the spirits grew jealous of the gifts given to such undeserving creatures and plotted against the insolent beings who had stolen the Great Spirits away from, but soon one of them noticed the disquiet. Tonatiuh, who held no great love for the humans, saw the disquiet among the spirits he favored and felt a sorrow overtake him. To placate his favored, Tonatiuh closed off the various spirit worlds from the humans and stole among them in the ever present dusk of the world. He stole away all of the food and water and took it away with him back to his realm, leaving Huitzilopochtli and his brethren starving and lacking for the precious water that helped all things grow. Soon the others discovered this treachery and in their wrath cast Tonatiuh from his golden realm, knocking him down to the shadows and darkness of the Underworld to fester in the pits there. They despaired when they could not find the food their brother had stolen and wailed their laments to the fallen Great Spirit in hopes of convincing him to relent. Twisted and corrupted Tonatiuh agreed to aid the mortals as long as he could return to his palace and once there told the others of his ploy. One of them would always need to light the world of Huitzilopochtli's children and family, battling through the underworld every night to rise again the next day, and in return Tonatiuh agreed to give out food enough to the men as long as they swore to honor and venerate the spirits always.

Soon after Quetzalcoatl went to Huitzilopochtli and guided him to a great mountain with a wide and clear lake around it's base, telling him how to craft stone and wood to make shelter for other men. All of the spirits watched in wonder as men created the first city of mortals and upon it's completion Huitzilopochtli rose from his humble shell to become a Great Spirit himself, a protector and guide of the people...the people of AztlŠn

-"Dawning of Man and the First Age"
Fragment from the Codex AztlŠn


Cipactli, a place where the beautiful and the savage walk side by side, if they are not entwined already by their very nature. A great jungle blankets all of the known land beneath the firey sun and Tlaloc's blessed rain falls often and hard to draw forth food from the earth for men across all the altepetl (city-states) and remote tribes. Great beasts stalk through that primordial jungle, a great danger to the unwary, while the creatures of the Underworld ply and pull at the souls and minds of men to pull them away from the great spirits that give them life.

Named for the great monument that lay at the center of the world, AztlŠn is a metropolis were the weak place themselves into the hands of the strong who in turn look to those far beyond mortal keen for life and power. Warring altepetl almost regularly alter the very lands around them in desperate bids for conquest and sacrifices to empower the gods and keep the world in balance. But times of chaos and warfare are drawing to a close as new discoveries shock the people of Cipactli and bring them closer together then ever.

The Fifth Age has lasted for many years now, warm beneath the sun's glare and the rule of Tlatoani (King) Eztli who has united more of the thirteen altepetls under his throne then any other before him with a threatening and unique mixture of spiritual and...un-living support. With fair systems of tribute and trade being establish to the conquered altepetls, more and more of the free reigning city-states contemplate submitting themselves to his rule and ending an era of strife.

New omens have been appearing all over the continent though, promising the return of evils best left forgotten and a new menace to appear from the starry void of black night if the gods are not appeased in time before the fire mountains rain destruction down across the land. Mighty Teoxihuitl, greatest of the free altepetls, girds itself for war and seeks to appease the Great Spirits with nothing less then the kingdom that Tlatoani Eztli has pain-stakingly constructed upon the bodies of thousands of warriors and sacrifices. Eztli on the other hand comforts his people saying that he will protect them from these menaces with his own plans...plans that have done nothing but dispersed his legions to the far corners of his realms and down into the Underworld itself...

_________________________________________________-

Welcome to AztlŠn, a homebrew campaign I'm whipping up mostly for my own amusement and out of boredom. It's open for use by any who want to just lemme know so I can bask in the glow of at least someone using it. :smallwink: And more importantly it's open to add into. If you want to make up a prestige class, race, feats, equipment, or something to add into the setting then be my guest. I'll carefully look over anything someone submits and give any helpful hints that I can or let you know if it just quite doesn't fit in with my reasons why I don't think it does (I can always be convinced otherwise). Heck theres a whole other four Ages of Man that are completely open to filling (Though there are some events that occur in each)

Coming soon!:
Player Character Base Classes and how they fit in
Races of AztlŠn
Prestige Classes of AztlŠn
Religion on AztlŠn
Society (Very sketchy at the moment)
The Underworld
Monsters

Callos_DeTerran
2007-10-11, 08:35 PM
Index:

Who's done what and what page it's on:
Jaguar Warrior (Prestige Class) (Page 1)

Callos_DeTerran
2007-10-11, 08:38 PM
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/90/Tepeyollotl_1.jpg
Jaguar Warrior
There are few in all of the Cipactli city-states who has not heard of the jaguar warriors of fearsome Tezcatlipoca, mighty warriors with the grace and power of great hunting cats. Tezcatlipoca honors the veneration that these warriors give him, bestowing upon them the ability to take the shape of the very cats that they emulate so freely. Various important temples keep a contingent of these fighters on hand to track down escaped sacrifices or lead war parties against other city-states. It is said that when they fail in battle that Tezcatlipoca himself punishes the warrior and those he protects and fights for...
The only classes that can readily apply for the jaguar warrior prestige class are those with skirmish or animal companions. Usually a pick of rangers and scouts, the rare druid has been none to give up their spellcasting progression to take levels in the class. Sometimes dual-class ranger/scouts enter into this class to optimize the favored hit-and-run style of this brotherhood.
Hit Die: d8

Requirements:
To qualify to become a jaguar warrior, a character must fulfill all of the following criteria.
Gender: Male
Deity: Tezcatlipoca
Base Attack Bonus: +9
Feats: Exotic Weapon Proficiency, Dodge, Mobility
Special: Animal Companion or Skirmish 2d6
Special: Must be initiated in a rite conducted by a priest of Tezcatlipoca involving the sacrifice of a warrior native to an enemy state. (The prospective warrior doesn't need to capture his own sacrifice however...it's merely encouraged.)

Class Skills: The jaguar warrior's class skills (and the key ability for each) are Climb (Str), Handle Animal (Cha), Hide (Dex), Intimidate (Cha), Listen (Wis), Move Silently (Dex), Search (Int), Spot (Wis), Survival (Wis), Swim (Str), and Tumble (Dex).
Skill Points at each level: 4+Int Modifier
{table=head]Level|Base Attack Bonus|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special

1st|
+1|
+0|
+2|
+2|Jaguar Blessing (Lesser Jaguar), Jaguar Form 1/day, Path of the Warrior

2nd|
+2|
+0|
+3|
+3|Skirmish 1d6

3rd|
+3|
+1|
+3|
+3|Scent

4th|
+4|
+1|
+4|
+4|Jaguar Form 2/day, Skirmish 2d6

5th|
+5|
+1|
+4|
+4|Jaguar Blessing (Jaguar)

6th|
+6|
+2|
+5|
+5|Pounce, Skirmish 3d6

7th|
+7|
+2|
+5|
+5|Jaguar Form 3/day

8th|
+8|
+2|
+6|
+6|Skirmish 4d6

9th|
+9|
+3|
+6|
+6|Speed Increase 10 ft.

