Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 33
  1. - Top - End - #1
    Orc in the Playground
     
    Domino Quartz's Avatar

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Auckland, NZ
    Gender
    Male

    Default Questions about Japanese

    I read a lot of manga (translated into English, of course), and a lot of the time the fan-translations leave in the Japanese honorifics. This makes sense most of the time, since a lot of manga are set in Japan or some fantasy counterpart. However, I've read that the ways the honorifics are used in manga are not necessarily the same as the ways they're used in real life. How are they used in real life (e.g. what does -dono mean and how is it used correctly)?
    Last edited by Domino Quartz; 2014-07-25 at 08:38 PM.
    Spoiler: Out-of-context quotes
    Show

    Quote Originally Posted by The Giant View Post
    Do not pass Go, do not collect $200.
    Quote Originally Posted by Kish View Post
    ...He would have to stay there permanently (without cake, somehow not breathing) for the prophecy to be fulfilled.
    Quote Originally Posted by ChristianSt View Post
    Maybe Blackwing is a Schrödinger's familiar.
    Any given member of the Order needs to do a quantum measurement to see if they remember him

    Azurite Name Inspirations
    Click here to find out why some people's misuse of the plural first-person pronoun annoys others.
    Rich is a better writer than that!
    Free speech?

  2. - Top - End - #2
    Ogre in the Playground
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Japanese honorifics

    Wikipedia to the rescue.
    I assume it's mostly correct, but I don't have any personal knowledge of the subject.

  3. - Top - End - #3
    Titan in the Playground
     
    Asta Kask's Avatar

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Gothenburg, Sweden
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Japanese honorifics

    Cats prefer to be addressed as -sama.
    Avatar by CoffeeIncluded

    Proud child of the Enlightenment

    Captain Kirk: [Listen], there are a million things in this universe you can have and there are a million things you can't have. It's no fun facing that but that's the way things are.

    Current Status

  4. - Top - End - #4
    Ogre in the Playground
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Japanese honorifics

    What sort of cats have you come across? The ones I've known have preferred -kami. Those damn Egyptians should never have started. Now all cats feel entitled.

  5. - Top - End - #5
    Titan in the Playground
     
    Asta Kask's Avatar

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Gothenburg, Sweden
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Japanese honorifics

    Shh... don't give my cats ideas.
    Avatar by CoffeeIncluded

    Proud child of the Enlightenment

    Captain Kirk: [Listen], there are a million things in this universe you can have and there are a million things you can't have. It's no fun facing that but that's the way things are.

    Current Status

  6. - Top - End - #6
    Barbarian in the Playground
     
    SwashbucklerGuy

    Join Date
    Jan 2012

    Default Re: Japanese honorifics

    TV Tropes have an IMO better, more extensive list than Polonopedia ... just say away from wikiwalking (as usual)
    Last edited by Sian; 2014-07-13 at 07:17 AM.

  7. - Top - End - #7
    Titan in the Playground
     
    AtlanteanTroll's Avatar

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Oberlin College
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Japanese honorifics

    I'm not sure what your question is? Is it how extensively they're used, or what all different roles they can take? Either way, the answer is a lot. If there's something more specific, I may be able to elaborate. That said, I only have a year of collegiate level Japanese under my belt, and Brother Oni, wherever he may be, could do a much better job.
    My art thread! Updated 6/27! C&C Appreciated!
    Quote Originally Posted by Dragonprime View Post
    AT, I esteem you above all other men now.

  8. - Top - End - #8
    Orc in the Playground
     
    Domino Quartz's Avatar

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Auckland, NZ
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Japanese honorifics

    Thanks for all your answers. I know that Wikipedia has a page on Japanese honorifics, but I was hoping for some comments from a native speaker. In answer to AtlanteanTroll's question, both.
    Spoiler: Out-of-context quotes
    Show

    Quote Originally Posted by The Giant View Post
    Do not pass Go, do not collect $200.
    Quote Originally Posted by Kish View Post
    ...He would have to stay there permanently (without cake, somehow not breathing) for the prophecy to be fulfilled.
    Quote Originally Posted by ChristianSt View Post
    Maybe Blackwing is a Schrödinger's familiar.
    Any given member of the Order needs to do a quantum measurement to see if they remember him

    Azurite Name Inspirations
    Click here to find out why some people's misuse of the plural first-person pronoun annoys others.
    Rich is a better writer than that!
    Free speech?

  9. - Top - End - #9
    Ettin in the Playground
     
    Brother Oni's Avatar

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Cippa's River Meadow
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Japanese honorifics

    Quote Originally Posted by AtlanteanTroll View Post
    That said, I only have a year of collegiate level Japanese under my belt, and Brother Oni, wherever he may be, could do a much better job.
    There are a number of native Japanese speakers on the board that can also help - I only married one.

    Quote Originally Posted by Domino Quartz View Post
    Thanks for all your answers. I know that Wikipedia has a page on Japanese honorifics, but I was hoping for some comments from a native speaker. In answer to AtlanteanTroll's question, both.
    As AtlanteanTroll said, it's too broad of a question. Use of the correct honourific depends on the context, both by the addresser and the addressee and this isn't including honest mistakes by either or deliberate insults. While most anime uses them correctly, not all translations do, particularly non-professional ones.

