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    Default The Greatrams of Hearth

    Storyhunduy

    As a flurry of snow blows across the mountain slopes a thunderous bleating sounds out from the ravine below. Suddenly the head of an enormous, four-horned ram appears over the edge and pulls its great body up...

    Large Magical Beast
    Hit Dice: 5d10+15 (42 hp)
    Initiative: +3
    Speed: 40 ft., climb 30 ft.
    Armor Class: 15 (-1 size, +2 dex, +4 natural), touch 11, flat-footed 13
    Base Attack/Grapple: +5/+14
    Attack: Head butt +9 melee (1d8+7)
    Full attack: Head butt +9 melee (1d8+7)
    Space/Reach: 10 ft./5 ft.
    Special Attacks: Awesome blow
    Special Qualities: Cliff runner, great leap, low-light vision, resistance to electricity 10, scent
    Saves: Fort +7, Ref +7, Will +3
    Abilities: Str 21, Dex 16, Con 17, Int 3, Wis 14, Cha 6
    Skills: Balance +12, Climb +16, Jump +18, Listen +6, Spot +6
    Feats: Improved Bull Rush, Power Attack
    Environment: Cold mountains
    Organization: Solitary or herd (4–20)
    Challenge Rating: 3
    Treasure: None
    Alignment: Always Neutral
    Advancement: 6-11 HD (Large), 12-15 (Huge)
    Level Adjustment: -

    Also known as Thunder Jumpers and Great Rams, the storyhunduy are massive sheep the size of a horse. Two sets of enormous, curved horns adorn the head of both sexes, one pair coiling nearly under the chin and the other back and to the sides. These horns are used during battles between Storyhunduy which sound like the roar of thunder through the mountains. They are covered in thick, shaggy fur of dark greys and dull whites with patterns of brown that when lying still gives one the impression of a snow-spotted rock.

    There is a half-orc of legend who is said to have come across a ram of four horns who could speak. The ram pawed the ground, ready to do battle, but the half-orc was not in the mood for blood, but instead challenged it to a race to the peak of the mountain. If he was to win he would saw off a horn of the ram as a token of his triumph. The ram agreed, but then named his reward. The half-orcs, known for teasing the gods till they could take no more, would annoy the sky for him. For the ram had bested all beast and man he had fought, yet he had heard the rumble of thunder and had heard the echoes of its blows against the mountains itself. And so the race was had, and though the half-orc was swift and strong, the ram won in the end. Laughing between hard breaths the half-orc nodded to the ram, and once his air was back, he began to taunt and jibe the still air and the meager mists that barely moistened the stones. After days of darkening clouds the gods of the storms could take no more and a great wind began to blow and lightening lit the dark sky. The ram, now having the god's attention, challenged it to a match. The ram braced itself and a blinding bolt sped down. It met with the horns of the ram and a great roar deafened all. The ram was thrown off its feet and flew to the peak of another mount where it lie still. Then, to the god's astonishment it staggered to its hooves. The stone was wet however, and the ram tired. As it tried to climb down it slipped. Now, the god in its anger had put more power in his blow than he had meant and wondered over how the ram could rise after the deadly strike. He sent winds to catch the ram, who had gained his admiration, and told it that he would never allow he or his offspring to fall again. The ram grew in size and his hooves seemed to grip the ground. It threw back its head and bleated in joy as it raced down the cliff as if its face were a level plain.

    The storyhunduy of today tend to live in community herds much as animals, with the strongest ram of all leading the herd.

    A storyhunduy speaks its own language, which sounds like rumbling bleatings, but can be trained to understand the language of its handler.

    Combat:
    A storyhunduy tends to try to intimidate potential foes by stomping its hooves and bellowing, but if sufficiently provoked tends to charge down the mountainsides, its horns lowered. If possible it tries to use bull rush to simply knock its agressor off the mountain, which tends to cut the battle short.

    Awesome Blow (Ex):
    If a greatram hits a corporeal opponent smaller than itself with a natural 20 attack roll, its opponent must succeed on a Reflex save (DC = damage dealt) or be knocked flying 10 feet in a direction of the attacking creature’s choice (usually off a cliff) and fall prone. The greatram can only push the opponent in a straight line, and the opponent can’t move closer to the attacking creature than the square it started in. If an obstacle prevents the completion of the opponent’s move, the opponent and the obstacle each take 1d6 points of damage, and the opponent stops in the space adjacent to the obstacle.

    Cliffrunner (Su):
    A storyhunduy can take part of one of its move actions to traverse a wall or other relatively smooth vertical surface if it begin and ends its move on a horizontal surface. The height it can achieve on the wall is limited only by this movement restriction. If it does not end its move on a horizontal surface, its falls, taking falling damage as appropriate for its distance above the ground. The storyhunduy treats the wall as a normal floor for the purpose of measuring its movement. Passing from floor to wall or wall to floor costs no movement; it can change surfaces freely. Opponents on the ground can make attacks of opportunity as it moves up the surface.

