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    Default The Bez-Kismet; or, a rebalanced Hexblade with a much more original name!

    Ladies and Gentlemen, children of all ages! Outsiders and Eldritch Abominations too!

    Better looking?

    Dunno if you have missed me or not, but one thing's for sure: I haven't missed you. As usual, here I provide for a class that need a bit of twinking, but one that is loved by most people as-is.

    ...Or that is, "as is" including some fixes. Of course.

    So...what in essence implies a Hexblade? Is it the curses? The fact that it's an arcane gish (of some sort) that does mostly debuffing? The idea was mostly a combination of the two: a warrior, somewhat like a Paladin, which could use magic spells and cold steel, a very strong debuffer, and a modestly resistant combatant: pretty much the first official gish, with a feel of its own. The biggest problem is not with the class, but in the book that it was released; that would be the Complete Warrior (tm) sourcebook, a book notorious for being the first official 3.5 experiment, and where the people were so green that they didn't ventured too forth. From them, the Hexblade is actually the better of the trio, considering the Swashbuckler is mostly a dipping class for smart fighters (no pun intended) and the Samurai...well, aside from Takahashi no Onisan, very rarely you can do much with it.

    So, why the Hexblade and not the Swashbuckler (since the Samurai has already been retooled, to be precise)? Because the Hexblade is cool, but I feel it could do better. Hopefully, this will be better than the original, but still having a pretty reasonable feel to the original.

    So, without further ado, I shall introduce to you...the:

    BEZ-KISMET



    Niam Tsinogatna, a bez-kismet. Pic...found on the Internets, but it probably is from Hyung-tae Kim if you look at it pretty closely...

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    So...why "Bez-kismet"? Why not keep it as Hexblade and used such a bizarre, obviously intended term?

    Well, first of all: excuses for all Serbians, Croatians, Bosnians and people who might get this a bit and blatantly realize this is wrong. Yes, it is grammatically wrong and I realize it, but I do it to make the class sound cool.

    The story of the name comes from a very unlikely source: the Biskmatar, from Final Fantasy Tactics. While stumbling upon its meaning, I stumbled upon the words "Bez" and "Kismet", which roughly translate to "without" and "fate"; hence, a person "without fate", or someone who's not manipulated by fate. This fit to an extent the concept of the Hexblade, which dealt with spreading misfortune and using it as a weapon. The concept took that one step further and applied it to fate, as someone who uses misfortune as a way to defy fate.

    Now...if someone is willing to make a much better translation, something that sounds reasonably good and that can sound less offensive to the above-mentioned people, by all means go for it. I'd go with Biskmatar, but it already has a pretty defined connotation (and people would go with "hey, this doesn't look anything like the Biskmatar I know!", so I want to be creative on the name for once...) I might consider it and make it better, or at least grammatically correct while still mysteriously sounding. If someone from those regions of Europe (or several) is willing to help, much better!

    MAKING A BEZ-KISMET (or, what has and what hasn't changed from the Hexblade):

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    Abilities: The most notable of the abilities, as you'll see, is Charisma. Being the driving force behind the spells, the supernatural abilities and pretty much everything behind it, Charisma should be one of the primary abilities. Strength is a second important stat, because the Bez-kismet in essence is a martial character; Constitution has a bit more importance because not only it defines the amount of HP the character will have and the Fortitude saving throw, but also the Concentration skill for its limited spellcasting.
    Races: Humans, as usual, suit bez-kismet pretty well. A human usually has a knack for making its own destiny, forging its own fate; to be deprived of a specific fate is to make it and forge it. Any race with a penchant for Charisma, a good arm and no moral qualms may also join: this may lead a few spellscales (Races of the Dragon) to pursue the path of facing destiny, a cruel twist to their ever-changing nature.
    Amongst savage or lesser known humanoids, tieflings gravitate towards this path. Aasimar with less than noble ideals, or whom has faced reality in the face and finds it disappointing may also become gifted in the arts of the bez-kismet.
    Alignment: Any non-Good. So...why not add Good? Most of the abilities of the bez-kismet are cruel, or questionable. Facing fate is not a decision easily done by good people; only brutal circumstances would lead to adopt the pathways that lead to the sword that defies fate. Most bez-kismet are cynical in nature, knowing that they are facing a force of the multiverse that has greater control over the world, and end up being mostly distrustful people, hard to make friends. The most amiable bez-kismet end up being usually neutral, knowing the practical value of a partnership but wary of creating too much empathy that destiny could use against it.
    Starting Gold: as Sorcerer
    Starting Age: as Sorcerer


    Class Skills: The bez-kismetís class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Bluff (Cha), Concentration (Con), Craft (any) (Int), Intimidate (Cha), Knowledge (arcana) (Int), Knowledge (the planes) (Int), Listen (Wis), Profession (Wis), Ride (Dex), Sense Motive (Wis), Spellcraft (Int) and Spot (Wis)
    Skill Points at 1st Level: (2 + Int modifier) x4.
    Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 2 + Int modifier.

