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    Default Masters of the Sword: A Warblade's Handbook

    Magic Items: Tricking Out Your Sword

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    Dungeon Master's Guide

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    Armor

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    +1 Bonus:

    Arrow Catching – Shield. Only applies to arrows aimed at targets within 5 feet of you, and notably, doesn’t function if the ranged weapons have an enhancement bonus greater than your shield. Little use.
    Bashing – Shield. Mandatory for shield-bashers, holds little use for those uninterested in shield bashing.
    Blinding – Shield. Blinded is a pretty nasty status condition, but the save DC is only 14 and the ability functions only twice per day.

    +2 Bonus:

    Animated – Shield. A defining property for shields, and the only thing that makes them worthwhile: granting all the benefits they confer but leaving both your hands free. It’s likely you’ll want to pick up an animated shield at some point. You’ll absolutely need to if you’re a shield-basher.
    Arrow Deflection – Shield. A DC 20 Reflex save to avoid a ranged attack is pretty snazzy. This is going to put a crunch in any archer’s day, especially because, at high levels, the save DC will probably become close to trivial.

    +3 Bonus:

    Ghost Touch – Armor/shield. If you’re incorporeal, I guess. But for the more substantial among us, not worth a +3 bonus.
    Invulnerability – Armor. Sorry, but if you call DR 5 invulnerability, then you are kind of silly.

    +5 Bonus:

    Reflecting – Shield. Spell turning, even once per day, is a very potent effect, but a +5 bonus is quite significant (and it has to be weighed against the benefits you might glean from investing your gold elsewhere). I would not, ultimately, pick this property, even in a Core-only game; however, it would not be an awful choice.

    Variable:

    Fortification – +1/+3/+5 bonus. Armor/shield. Comes in three versions, each providing a degree of immunity against critical hits – variously, 25, 75, and 100 percent. Critical hits are unexpected and often devastating, and as such the light and moderate versions of this property are almost certainly worth thinking about. The heavy version is more of a question: a +5 bonus, but in exchange for total crit immunity. Generally I would stick with the moderate version, as it’s significantly cheaper and still gives a 75% chance at negation.
    Spell Resistance - +2/+3/+4/+5 bonus. Armor. It comes in five versions, which provide from 13 to 19 SR. The SR is, needless to say, ridiculously low; if you’re restricted to Core, the first version could maybe be on the table, but anything above that is absurdly overpriced.

    +X GP

    Energy Resistance (Acid Resistance, Cold Resistance, Electricity Resistance, Fire Resistance, Sonic Resistance) – +18,000/+42,000/+66,000 gp. Armor/shield. Simply too niche (and at too great a cost) to be worthwhile. You’d be much better off simply having the party caster prepare or acquire scrolls of resist energy or energy immunity if you expect to go up against foes who use a certain type of energy damage. Not only is that cheaper, it’s also far more versatile.
    Etherealness – +49,000 gp. Armor. The price tag is somewhat hefty, especially considering that one may only go ethereal once per day, though on the other hand, you can stay ethereal indefinitely. Handy for ambushes, hiding, and making a quick escape; functions as a form of both flight and invisibility. However, there are probably cheaper ways to accomplish what this property does.
    Glamered – +2,700 gp. Armor. Lets your armor appear as a normal set of clothing. Needless to say, very nifty.
    Shadow, Silent Moves, Slick – +3,750/+15,000/+33,750 gp. Armor. Competence bonuses ranging from +5 to +15 on, respectively, Hide, Move Silently, and Escape Artist checks. None are (for you, at least) worth getting.


    Weapons

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    To be imbued with a special ability, a weapon must have at least a +1 bonus.

    Numerical Bonuses (+2, +3, etcetera) - It's never worth getting a numerical bonus higher than +1. Unless you go out of your way to ruin yourself, special abilities will always confer much greater benefits than a simple +1 to attack and damage. Numerical bonuses don't hurt you, but when you can you should always choose a special ability instead.

