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  1. - Top - End - #1
    Barbarian in the Playground
     
    PaladinGuy

    Join Date
    Feb 2013

    Default EFGT Organisation and Equipment

    IMPORTANT: Going to need to do 2 posts so give my chance to place the second (including formatting), first before replying, i'll drop a third post in when done.

    Okay the following is an organisational chart for the Earth Force Ground Troops. Mostly Iím looking for feedback from anyone with relevant experience/knowledge on weather the basics are sensible.

    My main reason for looking for feedback on this first is partly because of how much time the Loreís likely to take a fair while to write down. At the same time this is no longer just a world building exercise, Iím hoping to build my own tabletop army level system off the setting, and for that a good idea of the types and degree of commonality of various weapons is pretty vital to effective balance.

    Armour elements are missing from the Organisational level lists, however thatís purely because I havenít finished planning out all the details of the EFGTís armour and armour employment doctrine. Armour would typically, (mechanization attachments aside), be attached in standardised formats at the Battalion and/or Division levels, I just havenít listed it because of how WIP that part of their organization is.

    Logistics Elements and FortCom elements are unlisted for similar reasons.

    I donít want to go too deep into the Lore just here for the setting, partly because Iíve only got the basics roughed out, and partly because even those basics would probably take up far more space than this entire post. The basic setting is a futuristic magic-tech setting where advanced technology, advanced magic, and combinations of the two exist alongside each other. That said for the EFGT Magi, (magic users), Fallen, and most forms of magical technology are not any part of standardised EFGT deployment. The only real commonly deployed magic using item is the shield systems used on virtually all AFVís, (Ground and Aerospace), and as indirect fire protection at Forward Operating Bases. Even there most of the generators is 100% mundane, thereís just a couple of components being magically enhanced. Special issue gear can and is issued thatís more magically boosted, but itís very much not part of any standard list for regular units. Special Operations Assault Squads, (SOAS), do make heavy use of such equipment in standard issue form, (mostly in their power armour power and actuation systems), but thatís because of the mission theyíre primarily trained for.

    As the term ďEarth ForceĒ suggests the setting is interstellar in nature. However thereís been a period between the early 21st centaury and the ďcurrentĒ 24th centaury date where both sides have had littlie contact and no organised warfare, so whilst power and materials science tech has evolved heavily, weaponry hasnít much, so itís very similar to the modern era in general form

    The EFGT has two main descriptors for itís smallest organisational unit. Squad and Section.

    Section refers to a unit of the same size as a Squad, but attached in a specialised or support only role within a lager organisational structure. Squad Refers to the core unit of the larger organisational structure. Section my be prefixed by an Organisational Designator such as Platoon or Company. It should be noted that depending on the specific base organisational structure a specific asset may be a squad in one type, but a section in another.

    Ranks are listed by numeral. So R-0 is the lowest Rank, with each increase in numeral being one increase in rank. This avoids having to assign names, (Another point up for debate internally).


    Spoiler: Command Types
    Show

    Several Command Types exist. 3 basic types exist. Active Commands are commands that posses actual physical assets and oversee employment of those assets in theatre. At the oversight level they are also Admin Commands. Admin Commands are commands where individual units, (size varying as appropriate), oversee themselves on a day to day basis, with personnel above this level existing to provide the necessary administrative oversight. Most Admin Commands consist of units or assets not actually deployed on operations which must still be overseen on a limited basis whilst they train/are in storage/e.t.c. Paper Commands are Commands that exist on paper as an organisational tool, but have neither assigned units nor a requirement for any kind of admin oversight.

    Infantry Command (InfCom): Infantry command is responsible for the oversight of all standard infantry squads both in the field and those currently in reserves at bases outside current theatreís of operation. As a result it is both and Active and Admin Command. In itís capacity as an Active Command it is also responsible for any manpower or other assets attached to itís squads.

    Logistics Command (LogCom): Logistics command is responsible for the oversight of all logistical units and any assigned assets both in the field and those currently in reserves at bases outside current theatreís of operation. As a result it is both and Active and Admin Command. In itís capacity as an Active Command it is also responsible for any manpower or other assets attached to itís units.

    Support Command (SupCom): Support Command provides administrative oversight of all section type units not currently attached to an Active Command. Support Command is an Admin command as units in the field are always attached to either Infantry Command or Support Command.

    Fortification Command (FortCom): An Admin command responsible for the storage and maintenance of Forward Operating Base and Forward Command Post construction Assets such as power plants over-shield generators, weapons emplacements, e.t.c. Assets are always assigned to an Active Command in the field.

    Tactical Command (TacCom): A paper command. Tactical Command is an organisational designation for commanders, and attached staff, guards, and FortCom assets that are used to establish any level of command base from a Forward Observation Post to a full blown Forward Operating Base. TacCom units are used where tactical command of a formation too large to effectively command ďfrom the trenchesĒ must be exercised. As such a suitable rank of Commander will be chosen along with an assembled staff, guard force, and FortCom assets to aid the commander in battlefield awareness. Deployment locations will vary with the exact size of the formation to be commanded. All Assets are drawn from an existing command to assemble the necessary unit, the TacCom designator exists solely to distinguish such Commanders and attached manpower and assets from standard ďin the trenchesĒ commanders.

    Strategic Command (StratCom): Strategic Command is another Paper command, and other than the focus on Strategic level military Strategy decisions for their assigned Theatre of Operations is identical in basics of unit formation and the like to TacCom.



    Spoiler: Weapon Equivalency List
    Show

    Wherever possible Iím going to list an approximate modern equivalent to the various weapons listed below here. Where there is none Iíll give a quick blurb. I have written a much longer piece and Iíll attach that at the bottom, but that more of a fluffy blurb than a serious document, (I did just enough research to give it what I hope is a veneer of plausibility). Iíll be using US stuff where possible as I imagine that will have the greatest familiarity here despite my own UK origins.

    Some quick general notes on EFGT weaponry and gear:

    Firstly as this is a futuristic setting advanced composites and ceramics and the like mean anywhere a weight reduction wouldnít be detrimental due to simple mass considerations, (e.g. bullet weights, shrapnel weights, weapon weights for recoil purposes, e.t.c), they can significantly reduce the weight of components without compromising strength or thermal properties, (i.e. a barrels ability to absorb and dissipate heat).