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    Not so different from the original. Knowledge (the planes) implies a connection between the bez-kismet's knowledge and abilities, to outer beings interested in the fate (or lack of fate thereafter) of the individual. Sense Motive...well, a bez-kismet is not the most trustworthy of people. Certainly, he won't be trusting everyone, and will be on the eye for any bizarre event even in speech. Listen and Spot are abilities of perception, which should be useful for the bez-kismet if he feels he's being hunted.


    Hit Die: d10

    THE BEZ-KISMET
    Level Base Attack Bonus Fort Save Ref Save Will Save Special 0 1st 2nd 3rd 4th
    1st +1
    +2
    0
    +2
    Curse of the Fateless 2 - - - -
    2nd +2
    +3
    0
    +3
    Bonus feat, Miser's Fortune 2 - - - -
    3rd +3
    +3
    +1
    +3
    Aura of Misfortune 3 0 - - -
    4th +4
    +4
    +1
    +4
    Step into the Unknown (move speed) 3 0 - - -
    5th +5
    +4
    +1
    +4
    Improved Curse of the Fateless 3 1 - - -
    6th +6/+1
    +5
    +2
    +5
    Bonus Feat, Aura of Dissonance 3 1 - - -
    7th +7/+2
    +5
    +2
    +5
    Tainted Wounds 4 1 0 - -
    8th +8/+3
    +6
    +2
    +6
    Mettle 4 2 0 - -
    9th +9/+4
    +6
    +3
    +6
    Aura of Misfortune, Step into the Unknown (+10 ft.) 4 2 1 - -
    10th +10/+5
    +7
    +3
    +7
    Bonus Feat, Baleful Curse of the Fateless 4 2 1 - -
    11th +11/+6/+1
    +7
    +3
    +7
    Denial of Grace 5 2 1 0 -
    12th +12/+7/+2
    +8
    +4
    +8
    Aura of Negation 5 3 2 1 -
    13th +13/+8/+3
    +8
    +4
    +8
    Improved Mettle 5 3 2 1 -
    14th +14/+9/+4
    +9
    +4
    +9
    Bonus Feat, Step into the Unknown (double move) 5 3 2 2 0
    15th +15/+10/+5
    +9
    +5
    +9
    Aura of Misfortune, Dire Curse of the Fateless 5 3 3 2 1
    16th +16/+11/+6/+1
    +10
    +5
    +10
    Spell Resistance 5 4 3 2 1
    17th +17/+12/+7/+2
    +10
    +5
    +10
    Destiny Bond 5 4 3 3 2
    18th +18/+13/+8/+3
    +11
    +6
    +11
    Bonus Feat 5 4 4 3 2
    19th +19/+14/+9/+4
    +11
    +6
    +11
    Step into the Unknown (+10 feet speed) 5 4 4 3 3
    20th +20/+15/+10/+5
    +12
    +6
    +12
    Hex of Ending Death 5 4 4 3 3

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    Upon the biggest things you'll notice are..."the Hexb...I mean, the bez-kismet has now 0-level spells?!?!?!?"

    Yes, they do. I'll explain a bit later why they get them.

    Aside from that, they get a whole heck of nifty features: pretty much one ability for each level. Old favorites such as mettle remain, while some are moved around.

    You'll notice that there are several auras, but that the "Aura of Unluck" is absent. You'll notice, as well, why that had to happen. Aura of Unluck was a pretty awesome class feature, but it was: (a) gained pretty late and (b) excellent, but at the level a bit of a joke. Don't worry, though: it's meant to be better.


    Class Features
    All of the following are class features of the bez-kismet.
    Weapon and Armor Proficiency: Bez-kismet are proficient with all simple and martial weapons, with light and medium armor, and with light shields.
    Because the somatic components required for bez-kismet spells are simple, the bez-kismet may use his spells while wearing light or medium armor, and while using a light shield. However, like any other arcane spellcaster, a bez-kismet wearing heavy armor or using a heavy or tower shield incurs a chance of arcane spell failure if the spell in question has a somatic component (most do). A multiclass bez-kismet still incurs the normal arcane spell failure chance for arcane spells received from other classes.

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    One of the things that the original hexblade had was troubles with armor. They didn't have Mage Armor to justify the lack of proper armor, and medium armor is used very few times. While bez-kismet still have no heavy armor proficiency, they do have the ability to fight and cast in medium armor without ASF, which is pretty much the same.