10th|
+10|
+3|
+7|
+7|Jaguar Blessing (Dire Jaguar), Jaguar Form 4/day, Skirmish 5d6[/table]

Weapon and Armor Proficiency: A jaguar warrior gains no new weapon proficiency. They gain no new armor proficiencies.

Jaguar Blessing (Su): A jaguar warrior may plead to his patron for the ability to defeat his foes, gaining Tezcatlipoca's blessing in the form of a new form to combat his foes with. The only limits on this ability are how many uses of the Jaguar Form ability that the warrior has left. Using Jaguar Blessing is a free action that does provoke an AoO and cannot be used in response to an attack or a spell. In many ways this ability functions as the polymorph spell with a few differences. As normal for polymorph, the jaguar warrior gains the cat form's physical qualities (Including size, movement, natural armor bonus, natural weapons, and space and reach), as wqell as any special attacks possessed by the form (Such as rake). The transformation lasts for 3+(newly improved) Con Modifier rounds.

Unlike with the polymorph spell, the jaguar warrior does not gain the form's physical ability scores when he uses jaguar blessing, nor does he regain any hit points when he changes. However his current hit points increase due to his new Constitution score, much like the rage ability of a barbarian.

Any jaguar warrior can assume the form of a lesser jaguar once per day. While in lesser jaguar form, he gains a +6 bonus to Strength, +8 bonus to Dexterity, and a +4 bonus to Constitution. For determining attack modes, natural armor bonus, etc. use the leopard as the creature changed into.

At 5th level, a jaguar warrior can choose between a lesser jaguar and a jaguar when using jaguar blessing. While in jaguar form, he gains a +12 bonus to Strength, a +4 bonus to Dexterity, and a +6 bonus to Constitution. For determining attack modes, natural armor bonus, etc. use the tiger as the creature turned into.

At 10th level, a jaguar warrior can choose between a lesser jaguar, a jaguar, and a dire jaguar when he uses Jaguar Blessing. While in dire jaguar form, he gains a +16 bonus to Strength, a +4 bonus to Dexterity, and a +6 bonus to Constitution. For determining attack modes, natural armor bonus, etc. use the dire tiger as the creature turned into.

Jaguar Form (Su): This is the number of times per day that a jaguar warrior can use Jaguar Blessing. Every three levels after first he gains an additional use of the ability. (4th, 7th, 10th, etc.)

Path of the Warrior: At first level a jaguar must chose the path that he'll walk for the rest of his life. Whither he'll be the solitary hunter, striking swift and sure at the enemy before fading away back into the jungle. Or teamed with a fearsome beast of the wild, a man and animal beast united in their holy mission to Tezcatlipoca.

At first level a jaguar warrior decides if they will continue to advance their Skirmish ability by the indicated amount on the table or if they will continue to advance their animal companion as a druid equal to their jaguar warrior level+druid levels (Or ranger's animal progression). Once this choice is made it cannot be changed and often irrevocably influences how the jaguar warrior will combat his foes.

Skirmish (Ex): Whenever a jaguar warrior moves at least ten feet, he may deal the indicated amount of skirmish damage to the target of his attacks. This stacks with other sources of sneak attack and skirmish. Creatures without a discernable anatomy are unaffected by this ability. At every even-numbered level this damage increases by one die. (1d6 to 2d6, etc.) A jaguar warrior only gains this bonus damage while in his own form, not while in jaguar form.

Scent (Ex.): At 3rd level a jaguar warrior gains the scent special quality (see page 314 of the Monster Manuel) while in jaguar or non-jaguar form.

Pounce (Ex.): At 6th level a jaguar warrior gains the pounce special attack. A jaguar warrior can still make a full-attack at the end of a charge, despite the fact he moved, while in jaguar or non-jaguar form.

Speed Increase (Ex.): At 9th level a jaguar warrior gains a speed increase of 10 ft. to his land speed. This bonus only works in non-jaguar form and makes a jaguar warrior particularly efficient trackers and hunters.

Callos_DeTerran
2007-10-12, 06:02 PM
Races:

Humans:

http://fc02.deviantart.com/fs9/i/2006/019/0/c/Aztec_Journey_by_Darkfirevic.jpg

Description: Humans are by far the most prosperous and wide spread of all the races that populate Cipactli, being the race that is most blessed by the Feathered Serpent and the inheritors of the mortal world. They have long since served as the wellspring from which all of the other races have sprung and are among the first living beings to even tread upon the surface before the light and bounty of the gods came to reward the progenitor of men. They have survived all the tragedies that swept the surface as the gods disputed and feuded about who would be the suns that shine down on the mortals. Short-lived when compared to their offshoots, humans are still the ruling race of Cipactli and as long as the Great Spirits back their rule, little seems likely to change.

Physical Characteristics: Humans of Cipactli are between 5 1/4 feet to 6 feet tall with dark complexions. Hair colors usually range from black to a light brown color, though nobles in cities have been known to use dyes to color their hair in more exotic colors. The typical AztlŠn human is dressed to survive the scorching heat of noon when one of the sun's is beating down directly on the city, usually consisting of a loin clothe or other similar garment that won't trap the heat in but respectfully cover the groin (And usually the chest for women) from sight since public full-on nudity is frowned on. Gold is a common decoration considering how common it is as are jade and other colorful stones.

Gender: Gender is a very...complex issue in the human society. There are certain positions in the world that only a man can fill, while some they can never even be in line for, and vice versa for females. For example only a male can be the head of a family, but the leader of a village or city must be a female. Following along this line of thought only a male or female can rule certain city-states, depending on the region in question. In most of the other aspects of daily life, the issue becomes more relaxed with certain roles merely being traditionally held by one gender and not requiring one. Religion is almost as fierce in this respect in regards to certain orders and priesthoods favoring men or women respectfully but a meeting of two diametrically opposed orders still never results in blows with the understanding the world needs balance and different orders help to balance the scales in their own way.

Religion: Is covered in the religion section so it can be skipped.

Relations: On a whole humans are accepting and warm-hearted towards other races, considering that they are practically children. If but a bit wayward children who chose odd paths. The exception to this are the AztlŠn dwarves who are highly respected for the sacrifice they committed, mixed with revulsion at the impurities that they now spread so gleefully.