    Great Leap (Ex):
    The greatram almost seems to fly as it leaps from boulder to boulder, and can make standing long jumps and high jumps as if they were running long jumps and high jumps.

    Skills:
    A storyhundu gains a +10 racial bonus to balance, climb and jump checks, and a +2 bonus to spot checks.


    Training a Storyhunduy
    Dwarves, humans, and the occassional goliath sometimes use the storyhunduy as mounts. Their ability to navigate the most treacherous mountain terrain makes them invaluable in almost any rocky area. They are not particularly swift on level ground however, and nearly useless on cross country. Most storyhunduy have nothing to do with other races, and few will meet with non storyhunduy much less allow themselves to be ridden. Because of this many day-old storyhunduy kids are stolen by daring men who risk the anger of the entire herd. These kids are then trained into docility and service to their masters.
    Training a storyhunduy kid requires six weeks of work and a DC 20 Handle Animal check.
    Riding a storyhunduy requires an exotic saddle.
    Young Storyhunduy are worth 2,000 gp on the open market. Professional trainers charge 1,000 gp to rear or train a storyhunduy.
    Carrying Capacity: A light load for a storyhunduy is 459 pounts; a medium load 460-918 pounds; and a heavy load 919-1380 pounds.

  2. - Top - End - #2
    Ogre in the Playground
     
    Seffbasilisk's Avatar

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    Default Re: The Greatrams of Hearth

    so it looks like a bantha with more horns? Cool story. Problem is that every mountain-goer would want one. Maybe they require special shoes?
    Life is a gamble, roll the dice. If your life is like cards, rig the deck.

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    The Vorpal Tribble's Avatar

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    Default Re: The Greatrams of Hearth

    Naw, banthas are more like dire yaks.

    Problem is that every mountain-goer would want one. Maybe they require special shoes?
    Most mountain goers couldn't afford one. Pay 500 gp more and get a giant eagle that can fly and doesn't have to worry about heights at all ;)

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    Brickwall's Avatar

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    Default Re: The Greatrams of Hearth

    Well, if the eagle is so little more expesive, then why would anyone invest in this thing? The extra 500 gold would be worth it to be able to fly up mountains instead of climbing up them. Give the players a compelling reason why this could be a worthwhile mount

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    SwashbucklerGuy

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    Default Re: The Greatrams of Hearth

    Quote Originally Posted by Seffbasilisk
    so it looks like a bantha with more horns? *Cool story. *Problem is that every mountain-goer would want one. *Maybe they require special shoes?
    Goats can't wear shoes, they have cloven hooves (that's part of what allows them to balance on seemingly impossible ledges).

    The rarity, price and utility of these things would make them the equivalent of rare and sought after horse breeds of the Middle Ages: a status symbol in their own right.

    "Bantha = dire yak" though? Mad tribble! *;)

    Oh, and Brickwall:

    "Carrying Capacity: A light load for a storyhunduy is 459 pounts; a medium load 460-918 pounds; and a heavy load 919-1380 pounds." <-- that alone seems like a deal-clincher for any self-respecting dwarf. That's a lot more tools, gold, jewels or what not than an eagle can haul. And a storyhunduy is probably less likely to eat you if food gets a little scarse.

    Thane T: "I ain't getting on no giant killer chicken!" (drugged milk takes effect)

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    The Vorpal Tribble's Avatar

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    Default Re: The Greatrams of Hearth

    Well, if the eagle is so little more expesive, then why would anyone invest in this thing? The extra 500 gold would be worth it to be able to fly up mountains instead of climbing up them.
    Because these guys can carry about 400+ more pounds. A giant hawk's maximum weight is a storyhunduy's medium.

    Good grief, either its too useful, or not enough ::)


    "Bantha = dire yak" though? Mad tribble!
    They look pretty close to me. Same body structure. Just give the yak curly horns and there you go.


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    Barbarian in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: The Greatrams of Hearth

    Thane T: "I ain't getting on no giant killer chicken!" (drugged milk takes effect)
    Heh, for a second there I thought you were talking about a chocobo...but that could be because my old roomie would always rename Barret as "Mr T."
    "'To know, to do, and to keep silent.' Crowley had the first two down pat."

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    SwashbucklerGuy

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    Default Re: The Greatrams of Hearth

    Quote Originally Posted by SpiderBrigade

    Heh, for a second there I thought you were talking about a chocobo...but that could be because my old roomie would always rename Barret as "Mr T."
    Great minds SpiderBrigade. ;D

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