    +1 Bonus:

    Bane – If you know ahead of time that you’ll be facing a lot of one type of enemy, a bane weapon of the appropriate type can be a very profitable investment to make. If you don’t know what you’ll be facing, you can still reasonably choose a type that’s likely to come up, like monstrous humanoids or undead, but it’s a gamble and you may get better returns from a different property.
    Energy (Flaming, Frost, Corrosive, Screaming, Shock) – The basic weapon property, and very serviceable. If you’re restricted to Core, you’ll probably want to pick up one (or even two) of these. Corrosive and screaming are from the MIC, but they’re grouped here for convenience. Be aware that at higher levels, resistance to fire and cold damage is rampant, so you’ll probably want to get one of the other three instead; screaming deals on average one less point of damage than the others, but resistance to sonic damage is very rare. Note that a greater crystal of energy assault can, for a cheap price, net you one of these properties plus another minor benefit.
    Defending –
    Ghost Touch – A lesser or greater truedeath crystal will grant you this same property for a cheaper price, and without binding you to enchant your weapon. If you’re in a campaign heavy with incorporeal foes, I recommend grabbing one of those instead – not only will a weapon crystal not suck up part of your weapon’s precious +10 maximum, but you’ll get some nifty bonus damage versus undead (and with the greater version, the ability to crit against them).
    Keen – A scabbard of keen edges will grant you this property for 150 minutes each day, for only 16000 GP; pretty much every warblade should have one or the other (it's not optional for crit fishers). I’d tend toward preferring the scabbard, as three fifty-minute segments every day should probably cover most of your adventuring needs (you can always buy another, as well). But be aware that the scabbard takes a standard action to activate, which can be limiting if you’re not expecting combat.
    Merciful – The utility of this property depends heavily on how often you use nonlethal damage. I know that some groups employ it heavily, while others ignore it entirely; if your party falls into the first grouping, a merciful weapon may be worth considering. But my default reaction would be to say there are better choices.
    Mighty Cleaving – If you have the Cleave feat, this will allow you an additional cleave attempt. Fairly decent, though if you can use the MIC there are definitely better properties. If you’re restricted to Core – likely, if you have Cleave – it may be worth considering. But if you find yourself facing clusters of weak enemies often enough that this property frequently comes into play, you may simply be better off taking Great Cleave. If you don't have Cleave, of course, you can't use it.
    Spell Storing – A nifty property with lots of possible utility. It does have the problem of needing to be refilled very frequently. Subpar in terms of damage potential.
    Thundering – Essentially an energy burst property with slightly lower damage and without the non-crit benefit. When compared with a normal energy property, you're looking at 1d6 damage on every attack versus, with thundering, a negligibly higher 1d8 damage on a crit.
    Better if you have a weapon with a x4 crit modifier, but still not great.
    Vicious – The extra damage against your opponent is going to greatly outweigh the minimal damage you sustain. However, it does mean you’ll end most battles with a fair number of scrapes, so if you don’t have access to easy healing between encounters it may not be the best choice. Nonetheless it is something to consider, especially if you can’t use the MIC.

    +2 Bonus:

    Aligned (Anarchic, Axiomatic, Holy, Unholy) – As an adventurer, it’s expected that just about every foe you face will be evil. As such, the holy enhancement is incredibly useful (for evil characters, vice versa). The anarchic and axiomatic properties are far less reliable, and as such not a good choice.
    Disruption – Most warblades aren’t going to be using a bludgeoning weapon, which this property requires. Even if you are wielding a bludgeoning weapon, by the time you can afford a disruption weapon most undead will be able to make the low save easily; don’t expect them to fail more than 5-10% of the time. While a 5-10% chance of instant destruction may sound formidable, remember that combat in D&D is quick and that, in the long term, you’ll likely get more benefit by using that +2 bonus elsewhere. And if you’re drooling over the prospect of KOing that ancient lich, remember that if you’re in position to be hitting them you’ve likely won anyway.
    Energy Burst (Acidic Burst, Flaming Burst, Icy Burst, Screaming Burst, Shocking Burst) – Potentially excellent if you’re a crit fisher, especially if you have a way to increase your critical multiplier (or are restricted to Core). Acidic and screaming are from the MIC, but they’re grouped here for convenience. If you’re wielding a minotaur greathammer or another x4 weapon, an energy burst property may also be worth consideration. Otherwise, though, there are better options.
    Wounding – A property with the possibility of becoming very nasty indeed, even more so if you’re TWFing with two wounding weapons. As you level up, it becomes more and more appealing; higher enemy HD mean the Con damage goes farther, and more iteratives mean more Con damage. On the flip side, more enemies become immune to crits (and thus, this property’s effect).