Example Male Names: Yolotli, Huitzilli, Necuametl, Cuixtli, Amoxtli, Nelli, Amoxtli, Acolmixtl, Iccauhtli, and Chipahua

Example Female Names: Tlacoehua, Citlalmina, Zeltzin, Chipahua, Amoxtli, Xiuhtonal, Etalpalli, Xipil, Tlazohtzin, and Iuitl

Coming Next

Yaotls
Yaotl's Picture (http://fc03.deviantart.com/fs12/i/2006/268/8/c/Wild_Elf_by_Coinin.png)

Callos_DeTerran
2007-11-19, 03:35 PM
http://fc01.deviantart.com/images/i/2003/2/6/5/Aztec_Warrior.jpg

Eagle Warrior

Hit Die: d10

Requirements:
To qualify to become an eagle warrior, a character must fulfill all of the following criteria.
Deity: Quetzacoatl
Base Attack Bonus: +6
Feats: Air Devotion, Sun Devotion,
Special: Must be initiated in a rite conducted by a priest of Quetzacoatl involving the benediction of the priest as well as a small quest involved to prove one's worth.

Class Skills: The eagle warrior's class skills (and the key ability for each) are Climb (Str), Diplomacy (Cha), Handle Animal (Cha), Heal (Wis), Intimidate (Cha), Knowledge (Religion), Listen (Wis), Search (Int), Sense Motive (Wis), Spot (Wis), Survival (Wis), Swim (Str), and Tumble (Dex).
Skill Points at each level: 2+Int Modifier
{table=head]Level|Base Attack Bonus|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special

1st|
+1|
+2|
+0|
+0|Feathered Serpent's Strike (+1)

2nd|
+2|
+3|
+0|
+0|Quetzacoatlís Boon (Air or Sun)

3rd|
+3|
+3|
+1|
+1|Fly Speed 20 ft. (Poor)

4th|
+4|
+4|
+1|
+1|Quetzacoatl's Boon (Air or Sun)

5th|
+5|
+4|
+1|
+1|Feathered Serpent's Strike (+2)

6th|
+6|
+5|
+2|
+2|Fly Speed 40 ft. (Average), Quetzacoatl's Boon (Air or Sun)

7th|
+7|
+5|
+2|
+2|

8th|
+8|
+6|
+2|
+2|Quetzacoatl's Boon (Air or Sun)

9th|
+9|
+6|
+3|
+3|Fly Speed 60 ft. (Good)

10th|
+10|
+7|
+3|
+3|Feathered Serpent's Strike (+3), Quetzacoatlís Boon (Air or Sun) [/table]

Weapon and Armor Proficiency: A eagle warrior gains no new weapon proficiency. They gain no new armor proficiencies.

Feathered Serpent's Strike (Su): At first level a eagle warrior learns to strike with all the fury of the Feather Serpent himself, unleashing divine energy unto those unfortunate foes who rile his anger. Once per encounter an eagle warrior may declare a Feathered Serpent's Strike in place of a normal attack. If the attack hits, the eagle warrior adds his class level (Total class level, not just eagle warrior level) and his Charisma bonus to damage. This attack gains a +1 bonus to hit that increases by one every fifth level (+2 at 5th, +3 at 10th, etc.) and if it misses, is wasted. An eagle warrior regains the ability to use his/her Feathered Serpent's Strike in the next encounter by spending five uninterrupted minutes in meditation or prayer.

Quetzacoatlís Boon: At 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th, and 10th level, an Eagle Warrior receives the blessing of Quetzacoatl, either empowered by air or by the sun itself. Each time an eagle warrior gains this ability she chooses either Air or Sun and gains access to a new ability based on how many previous times she has chosen Air or Sun. (Ex. A 6th level Eagle Warrior has chosen Air twice and Sun once. She has the first level ability for Air and Sun and the second level ability for Air, at 8th level she can chose to gain the third level Air power or the second level Sun power) As an eagle warrior gains more Boon's her feathered cloak changes to show the nature of her abilities with each chose of Air changing the cloak to a more bluish white color and each Sun choice giving it a golden hue.

Fly (Su): At 3rd level an eagle warrior is given the great boon that is flight by his/her divine patron. Beginning at 3rd level, an eagle warrior gains a fly speed of 20 ft. (poor maneuverability) granted by their signature feathered capes. At 6th and 9th level the speed of the flight increases by 20 ft. and the maneuverability increases by one step.

To be continued! (The tiers are being tweaked)

puppyavenger
2007-11-19, 06:06 PM
Yah an aztec themend setting!

EvilElitest
2007-11-19, 06:36 PM
good show, will you be doing the Incas next?
from,
EE

Callos_DeTerran
2007-11-20, 04:04 AM
good show, will you be doing the Incas next?
from,
EE

Unlikely considering I haven't quite finished this setting yet. If you look closely though you may see hints of the Incas mixed into it all, just like you'll see some Mayans tossed in when I get around to describing the spirit world and it's darker counterpart.

Neek
2007-11-20, 12:21 PM
I have to say, awesome. But a few questions on flavor: Why AztlŠn and not its native name, Anahuac (The Land Between the Waters)? I always thought Anahuac was a cooler name than "Place of the Snowy Crags" :P

Also, how is literacy and magic going to work? I'm quite curious about the two (seeing as wizards rely on a certain measure of literacy for their spellbooks).

(Also, slight correction which you are most probably aware of: Tlatoani is Nahuatl for "he who is oft to command," or perhaps better, "commander," or "speaker." Huey-Tlatoani, however, is "he who is oft to command greatly" or simply "great-speaker." It's just something that was bothering me, excuse me).

Callos_DeTerran
2007-11-20, 03:25 PM
I have to say, awesome. But a few questions on flavor: Why AztlŠn and not its native name, Anahuac (The Land Between the Waters)? I always thought Anahuac was a cooler name than "Place of the Snowy Crags" :P

I didn't actually know Aztlan meant anything when I chose that particular name, but the thought of hinting at Snowy Mountains in the jungle does highly amuse me.


Also, how is literacy and magic going to work? I'm quite curious about the two (seeing as wizards rely on a certain measure of literacy for their spellbooks).

Magic is going to be altered a good deal. As it stands right now the wizard and sorcerer class doesn't even exist right now, going to be coming up with my own base class for it.


(Also, slight correction which you are most probably aware of: Tlatoani is Nahuatl for "he who is oft to command," or perhaps better, "commander," or "speaker." Huey-Tlatoani, however, is "he who is oft to command greatly" or simply "great-speaker." It's just something that was bothering me, excuse me).

Heh, believe me, THAT was intentional. Though I have to ask how your translating things to Nahuatl, since the program I was using to translate has disappeared off the face of the earth.

In any case, the schedule so far is to finish the Eagle Warrior, put up all the god information (Which to be honest is mostly transcribing something else unto GiantITP) which includes important information about alignment, and then the base classes. Races not so much so because Humans are predominate for a reason.

Neek
2007-11-21, 12:39 AM
I didn't actually know Aztlan meant anything when I chose that particular name, but the thought of hinting at Snowy Mountains in the jungle does highly amuse me.

It does. Nearly everything in Nahuatl has a core meaning to it. In this case, Aztlan is a possible city located on the western coast of Mexico. I can't be too sure of its specifics.