    Secondly much of the equipment and doctrine of employment of the EFGT has to take account of both advanced in body armour protection, and more importantly the high preponderance of Fallen in cultist forces. Without going too deep into the lore here, they can shrug of 50 cal frangible headshots quite readily. So heavy fragmentation and really big bullet masses are pretty much par for the course for them.

    In the same vein, whilst I havenít fully planned out the details of the EFGTís AFV collection, I do have the basics of the tech changes worked out and a variety of factors means even a simple Humvee equivalent can absorb several missiles. Hence the high quantities carried.

    Equipment is not fixed, the below specifics are just a general standard load out, actual load outs can be modified to suit specific needs.

    Pistol = M11
    SMG = MP5
    Carbine = M4
    Assault Rifle = M16
    Under-Slung Launcher = M26 with micro grenade options
    LMG = M249
    SAR = M240
    Light Marksmen Rifle = SEAL Recon Rifle
    Medium Marksmen Rifle = Precision Sniper Rifle, (AKA Remington MSR)
    Heavy Marksmen Rifle = M107
    MMG = No direct equivalent, think of it as sitting between the M240 and the M134 Minigun in capabilities
    HMG = M2 Browning
    60mm Grenade Launcher = although of a larger calibre, it serves effectively the same function as the M32
    LWGM = No direct equivalent, think of it as the capabilities of a Stinger and a Javelin in one missile
    90mm Mortar = M252
    10 Gauge Crew Served Automatic = XM307
    MULE = Not actually a weapon, itís a small, (smaller than a person), electrically driven all terrain transport unit. It serves a similar purpose to old school pack animals. Hence the name.



    Spoiler: Infantry Level
    Show


    Standard Infantry Platoon:

    7 Squads configured as follows:

    Squad 1 (Lead Squad)

    4 men per squad, (R-0), equipped with 1 x Pistol (100 Rds), 1 x Assault Rifle, (600Rds), 1x Under-slung Launcher (10 rounds), 2 Grenades (Type varies), Target Designator and Range-finding unit, Medium Marksmen Rifle ammo (100 Rds)

    1 Squad Leader per squad (R-1), equipped with 1 x Pistol (100 Rds), 1 x Light Marksmen Rifle, (600Rds), 1 Grenade (Type varies), Target Designator and Range-finding unit, additional Comms gear.

    1 Platoon Leader per squad, (R-2), equipped with 1 x Pistol (100 Rds), 1 x Carbine, (600Rds), 1x Under-slung Launcher (10 rounds), 2 Grenades (Type varies), Target Designator and Range-finding unit.

    2 Men per squad, (R-0), equipped with 1 x Pistol (100 Rds), 1 x Medium Marksman Rifle (20 Rds), 1 x Carbine (600Rds).

    Squad 2 -5

    2 men per squad, (R-0), equipped with 1 x Pistol (100 Rds), 1 x Assault Rifle, (600Rds), 1x Under-slung Launcher (10 rounds), 2 Grenades (Type varies), Target Designator and Range-finding unit, LMG ammo (200 Rds)

    3 men per squad, (R-0), equipped with 1 x Pistol (100 Rds), 1 x Assault Rifle, (600Rds), 1x Under-slung Launcher (10 rounds), 2 Grenades (Type varies), Target Designator and Range-finding unit, 60mm Grenade ammo (6 Rds)

    1 Squad Leader per squad (R-1), equipped with 1 x Pistol (100 Rds), 1 x Light Marksmen Rifle, (600Rds), 1 Grenade (Type varies), Target Designator and Range-finding unit, additional Comms gear.

    1 Man per squad, (R-0), equipped with 1 x Pistol (100 Rds), 1 x LMG (600Rds), 1x Under-slung Launcher (10 rounds), 2 Grenades (Type varies), Target Designator and Range-finding unit.

    1 Man per squad, (R-0), equipped with 1 x SMG (200 Rds), 1 x 60mm Grenade Launcher (9 Rounds).

    Squad 6 -7

    2 men per squad, (R-0), equipped with 1 x Pistol (100 Rds), 1 x Assault Rifle, (600Rds), 1x Under-slung Launcher (10 rounds), 2 Grenades (Type varies), Target Designator and Range-finding unit, LMG ammo (300 Rds)

    3 men per squad, (R-0), equipped with 1 x Pistol (100 Rds), 1 x Assault Rifle, (600Rds), 1x Under-slung Launcher (10 rounds), 2 Grenades (Type varies), Target Designator and Range-finding unit, SAR ammo (100 Rds)

    1 Squad Leader per squad (R-1), equipped with 1 x Pistol (100 Rds), 1 x Light Marksmen Rifle, (600Rds), 1 Grenade (Type varies), Target Designator and Range-finding unit, additional Comms gear.

    1 Man per squad, (R-0), equipped with 1 x Pistol (100 Rds), 1 x LMG (600Rds), 1x Under-slung Launcher (10 rounds), 2 Grenades (Type varies), Target Designator and Range-finding unit.

    1 Man per squad, (R-0), equipped with 1 x Pistol (100 Rds), 1 x SAR (200 Rounds).


    Missile Platoon Section:

    7 Sections configured as follows:

    Notes: Typically in the field the sections will split into 4 man fireteams. In the event that MULEís are not suitable and other mechanisation is not available either the section is deployed as a single unit with half the sections launchers replaced by additional man carried ammo.

    Sections 1-7

    1 Section Leader per section, (R-1), equipped with 1 x Pistol (100 Rds), 1 x Carbine, (600Rds), 1x Under-slung Launcher (5 rounds), 1 Grenade (Type varies), Target Designator and Range-finding unit, LWGM ammo (2 Rds)

    3 men per section, (R-0), equipped with 1 x Pistol (100 Rds), 1 x Carbine, (600Rds), 1x Under-slung Launcher (5 rounds), 1 Grenade (Type varies), Target Designator and Range-finding unit, LWGM ammo (2 Rds)

    4 men per section, (R-0), equipped with 1 x Pistol (100 Rds), 1 x Carbine, (600Rds), 1x Under-slung Launcher (5 rounds), 1 Grenade (Type varies), Target Designator and Range-finding unit, LWGM Launcher (1 Rds)

    2 MULEís per section carrying LWGM ammo (16 Rds)

    Crew Served Weapon Platoon Section:

    7 Sections configured as follows:

    Notes: Typically in the field the sections will split into 4 man fireteams. In the event that MULEís are not suitable for the terrain and other mechanization is not available either the section is deployed as a single unit with half the sections crew served weapons replaced by additional man carried ammo. All crew served weapons disassemble into 4 man loads for easy carriage.