    +3 Bonus:

    Speed – Copies the extra attack effect of haste (which it doesn’t stack with). If you can afford to buy a +3 weapon property, you can afford to just buy a wand of haste instead (which also gets you the benefits of extra movement speed and the bonus to attacks and Reflex saves). However, haste from a default wand only lasts five rounds, so you’ll have to buff before every combat (and risk running out mid-fight); the habit can also quickly become expensive. The speed property’s permanent nature is a benefit that can’t be overlooked.

    +4 Bonus:

    Brilliant Energy – Yuck, lightsabers. A brilliant energy weapon can’t affect constructs or undead, so make sure to keep a backup weapon if you decide to use one. Its effect – ignoring armor bonuses to AC – is going to basically result in you auto-hitting; however, at a +4 bonus it is quite expensive, and you should be hitting nearly all the time, anyway (the Tarrasque only has 35 AC; pit fiends have only 40). You’d likely be better off spending that +4 bonus on other properties.
    Dancing – A dancing weapon will need to be a backup weapon, since it can’t dance and be wielded at the same time. At an additional +4 bonus, that means your backup weapon will probably be nearly equal to your main weapon in price – and that’s something you simply can’t afford, unless you’re inordinately rich. Especially because it won’t be doing all that much damage, a dancing weapon is prohibitively expensive.

    +5 Bonus:

    Vorpal – Vorpal weapons are a manxome issue. Their cost is frumiously expensive, both in terms of costing an outgrabe amount of gold and taking up a full half of your weapon’s maximum +10 bonus; however, the allure of a 5% chance (a greater chance with iteratives) of automatically whiffling your enemy can’t be denied. The severing effect does work against enemies immune to crits, but not against those who have no heads or can function without theirs, which can be problematic; and most combats are caloohly short. It’s also a death effect, to which (by the time you can afford this) most uffish foes are going to be immune. Generally, I would say that the vorpal property is a bit too gimble to be worth it.


    Jewelry

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    Throat:

    Fingers:


    Clothing

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    Head:

    Face:

    Torso:

    Body:

    Waist:

    Shoulders:

    Arms:

    Hands:

    Feet:


    Tools

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    Consumables:

    Utilities:


    Magic Item Compendium

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    Armor

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    Armor:

    Shields:


    Weapons

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    +1 Bonus:

    Banishing – Fabulous. At high levels you’ll be fighting loads of extraplanar creatures, and activating this property (you get three activations per day) forces them to make a DC 20 (or potentially higher) Will save or be banished. There’s not much to say about a SoL.
    Binding – It mimics the effect of dimensional anchor twice a day, for ten minutes. While potentially useful, if you know that you’re going to be needing dimensional anchor, it’s probably better to just have the party caster either prepare it or procure a scroll or wand of it.
    Blessed – You shouldn’t have trouble confirming critical hits, and the holy property, which you’ll probably want to get, covers DR/good.
    Bloodfeeding – A normal energy property is more reliable and often better.
    Bloodstone – Useless.
    Brutal Surge – Initiate a bull rush as part of an attack, 1+ Con modifier/day. If you’re a goliath or other large race, almost mandatory. The property gets even better if you have Improved Bull Rush, but is wonderful on its own terms.
    Chargebreaker – Let’s be real here, no enemy that’s charging at you is going to fail a DC 14 Fort save except on a natural 1 (if they can, they’re not a threat). When they do fail their save, though, this effect is utterly devastating.
    Charging – If you’re a mounted combatant, this property is mandatory. If you’re not, its effect is useless to you.
    Defensive Surge – You should not be using Combat Expertise as anything but a feat sink to qualify for Improved Trip. Even if you are, +2 AC isn’t worth a +1 bonus.
    Desiccating – For most purposes, identical to screaming and psychokinetic. Screaming is ineffective against sonic-resistant foes; desiccating is ineffective against nonliving ones. Psychokinetic is better than both, as it deals force damage.
    Dislocator – From now on, you will try to fight every battle on the edge of a lava pit. A DC 17 Will save isn’t too terrible, and moving your foe ten feet can be lifesaving.
    Also, lava pit.
    Dispelling – Because you have no CL as a warblade, you’re going to be unable to dispel anything with a CL higher than 9. That’s pretty limiting, especially when you consider that even on lower-CL effects, your chances of dispelling won’t be favorable – and the effect only functions three times per day.
    Divine Wrath – Not suited to warblades. Charisma is your dump stat.
    Dragondoom – No, just get a dragonbane weapon.
    Heavenly Burst – Unless you have a weapon with a x4 crit multiplier, superior to an energy burst property. A very solid enhancement, especially for crit-fishers.
    Illusion Bane – Becomes wonderful as miss chances become more common. It takes a swift action to activate, however, which for you is problematic.
    Impact – See keen. This is keen for bludgeoning weapons.
    Impaling – A nice property, but warblades should usually steer clear of it because it takes a swift action to activate.
    Knockback – Note that it only works against creatures of your size or smaller, and only thrice a day. Brutal surge is superior in every way.
    Lucky – Rerolls are priceless.
    Magebane – Like a bane weapon, but it works against all enemies who cast arcane spells or use invocations. The version that appeared originally in Complete Arcane also functioned against enemies with SLAs, but the MIC nerfed it. It's still excellent, though.
    Maiming – A vanilla energy enhancement is going to be superior.
    Morphing – Not a great deal of use.
    Paralyzing – While paralyzing your opponent is awesome, the effect only functions once per day and the save DC is too low for that to be justified. Look into paralytic burst instead.
    Profane – Evil is always getting the short end of the stick. I can guarantee that taking 1 Con damage every round is far worse than dealing an extra 1d6 damage. Get an unholy or energy weapon instead. If you’re undead, though, it’s a nice enhancement.
    Psychokinetic – Basically a superior version of screaming or desiccating. The extra 1d4 damage is force damage, which means it’s not subject to DR or even to incorporeality. Cool beans.
    Resounding – Just plain terrible. Skip it.
    Revealing – A very interesting effect – any foe you hit loses concealment. Concealment effects are terribly frustrating, and higher-level foes will use them if they are smart; this could be a very useful choice of enhancement.
    Sacred – You don’t get any benefit from Charisma, which makes this property less awful than it would normally be. With your low Charisma, wielding this for any length of time could become dangerous to you; it also makes you an obvious target for Cha-draining effects. Energy properties are much superior. Notice that the good guys only suffer Cha damage, while the bad guys take hits to Con.
    Shattermantle – If your mage is wise, they will be using no-SR spells against enemies with SR. And you won’t be making a full attack all that often, which makes the effect far less useful.
    Shielding – If you have an off-hand weapon, you don’t want a shield. If you use a shield, you’ll want a real shield. You’ll probably have an animated shield, anyway.
    Stygian – Very nice indeed. Automatically granting your enemy a negative level, 3/day, is excellent. It stacks with enervating.
    Sundering – Mediocre. There’s possible use, but not a great deal; a warblade will often take Improved Sunder in any case, to qualify for Combat Brute.
    Sweeping – Potentially useful for trippers, though at only a +2 bonus it seems like a different property would be more beneficial.
    Venomous – Like chargebreaker, a stupidly easy Fort save. Unlike chargebreaker, it only works three times a day.
    Warning – +5 to initiative is awesome, especially because it’s an insight bonus. Even better at high levels, when combat starts to resemble rocket tag. You only need to be holding it to gain the benefit; if you have Quick Draw, you can enter combat with a warning weapon held, get the bonus to initiative, and then swap to your main weapon.
    Weakening – An automatic -4 Str to your opponent when you score a critical hit. There’s no save, which is neat. Sadly, multiple hits aren’t cumulative, but it’s nonetheless a potent ability (even more so in the hands of a crit-fisher).
    Whirling – Functions 3/day as a superior Whirlwind Attack, and without all the terrible prereqs. Identical to the Mithral Tornado maneuver, and inferior to Adamantine Hurricane. Very nifty.

    +2 Bonus:

    Blindsighted – A blindfold of true darkness is better and cheaper.
    Blurstrike – For obvious reasons, less useful to you than rogues and their ilk. Still, it’s hard to argue with catching an opponent flat-footed.
    Collision – A no-nonsense +5 untyped damage with every hit. Beautiful in its simplicity, though, like all static bonuses, it ages.
    Consumptive – An inferior collision.
    Desiccating Burst – See energy burst.
    Disarming – For the last time, do not disarm. Interestingly, makes you disarm-immune; however, if your enemy wants to rid you of your weapon they will try to sunder it, not disarm you. Absolutely not worth a +2 bonus.
    Elemental (Aquan, Auran, Ignan, Terran)– Far too particular to waste a +2 bonus on.
    Great Dislocator – Lava pit.
    Greater Dispelling – Not a great deal more benefit to you, and it suffers the same problems dispelling does.
    Domineering – Not bad at all, but cursespewing is much better and only a +1 higher bonus.
    Doom Burst – While not terrible on its own terms, it’s as above inferior to cursespewing. If you’re considering this property, you should spring for cursespewing instead.
    Energy Aura – Collision and holy are both better choices. Both screaming and desiccating accomplish the same job of overcoming common energy resistances, and at only a +1 bonus.
    Energy Surge – Not bad at all, especially because the number of uses you get per day are keyed off of Con, one of your main stats. Better than an energy burst property, certainly. Never get fire or cold.
    Enervating – Pure awesome. No TWFer should be without a pair of enervating weapons, and it’s a superb choice of enhancement for any warblade.
    Fiercebane – Oh look, it’s Sting. Not worth it, sadly; you gain minimal benefits over bane.
    Fleshgrinding – A nice ability. The main benefit is the chance of depriving your opponent of a standard action. But be conscious of the fact that everything you spend on your alternate weapon is money that could have been spent on your main weapon.
    Ghost Strike – A greater truedeath crystal is cheaper, provides you with exactly the same benefit, and gives you an extra d6 damage versus undead to boot.
    Illusion Theft – Decidedly mediocre.
    Impedance – While it looks good on the surface, consider two things:
    One, the Spellcraft DC is absurdly low, and skill checks don’t automatically fail on a natural 1.
    Two, no spellcaster worth their salt is going to let you get into melee range.
    Metalline – As that pesky DR starts popping up, being able to change your weapon’s material at will is invaluable. Highly recommended.
    Paralytic – The Will DC is reasonably high, though it ages, and putting your foe out of action for a round is quite often equivalent to killing them. When you realize that with this property, critting is a SoL effect, it becomes extremely enticing – like all effects keyed off of crits, crit-fishers and TWFers get the most benefit out of it. Do remember that it doesn’t work against foes immune to paralyzation.
    Profane Burst – Even worse than profane. Even if you’re undead, this isn’t worth it.
    Psychokinetic Burst – The extra damage is far too little to be worthwhile.
    Sacred Burst – If you’re critting with enough regularity to consider this enhancement, it is going to send you to 0 Cha – and thus, out of the battle – in no time. 1d4 Cha damage every time you crit makes this ability worse for you than your foe.
    Soulbreaker – Why in the world are you leaving survivors?
    Transmuting – Superb, comparable to metalline. DR is very common at high levels, and overcoming it automatically is great.
    Vampiric – The untyped bonus damage is nice, and the healing is bound to come in handy. Very functional and a good choice.

    +3 Bonus:

    Bodyfeeder – At a +3 bonus, not worth considering unless you’re a crit-fisher. The temporary hitpoints don’t stack with each other, though they’ll definitely come in handy. The thing to consider is whether you’d get more steam by applying that +3 bonus elsewhere.
    Cursespewing – Amazing, especially for crit-fishers. Nice for softening up targets for a SoD.
    Ethereal Reaver - Never worth it.
    Holy Surge – While a great enhancement, you lack the Cha to fuel it. Still solid, especially if you’ve raised your Cha via inherent and/or enhancement bonuses.
    Implacable – Yay, +2 to +8 damage every round…for the price of a +3 bonus. And it’s only higher than +2 if you full attack. I guess those, um, ogres won’t know what hit them. Yeah. Er. Um.
    Incorporeal Binding – Not worth a +3 bonus.
    Unholy Surge – See holy surge.

    +X GP:

    Keep in mind that a weapon can't have a price tag of greater than 200,000 gp. If you add a +X enhancement to your weapon, you forfeit the chance of getting a full +10 bonus. This may or may not be worth it, but it's smart to be aware of.