Magic is going to be altered a good deal. As it stands right now the wizard and sorcerer class doesn't even exist right now, going to be coming up with my own base class for it.

I cannot wait.


Heh, believe me, THAT was intentional. Though I have to ask how your translating things to Nahuatl, since the program I was using to translate has disappeared off the face of the earth.

I taught myself Classical Nahuatl. I'm not too proficient with it; I can't, for instance, spot-translate passages out of any of the Codeces (and actually deciphering their writing system, you can forget about it).

A good resource is Nahuatl as Written, by James Lockhart, which is a excellent utility. Various internet grammars can help.


In any case, the schedule so far is to finish the Eagle Warrior, put up all the god information (Which to be honest is mostly transcribing something else unto GiantITP) which includes important information about alignment, and then the base classes. Races not so much so because Humans are predominate for a reason.

Well, I can hardly wait. Once it's ready for playability, I'd love to run a module with it.

Callos_DeTerran
2007-11-21, 04:47 PM
I know it's a bit out of order, but I'm actually doing deities next since...well they play a very large part in this game and influence lots of things.

Story of the Five Suns
When it came time to decide who would take on the role of being the new sun for AztlŠn the two spirits who had worked together, Tezcatlipoca and Quetzalcoatl, fought over who would be the sun. Tezcatlipoca-who was dark as shadow-stole the newly made sun and tied it to his waist. Thanks to his darkness, though, he could only illuminate half the day. Eventually Quetzalcoatl took a gigantic stick and knocked him out of the sky. Quetzalcoatl then took up position as the sun.

After the world was settled, Quetzalcoatl took human form and lived among the humans. He gave them the tools of civilization-agriculture and crafts, governance and piety- and served as an advisor to their rulers. Texcatlipoca grew envious of Quetzalcoatl's eminence and he too took human form. Unlike Quetzalcoatl, though, Tezcatlipoca used his powers to cause mischief and discord among the humans. He enthralled whole villages and led them to perform self-destructive acts. With the aid of his sister Tlazoteotl, Tezcatlipoca even tricked Quetzalcoatl into becoming drunk and devasing himself. So ashamed was Quetzacoatl that he ordered his city of Tula to be raze and all its treasures buried. Then he went to the coast and sailed off on a raft of snakes, vowing to return one day and reclaim his kingdom. Not long after he left, the first human empire collapsed. Without the counterbalance of Quezalcoatl, Tezcatlipoca is free to work his evil in the world unhindered, and many look toward the day when the Feathered Serpent returns.

After the second sun had gone, Tlaloc claimed the sky and took his place. After a time Quetzalcoatl sent a firestorm that burned the earth. The shower of flame burned so hot that even the sun went up in glames. Those people who survived transformed into turkeys, a bird important to the people of Cipactli. Quetzalcoatl then invited the rain god's wife, Chalchihuitlicue to become the fourth sun, and she agreed. Her time as the sun was marked by unending rain. The water eventually rose above the mountains and the people changed into fish. It rained so hard the sky fell, and with it the fourth sun. When Quetzalcoatl discovered Food Mountain-where corn, beans, peppers, and all the other foods had been hidden since the beginning og the world-he asked the other deities what they should do with it. Most believed they should take its contents and give it to the people. Yet not Tlaloc, who stole the food while the other deities debated. The rain god still has the food from Food Mountain, which he gives back only a part of each year-some years more, some years less.

When it came time to choose the fifth sun, the deities built a bonfire and stood around it discussing who would be next. None of the deities wanted to be the new sun, so the chose Nanahuatl, god of misfortune. Nanahuatl balked, but the other deities told him, "don't be afraid. No longer will you be poor and weak as the sun you will fly through the sky." Thus, Nanahuatl closed his eyes and jumped into the bonfire. When his body had been completely burned, he traveled underground until he reached the eastern horizon. When the sun appeared over the horizon it was large and bright, but as soon as it appeared, it stopped. The gods sent a falcon to see what the trouble was. hen the falcon returned it told the assembled deities that the sun refused to rise unless they agreed to sacrifice themselves and give their hearts to the new sun. Angry and frightened, the deities called upon the terrible war god Tlahuizcalpantecuhtli, the Morningstar. Tlahuizcalpantecuhtli took his bow and fired an arrow at Nanahuatl, but the new sun dodged out of the way. Then Nanahuatl took up his own bow and shot the Morningstar with a flaming dart. Wounded, Tlahuizcalpantecihtli fell into the Dead Lands.

The deities realized that the sun was too powerful to resist and so allowed themselves to be sacrificed one by one. Satisfied at last, Nanahuatl-now called Tonatiuh-began his journey across the sky...

-"The Story of the Sun" from the Fourth Age
Fragment from the Codex AztlŠn

Gods
Quetzalcoatl
Greater God (Lawful Good)
Quetzalcoatl is the god of order and goodness. With Tezcatlipoca, he created the world and the creatures that live on it. The author of civilization, all wisdom and knowledge flow from him. He served as the second sun. Quetzacoatl is a god in exile. During the time of the first human empire, he led by example. The deception of Tezcatlipoca made him leave the mortal realms, however, and now men must rely on their own recognizance to determine what is good and orderly. Although his clergy strives to maintain the ideals Quetzalcoatl embodies, his clerics look forward to the day when the Feathered Serpent returns.Quetzalcoatl is depicted with pale skin, a dark, full beard, and wearing either long, concealing robes or the feathered garb of a noble. Despite his absence from the mortal realm, Quetzacoatl teach the values of adherence to social conventions, kindness to others, and peaceful relationship with neighbors. Civility separates humans from the beasts, and it is through civilization that humans collectively achieve perfection.
Portfolio: Air, civilization.
Domains: Air, Good, Law, Protection, Travel.
Favored Weapon: Mace.
Cleric Training: A cleric of Quetzalcoatl must possess knowledge of civics and literature, as he is expected to pass along his wisdom either as an advisor to a noble ruler or as a teacher in the calmecac (a religious school).
Quests: Typical quests undertaken in the name of Quetzalcoatl include helping a good prince become king over his evil rivals, protecting a village from a rampaging dragon, and foiling the schemes of Texcatlipoca's minions.
Prayers: Although he no longer lives among the people, Quetzalcoatl still grants power to his clergy. Prayers to Quetzalcoatl often begin with a plea for his swift return.
Temples: Temples to Quetzalcoatl are distinctly circular in a culture that prefers rectangular buildings. Found in every city, temples to Quetzalcoatl also dot the summits of tall mountain peaks. Clerics maintain these temples in preparation for the Feathered Serpent's return.
Rites: Rituals honoring Quetzalcoatl are brightly colored affairs filled with music and dance. Unlike most gods, Quetzalcoatl does not demand human sacrifice. In addition to the traditional rites, clerics have recently added a new duty: a watch is maintained along the east coast, waiting for the god's return.
Herald and Allies: The Feathered Serpent's herald is a 20th lvl. cleric recognizable by his pale skin and full beard. Allies are hound archons, couatls, and planetar angels.