    Section 1

    1 Section Leader per section, (R-1), equipped with 1 x Pistol (100 Rds), 1 x Carbine, (600Rds), 1x Under-slung Launcher (5 rounds), 1 Grenade (Type varies), Target Designator and Range-finding unit

    3 men per section, (R-0), equipped with 1 x Pistol (100 Rds), 1 x Carbine, (600Rds), 1x Under-slung Launcher (5 rounds), 1 Grenade (Type varies), Target Designator and Range-finding unit.

    4 men per section, (R-0), equipped with 1 x Pistol (100 Rds), 1 x Carbine, (600Rds), 1x Under-slung Launcher (5 rounds), 1 Grenade (Type varies), Target Designator and Range-finding unit.

    1 MULE carrying MMG ammo (10000 Rds)

    1 MULE carrying 10 Gauge Ammo (1500 Rds)

    1 MMG

    1 10 Gauge Crew Served Automatic

    Sections 2-5

    1 Section Leader per section, (R-1), equipped with 1 x Pistol (100 Rds), 1 x Carbine, (600Rds), 1x Under-slung Launcher (5 rounds), 1 Grenade (Type varies), Target Designator and Range-finding unit

    3 men per section, (R-0), equipped with 1 x Pistol (100 Rds), 1 x Carbine, (600Rds), 1x Under-slung Launcher (5 rounds), 1 Grenade (Type varies), Target Designator and Range-finding unit.

    4 men per section, (R-0), equipped with 1 x Pistol (100 Rds), 1 x Carbine, (600Rds), 1x Under-slung Launcher (5 rounds), 1 Grenade (Type varies), Target Designator and Range-finding unit.

    1 MULE carrying MMG ammo (10000 Rds)

    1 MULE carrying 90mm Mortar Ammo (100 Rds)

    1 MMG

    1 90mm Mortar

    Sections 6-7

    1 Section Leader per section, (R-1), equipped with 1 x Pistol (100 Rds), 1 x Carbine, (600Rds), 1x Under-slung Launcher (5 rounds), 1 Grenade (Type varies), Target Designator and Range-finding unit

    3 men per section, (R-0), equipped with 1 x Pistol (100 Rds), 1 x Carbine, (600Rds), 1x Under-slung Launcher (5 rounds), 1 Grenade (Type varies), Target Designator and Range-finding unit.

    4 men per section, (R-0), equipped with 1 x Pistol (100 Rds), 1 x Carbine, (600Rds), 1x Under-slung Launcher (5 rounds), 1 Grenade (Type varies), Target Designator and Range-finding unit.

    1 MULE carrying MMG ammo (10000 Rds)

    1 MULE carrying HMG Ammo (2600 Rds)

    1 MMG

    1 HMG

    Anti-Material Section:

    3 men per section, (R-1), equipped with 1 x Pistol (100 Rds), 1 x Light Marksmen Rifle, (600Rds), 1 Grenade (Type varies), Target Designator and Range-finding unit, Heavy Marksmen Rifle ammo (60 Rds)

    1 Section Leader per section (R-2), equipped with 1 x Pistol (100 Rds), 1 x Light Marksmen Rifle, (600Rds), 1 Grenade (Type varies), Target Designator and Range-finding unit, additional Comms gear.

    4 Men per section, (R-1), equipped with 1 x SMG (200 Rds), 1 x Heavy Marksman Rifle (20 Rds).

    Company Command Section

    1 section configured as follows:

    4 men per section, (R-0), equipped with 1 x Pistol (100 Rds), 1 x Assault Rifle, (600Rds), 1x Under-slung Launcher (10 rounds), 2 Grenades (Type varies), Target Designator and Range-finding unit, Medium Marksmen Rifle ammo (100 Rds)

    1 Section Leader per section (R-2), equipped with 1 x Pistol (100 Rds), 1 x Light Marksmen Rifle, (600Rds), 1 Grenade (Type varies), Target Designator and Range-finding unit, additional Comms gear.

    1 Company Commander per section, (R-3), equipped with 1 x Pistol (100 Rds), 1 x Carbine, (600Rds), 1x Under-slung Launcher (10 rounds), 2 Grenades (Type varies), Target Designator and Range-finding unit.

    2 Men per section, (R-0), equipped with 1 x Pistol (100 Rds), 1 x Medium Marksman Rifle (20 Rds), 1 x Carbine (600Rds).


    TacCom Headquarters Section:

    Notes (1): TacCom Commanders are of a rank appropriate to the force they command, starting at a typical R4 for Battllions and increasing by force size from there.

    Notes (2): Despite nominally only carrying an SMG with limited Ammo, practical field realities at the Battalion level mean the equipment load will often be equivalent to a Company Commanders.

    1 TacCom Commander, (R-4+), equipped with 1 x SMG (200 Rds).

    1 TacCom Commander Staff, (numbers and equipment varies with assignment).

    2 Infantry Platoons Sections (As standard Infantry Platoon).

    1 Crew Served Weapons Platoon Section.

    Various Equipment, (numbers and equipment varies with assignment).





    Spoiler: Organisational Level
    Show


    Notes: A Lesser Planetary Assault Force is typically the minimum force Level deployed to a single theatre, (planet), of operations. Typically they are deployed at a ratio of 1 force per 1 billion planetary inhabitants. Though this can be subject to change depending on various factors.

    Infantry Company:

    1 Company Command Section

    5 Infantry Platoons

    2 Missile Platoon Sections

    1 Crew Served Weapons Platoon Section

    4 Anti-Material Rifle Sectionís


    Infantry Battalion:

    Notes: Although not listed it is common for AFV assets to be attached to such formations.