    Aquatic – +2,000 GP. In an aquatic campaign (or one where you find yourself frequently underwater), it’s a steal. Otherwise, there’s no need to get it.
    Changeling – +2,000 gp. No concrete function.
    Everbright – +2,000 gp. Cheap. The effect is not very useful, and as such your money is probably best spent elsewhere.
    Hideaway – +2,000 gp. If you’re not going to invest in a +10 weapon, this is a nifty ability and is exceptionally cheap.
    Illuminating – +500 gp. Just get a light spell made permanent.
    Prismatic Burst – +30,000 gp. Utterly ridiculous. This ability alone can – and does – justify not getting a +10 weapon. Simply ludicrous for crit-fishers.
    Shadowstrike – +5,000 gp. Pretty cool; an extra 5 feet of reach is sometimes all you need. But it takes a swift action to activate, which is painful.
    Sizing – +5,000 gp. It can be useful to add to a weapon after you've acquired a pair of strongarm bracers.
    Slow Burst – +5,000 gp. At DC 14, an easy save to make – but slow is a nasty effect. If you’re getting prismatic burst, you may as well tack this on.
    Vanishing – +8,000 gp. 1/day dimension door with a 60-foot range as a swift action (but only after a melee attack). Could be a nice utility, but don’t count on a 60-foot teleport to save you if you’re in trouble.


    Jewelry

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    Throat:

    Amber Amulet of Vermin – 500-1,200 gp. Once per day, summons a large or huge vermin for ten rounds. Very nifty and very cheap, though the vermin are relatively weak.
    Amulet of Aquatic Salvation – 500 gp. Well worth the price. If you’re planning on underwater adventuring you’ll need something with a longer duration, but especially at lower levels this can be a lifesaver.
    Amulet of Emergency Healing – 6,000 gp. 1d4+5 damage, even as an immediate action, isn’t going to be much help for long; as you level up, that amount becomes trivial. If an ally is reduced to something like -14 HP, then this amulet is an awesome thing to have; but you shouldn’t expect that will happen very often. This amulet can be either a lifesaver or a waste of money.
    Amulet of Fortune Prevailing – 5,000 gp. I have said so before, and I will say so again: rerolls, especially on saving throws, are just about priceless. This one is just 5,000 gp, so if you’re high level there’s little excuse not to pick it up (especially given how devastating a high-level SoL can be). Do be aware, though, that you have to reroll before knowing whether you’ve succeeded or not.
    Amulet of Inviolate Form – 11,000 gp. Automatically resist transformations or polymorphs (ie, baleful polymorph and the like. Sounds good to me.
    Amulet of Second Chances – 40,000 gp. Redo an entire turn, once per day. A little pricey, but utterly incredible.
    Amulet of Teamwork – 2,000 gp. +2 damage when flanking. Could be worth it if you have a regular flanking pal, like the party rogue.
    Amulet of Tears – 2,300 gp. A handful of temporary hit points every day, as a swift action. The swift action is the dealbreaker – you’ll do far better by using a maneuver.
    Amulet of Toxin Delay – 400 gp. Very situational, unless your DM particularly enjoys poison. The delay poison effect only lasts two rounds, and you have to be wearing it when you’re affected by the poison; that means you can’t just hold one in reserve. Not a good buy.
    Badge of the Svirfneblin – 15,000 gp. The blur effect is useful, and the darkvision can be helpful, but it’s not worth 15k.
    Brooch of Avoidance – 3,100 gp. Not terribly useful.
    Brooch of Stability – 1,000 gp. Automatically become stable when reduced to -1 hit points or fewer. Can be a great help, though it shares the same problems the amulet of emergency healing has: the chances of being hit into the neat little window between -1 and -9 grow increasingly slimmer as damage increases.
    Cat’s-Eye Brooch – 9,000 gp. +1 to saving throws is nice, but you have better ways to spend 9,000 gp.
    Contact Medallion – 3,000 gp. A nice utility to have at hand, especially in situations where surreptitiousness is needed.
    Eagle Claw Talisman – 1,000 gp. Deliver “ruinous strikes” against that vicious furniture. Just like eagles do, I guess?
    Enduring Amulet – 1,500 gp. Useful for the permanent endure elements. You can use its charges to give yourself fire or cold resistance as an immediate action, which is handy.
    Enemy Spirit Pouch – 2,100 gp. +1 attack against creatures of a specific type. Needless to say, not worth it.
    Farspeaking Amulet – 6,000. One amulet lets your party speak with each other for three ten-minute segments a day, regardless of where you are (as long as you’re all on the same plane). Excellent if you get split up, as so often happens.