Tezcatlipoca
Greater God (Chaotic Evil)
Texcatlipoca (the Smoky Mirror) is the god of chaos and evil. He personifies the harmful and disruptive forces of nature and is the patron of sinful pleasures and arcane magic. He encourages people to escape the bonds placed on them by society and fate, and thus the lowly and downtrodden worship him-as do the ambitious. Despite his evil, he is the vessel by which people gain absolution for their sins from the gods. Tlazoteotl, goddess of filth, is his sister. Tezcatlipoca aided Quetzalcoatl in creating the world and served as the first sun, but he wasn't bright enough to last the whole day. Quetzalcoatl eventually knocked him out of the sky, and Texcatlipoca later became the god of night. Tezcatlipoca is depicted as black-skinned with a yellow striped face. He carries a mirror polished obsidian (a common divining tool). Tezcatlipoca sometimes takes the form of a jaguar, his sacred animal. Tezcatlipoca encourages his followers to push the boundaries of ethics and morality, and he teaches that the strong-willed can change their fate.
Portfolio: Night, mischief.
Domains: Chaos, Evil, Knowledge, Magic, Trickery
Favored Weapon: Dagger
Cleric Training: Clerics of Tezcatlipoca, like those of other gods, refrain from regular bahing. As such dried blood and filth cake them as a result of their foul rituals. Tezcatlipoca is the patron of diviners, and his clerics train in a number of traditional divining methods. Some of his clergy often specialize as diviners or illusionists.
Quests: A follower of Tezcatlipoca might never know if a quest he undertakes is part of the god's greater plan or merely a random act of destruction. Typical quests include embarrassing a respected ruler, stealing a powerful magic item, and playing a deadly trick on an entire village.
Prayers: Many pray to Tezcatlipoca seeking absolution for their sins or reprieve from divine misfortunes. Others who call on the god seek to bend the rules-whether societal, such as slaves who aspire to higher castes, or natural, such as a magic-user seeking new spells.
Temples: Although undeniably evil, Tezcatlipoca is na important and somtimes even beneficial deity, and temples to the Smoky Mirror are found in all major cities. Carvings of jaguars feature prominently on these temples.
Rites: Unlike the public rituals of most of the gods, worship of Tezcatlipoca is mostly performed behind closed doors. Participants in these rituals often engage in acts of debauchery such as a form of catharsis
Herald and Allies: Tezcatlipoca works mischief through his herald, a 20th-level sorcerer. Allies are howlers, glabrezu demons, and nalfeshnee demons.

Tlaloc
Intermediate God (Lawful Evil)
Tlaloc is the widely worshipped god of rain, for without his life-giving water the city-states could not survive. Tlaloc is also seen as the protector of children and served as the third sun until Quetzalcoatl sent a firestorm to end his reign. The most inhuman looking of the gods, Tlaloc has a reptilian countenance with wide staring eyes and a tusked maw. He is served by his children: minor water spirits collectively known as the Tlaloques. Tlaloc promotes a philosophy of obedience and discipline. In order to receive the gifts of heaven (Such as sunlight and rain) one must obey the will of the deities. He teaches that those who respect their superiors are rewarded. Tlaloc encourages his followers to seize opportunities to advance themselves whenever possible, just as he does.
Portfolio: Rain
Domains: Air, Law, Plant, Water
Favored Weapon: Sickle
Cleric Training:Clerics of Tlaloc learn the means to track and predict weather (the will of Tlaloc). When not serving at the temple, clerics might be found providing guidance and blessings to rural communities.
Quests: Typical quests include annexing a cenote from a barbarian tribe, protecting a noble's child from evil spirits, and leading an army against an impious king.
Prayers: Clerics of Tlaloc make idols from cornmeal paste, which they then sell to farmers who wish to supplicate the rain god.
Temples: Most cities have a prominent temple to Tlaloc built atop a ziggurat. These temples usually sit alongside temples to the sun god, Tonatiuh. Small shrines to Tlaloc and Chalchihuitlcue are also found near springs and cenotes.
Rites: Typical agricultural rituals are performed at various times of the year to appease Tlaloc. During times of draught, however, clerics perform additional rites. These rituals involve shouting and dancing through the night in hopes of waking the rain god from his drought-inducing slumber. If prayers fail, the clerics offer the blood of a youth to Tlaloc. The youth's cries are taken as a positive sign: the more tears, the more rain.
Herald and Allies: Tlaloc's herald is a 20th-level lizardfolk druid with wide eyes and large tusks. Allies include formian taskmasters, formian myrmarchs, and Huge Elementals (air, fire, or water).

Tonatiuh
Intermediate God (Neutral Evil)
The fifth and current sun, Tonatiuh is a demanding god. He requires the blood of warriors to give him the strength to fight his way through the underworld and defeat the forces of night. The people acquiesce, knowing they cannot live without the sun. His lesser aspect is Nanahuatl, the god of misfortune, such as poverty, disease, and earthquakes. Tonatiuh is depicted with his face blazing like the sun; the light obscures the rest of his body. His previous incarnation, as Nanahuatl, appears as a wretched dwarf.The doctrine of Tonatiuh teaches that happiness and success come only with toil and suffering. His followers are encouraged to test their own limitations. As Tonatiuh's own origins demonstrate, power does not come without pain.
Portfolio: Sun, misfortune.
Domains: Destruction, Evil, Sun, War.
Favored Weapon: Shortbow
Cleric Training: Tonatiuh demands his clerics perform many exacting rituals to appease and strengthen the sun god on his daily journey. Followers fear that if the proper rituals are not performed, the sun will fail to rise and the time of monsters will ensue. Just as Tonatiuh opposes creatures of the dark as he passes through the underworld, so too must his clerics. Clerics of Tonatiuh channel positive energy regardless of their alignment.
Quests: Typical quests for Tonatiuh include finding or creating a magic item needed to win a battle, capturing a certain renowned warrior to sacrifice to the sun god, and defeating a powerful creature from the underworld.
Prayers: As the sun sets, the people give prayers to Tonatiuh to strengthen him do he can rise again the next day. They also pray for mercy from Tonatiuh when the sun becomes oppressive or misfortunes strike.
Temples: Temples to Tonatiuh are built atop ziggurats, typically alongside temples to Tlaloc, the rain god. The altars of these temples are stained black from many offerings of blood.
Rites:The hearts of captured warriors are sacrificed to Tonatiuh on most days, to give him the strength to make his daily journey. As well, soldiers pierce themselves and scatter their blood as sacrifice to give power to the sun god. They hope that, in return, Tonatiuh grants them strength versus their enemies.
Herald and Allies: Tonatiuh's herald is a pit fiend. Allies are flamebrother, average, and noble salamanders (called xiuhcoatl, or "fire serpents").