    TacCom Headquarters Section

    5 Infantry Companyís


    Infantry Division:

    TacCom Headquarters Section

    5 Infantry Companies


    Infantry Regiment:

    5 Infantry Divisions


    Infantry Corps:

    5 Infantry Regiments


    Infantry Army Group:

    5 Infantry Corps


    Infantry Grand Army Group:

    5 Infantry Army Groups


    Infantry Lesser Planetary Assault Force:

    StratCom Headquarters Section

    5 Infantry Grand Army Groups


    Infantry Planetary Assault Force:

    StratCom Headquarters Section

    5 Infantry Lesser Planetary Assault Forceís


    Infantry Grand Planetary Assault Force:

    StratCom Headquarters Section

    5 Infantry Planetary Assault Forceís

  2. - Top - End - #2
    Barbarian in the Playground
     
    PaladinGuy

    Join Date
    Feb 2013

    Default Re: EFGT Organisation and Equipment

    Below, (Second Post) is the equipment list in detail, please bear in mind once again that it's meant to posses a veneer of plausibility. Feel free to note any really egregious points but bear in mind i'm not expecting much of this, if any, to stand upto scrutiny from a gunsmith, i dont have the expertise to produce that kind of quality output.

    Spoiler
    Show
    4mm Round: The 4mm Round owes itís origins to the Cultist war following the Stonehendge massacre. Originating somewhere in southeast asia it had been adopted by all surviving south east asian military powers by the end of the conflict. It is impossible to be sure precisely which cartridge was the base for this small calibre round but it was probably one of the standard rifle calibres at the time of the outbreak of hostilities. The exact reasoning behind the introduction of the cartridge have been lost with itís precise origins but all major users in the aftermath stated several key reasons for retaining it. Namely itís combination of lightweight weapons, lightweight ammo, and low recoil where perfectly suited to the small frames of their soldiers. At the same time the round produced surprisingly littlie heat or noise making it trivial to silence a weapon using it, or achieve rifle type weapons with high sustained automatic rates of fire. Additionally, the blunt force trauma effect against targets equipped with modern body armour was considered acceptable in comparison to larger intermediate calibre weapons, whilst the higher Automatic RoF and lighter ammunition was considered to provide a better suppression effect against all target types, and comparable wounding potential against un-armoured targets. The round is also noticeable for possessing extremely ballisticly efficient bullets. Whilst still somewhat less potent at mid ranges and noticeably less so at long ranges in comparison to intermediate calibre rounds it does retain excellent power over all short range engagement distances, and is possessed of extreme accuracy from nearly any length of barrel at all ranges it can be considered effective at.

    The round survived to the modern era largely because it proved exceedingly popular with police and paramilitary forces for all the previously stated reasons, and so when the EFGT where formed via emergency draft it formed the most easily accessible automatic weapon for their initial use. Whilst superseded by the 6mm Calibre for general engagements due to that rounds superior mid and long range engagement capabilities it nonetheless remains the standard calibre for the variety of machine pistols and auto carbines that are used as backup weapons by the EFGT regular squads. In addition the 4mm full Assault rifle remains a popular weapon for close terrain engagements, particularly urban warfare. In these situations the incredibly low weight of itís ammunition, (4Lbís for a 240 Round belted box, for example), allow for a weapon that is able to achieve good sustained firing capacity whilst possessing superior handling characteristics in close quarters.


    4mm Pistol: Light Machine pistol optimised for short range fighting only, poor accuracy at longer ranges however. Typically a 20 round straight magazine is used.

    4mm Auto Carbine: Low RoF Automatic 4mm Rifle. Noticeable range falloffs compared to the standard assault rifle, but very light and thus highly suitable as a backup weapon. Acceptable close range firepower as well. Trades some damage for slightly better range and noticeably longer sustained firing capability and reduced recoil in comparison to 9mm SMG. Typically uses lightweight 100 round box magazine, but not compatible, (due to space issues), with the 240 round box magazine.

    4mm Assault Rifle: A rotary breech weapon possessing an extreme maximum RoF, as well as selectable lower rates, it is generally fitted with a 240 round box magazine, though it will accept the smaller 100 round magazines as well. The weapon possesses equivalent short range characteristics to the 4mm Auto Carbine, but with better power at mid and long ranges, though itís long range capability still leaves much to be desired. Also possessed of superior sustained firing and suppression capabilities.


    9mm Round: The 9mm Parebellum round has remained a common selective fire pistol round since the early 20th centaury, and despite numerous power upgrades, many of the weapons utilising it have changed littlie since the end of the 20th centaury. Remaining the most popular ammunition with civilian pistol enthusiasts throughout the intervening years it was the obvious choice of cartridge when EFGT command decided on the balance of combat experience to seek out a heavier duty selective fire pistol round to replace the 4mm in front line selective fire backup weapons. Invariably this lead to a number of automatic weapons, (a limited number of police and paramilitary unit still favoured the calibre over the 4mm round), to be tested. These too where found to be decent weapons, trading the limited but still passable mid range performance of the 4mm round for far better stopping power at very close ranges. This quickly led to these weapons being adopted by units in urban environments who where regularly facing heavily armoured enemy combatants against which standard 4mm ammunition was at times not sufficiently powerful, even at close ranges. Though doing so carries a significant tradeoff in terms of sustained firing capability due to higher ammunition weights per bullet.

    9mm Pistol: Semi-Automatic with good punch and short range ability plus enough range and accuracy to reach out a bit.

    9mm SMG: provides decent short and short to mid range firepower in an automatic package. Not as accurate outside short ranges as a true assault rifle and more limited range bands. But a versatile weapon nonetheless.


    12mm Round: A rare example of a round custom developed for the EFGT, (as apposed to an existing round lightly modified for their use), the 12mm Pistol cartridge is a development from the 6mm Rifle cartridge, being created by the simple expedient of cutting the cartridge at the base of the shoulder, and inserting a 12mm bullet, producing a simple effective large calibre cartridge. The round itself was developed at the request of the SOAS units who found existing backup weapons rather feeble in comparison to their mainline armaments. Weapons chambered in this calibre invariably have harsh recoil, and despite being typically designated as either pistols or machine pistols are typically much larger.