    Another thing I added were light shields. Hexblades could use a proper shield right at the beginning, perhaps while they are still under their 0-level spells, and use simple gestures to cast with one hand, which is what they presume are "simple gestures". This allows a hexblade, with weapon and light shield and medium armor to cast spells without ASF even if holding the shield on one hand; technically, the hexblade's casting ability should not be limited, or fixed with a feat (*coughcoughSomaticWeaponrycoughcough*) in order to be useful.


    Spells: A bez-kismet casts arcane spells, which are drawn from the sorcerer/wizard spell list. He can cast any spell he knows without preparing it ahead of time. To learn or cast a spell, a bez-kismet must have a Charisma score equal to at least 10 + the spell level. The Difficulty Class for a saving throw against a bez-kismetís spell is 10 + the spell level + the bez-kismet Charisma modifier.
    Like other spellcasters, a bez-kismet can cast only a certain number of spells of each spell level per day. His base daily spell allotment is given on the table above. In addition, he receives bonus spells per day if he has a high Charisma score. When the table above indicates that the bez-kismet gets 0 spells per day of a given spell level, he gains only the bonus spells he would be entitled to based on his Charisma score for that spell level.
    The bez-kismet selection of spells is extremely limited. A bez-kismet begins play knowing two 0-level spells of his choice. At most new bez-kismet levels, he gains one or more new spells, as indicated below. (Unlike spells per day, the number of spells a bez-kismet knows is not affected by his Charisma score; the numbers below are fixed.)
    A bez-kismet can learn any sorcerer/wizard spell from the enchantment, illusion, necromancy and transmutation schools, and conjuration spells with the calling or summoning descriptor. However, a bez-kismet is incapable of learning spells with the good descriptor. A bez-kismet may also choose other spells from different schools of the sorcerer/wizard spell list but as indicated below; furthermore, he can learn unique spells not available on the sorcerer/wizard spell list.
    Upon reaching 8th level, once per week and at every three class levels afterwards, a bez-kismet can choose to learn a new spell in place of one he already knows. The new spellís level must be the same as that of the spell being exchanged. A bez-kismet may swap only a single spell at any given moment, and must choose whether or not to swap the spell at the same time that he gains new spells known for the specified level.

    Table: Bez-Kismet spells known
    Level 0 1st 2nd 3rd 4th
    1st 2 - - - -
    2nd 2 - - - -
    3rd 3 11 - - -
    4th 3 21 - - -
    5th 3 2 - - -
    6th 3 3 - - -
    7th 4 3 11 - -
    8th 4 3 21 - -
    9th 4 4 2 - -
    10th 4 4 3 - -
    11th 5 4 3 21 -
    12th 5 4 3 2 -
    13th 5 5 4 3 -
    14th 5 5 4 3 21
    15th 6 5 4 3 2
    16th 6 5 4 4 3
    17th 6 5 5 4 3
    18th 6 6 5 4 4
    19th 7 6 5 5 4
    20th 7 6 5 5 5
    1 Provided the bez-kismet has sufficient Charisma to have a bonus spell of this level.

    As noted above, a bez-kismet needs not prepare his spells in advance. He can cast any spell he knows at any time, assuming he has not yet used up his allotment of spells per day for the spellís level.

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    This is a really big change within the hexblade, now renamed bez-kismet.

    The main changes to the spellcasting include full caster level (so that their spells are usable at full power), an expanded class list (taking from spells of illusion, necromancy and transmutation as well as a few other spells that enhance gishes) and a reduction at some key spells, so that they get them at appropriate levels. While it remains an arcane spellcaster first and foremost, the wealth of options you can get through spellcasting serves as an appropriate exchange for the flavor.

    I chose spellcasting because of its practicality, and because the original hexblade had arcane spells. There are some ACFs that exchange some of that flavor, but the idea is that the bez-kismet should be quite practical in terms of how it should work. Being a retooling, I usually attempt to keep some stuff untouched while fixing others.

    UPDATE: A bez-kismet can cast spells of 1st level at 3rd level, and those of 2nd level at 7th level.


    Curse of the Fateless (Su): The bez-kismet is a warrior shunned by fate. Either by defiance or by determination, the bez-kismet alters the fortune of people, cursing them into terrible misfortune. Albeit the bez-kismet opposes the whim of fate, forces beyond his knowledge ensure that he does not suffer from its terrible consequences by equaling the fighting ground.
    As a swift action, a bez-kismet may unleash a curse upon his foe. The target must be visible to the bez-kismet and within 60 feet. The target of a curse of the fateless takes a -2 penalty on attack rolls, damage rolls saves, ability checks and skill checks for the rest of the encounter and for a number of rounds equal to the bez-kismetís class level afterwards. A successful Will save (DC 10 + Ĺ the bez-kismetís class level + the bez-kismetís Cha modifier) negates the effect though a curse attempt is not wasted if the target saves successfully.
    Multiple curses of the fateless donít stack, and any foe that successfully resists the effect cannot be affected by the same curse for 24 hours. Any effect that removes or dispels a curse eliminates the effect of a curse of the fateless.
    At 1st level, a bez-kismet can use his curse of the fateless a number of times per day equal to 1 + his Charisma modifier. At 5th level, and every five levels afterwards, the bez-kismet gains an extra use of his curse of the fateless per day.