Xipetotec
Intermediate God (Lawful Neutral)
Xipetotec, the Flayed Lord, is the god of agriculture and sacrifice. He allows others to flay off his red and diseased skin to reveal a golden body underneath. This is a metaphor for the process of growth in plants, the stalk emerging from the seed and the maize shucked from its husk, and spiritual growth-only by casting off one's sins and flaws can a person hope to reach perfection. Xipetotec encourages his followers to seek self-perfection. By indentifying your flaws and working to overcome them you become a better person. His followers also seek to improve society through commitment to the greater good, and by reforming (or removing) those who shirk their duty to the deities and their fellow man.
Portfolio: Agriculture, sacrifice.
Domains: Earth, Law, Luck, Plant.
Favored Weapon: Flail
Cleric Training: The primary duty of clerics of Xipetotec is to oversee crops from planting to harvesting. They also aid others in makin proper sacrifices to the deities.
Quests: Typical quests include protecting a harvest from swarming vermin, capturing a group of crop-stealing bandits, and destroying a useful artifact as a sacrifice to the deities.
Prayers: As god of agriculture, Xipetotec is predominantly worshiped by farmers, who pray for a good crops. Those who suffer from a disease or curse might also call upon the Flayed Lord to remove their burden.
Temples: Temples of Xipetotec are decorated with motifs of corn and other crops. They are often built near communal silos.
Rites: Clerics of Xipetotec perform a number of agricultural rituals throughout the year. Among the humans, these rituals are particularly grisly, as a priest imitates the god by wearing the flayed skin of a sacrificial victim.
Herald and Allies: The flayed skinned herald of Xipetotec has the characteristics of a mummy lord, but is not evil. Allies are formian taskmasters, formian myrmarchs, and horned devils.

Cihuacoatl
Intermediate Goddess (Neutral)
Cihuacoatl (Snake Woman; Coatlicue, "Skirt of Serpents;" the Hungry Woman) is the earth from which all living things spring. She is also the earth which consumes the dead. As spirit of the fertile earth, she acts as the patron of mothers and farmers, but hse also serves as the spirit of barren rock and the swallowing cave, and in this aspect mourners and miners worship her. Most depictions of Cihuacoatl show her as a woman with a necklace of severed hands and a skirt of live snakes. Sometimes she has the head of a snake. According to the teachings of the Cihuacoatl, the earth is the womb which births all things, and the grave to which all things inevitably return. No one owns the land forever; after a time one must let the land lie fallow.
Portfolio: Earth, birth, death.
Domains: Animal, Death, Earth, Plant.
Favored Weapon: Pick
Cleric Training:Cleris of Cihuacoatl are taught ot recognize the will of the earth goddess. They must be able to determine the best place to plant and hunt, as well as to know when a piece of land can no longer support crops or game.
Quests: Typical quests include taking an offering to a distant crevasse, exploring a cave system for treasure, and defending a mountain village from lowland invaders.
Prayers: Worshipers pray to Cihuacoatl for the abundant crops and healthy children or to reveal buried treasures. An offering of food for the Hungry Woman goes a long way toward gaining the goddess's attention.
Temples: Natural caves typically house temples dedicated to Cihuatcoatl. Otherwise, they are dark and claustrophobic buildings reminiscent of caves.
Rites: Clerics of Cihuacoatl celebrate births and often act as midwives. They also oversee ceremonies made at beginnings, such as when plowing fields, opening mines, and interring the dead.
Herald and Allies: People traveling in the countryside at night might hear the frightful moan of Cihuacoatl's herald, an 18th-level human ghost cleric. Allies are Medium, Large, and Huge earth elementals.

Huitzilopochtli
Lesser God (Lawful Evil)
Huitzilopochtli (Hummingbird of the South) is a young god and the primary deity of the people. The god of war and conquest, he urges his chosen people to make war. The people fight not to destroy their rivals but to subdue them: collectively (forcing defeated cities to pay tribute) and individually (gathering prisoners for sacrifice). Although the patron of te people, Huitzilopochtli's influence is mostly confined to the regions around the central city. Conquered city-states pay lip service to the god, but few worship him. That said, all know Huitzilopochtli is the impetus behind the warmongering and rightly fear him. The central tenet of Huitzilopochtli's church is "might makes right". He teaches his followers that strength in battle leads to temporal success. He also tells his chosen people that they are destined to dominate the world through military might.
Portfolio: War, conquest, humans.
Domains: Evil, Law, Strength, War.
Favored Weapon: Macahuitl
Cleric Training:All clerics of Huitzilopochtli are trained to fight and many travel with armies, providing divine assistance while fighting alongside the warriors. Others officiate over the sacrifice of hearts to Huizilopochtli and other gods.
Quests: Quests for Huitzilopochtli involve war and conquest. Typical quests include inciting war between two nations, defeating the minions of other gods, and leading an army in conquest.
Prayers: Blood is the central component of Huitzilopochtli worship. The war god ignores prayers not sanctified with blood-whither from the petitioner or a sacrificial victim.
Temples: Temples of Huitzilopochtli are built atop very steep ziggurats (aside the temple of Tlaloc, the rain god). Priests force prisoners of war to ascend these stone steps to the altar: a circular stone stained with the blood of many sacrifices. The largest of these temples stands at the center city, and rumors persist that the original wooden idol of Huitzilopochtli that spoke to priests and led his people is housed there. Most garrisons include a small shrine to the war god.
Rites: Huitzilopochtli demands the hearts of warriors as sacrifices to give him the strength he needs to fight the spiritual enemies of the people. His loyal worshippers capture many of their foes to sacrifice in this way.
Herald and Allies: Huitzilopochtli's herald is an 18th-level fiendish human fighter. Allies include bearded devils, barbed devils, and pit fiends.

Chalchihuitlicue
Lesser God (Neutral Good)
Chalchihuitlicue (She of the Skirt of Jade), the goddess of water, beauty, and youth, is revered by water-bearers, fishermen, and chinampa (Hanging garden) workers who depend on her for their livelihood. She is associated with fertility and childbirth and serves as the patron of artists and craftsmen, young lovers, and women in labor. Chalchihuitlicue lives in Tlalocan, a beautiful paradise created for her by her husband, Tlaloc. After Quetzacoatl deposed Tlaloc as the third sun, he chose Chalchihuitlicue to serve as the fourth. The ceaseless rain of her time eventually flooded the whole world. Usually depicted as a beautiful young woman wearing a skirt of jade scales, Chalchihuitlicue is sometimes represented by a river with a fruit-laden cactus on its banks. Jade and the prickly pear cactuc both symbolize the human heart, over which she has metaphorical dominion. Her symbol is that of a jade fish. Chalchihuitlicue teaches a simple philosophy of respect for life. Love and beauty transcend all boundaries, and her followers are encouraged to look for and nurture goodness wherever they find it.
Portfolio: Water, beauty, youth.
Domains: Good, Healing, Luck, Water
Favored Weapon: Trident
Cleric Training: Clerics of She of the Jade Skirt look after wells, lakes, and springs. These clerics make sure fresh water remains available to all who need it. They protect these sources of water from overuse and contamination.
Quests: Typical quests include discovering why a well has dried up, uniting star-crossed lovers, and bringing water from Tlalocan to a prince with an incurable disease.
Prayers: Offerings to Chalchihuitlicue are thrown into a body of water. Typical offerings include flowers and small pieces of jade.
Temples: Temples to Chalchihuitlicue are built near sources of fresh water, such as rivers, lakes, and cenotes (natural wells), and contain decorative elements made from jade.
Rites: Few regular ceremonies exist for Chalchihuitlicue. Clerics of She of the Jade Skirt serve as celebrants for marriages and births or might be called upon to bless a new chinampa or public artwork.
Herald and Allies: Chalchihuitlicue's herald is an 18th-level celestial human cleric. Allies are Medium and Large water elementals and elder tojanidas.