    12mm Pistol: A 12mm Semi Auto pistol packing heavy duty rounds for use against heavy duty targets. Suffers in terms of harsh recoil, limited magazine and poorer accuracy for that power however.

    12mm SMG: Heavy duty damage but again accuracy degrades rapidly and recoil is a very severe issue. Typically issued to Power Armoured units, as normal units find the recoil uncontrollable in automatic fire mode.

    6mm Round: The history of the 6mm round is fairly well documented. During the cultists wars the existing western 5.56mm cartridge was found to have even more severe issues with stopping power than in prior conflicts. Whilst 7.62mm automatic rifles where issued in some cases as a stopgap there was clearly a need for a more potent round that was more controllable than the 7.62. The initial line of research focused on fitting larger rounds into the existing 5.56 mm casing but largely went nowhere, the results whilst more potent did not meet the requirements. With the need becoming ever more dire the focus shifted to the other common cartridge of the day. The 7.62mm NATO. By significantly cutting the length of the cartridge and necking it down to 6mm it proved possible to fire a heavier round than the 5.56mm at comparable velocity without excessive sacrificing of controllability as with a full power 7.62mm round.

    When the EFGT where formed they initially used 4mm rifles as their default weapon, however it rapidly became clear that outside of close terrain engagements the 4mm rounds limited mid range performance was an issue. Whilst the 6mm had fallen out of favour with paramilitary and police units in the interim years, it remained a popular civil cartridge and was rapidly resurrected to provide the basis of a wide range of 6mm weaponry.

    6mm Marksmen Rifle: The lightest of the marksmen rifles. The fully automatic capability is dropped in favour of an enhanced internal mechanism intended to eliminate mechanism induced inaccuracies. It retains the ability to fire selective bursts however. It is also fitted with an extended barrel, built in silencer and fully adjustable telescopic sight. Itís semi automatic and burst fire capabilities ensure it retains a decent RoF for a marksmen rifle, despite itís lack of a fully automatic option. The combination of round, rifle, and silencer makes the weapon ideally suited to mid range selective fire support operations without giving away the firers position. Though the nature of the 6mm round limits its utility at extreme range and the round is not ideally suited to hardened targets, or other tough opponents.

    6mm Assault Rifle: The basic rifle that is used by the EFGT regulars in most situations it represents a happy medium between stopping power, accuracy at range, and ammo weight make it perfect for most general duties. Compared to the 4mm it loses somewhat in RoF and thus also suppression capability. It is also somewhat less easy to point, but remains an easy to aim weapon despite this. Usually fitted with a 120 round double drum mag.

    6mm LMG: Utilising what is effectively a scaled up 4mm Assault rifle rotary breech action the weapon possesses a high RoF and itís marksmen rifle length barrel adds to the effective range and stopping power of the weapon. As the LMG, (Light Machine Gun for those wondering), designation suggests the weapon is intended as a lightweight form of sustained automatic fire support. Itís combination of round, barrel and action make it an excellent option for this with considerable stopping and suppression power, in an only modestly heavy weapon.

    8.6mm Round: The 8.6mm round was technically around for much longer being a very minor modification of the pre-cultist war .338 Lapua Magnum round. The .338 had been a popular western sniper round even prior to the Cultist Wars, but the ever higher lethality demanded by that conflict cemented the round, and several other similar rounds in non-western parts of the world as an excellent sniper round. In the following years it became the common high portability Marksmen round of choice for police and paramilitary units, as well as high powered civilian shooters.

    When the EFGT where formed their greatest stumbling block was the lack of a true medium calibre machinegun round for dedicated fire support roles. Given that they had already adopted the .338 calibre as a marksmen rifle round it was therefore natural they would develop a range of medium automatics as well. Minor modifications where made to cartridge and other specifics of the round to ensure it performed to adequate standards in these weapons, but these where minimal. The end result is the current 8.6mm round.

    8.6mm Marksmen Rifle: This larger Rifle is distinctly separate from 8.6mm Automatics and is a semi-automatic design. The choice of round coupled with the simple basic design and scope make for a potent sniper weapon useful vs all but the hardest of infantry class targets. The weapon also possesses a suppressor, whilst not as effective as a full silencer, it does allow sniping at longer ranges with no fear of revealing the current position. At mid and close ranges however it is distinctly insufficient.

    8.6mm SAR: the 8.6mm Simple Automatic Rifle, (SAR for short), was an attempt to provide the power of the 8.6mm round in as portable a package as possible, thus providing a partial replacement for the 6mm LMG, which although powerful, was not always sufficient in both range and stopping power. The design is largely successful, though a littlie heavy, and the recoil makes firing without the benefit of the bipod effectively impossible for regulars. As a result it is ironically far more common amongst the SOAS, whilst a littlie unwieldy even for power armoured troops at close range it makes an excellent larger calibre mid/long range automatic rifle for them. And when properly supported is ferociously dangerous. Even amongst the EFGT regulars it enjoyed a solid positive reception, itís flaws merely mean it must play second fiddle to other weapons to some degree.

    8.6m MMG: The 8.6mm Medium Machine Gun is a large very high rate of fire rotary breech weapon intended to provide sustained long range medium calibre fire support. The relatively large mechanism and need for an actively air-cooled barrel do make for an noticeably heavy weapon. This was one of the reasons the SAR was developed, at the cost of a marked reduction in RoF and sustained firing capability it was able to provide automatic medium calibre support in a more mobile package. Despite this development and the development of the 14.5mm HMG it remains a popular crew served weapon, itís combination of RoF and medium calibre round make it both an excellent suppressive weapon as well as a potent killer vs a wide range of targets.