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    The hexblade's curse, now renamed into a much cooler name! But...in essence, it's the same thing.

    One of the usual things while watching hexblade fixes is that they bring up a small "fix" list done by the original creator of the class, Mike Mearls. This is because otherwise the class abilities of the hexblade would be pretty underwhelming, specially one as the hexblade's curse which should be the key ability of the bez-kismet.

    Now, at the moment, the curse of the fateless looks almost word by word as the hexblade's curse, and it's meant to be so; it is basically the same ability, except with Mearls' fix added in. However, you'll notice that each level in which the bez-kismet would gain an extra daily use, the name differs. That's good: that is because it's meant to be improved at each level. So: with a good Charisma, a 1st level bez-kismet would have up to 5 uses a day for its signature ability; in later occasions, this might increase up to 11 uses per day, which is not a slouch.

    However, the key is later, and later is where I'll explain a bit more how this ability changes.


    Bonus Feat: At 2nd level, and every four levels after that, a bez-kismet gains a bonus feat in addition to those he obtains by means of improving levels. These bonus feats must be drawn from the feats noted as fighter bonus feats, reserve feats (see Complete Mage) or from the list provided below. A bez-kismet must still meet the prerequisites for a bonus feat, as usual. For purposes of fighter level prerequisites, a bez-kismet is considered to have a fighter level equal to his class level -5.
    Bez-Kismet Bonus Feat List: Arcane Defense, Arcane Mastery, Arcane Preparation, Combat Casting, Eschew Materials, Extra Slot, Extra Spell, Greater Spell Focus, Greater Spell Penetration, Ranged Spell Specialization, Spell Focus, Spell Penetration, Touch Spell Specialization.

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    This is an expansion to the list of bonus feats the old hexblade had access, and which were pretty unassuming: now, you can either get fighter bonus feats or reserve feats, so you can mix and match to your tastes. This reduces the feat starvation of the class even more, and at the moments where they starve the most, without stealing the fighter's spotlight.


    Miserís Fortune (Su): At 2nd level, a bez-kismetís miserable fortune is such that it cannot plunge any lower. Whenever he receives a penalty on attack rolls, saving throws, skill checks or ability checks, he may ignore part of this penalty, to an amount equal to 1 + 1 per three class levels after the second. This penalty reduction applies to all penalties separately, and does not affect penalties to ability scores. A penalty cannot be reduced to lower than 0 by means of this ability (hence, the bez-kismet cannot gain a bonus by means of this ability). While under the effects of a penalty, however, a bez-kismet cannot benefit from luck bonuses.

    Furthermore, if the bez-kismet successfully curses an opponent, he may add his Charisma modifier to all damage rolls done to it. This benefit applies regardless of the method of cursing, but only through use of the Curse of the Fateless class feature.

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    Magikeeper made this ability less fluffy and more useful. Kudos.

    So, basically, you now get to reduce penalties gained from any source, and this reduction increases depending on the class level, which makes it much more powerful (and less dip-tastic). However, the character loses luck bonuses, which basically means his fortune (or lack of it) is resisting the penalties.

    UPDATE: Because of the playtest results from Nine and Gareth, I decided to boost their damage potential a bit. It depends on using their curses, but given that they WILL use their curses because it's a swift action, it's a win-win situation.