Clerics, Alignment, and Sacrifice
Normal D&D alignment system does not do the complex morality of this setting justice. People regularly appease evil deities as much as they pray to good ones and things such as slavery and human sacrifice are accepted norms. To account for this, several changes are made to the cleric class.

-A cleric can be of any alignment instead of merely being one step away from it. Good clerics can worship gentler aspects of an evil deity while evil clerics might need to appease good ones with sacrifices.
-A cleric can cast spells of any alignment. However casting a spell of a certain alignment descriptor still counts of an act of that type. (Casting an evil spell is still evil so good clerics doing it too often will still experience an alignment shift. The same for Chaotic, Lawful, and Good spells)
-A cleric still loses their spellcasting ability for violating the tenets of their faith. (A cleric of Tlaloc would never poison or contaminate food or water from his god for example.)

*Sigh* Wow...this was one long post. One thing to keep in mind though, this is not an exhaustive list of myths or gods. There is quite obviously more, but these are the most important.

Icewalker
2007-11-21, 07:45 PM
Well, I skimmed some of your works so far, but this is indeed awesome, and I'd love to contribute.


Just a note, which may have some interesting alignment ramifications in an Aztec-based campaign world...human sacrifice. There was a lot of it. a lot of it. I'm assuming you know this, but still. It's also pretty much an accepted part of their religion, huge amounts of sacrifice to please the gods, so it seems to me that it shouldn't be evil.

As well as sacrifice, there was lots and lots of blood-letting as a lesser form of the same idea. I would like to make you a magic class based on this idea.

Basically, a blood mage. They would draw their own blood to enhance their spells, and things like casting a spell over the ritual sacrifice of another would allow them to do greater things.

I think their spell list would focus on things that are excruciatingly terrible (boiling blood, anyone?) as well as some healing, and some buffing. One example of enhancement by human sacrifice: sacrifice some guy in front of your army combined with some blessing of battle, to give it to everyone for an extended period of time. That kind of thing.

Neek
2007-11-22, 12:00 AM
One example of enhancement by human sacrifice: sacrifice some guy in front of your army combined with some blessing of battle, to give it to everyone for an extended period of time. That kind of thing.

While a nominal idea, it doesn't work too well for the setting. You didn't sacrifice to receive blessing when you go to war; you go to war to harbor enough sacrifices to appease the gods and ensure that they do not destroy the world.

Blood letting, on the other hand...

Icewalker
2007-11-22, 12:20 AM
Yeah, I suppose so. Perhaps the living sacrifice mechanic wouldn't work. The blood-letting I think would fit fine.

I was just considering that human sacrifice was a capstone allowing you to give a huge benefit to one of the aspects of a spell: Save DC, Duration, # affected, effective level, etc. while blood-letting would give a plus to it.


Also, I think bloodletting should deal constitution damage, instead of health. Otherwise higher level casters would either be able to sacrifice huge amounts, and would apparently have more blood than a lower level.

puppyavenger
2007-11-22, 07:36 AM
Heres an idea,if there is ressurection than maby you have to sacrifice someone to ressurect someone? It would explain why high level casters don't just spend the entire time keeping their army at full strength and it would get the PC's used to human sacrifice.

Callos_DeTerran
2007-11-22, 09:59 AM
Just a note, which may have some interesting alignment ramifications in an Aztec-based campaign world...human sacrifice. There was a lot of it. a lot of it. I'm assuming you know this, but still. It's also pretty much an accepted part of their religion, huge amounts of sacrifice to please the gods, so it seems to me that it shouldn't be evil.

As well as sacrifice, there was lots and lots of blood-letting as a lesser form of the same idea. I would like to make you a magic class based on this idea.

Basically, a blood mage. They would draw their own blood to enhance their spells, and things like casting a spell over the ritual sacrifice of another would allow them to do greater things.

I think their spell list would focus on things that are excruciatingly terrible (boiling blood, anyone?) as well as some healing, and some buffing. One example of enhancement by human sacrifice: sacrifice some guy in front of your army combined with some blessing of battle, to give it to everyone for an extended period of time. That kind of thing.

...Oops...wrote down the last part of my last post would contain stuff about sacrifice and then I forget entirely to put it in there. Er....Well I do know Aztec's (primary source for all this) had lots of sacrifice and blood-letting (Animal AND human), so no worries about that. Essentially though (And I'm going to add it to my above post too) the Sacrifice rules from BOVD is going to be in effect for clerics of any alignment. (It IS still evil though...even if thats not as much a problem with a lot less alignment restrictions)

As for the blood-casting class, sounds like a blast. I'd be happy to look over it if you decide to make it. Have to ask though, is it going to be a divine spellcasting or a arcane spellcasting?

As for using sacrifice to empower effects, I wouldn't quite say you need human sacrifice for it (Depends on who your trying to please after all) but I'd definitly add in that you don't need YOUR blood for that ability. You can use someone else's blood at double the rate (To get the same effect you need to do twice the CON damage you'd do to yourself though) though a I doubt good members of this class would go for that part. So I'm going to be making some adjustments to the above posts obviously but the short version is below.

-Sacrifice is an accepted practice (BoVD sacrifice rules essentially)
-Healing spells are part of the necromancy school (I know there is a lot of debate about this, but this is my personal decision)
-Reasurreaction is undecided as to whither or not it'll be allowed. Right now though I'm leaning towards 'no' rather then 'yes'. As will be explained later, if the living want to venerate the dead then they'll bring back said dead as zombies so they can continue to be of assistance. (If you can't tell undead really don't have as much a stigma on them. People are still scared, but they don't try to kill someone just for making them.)

Icewalker
2007-11-22, 01:18 PM
Well, the idea of using someone else's blood occurred to me, but I don't want people giving themselves bonuses to their next spell as long as they hit someone with a slashing or piercing weapon. I think the blood-letting has to have some ritual aspects, so the person (or at least enough of a part of them to cut on) must be willing or immobilized to use them.