    14.5mm Round: The 14.5mm round is second only to the 9mm in terms of age. A long standing Russian HMG round, itís current iteration arose during the cultist wars where their developed a need for an even more powerful sniper round than those currently available, (other countries saw similar issues, but most got by with some form of 20mm anti-material rifle, or put up with the limitations of existing 50 calibre HMG rounds). The existing 14.5mm was the obvious cartridge but had some long range precision accuracy issues. As a result both cartridge and bullet where extensively modified to produce this heavy weight hard hitting round. Whilst rifles for it where heavy and even a perfect shot with high powered ammunition was not guaranteed to kill some targets, it was a significant step forward over the next best round available to the Russian military. Due to itís sheer stopping it soon eclipsed the various 50 calibre rounds in the post war era, and as such remained the heavy duty round of choice for extremely high powered marksmen rifles. Naturally when the EFGT went looking for a high powered sniper round the 14.5mm was the natural choice, and it in turn led to the resurrection of HMG designs based on the round, whilst straight copies of very old Russian military hardware initially soon all new designs taking full advantage of materials advances emerged.

    14.5mm Marksmen Rifle: The big boy of sniper weaponry the 14.5mm is a bolt action un-suppressed weapon, whoís hefty weight and recoil make it very awkward to use. However it is virtually the only non-collateral causing, (single man portable), weapon available to EFGT regular units that is capable of dealing with power armoured foes, or other equivalents.

    14.5mm HMG: The 14.5mm HMG is a large calibre moderate RoF 14.5mm weapon. Itís combination of heavy duty actively cooled barrel, and large calibre round mean very few targets can safely endure itís firepower for even a brief period, and fewer still for extended periods. This heavy duty firepower makes the weapon highly popular amongst all forces. Nonetheless itís lower RoF and marginally higher weight do make it inferior in both the suppression role, and as a general purpose machine gun vs targets that do not require the full destructive power of the 14.5mm round, when compared to the 8.6mm MMG.


    20 Gauge Round: The 20 Gauge shotgun calibre has been a popular weapon calibre for longer than any other size currently in the EFGT inventory. Though it is worth noting that the current round bears only a passing similarity to older rounds, being a scaled down form of the 10 Gauge calibre intended to be more controllable in a lighter weapon. The calibre was not originally part of the EFGT procurement programme. The request for a round of this type was not in fact placed until some time after the EFGTís initial formation. At around this time period Cultist forces had begun utilising large numbers of fallen as shock troops. Whilst in more open battlefields this proved not to be as major an issue, (since a number of heavier weapons could be easily brought to bear), in closer combat environments such as urban areaís it proved rather problematic as those same heavier weapons where not easily brought to bear quickly in such tight confines. This lead to a requirement being issued. A number of different weapon and ammunition calibre possibilities where studied but ultimately the 20 Gauge won, in part because through the use of shot it could be easily used to great effect against lighter targets in a way the alternatives could not.

    Like itís larger 10 Gauge sibling the 20 Gauge is a long length, brass construction, rebated rim cartridge. Typically it is loaded with either tungsten 00 Buckshot or a HDFBBCW (High Density Finned Base, Ballistic Capped, Waddcutter) slug, usual shot and slug weights are in the 40 grams region with velocities being just slightly subsonic. This was felt to represent the best compromise between stopping power, accuracy and recoil. Due to this high per round weight however it has not replaced the 4mm or 9mm calibres and is typically used on a limited basis within the squad rather than as a full replacement for standard rifles or backup weapons.

    20 Gauge Carbine: Despite itís designation, carbine is perhaps a littlie misleading, as the weapon lacks any true automatic capability and is typically used with a rather small 5 round clip. The relatively simple and lightweight construction as well as the typically short 20 gauge barrel do however ensure a lightweight weapon. As a result it is commonly carried by so equipped squad members in the place of the 9mm SMG when a squad expects to need the heavier stopping power.

    20 Gauge Automatic: The 20 Gauge Automatic whilst using the same length barrel as the Carbine uses a much stronger automatic capable mechanism and heavy weight barrel paired with a larger 30 round top feed magazine. The result is capable of delivering heavy duty automatic firepower at short range capable of impeding the toughest of targets. Despite itís firepower and relatively modest weight compared to many weapons, the weight of ammo means it is rarely used as a direct rifle replacement, and whilst a variety of employment methods can and have been used depending on circumstances the typical usage seen most commonly is to replace a squads standard 6mm LMG with the weapon.

    10 Gauge Round: The 10 gauge round was for all intents and purposes developed entirely for the SOAS for use in ďHard ContactĒ operations. These operations, dominated by heavy infantry on infantry combat with littlie or no AFV-G or AFV-A support, but with a marked disparity in numbers that disfavours the SOAS forceís whilst requiring them to launch a highly time sensitive assault on defended enemy positions is the most challenging test of men and equipment the EFGT know of. The close terrain that typifies such engagements coupled with the defensive nature of the opposition and lack of heavy supporting assets places an emphasis on pure infantry forces. It has been well known for centuries that whilst gunfire can and does achieve many kills, fragmentation explosives are by far the most effective and quick method of eliminating opposition in such an environment. Unfortunately friendly fire concerns have always prevented very close range or overly liberal use of such in close infantry on infantry engagements. The mass deployment of SOAS Power armour offered an opportunity however since light fragments could not damage even the weakest parts of such armour. This created itís own problems however since existing hand grenades and 60mm man portable grenade launcher ordinance was designed to produce just such heavy fragments to aid in penetrating light obstacles and disabling unusually tough opponents such as Fallen. A lighter explosive system was required to do the job. The 10 Gauge round was the ultimate result of these efforts at producing a lighter, ďmini-grenadeĒ, the decision to classify it as a shotgun round being a mixture of counter-intelligence and simple practicality based on itís use of a smooth bore design to facilitate fin-stabilised projectiles. Buckshot, typically Tungsten 0 Buckshot, was added later. Regardless of load mass is approximately 80 grams with a muzzle velocity of approximately half a kilometre per second. The micro-grenades use a ballisticlly capped boat-tailed finned base design, secondary factors mean the micro grenades have selectable fusing for impact, delay action, standoff, and timed fusing options. The fuses being micro electrical in nature allowing the explosive portion to be disabled on command, though genuine solid shot lacking any explosive is preferred where possible in situations that require it. Though not all weapons use the action, the design uses a rebated rim cartridge ideal for API Blowback operation, though even then recoil is harsh in most designs.

    10 Gauge Underslung Launcher: Possessing a simple plastic 5 round revolver magazine with the breech forwards of the magazine and firing from an open bolt to facilitate this the design is a simple and efficient means to place the firepower in the hands of virtually every rifle equipped regular infantryman in the service. Itís combination of short barrel with lowered muzzle velocity and delayed recoil design make it respectably accurate and not too unwieldy in recoil, though accuracy at extreme range and maximum range suffer as a consequence.

