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Mordar
2008-05-13, 04:41 PM
Hi all -

Despite the lack of anime or versus elements, I'll assume this is the proper place to post this discussion :)

I've read a number of Laurell K Hamilton books (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_gw?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=Laurell+K.+Hamilton) and have *generally* liked them. I was particularly fond of the earliest books in the Anita Blake and Meredith Gentry series...but have found myself more and more exasperated as I continued reading. I dropped the Anita Blake series from my reading list altogether and think I'd probably be best served by doing the same with the Gentry books.

The problem, of course, is that they've become porn-fiction and instead of telling engaging stories they now just tell stories of naked engagements. It's really kind of disappointing.

[So, I guess that's Discussion Point 1: How do you feel about the timbre and content of her work? Has the fairly graphic and ubiquitous depictions of sexual activity drowned out the story? Does it serve a real purpose other than pandering to a particular audience?]

That being said, I've been a longtime fan of Faerie Tales (you know - stories about the Sidhe, presented as horror, historical fiction, modern fiction or swords-and-sorcery fantasy) and was really enjoying the stage LKH had set with the Meredith Gentry books. It had the magic, the mystique and the politicking I was hoping for - the dynamic between the two courts, the somewhat cliche' but usually interesting corruption-within-beauty that is the Fey, the loss of magic and the integration of the Sidhe into modern life...it was such a great setup. Then...BAM...Pornfic.

So what am I to do now? [Discussion Point 2: Who has good recommendations for books/series' to capture my attention and earn accolades for being a good Faerie Tale?]

I've read lots of Morgan Llywelyn (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_gw?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=Morgan+Llywelyn), Kenneth Flint (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_gw?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=kenneth+flint) and stuff by Fiest, Brooks and a few others that fall into this category. Cookies for whomever comes up with great recommendations!

Thanks for your time!

- Mordar

North
2008-05-13, 04:49 PM
Yeah those were my problems too. :smallsigh: Great concepts and cool ideas, that turned into a giant free for all of everyone having sex with everyone else. It was really bad for a while, then they gave her the magic curse of "having to have sex with someone every couple hours":smallmad:.

Meredith Gentry was even worse. The basic premise was a race between her and the prince to see who could get have a kid first. So she keeps sleeping with everyone to get pregnant as fast as she can...

If you want a good urban fantasy series check out the Dresden Files by Jim Butcher. Amazing series. They cover the supernatural gamut from vamps, wolves, wizards, faeries, trolls, demons, and more. The stlye of book is like a detectives crime novel, with a really sarcastic narrator. Just awesome.

Thiel
2008-05-13, 04:52 PM
I personally like the Anita Blake series. I tend not to notice the sex scenes and so don't find them problematic.
Then again, I did come with some heavy duty mental filters.

Hadrian_Emrys
2008-05-13, 05:01 PM
The vamp series was awesome until it became "SECKS SOLVES EVERYTHING!!1!" :smallfurious:

Mordar
2008-05-13, 05:25 PM
If you want a good urban fantasy series check out the Dresden Files by Jim Butcher. Amazing series. They cover the supernatural gamut from vamps, wolves, wizards, faeries, trolls, demons, and more. The stlye of book is like a detectives crime novel, with a really sarcastic narrator. Just awesome.

I do like the Dresden Files for the most part...a little too much chip on the shoulder at times (it seems everyone does that these days - even though all it should do is make things harder on the heroes. Maybe a lot of repression from the authors' real lives growing up or something) but mostly enjoyable. However, from what I've read they're more monster-of-the-week then giving any great depth of Faerie Tale. Does this change later in the series, with more continuity and interaction (with more recurring characters outside Dresden, his skull and the ladycop)?

Who's got more Faerie?

- Mordar

comicshorse
2008-05-13, 07:36 PM
I've only read the Anita Blake books but yes I agree with pretty much everything you said. ' Obsidian Butterfly' was the last good one, also am I the only one who feels if this was a male author writing about a male character he would get some real criticism for the 'every-body I meet has sex with me' plots.
Maybe if she did a book about Edward I'd be tempted to buy it.
As for weird, faery fiction. I'd recommend 'Mythago Wood' and ' Faerie Tale'

purple gelatinous cube o' Doom
2008-05-13, 10:26 PM
I've kinda been wondering whether or not I'd like to read some of her books. But, as some of the other people seem to have stated, then fact that the books (especially the later ones from what I hear) basically turn into the novel equivalent of porn. That, and I hear the Dead Witch Walking series by Kim Harrison is much better.

cnsvnc
2008-05-14, 07:49 AM
I personally like the Anita Blake series. I tend not to notice the sex scenes and so don't find them problematic.

I did that too at first, until other scenes became a backdrop for porn. Not that I have anything against porn, but this is supposed to be a supernatural detective novel...

I loved the premise of Anita Blake. Books are very good, until said porn overwhelms it.

Gentry was worse from the get go. I read the first book, and that was a waste of time. It's as if that series was made because Anita can't get into sex scenes weird enough.


also am I the only one who feels if this was a male author writing about a male character he would get some real criticism for the 'every-body I meet has sex with me' plots

No you're not. And that is what we'd call sexual discrimination.