Well, how I think it'll work is you deal con damage to yourself, and depending on how much you sacrifice, it increases some aspect of the spell of your choice. Something like:

+1 DC: 1 con
+1 target: 2 con (if a mass spell, this would have to have a variation)
+25% duration: 1 con
+1 effective spell level: 2 con

And more as I think of them. You can sacrifice a limited amount of blood per spell, but you can spread out the bonuses. So if you sacrificed 4 con you could give the spell +2 DC and +1 spell level.

Also, I think other people's con as use should stay at a 1-1, as they have to hold still for you.

Lastly, an interesting idea: limited amount of blood per spell per person. So if your limit is a max sacrifice of 5 con, you can cut yourself for 5 and an ally for 5 and get a +10 bonus.


I think it'll be a divine caster, and I think I need to make a huge amount of new spells...:smallsigh:

Athaniar
2007-11-22, 01:41 PM
Ever heard of Maztica, an old Forgotten Realms campaign setting? Also Aztec-themed, but never converted to 3rd Edition, so keep up the good work!

Callos_DeTerran
2007-11-22, 01:59 PM
Well, the idea of using someone else's blood occurred to me, but I don't want people giving themselves bonuses to their next spell as long as they hit someone with a slashing or piercing weapon. I think the blood-letting has to have some ritual aspects, so the person (or at least enough of a part of them to cut on) must be willing or immobilized to use them.

Of course.



Well, how I think it'll work is you deal con damage to yourself, and depending on how much you sacrifice, it increases some aspect of the spell of your choice. Something like:

+1 DC: 1 con
+1 target: 2 con (if a mass spell, this would have to have a variation)
+25% duration: 1 con
+1 effective spell level: 2 con

I'd rethink the spell DC one. As it stands it usually takes a lot to increase spell DCs (Or at least theres limited choices) so either put that up higher as an ability you can use or increase the con you need to sacrifice for it. As it stands increasing the save DC by one is the same as one more target which is a little off to me.


And more as I think of them. You can sacrifice a limited amount of blood per spell, but you can spread out the bonuses. So if you sacrificed 4 con you could give the spell +2 DC and +1 spell level.

Very nice idea. Nobody wants a spellcaster dumping all their Con but 1 to make a save or die/suck/whatever much more dangerous then it actually is and knock out a BBEG in one go.


Also, I think other people's con as use should stay at a 1-1, as they have to hold still for you.

True, but I'd say either increase the exchange rate or the casting time for the spell then because it takes longer to draw enough blood from someone else and plus it's not yours. (I think it'd be harder to work someone else's blood in since its not yours so you don't have any kind of spiritual or physical connection to it.)


Lastly, an interesting idea: limited amount of blood per spell per person. So if your limit is a max sacrifice of 5 con, you can cut yourself for 5 and an ally for 5 and get a +10 bonus.

I think this leads to lots and lots of Leadership cheese. x.x My suggestion: Put a cap either on the number of people who can donate or the number of Con that can ultimately be sacrificed for one spell. That, or if you use the 'increase casting time for someone's blood besides your own' idea above then have the casting time increase for each person who contributes. That way it's risky to use lots of people (Cause your enemies are DEFINITLY going to notice you standing behind and gathering lots of blood for a spell, which leads to them trying to interrupt it) but you can have major 'spell rituals' that could potentially change the course of a battle or even war. Maybe some sort of skill check for each 'total' extra round you end up adding unto the casting time to hold unto the spell.

(Meant to suggest some other things Con can be used for, such as area of spell effect increase but I'll think more on those)



I think it'll be a divine caster, and I think I need to make a huge amount of new spells...:smallsigh:

I dunno...you might be able to accomplish some of it by mixing up some of the regular spell lists to get what you want..might, but probably not all of it.

Icewalker
2007-11-22, 02:04 PM
I've started work on the spells. I'm going to try to find any with a connection to blood...but I doubt the list is long.


Clerics basic healing spell is the cure spell line. Cure Light Wounds, Cure Moderate Wounds, etc etc, and their counterparts: Inflict Light Wounds, etc.

The Blood Mage basic healing spell line is the 'Revitalize' spells. They heal the target over time:

Revitalize, minor: 1 hit point.
Revitalize, Lesser: 1d4 hit points per round, duration = caster level max 5.
Revitalize: 1d6 hit points per round, duration based on caster level
Revitalize, greater: 1d8 hit points per round, duration based on caster level
Revitalize, severe: 2d6 hit points per round, duration based on caster level

I have no idea if these are balanced at all. I also don't know what school to put them in.

I made all but severe available to clerics and druids as well.

Each new form of the spell is available like clerics with cures. 0, 1, 2, 3, 4.


There will be reversed versions of the spells, but I'm not sure on the name yet.

Callos_DeTerran
2007-11-22, 02:13 PM
I've started work on the spells. I'm going to try to find any with a connection to blood...but I doubt the list is long.

The ones off the top of my head are Burning Blood, Extract Water Elemental, and there was an assassin one too. And this Blood Elemental (http://www.wizards.com/dnd/article.asp?x=dnd/sb/sb20030208a)



Clerics basic healing spell is the cure spell line. Cure Light Wounds, Cure Moderate Wounds, etc etc, and their counterparts: Inflict Light Wounds, etc.

The Blood Mage basic healing spell line is the 'Revitalize' spells. They heal the target over time:

Revitalize, minor: 1 hit point.
Revitalize, Lesser: 1d4 hit points per round, duration = caster level max 5.
Revitalize: 1d6 hit points per round, duration based on caster level
Revitalize, greater: 1d8 hit points per round, duration based on caster level
Revitalize, severe: 2d6 hit points per round, duration based on caster level

I have no idea if these are balanced at all. I also don't know what school to put them in.

They'e pretty balanced looking to me. Would go into Necromancy though with all the other healing/inflicting type spells.


I made all but severe available to clerics and druids as well.

Each new form of the spell is available like clerics with cures. 0, 1, 2, 3, 4.


There will be reversed versions of the spells, but I'm not sure on the name yet.


Decay, lesser/severe/etc.

Icewalker
2007-11-22, 02:22 PM
Oooh, decay...nice. I'll go write those up.

I'm just a little worried about severe, because it's the same level as cure critical, and does 2d6 per round instead of 4d8+1/level.

Thanks for the spell references.


Hmm, upon seeing Burning Blood, it looks like the decay spells were severely underpowered. It is the same level as severe (2d6/level for 5 rounds) and deals 2d8 damage/round (duration = level) and reduces them to a half action.

Also an idea for a variation to undead: usually they are skeletons with flesh rotting away. Almost every undead is rotting flesh and/or bones. My idea is that some undead could be the circulatory system/muscle, making bloody red humanoid. Bloodborn could be the name, although that sounds more like a unique race than a kind of undead.