    Aura of Misfortune (Su): Beginning at 3rd level, a bez-kismet unmakes the fortune of his enemies. This manifests as an aura that has a small distance, but that slowly increases in size as the bez-kismet progresses.
    Projecting an aura is a swift action, and the bez-kismet can only project one aura at a time. An aura remains in effect until the bez-kismet uses a free action to dismiss it or he activates another aura in its place. A bez-kismet can have an aura of misfortuneactive continually; thus, an aura can be in effect at the start of an encounter even before he takes his first turn.
    A bez-kismet that acquires this ability must choose from one of the auras presented below. Unless otherwise noted, the range of the aura is of 60 feet. As a bez-kismet progresses in levels, he learns to manifest more auras and the size of his auras increase; at 9th level, he gains the ability to manifest one more aura from the list and his aura increases to 75 feet; at 15th level, a bez-kismet gains the ability to manifest another aura and his area of effect increases to 90 feet. Opponents within the area of effect of the aura must have line of effect to the bez-kismet in order to be affected by it. The bez-kismetís aura is dismissed if he becomes unconscious or slain, but otherwise it remains in effect even if she is incapable of acting.
    All of the auraís penalties start at -1, and increase by 1 for every three class levels of the bez-kismet. If the bez-kismet has the ability to manifest other kinds of auras (such as the dragon shamanís draconic auras from Playerís Handbook II or the marshalís major auras from Miniatures Handbook, but not the marshal's minor auras or draconic auras from Dragon Magic acquired through feats), his auras increase in power: for every two points of bonus from other auras, the bez-kismetís aura of misfortuneís penalties increase by 1, and for every two points of penalty from the auras of misfortune, all other aurasí bonuses increase by 1. Unless otherwise indicated, all penalties are luck penalties.
    Apathy: luck penalty on all Will saving throws
    Debilitation: luck penalties on attack rolls and damage rolls.
    Frailty: luck penalty on all Fortitude saving throws
    Hesitation: luck penalty on all Reflex saving throws
    Lethargy: reduction in speed equal to five times the penalty provided by the aura. This applies to all speeds, except flight speeds in which the reduction is equal to 10 times the penalty. A characterís speed can be reduced to 0 by means of this ability.
    Recklessness: luck penalty on Armor Class. A character under the effects of this aura may not make 5 ft. steps.

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    Remember when I said that there was something like Aura of Unluck, but better? Here's that "better".

    The Aura of Misfortune is basically an aura you manifest, which provides a pretty solid penalty to the opponent, and every now and then the aura's area of effect increases. Part of the reason why the Marshal, the Dragon Shaman and the aura-based classes are considered weak is because of this specifically: too small area of effect. At 60 feet radius, the AoE should be enough to cover virtually every opponent without being in much range.

    Now, and this is crucial: you'll notice that the penalty scales pretty quickly, to the point that an 18th level bez-kismet will provide a base penalty of -6 depending on the active aura. That...well, pretty much makes the Marshal worthless (or at least the system it uses). That is intentional; not that I hate the Marshal, but the aura-provided bonuses have a pretty odd progression. Now, if you consider the aura's penalties are a tad too severe, make it so that it gains a point at 3rd, 9th, and 15th level: that way, they won't steal the shine of the Marshal or Dragon Shaman.


    Step into the Unknown (Su): At 4th level, a bez-kismet gains the ability to escape from various situations by warping the space around himself. A bez-kismet is convinced of the certainty of death, but he refuses to believe his death is predestined to happen at the whim of fate.
    As a move action that does not provoke attacks of opportunity, a number of times per day equal to his Charisma modifier, a bez-kismet can teleport a small distance away from its current location (up to his land speed). He may use this ability even if heís grappled, pinned, immobilized, dazed or stunned, and even if he does not have line of effect to the location, but not if heís paralyzed, petrified, unconscious or otherwise helpless.
    At 9th level, the bez-kismet gains a bonus of 10 feet to his land speed for purposes of determining the maximum range of teleportation. At 14th level, he may use this ability as a full-round action and move up to twice his effective land speed, as if making a double move action. At 19th level, the bez-kismet gains an actual bonus of 10 feet to any of his speeds, which can be duplicated if making a double-move teleport and that stacks with the earlier effective bonus to speed for purposes of determining the maximum teleportation range. At each of these levels, the bez-kismet may use this ability two more times per day.

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    Step into the Unknown is a nifty movement ability, at the lines of the Monk's Abundant Step or the infinitely better Conjurer's Abrupt Jaunt Wizard ACF. It takes your move action (preventing full attacks) and has limited uses per day, but it still has some utility when tactical teleportation is needed.


    Improved Curse of the Fateless (Su): At 5th level, the curse inflicted by the bez-kismet increases in potency. The penalty on on attack rolls, damage rolls saves, ability checks and skill checks increases to -4, and the duration of the curse last for an amount of minutes equal to the bez-kismetís class level afterwards (if the creature manages to escape). Alternatively, the bez-kismet may impose a -4 penalty to a single ability score (this penalty stacks with the penalty from Bestow Curse), but the penalty only lasts for a number of rounds equal to the bez-kismetís class level (if the creature manages to escape).

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    Basically, this is the old Improved Hexblade's Curse with a twist: now, the bez-kismet can place one of two different curses instead of the same curse. The curse becomes much more powerful and retains its utility as compared to before, and that goes without mention that penalties are very rarely resisted, in comparison to ability damage and ability drain.