    Fireflower – 13,000 gp. Continuous fire resist 10, with the ability to make yourself immune for up to one round every hour. If you’re going up against a load of fiery foes, it can help, though you may want to just have your mage spring for energy immunity.
    Githborn Talisman – 1,800 gp. +2 to attack and damage rolls against aberrations, +4 if you’re a gith. If you know you’re going to be up against aberrations, it might be a good investment as it’s relatively cheap. Otherwise, it can be safely counted a waste.
    Hand of the Oak Father – 5,000. Allows you to use a handful of druid utility spells, each once per day. Not explicitly for druids – you can definitely get some use from it – but pretty mediocre.
    Heartseeking Amulet – 3,000. Thrice per day, make a melee attack as a melee touch attack. Touch attacks are horribly easy to make, which makes this wonderful. Because it takes a swift action to activate, essentially a 3/day Emerald Razor maneuver.
    Medal of Gallantry – 1,350 gp. Utterly useless.
    Necklace of Copper Dragon Scales – 570 gp. Acid resist 5 for an hour will do nothing to help you. Made even more insulting by the fact that, after six uses, it becomes useless.
    Necklace of Warning – 4,000 gp. +2 to your flat-footed AC. Consider that you have Uncanny Dodge, and also that +2 AC does little.
    Reins of Ascension – 3,300 gp. You’ll need to get a permanent method of flight eventually, so you’ll want to ditch it at some point. Until then, it’s quite useful.
    Retributive Amulet – 9,000 gp. Thrice per day, reflect half of the melee damage dealt to you back on the attacker. Pure awesome when up against melee brutes, especially a power-attacking charger.
    Safewing Emblem – 250 gp. Activates a feather fall effect if you fall, but only up to 180 feet. Shatters upon use. You probably don’t want to keep this on all the time.
    Scarab of Invulnerability – 40,000 gp. Once per day, become immune to all forms of damage for one round. Expensive, but its effect is incredible.
    Scarab of Stabilization – 20,000 gp. Identical to the brooch of stability, but if you are reduced to less than -9 hit points the amulet automatically brings you up to -1 and is destroyed. A literal lifesaver, though unavailable until the high levels due to its cost.
    Scentblinder – 8,000 gp. There are far better ways to spend your gold.
    Skull Plaque – 6,200 gp. 1/day death knell and detect undead. Little use.
    Spellsink Scarab – 2,000 gp. Three daily charges used to reduce damage taken from spells or psionic powers. If a caster is using direct damage, chances are that either they’ll be so weak as to pose little threat, or it’ll be so much damage as to render this scarab trivial. Useful at low levels, though.
    Torc of Displacement – 2,000 gp. Pretty neat for the price, especially since it takes an immediate action. You’ll probably want to get a cloak of displacement or another source of miss chance somewhere along the line, but a torc of displacement remains useful.
    Torc of Heroic Sacrifice – 6,000 gp. Once per day, when an ally within 30 feet takes damage, you can choose to take that damage instead. It’s likely you’ll have the most hit points in your party, which makes this an excellent buy. The 30-foot range can occasionally be mildly limiting.
    Torc of the Titans – 3,300 gp. Swift action to activate. I can guarantee that using a maneuver will always help you more than +5 damage will.
    Unicorn Pendant – 6,000 gp. Not utterly useless, but not particularly useful, either.
    Vampire Torc – 5,000 gp. Twice per day, heal damage equal to what you deal on your next melee attack. Swift action to activate, but the effect is pretty handy. Less useful if you’re a TWFer, though, as a single attack won’t mean much to you.

    Chronocharms

    Any number of chronocharms can be worn simultaneously. All chronocharms cost 500 gp.

    Chronocharm of the Celestial Wanderer – Listen and Spot checks are not as crucial as saving throws or attack rolls, and you are not likely to be the ears or eyes of the party; nonetheless, a reroll is a reroll.
    Chronocharm of the Fateweaver – Reroll a Balance, Climb, or Tumble check. Worth adding to your collection, if not stellar.
    Chronocharm of the Grand Master – You’re always better off pursuing miss chances rather than AC boosts; also, ranged attacks become less used at higher levels. Nonetheless, it’s worth its price.
    Chronocharm of the Horizon Walker – Move half your speed as a swift action. Nifty, though it sucks up a swift action.

    Fingers:


    Clothing

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    Head:

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    Torso:

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    Shoulders:

    Arms:

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    Tools

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    Consumables:

    Utilities:

    Last edited by Elfin; 2011-12-23 at 05:46 PM.