    10 Gauge Crew Served Automatic: A heavy modification of the 10 Gauge SOAS Assault Gun. The addition of a tripod, man load sized individual component groups, and a single feed ammunition system, feeding from belted ammunition allows the weapon to function as a crew served weapons system. Itís heavy weight ammo, meagre 300RMP rate of fire, and limited long range capability preclude mass deployment. Nonetheless it remains a popular weapon for itís ability to flush even the hardiest defenders from cover.

    10 Gauge SOAS Assault Gun: Effectively an oversized assault rifle, itís sheer weight makes it virtually impossible for a normal soldier to wield, and if the API operation seriously limitís experienced recoil, it is far from a mild weapon. Fitted with a 40 round top feed magazine with a secondary, (usually 5 round clip), side feed the weapon is capable of laying down a withering hail of fragmentation explosives whilst possessing the ability to rapidly switch to an alternate payload for specialised situations. In the hands of a SOAS power armoured trooper the weapon is easily pointable and is heavily favoured in all but the most open terrain. Though it remains customary for a unit to mix in at least a few ďconventionallyĒ equipped members to provide necessary long range firepower.

    Heavy Ordinance:

    60mm Grenade: The 60 mm Grenade, like most explosive ordinance had to be developed from scratch. There was initially much debate about the calibre with many preferring a smaller more portable size based off calibres commonly used by riot police. However simple harsh experience in the face of numerous shock troops encounters, particularly with fallen, made the development of a weapon with heavier fragmentation effect highly desirable. Creating a round with sufficient velocity whilst retaining acceptable recoil was not easy and much of the effort would lie with the weapons rather than the ammunition. Per round weight including the typically lightweight ceramic magazine section is in the 1.5kg range per round. The rounds use a mortar style design in which a short finned tail and rounded nose is used with the propellant encasing the tail with an igniter in the tail base itself. The igniter is in fact a 4mm round crimped into the base, thus allowing for easy replacement of faulty igniters. This design allows the ammunition to double as 60mm mortar rounds.

    60mm Grenade Launcher: The standard man portable 60mm design for standard infantry squads. The design is reminiscent of the 10 Gauge underslung weapon. Though the ammunition is held in single non-flexible ďlinksĒ, (usually carried in 3 round ďclipsĒ), it uses the same open bolt design with the same magazine aft of the breach configuration which allows the same relatively lightweight magazine construction. Likewise the Barrel, Magazine, and Action are mounted as a single unit on rollers within the weapon frame allowing them to recoil within it against a recoil spring. The Recoil system is specially designed to delay the experience recoil allowing the round to exit the barrel before it is experienced, thus improving accuracy. The feed system nominally feeds clips from the top to bottom of the weapon with sights mounted on the side of operators choice, however they can be rotated in less than 15 seconds to allow the feed to be from either side with the sights repositioned to the top of the weapon. This facilitates the use of bipod and tripod mounts to further buffer recoil allowing for higher sustained rates of fire. The frame and barrel may both be extended via an add on kit allowing a larger mortar bipod to be attached to the extended frame. The stock cover is removable and the stock frame to which it is attached folds out into a v-shaped base thus converting the weapon to a 60mm mortar configuration. Dedicated mortar sights are attached to the barrel extension. The weapons primary limitation is itís high ammo weight, though with the full mortar conversion kit it approaches an all up weapon weight in the same region as a SAR.

    SOAS 60mm Underslung Launcher: Designed for the SOAS units the design is effectively a standard 60mm launcher barrel and action in a new frame. This frame is suitable for attaching to the underside of SARís a similar weapons favoured by SOAS units, it lacks the recoil delay and dampening features, since these are not require by SOAS units, Feed is typically from a 5 round revolver style magazine with modified feed mechanism to facilitate, though it retains the ability to feed from straight clips as well. Due to the lack of stock it cannot be converted to a mortar however.

    LWGM-MP: The LWGM-MP (Lightweight Guided Missile Ė Multi-Purpose), usually shortened to LWGM was the EFGT answer to the need for a man portable guided munitions able to engage both aerospace and ground targets alike. The warhead is a simple design with a multi-stage HEAT at itís core surrounded by a further layer of high explosive and pre-scored casing to enhance shrapnel and blast damage effects. The missile uses broad band passive EM guidance able to lock onto targets by itself or with the aid of a laser designator. It is also capable of accepting local terrain update for nap of the earth flight and limited autonomous navigation, as well as having several pre-set options for itís flight and attack profiles. Finally it can be fired in a ballistic mode where internal gyroís and control surfaces will keep it on a direct line track away from the launcher, eliminating the need for super elevation. The propulsion is 3 stage. An initial low back blast booster kicks the round clear of the launcher before falling away. Once clear the main grain is ignited. The grain starts as a traditional rocket grain, however the oxidiser content of the grain rapidly becomes lean after around a half a second of operation. At this point the air intake baffle plates retract allowing air to flow into the rocket core at supersonic speeds converting the propulsion to ram-rocket for the remainder of the burn. The weapon form is of a lifting body design with fold out control surfaces. Rounds are supplied sealed inside individual canisters that can be loaded into a wide verity of launchers with the form designed to ensure that the canister can be inserted into the launcher in only one orientation so as to ensure the lifting body works as intended. Range is approximately 12KM against ground targets. Aerospace range depends on target heading, altitude, and speed at the time of launch.

    LWGM Infantry Launcher: The standard LWGM launcher used by the infantry is a single tube design with integrated comms capability for missile updates and selectable firing modes. Whilst the weapon can be fired from the shoulder in both guided and ballistic modes the standard employment is to emplace it on itís bipod, usually in a high angle mortar style configuration, though low angle emplacement is an option. Though backblast is minimal for the ordinance fired a deflection plate add on with variable angle is included to reduce dust kick up. The launcher also possesses an orbital asset positioning system, though provision is given for manual input in the event an orbital network is unavailable or disrupted. Standard procedure is to emplace the weapon in a suitable location, with the comms system tied into one or more pre-defined frequencyís. Once setup any infantryman with the appropriate equipment may request a fire mission from a mission specified number of launchers. Launchers are then selected in a nearest to target order and coordinated in launch time vs estimated transit times to achieve a simultaneous arrival on target.