WalkingTarget
2008-05-14, 08:02 AM
Hmm, not sure if this is quite what you're looking for, but there's Neil Gaiman & Charles Vess' Stardust (I fully recommend the original version w/ the illustrations over the purely text version, it's the same story). The film has its own charms, but it lost a lot of the overtly "fairy-tale" style.

Also, there is Lord Dunsany's The King of Elfland's Daughter.

And, last but far from least, there's Terry Pratchett's Lords and Ladies from the Discworld series (reading some of the other books first can help but isn't strictly necessary).

None of these are strictly dealing with the Sidhe, they're all using their own versions of Faerie (the first two are examples of pre-Tolkien English fantasy, literally in the latter case; Pratchett might be closer to the Celtic side of things).

Manga Shoggoth
2008-05-14, 08:19 AM
You could also try "Tam Lin", by Pamela Dean.

I am not a fan of her other work (caveat: I have only read two of her books in total), but I enjoyed this one.

It is set in Minnesota, focussing on the life of a student in college. What I found interesting about it was that it was very much "slice of life" until you realised exactly what was going on. Then it got interesting.

(ISBN details, should you want them:
Tor Books (Tom Doherty Associates), ISBN-10: ISBN 0312851375, ISBN-13: ISBN 978-0312851378, March 1991, hardcover
Tor Books (Tom Doherty Associates), St. Martin's Press, ISBN-10: ISBN 0812544501, ISBN-13: ISBN 978-0812544503, April 1992, paperback
Firebird Books (Penguin Group), ISBN-10: ISBN 014240652X, ISBN-13: ISBN 978-0142406526, August 3, 2006, paperback)

Ashtar
2008-05-14, 09:46 AM
I really liked the Anita series until it descended into the abyss of having more sex scenes than scenario. The characters were (and still are) intriguing.* The action was well described and the magic scenes I felt quit well done.
I liked the balance and descent into corruption / fall from her high morals (can we call it that?) over the series.

Also as an added incentive, my (at the time) fiancée was so hooked on them that she would read them in English instead of waiting for them to come out in French. Something that I was always prompt to encourage :smallbiggrin:.

*Although I hated the direction of the plot concerning Richard Zeeman. Seems part of it was the Author dealing with real world issues...

SmartAlec
2008-05-14, 04:04 PM
As far as faerie tales go, I was quite fond of Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell, by Susanna Clarke.

North
2008-05-14, 04:17 PM
I do like the Dresden Files for the most part...a little too much chip on the shoulder at times (it seems everyone does that these days - even though all it should do is make things harder on the heroes. Maybe a lot of repression from the authors' real lives growing up or something) but mostly enjoyable. However, from what I've read they're more monster-of-the-week then giving any great depth of Faerie Tale. Does this change later in the series, with more continuity and interaction (with more recurring characters outside Dresden, his skull and the ladycop)?

Who's got more Faerie?

- Mordar

Thats actually why I like the series so much is because of the recurring cast and villains. The first books are the setup with the middle to later ones really delivering upon the supporting cast thats been built up. Lots n lots of supporting characters. The fourth book has a war brewing up between the Winter and Summer courts. And Harry is being employed by Winter.:smallbiggrin:

Frosty
2008-05-14, 06:17 PM
I read Jim Butcher first, got introduced to the Anita blake series, and discovered Meredith Gentry on my own.

Yeah...Jim Butcher...I'm addicted.

Anita Blake stuff I'll read because I really like the characters. The sex isn't the entire focus of the plot yet.

Meredith Gentry...what can I say about this series. I've read a few of the series, hoping it'd get better the furhter I go. Not so much. It's basically softcore (and sometimes not so softcore) erotica. I can't tell if the book si marketed towards men or women (I think women). I felt like I was reading a romance novel with faeries.

BRC
2008-05-14, 07:21 PM
Thats actually why I like the series so much is because of the recurring cast and villains. The first books are the setup with the middle to later ones really delivering upon the supporting cast thats been built up. Lots n lots of supporting characters. The fourth book has a war brewing up between the Winter and Summer courts. And Harry is being employed by Winter.:smallbiggrin:

THe one problem is that Butcher has a habit of ending a book with untied loose ends. It makes you motivated to buy the next book, but for every subplot he wraps up he adds two more.
However, Harry can snark at an epic level which makes it all good.

North
2008-05-14, 07:34 PM
THe one problem is that Butcher has a habit of ending a book with untied loose ends. It makes you motivated to buy the next book, but for every subplot he wraps up he adds two more.
However, Harry can snark at an epic level which makes it all good.

I really like that actually. The way the series keeps building upon itself. But the books do have resolution to each books main plot. The arching overplots are like a puzzle that slowly is being pieced together through the series. The continuation of that is one of the hooks for me. Trying to figure out the greater mystery from the tidbits of information we get is a lot of fun.

Prustan
2008-05-15, 05:19 AM
Not sure if it's what you're looking for, but you could try Michelle Hauf, who's written a set of three connected books - not a trilogy as such, but connected by the main characters. Only title I can remember offhand is Gossamyr.