    By the time you reach Dire Curse of the Fateless, you'll figure out what I'm trying to do with this ability. But it should be clear by now :P


    Aura of Dissonance (Su): At 6th level, a bez-kismet impedes the use of magic upon his surroundings. The bez-kismet imposes a circumstance penalty on caster level to any enemy spellcaster when using a spell equal to the penalty provided by his aura of misfortune (see above). Reduction of caster level by means of this aura's effect does not prevent spellcasters from accessing their highest spell levels (an exception to the norm), except as follows. If the spellcaster fails a Will saving throw (DC equal to 10 + 1/2 the bez-kismet's class level + the bez-kismet's Charisma modifier), it may not use spells of the highest level it can cast while they are within the range of the aura of misfortune.

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    So...this aura could easily go in the list above, but I consider that it would be an aura that most people would choose, and for good measure. Furthermore, there's a high chance that they won't try to change said aura in any case they find a spellcaster. Thus, this aura is provided separately from the other three auras you can get by virtue of class levels.

    Now, this aura is meant to hinder enemy spellcasters, and with a strong reason: by 6th level, spellcasters can already cause big trouble within a game. While this doesn't remove much power from a spellcaster, it makes spells less durable and it also makes some attack spells a bit less powerful. For example: Fireball loses two entire dice of damage, while spells such as Haste and Alter Self lose two entire rounds of duration. Range of spells becomes a bit smaller, and if capable of using mass spells, they affect one less character.

    UPDATE: Now it only limits spellcasters to be unable to cast their highest-level spells, and the effect is resistable.

    Now: I concur that this is a pretty strong ability, and that perhaps the effect is a bit too powerful for what it means (and it would be a lot less powerful if the corollary of preventing spellcasters from using their highest level spells would be removed), so a bit of opinion is welcome. There's a much more powerful ability six levels later, just mentioning.


    Tainted Wounds (Su): At 7th level, a bez-kismet can taint the wounds of creatures struck by his weapons, making them much more difficult to heal.
    By sacrificing a daily use of the curse of the fateless class ability, the weapons of the bez-kismet become tainted weapons for a number of rounds equal to half the bez-kismetís class level. Whenever the bez-kismet strikes a creature with a weapon tainted by this ability for the first time, the creature must make a Fortitude saving throw against a DC equal to 10 + Ĺ the bez-kismetís class level + the bez-kismetís Charisma modifier. If the creature fails its saving throw, any wound dealt by the bez-kismet does not heal naturally, and magical healing is impaired. Any healing spell, as well as fast healing and regeneration are reduced to half their effectiveness. Healing spells restore half the amount of hit points (but only hit points) it would normally heal, and fast healing/regeneration only heal half the normal amount of hit points it would heal per turn.
    This effect lasts for 24 hours, or until the creature is treated with a Remove Curse, Break Enchantment or similar ability. If the creature succeeds on the saving throw, it is immune to the effect of this ability for the remainder of the rounds the bez-kismet holds this ability and for 24 hours afterwards.

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    UPDATE: With the removal of the Baneful Aura of Misfortune, Tainted Wounds has taken that task. Not only that, it's a flat 50% reduction in all HP healing. It's easy, less noggin' breaking, and effective with everything: Cure X Wounds spells will be weaker, but not entirely weak, while Heal spells will take a severe hit (and with Aura of Dissonance, even more!). Fast Healing will take only a moderate hit, except for the Tarrasque which all of a sudden will only heal 20 of its HP, instead of the whopping 40.

    Though...thinking about the Tarrasque, I'm this close to say that, if you use Tainted Wounds on the Tarrasque, it loses ALL its regeneration. Just because the Tarrasque is overrated :P


    Mettle (Ex): Beginning at 8th level, if a bez-kismet makes a successful Will or Fortitude save that would normally reduce the saveís effect, he suffers no effect from the spell at all. Only those spells with a saving throw entry of ďpartialĒ or ďhalfĒ are affected by this ability, and only for purposes of Will and/or Fortitude saves with these descriptors.

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    Not much to say: the Bez-kismet deserves mettle, it retains mettle. It has already high Fort and Will saves, it is meant to be a frontline tank, so why not grant it this ability?


    Baleful Curse of the Fateless (Su): At 10th level, the curses of the bez-kismet not only improve further, but also cause physical harm whenever they are resisted. The penalty on on attack rolls, damage rolls saves, ability checks and skill checks increases to -6, and the duration of the curse last for an amount of hours equal to the bez-kismetís class level afterwards (if the creature manages to escape). If the target creature succeeds on the saving throw, the curse of the fateless ability is not wasted (as usual), but the creature takes damage equal to twice the bez-kismetís class level plus his Charisma modifier (unless the creature has the mettle ability, in which case it takes no damage).

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    By the time this ability is acquired, you can deal basically 5 20 + Cha mod. damage, which would be a solid 9-11 24-26 points of damage as a swift action. Now, you can deliver curses of the fateless without worrying that there won't be any effect.