    90mm Mortar Round: Yet another round developed specifically for the EFGT. In form it is simple a scaled up 60mm grenade round. The same basic Mortar Style design is used with the same ignitor. Unlike the 60mm round however rounds can be manually removed from their individual magazine cartridges. Rounds are held within the cartridge by springed cams rather than breakaway holders. When the round is chambered the action depresses 2 studs on the exterior of the cartridge, releasing the round. Rounds are supplied in their cartridges with a full set of firing charges, however the charges are simple to add or remove, a round can thus be removed, itís charge load reduced, and re-inserted into the cartridge in less than 15 seconds, this can even be done when the cartridge is being fed as part of a belt of belt of cartridges, (Belts are of the same solid design as the 60mm Grenade round).

    90mm Crew Served Mortar: In basic configuration the design is similar to the 60mm Grenade Launcher in itís mortar configuration. However it uses a dedicated baseplate, lacks the recoil delay mechanism, and the frame and barrel are single pieces rather than 2 sections each. It retains the recoil buffer and heavy duty muzzle brake however. The feed mechanism has been modified however. Instead of the rearward recoil directly actuating the feed system it compresses a piston against a spring. Unless the piston is fully released a springed cam at the rear of the action will retain the bolt in the rearmost position even if the lanyard operated sear is released. A second springed cam also ensures the action cannot cycle during recoil, holding the bolt to the rear until the weapon returns to battery. Lanyard operation is single action on the bolt sear and selectable double action on the piston sear. The weapon thus has 2 modes of feed operation. Mode 1 has the spring remain cocked after the bolt fully recoils, when the lanyard is pulled the lanyard sear disengages, whilst simultaneously disengaging the piston sear, thus releasing the cocked spring, this actuates the feed mechanism, loading the next round, once fully loaded the piston will be fully uncompressed thus releasing the bolt to chamber and fire the round before it actuates re-cocking the mechanism. Because the piston sear is double action the lanyard must be released and pulled again to fire another round. This mode of operation allows each rounds charge loadout to be altered right up to the moment the lanyard is pulled, since the next round in the mag is not chambered till it is pulled. Mode 2 causes the piston sear to permanently disengage. This means the round is chambered before the lanyard is pulled. Combined with the single action bolt sear this allows the weapon to operate in fully automatic mode with RoF being limited by the recoil buffer system cycle rate. A separate manual piston sear release exists, allowing a round to be manually chambered during mode changes, and a push stud disconnects the piston from the feed mechanism while depressed allowing a new mag to be manually chambered even if the weapon was last fired in Mode 1. A cocking handle allows the weapon to be cycled in the event of an ignitor failure with the unfired round returning to itís magazine section.
    Last edited by Carl; 2014-07-03 at 10:30 PM.

  3. - Top - End - #3
    Barbarian in the Playground
     
    PaladinGuy

    Join Date
    Feb 2013

    Default Re: EFGT Organisation and Equipment

    Ok post away :).

  4. - Top - End - #4
    Bugbear in the Playground
     
    ElfPirate

    Join Date
    Feb 2008

    Default Re: EFGT Organisation and Equipment

    Implied but not stated is that the EFGT is American-style heavy infantry. Which in turn implies that there's a huge load of other carried gear besides the weapons listed, and that the structure is basically professional (as opposed to, say, Warhammer 40K). It's not clear whether the soldiers are conscripts, volunteers or a professional military class or caste. Care to describe these things?

    The list of cartridges made my eyes bleed. I'm not sure who other than a gunsmith would care about 101 variations on bullets.

  5. - Top - End - #5
    Barbarian in the Playground
     
    PaladinGuy

    Join Date
    Feb 2013

    Default Re: EFGT Organisation and Equipment

    To go at your reply backwards. The detailed Ammo list started way back when i was gonna try for an RPG. Unfortunately after much wrangling i realized there was no practical way to make the varying ranges work. However i was most of the way through the document at the time so i saw no reason not to finish it.

    At the same time my world building style is very much interconnected. One thing informs another. As a result i wanted a good idea of the capabilities of specific weapons before i began laying out my organisation charts as their mode of employment, (given power armor is not standard issue), would be dependent on factors such as weapon and ammo weights. And things like caliber choice where dictated by a combination of what would have been readily available when the EFGT whee formed, (it was something of an emergency that forced them to grab off-the-shelf hardware) and what i saw as necessary operational requirements.

    That said the ability to customize unit equipment within certain ranges will be in, or at least that's the intent.

    For the rest of your post:

    1. Not sure what the typical ratio of AFV to infantry squads is in an american style army, (had real issues researching this), but EFGT are probably slightly more AFV heavy as a result of several factor's. Primarily amongst them being that only heavy non-man-portable missiles can achieve kills on stuff heavier than an IFV, and anything heavier than an armored car, (Humvee equivalent), is vulnerable to infantry portable ordinance in specific weak points only. So dedicated missile carrier's form a vital backbone to EFGT anti-armor doctrine, and these continue to exist alongside mechanization assets and direct and indirect fire support AFV's. Aerospace is also vastly different in this era, i'm still working out how they'd be employed.

    2. Thought i'd added a note on this. Yes they can be assumed to carry stuff like rations, survival supplies, body armor, personal radios, e.t.c. I'm only listing stuff i wouldn't expect to be standard issue to all personnel. Though agin tech advances mean most of the stuff that can be lighter will be and body armor is more protective to boot.

    3. EFGT is primarily volunteer, but there probably is limited conscription used when they don't get enough for a specific time period. Both sides have a lot of planets, (somewhere from several dozen to a couple hundred is my current working level), so they can raise fairly large forces on a volunteer basis.

    4. Structure is very much professionally trained, though i chose not to divide the squads into fire teams as i figure the issue of Fallen shock troops, (Rough mental guesstimates say the equivalent of 1 EFGT platoon of them per EFGT equivalent company), makes firepower concentration vital.

    That help?

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