Quote Originally Posted by Seerow View Post
I like it. It's simple, it gets the same range across well, and if you let the attributes scale above 20 (another DDN design decision I am very opposed to) it lets strength scale very quickly. Maybe make it strx5 for max before encumbered, strx10 for max encumbered, and multiply by str bonus for max lift.


Let's see
Max Unencumbered/Encumbered/Lift
3e:
10-33/100/200
14-58/175/350
18-100/300/600
22-173/520/1040
26-306/920/1840
30-532/1600/3200

Your system:
10-50/100/200
14-70/140/280
18-90/180/720
22-110/220/1320
26-130/260/2080
30-150/300/3000

The numbers fit reasonably well for the 10-20 range within human capability. The encumbered numbers are reasonable enough; a little more lenient than 3e. The encumbrance values don't scale as quickly past that as it does in 3e, but by the time you get to those strength values it doesn't matter much anyway since you do have extra-dimensional space.

On the other hand, the max lift keeps up nicely, and something equally simple like a x3 multiplier can be added for max push/drag, which means high strength characters still have something to add to exploration, namely the ability to easily move around extremely large things.
But see, even that is more than most people are going to care about. A simple multiplication is easier to remember and apply in practice, and having the numbers be somewhat high means that they won't come up unless the player tries to do something absurd, which is also good.

If you make the fairly restrictive by default, then players might feel like they need to follow those rules even if they don't really want to. I had a similar experience with the 3.5 rules. Our group tried to follow them, which always involved looking up the rules every few minutes and lots of time wasted trying to figure out who could carry how much and how encumbered they were and so on and so forth. I'd far prefer a system that is very simple, easy to remember, and not too intrusive to playing the game.