    If there are good things about 4th Edition, is that they made some abilities work even if they missed. Same thing should apply to some of the 3.5 edition classes and characters. Since it's a swift action, an effect that only applies at a miss, and an ability that can't be spammed, it's meant to be pretty annoying; the more annoying it is, the more hate it'll provoke, and the more chances they'll try to neutralize you, which is the idea for a tank, no?


    Denial of Grace (Su): At 11th level, a bez-kismet becomes slightly resistant to magic spells. A bez-kismet gains a bonus against spells, spell-like abilities, psionic powers, psi-like abilities and mysteries (whether they are cast as arcane spells, spell-like or supernatural abilities) equal to his Charisma modifier.

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    Denial of Grace is basically the Arcane Resistance of the old Hexblade, but several levels later. It's meant to be a powerful ability (you get a bonus to saves on effectively five different types of abilities, including the entire line of mysteries), but with the catch that you'll be effectively barred from getting buffs. It's a zero-sum benefit: either get really high saves and protect yourself from some nefarious spells, or keep your spells low to prevent having buffs fail on you. Still, you *can* buff yourself, so it's not a bad idea....


    Aura of Negation (Su): At 12th level, a bez-kismet negates a creatureís chances to incline the odds to its favor. When using a spell, spell-like ability, psionic power, psi-like ability or mystery (provided it is used as a spell or spell-like ability) that provides any kind of bonus, a creature within the aura of misfortune of the bez-kismet must succeed on a Concentration check equal to 13 + the bez-kismetís class level + the bez-kismetís Charisma modifier or botch the spell. This ability does not affect supernatural abilities that provide a bonus.

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    Basically, aura of negation prevents people from being buffed by spells, psionic powers or mysteries (but not supernatural abilities) cast within area. This is meant to be the improved version of Aura of Dissonance: super-buffers within the area are basically nullified, and it takes only a friendly cast of Dispel Magic to halt them in their tracks.

    So...why 13? It makes sense: a Concentration check, at its base, is equal to the ranks in Concentration, plus its Constitution modifier, plus a d20 roll. With this, your Charisma effectively negates the creature's Constitution for purposes of the roll, your own class level negates the ranks in Concentration, and what's left is basically the spellcasting succeeding on a roll of 10 or more (or less; it's basically a roll of 10 +/- the difference between your stats and the creature's own). With a much higher Charisma than Constitution (as expected), the creature will be forced to have insanely high bonuses in Concentration or have its buffs fail.

    Now, seeing this ability and the earlier ability: are they strong abilities? Certainly, they won't destroy the hegemony of a spellcaster, but it will make them less effective within the area of a bez-kismet, which is the intention.


    Improved Mettle (Ex): At 13th level, a bez-kismetís mettle ability improves. He still takes no effect on a successful Will or Fortitude save that has the ďpartialĒ or ďhalfĒ descriptor, but henceforth he takes only the partial effect or half the damage on a failed save.

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    Not much to say here: if they got mettle, it makes sense that they get improved mettle. After all, they're staying within the class, and they're getting pretty resistant to various spells in any case; why not grant them one more resistance?


    Dire Curse of the Fateless (Su): At 15th level, a bez-kismetís curse becomes mortally crippling; such is the nature of the curse. The penalty on on attack rolls, damage rolls saves, ability checks and skill checks increases to -8, and the duration of the curse is permanent. The bez-kismet may instead reduce a single ability score to 1, or grant a -8 penalty to two ability scores, and the curse lasts for the entire encounter and for a number of hours equal to the bez-kismetís class level afterwards. Alternatively, the subject of the curse has a 50% to act normally; otherwise, it takes no action. This last effect lasts for the entire encounter and for a number of rounds equal to the bez-kismetís class level afterwards.
    Spells such as Break Enchantment and Limited Wish cannot remove this curse while it remains on the creature, but a spellcaster using Miracle, Wish or Remove Curse (the latter cast by a spellcaster with a caster level equal or greater to the bez-kismetís class level) can remove this curse.

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    Still don't get it? Well, lemme be nice with you: this is basically making Greater Bestow Curse (or is it Bestow Greater Curse) as a swift-action supernatural ability. By now, any curse applied to a creature is potentially fatal, and the original curse becomes permanent (the others have different durations, though).

    So, an ability such as this truly merits the somewhat restrictive daily uses, but it makes sense; a spellcaster can only use this ability a few times per day, as a standard action, and it'll still have less chances of success than yours (unless it blatantly cheats on its save DC, that is), with the caveat that if the effect fails, you still deal damage AND have a full-round worth of actions. It's neither insanely strong nor insanely weak: in fact, although it attacks, so to speak, the strongest save of a spellcaster it has a reasonable chance of ending a battle with them immediately.

    Too much speak of spellcasters...no, I don't hate spellcasters, but I think it's time that martial characters and hybrids get nice toys against them.


    Spell Resistance (Su): A bez-kismet of 16th level or higher gains spell resistance equal to 15 + his class level. Unlike other forms of spell resistance, a bez-kismet cannot voluntarily lower (or reactivate) his spell resistance during an encounter; only in or out of battle.

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    Yep...spell resistance. A pretty decent, pretty high spell resistance (SR 31 right when you get it, for example). UPDATE:A bit less stupid restriction, but a reasonable one: your spell resistance is much more difficult to activate or deactivate.

    This also still doesn't work exactly against SR: No spells, unless those have saving throws (in which Denial of Grace applies), but Aura of Dissonance still works for that. So they may depend on orbs against you, some of those horrible, horrible orbs they use, but those orbs will be weaker in average.


    Destiny Bond (Su): At 17th level, a bez-kismet defies fate even if it perishes, by means of a death curse. If a creature uses an ability that instantly kills or destroys the bez-kismet, the creature must make a Fortitude saving throw with the abilityís DC, plus the bez-kismetís Charisma modifier, or suffer the same effects as the bez-kismet. Thus, if a sorcerer with Charisma 24 uses Finger of Death (a 7th level spell for sorcerers) against a bez-kismet with Charisma 24, and the bez-kismet is slain, the creature must make a Fortitude save with a DC of 29 or be slain instantly as well. This ability does not activate if the bez-kismet is slain by means of ability damage, ability drain or energy drain, but it activates if the bez-kismet is petrified or slain by a coup-de-grace.

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    For anyone who asks: yes, I took this one from Pokemon. Just because it's an awesome ability.

    So basically: you manage to fail an instant-kill ability? That might hardly happen with some spells, but it works with others; the idea is that a spellcaster (or any creature, actually) will think it twice before trying to kill you, but it'll still need to take you out of the battle because you're making their chances of combat more difficult. So: if you die by means of plain coup-de-grace, Disintegrate (you'll take 5d6 damage, but if you still die because of that the other guy becomes Disintegrated as well), Implosion, Finger of Death...you name it. Why have Death Ward when you can get the best kind of death-ward?

    That goes without mentioning that you add your Charisma modifier to the save DC. What this means is that the guy is probably screwed, since if it managed to instantly kill you, whom has high Fort and Will saves, it might instantly kill them as well (unless they are insanely lucky enough, right?)


    Hex of Ending Fate (Su): At 20th level, the bez-kismet develops a terrifying new power when someone is bound to his curse; to unravel the binds of fate and attempt to end an accursed personís life. As a standard action, if a creature is under the effect of a curse of the fateless, the bez-kismet may decide to end this effect prematurely. The creature then must make a Will saving throw, against a DC of 10 + Ĺ the bez-kismetís class level + the bez-kismetís Charisma modifier or perish instantly, its body destroyed in the process. A creature that perishes because of this ability cannot be revived by means of raise dead or resurrection spells; only a true resurrection, wish or miracle spell can revive the character. If the saving throw succeeds, the creature no longer suffers the effects of the curse (and may not be affected by the curse of the fateless for 24 hours, as if it had successfully resisted the curse in first place).
    If a creature is immune to death effects by any reason, it instead takes an amount of damage equal to the bez-kismetís class level times his Charisma modifier, and if the creatureís HP reaches 0 because of this ability, the creature is likewise destroyed.

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    Capstone ability, and I intended this one to be sick.

    So you have the BBEG cursed, with a miserable Will save, and otherwise making your life impossible? All of this depends on a well-timed gamble? Good: make this gamble worthwhile. Either kill the guy, or remove his curse. It's a clever, risky, and tasty method of ending a creature's life, and it'll leave you thinking whether to use this ability or keep the curse ongoing, sapping its life slowly.

    However...what if you can't kill it? Simple, you take an insane amount of damage. Since this is a capstone ability, that means you deal at the very least 20 points of damage, and that is if you play a bez-kismet wrong. If you play it right (and I assume you do), you'll be dealing something along the lines of 140-180 points of damage in a single blow. That should be enough to kill most creatures, especially if they have taken damage before. If they manage to survive (or make the save), then things get harder, but by no means impossible; that well-timed curse might have just weakened the creature enough already.

    Also: it can be done in a single round. Two saves, and if it already failed your Will save for the curse, chances are it'll die on the first round. This is also the ultimate taste of irony: you depend on luck for one of your abilities, but by now you've essentially given the finger to luck, so chances are that you've just changed their fate.
    Last edited by T.G. Oskar; Yesterday at 03:10 PM. Reason: Fixing tables