    Both of the articles linked are generally correct, although -san implies a certain amount of familiarity with the subject so isn't quite as impersonal as Mr/Mrs can be in English. Edit: apparently this is not true any more.

    Both articles neglect honourific prefixes; the most common one is 'O-', for example, a shop assistant may address customers directly as 'o-kyaku-sama' while taking about customers in general as 'kyakyu-san'. It also turns up a lot in historical anime/manga attached to names or titles (o-sensei or o-Takeda-tono) but is fairly archaic these days.
    It also makes for Japanese puns, for example the game Okami can be rendered as 'great god/spirit' as o-kami, or 'wolf' as okami (trust me, Japanese has a lot of these).

    There's also the various different pronouns (eg. watashi/atashi/watukshi/ore/boku/sessho etc) of varying politeness and gender use when used correctly. Insults or personal statements muddy that even further: for example, a male using 'atashi' would be making a fairly strong statement on their effeminism.

    Gah, before I get sucked in further (I'm supposed to be working on something for Bhu as well!), if you'd like more specific answers, you'll need to ask more specific questions.

    Edit: spoke to my wife and she can't think of any manga that uses honourifics differently as to how they would in real life. Any manga that did used honourifics differently would just sound odd, particularly if set in real life contemporary settings. Fantasy or other settings may differ though.
    Last edited by Brother Oni; 2014-07-14 at 02:30 PM.

  10. - Top - End - #10
    Orc in the Playground
     
    Domino Quartz's Avatar

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Auckland, NZ
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Japanese honorifics

    Another question I have (not directly related to the original topic, but another thing about Japanese) is: What is the difference between the meanings of the words "yokai", "oni", and "ayakashi/ayashi"?
    Spoiler: Out-of-context quotes
    Show

    Quote Originally Posted by The Giant View Post
    Do not pass Go, do not collect $200.
    Quote Originally Posted by Kish View Post
    ...He would have to stay there permanently (without cake, somehow not breathing) for the prophecy to be fulfilled.
    Quote Originally Posted by ChristianSt View Post
    Maybe Blackwing is a Schrödinger's familiar.
    Any given member of the Order needs to do a quantum measurement to see if they remember him

    Azurite Name Inspirations
    Click here to find out why some people's misuse of the plural first-person pronoun annoys others.
    Rich is a better writer than that!
    Free speech?

  11. - Top - End - #11
    Halfling in the Playground
     
    AmberWynne's Avatar

    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    USA
    Gender
    Female

    Default Re: Questions about Japanese

    Quote Originally Posted by Domino Quartz View Post
    (e.g. what does -dono mean and how is it used correctly)?
    I'm not a native speaker, but I was fortunate enough to spend the better part of a year in Japan when I was younger, and I consider(ed) myself somewhat fluent, so I can try to answer. And of course I'm happy to be corrected by someone more knowledgeable.

    For -dono, it's not really used colloquially by anybody today. I think it might still be used for referring to royalty (e.g the Emperor), but you very likely wouldn't call your brother or father or friend with that, no matter how much you respect them. -sama is pretty much the only serious thing you might use these days; anything like '-kami' that BWR mentions is probably overblown and would likely be seen as joking/mockery, I think. In older times, I believe the use of the suffix -dono may have extended to other high-ranking members of noble houses. But because of the change of social structure, -dono is pretty obsolete, to my experience.

    When talking about someone and wanting to use second-person pronouns ("you"), there are a variety of choices with different meanings that suggest both things about you and your relationship with/what you think about the other person. From my limited experience, I think in anime/manga pronouns are actually used a bit MORE than in real life, because they convey a good deal of information about the interaction and perspectives in a concise manner.

    Probably the most polite way to talk to other people is to actually abstain from pronouns entirely and to just use their name--or even better, their title. With that said, it isn't uncommon to drop pronouns in general in conversation, once you've used their names/nouns to identify them. Context tends to take care of the rest; or you might rather just use the proper noun again.

    And like Brother Oni suggested, you can add o- to titles, like "o-tou-san/sama" (meaning "father"--actually it's just the "tou" that means father and the prefix and suffix are honorifics). But I think it seems natural to only attach the o- when talking TO that person; if you were talking to someone else about your father, you would... actually probably use a different word entirely (chichi, or maybe possibly chichiue for high-class). So maybe this isn't the best example. xD Oni's is much cleaner.

    I guess that leads into the thought that you don't always use the same honorifics for the same person--it's very contextual. If you are an executive representing your company, for example, you actually speak of your own company/coworkers/products in a humble way when talking to another executive; but then when you talk to your own boss, you address him, personally, with great respect.

    The 'father' example I was trying to give is pretty much the same idea: When speaking directly to your father, you speak honorably, because you are a sort of "group of one" and he is above you in a different group; but when talking to your friends, you use humbler words, because your whole family is your group and you don't want to elevate your family over your friends'.

    I could also get into keigo, but... I was always terrible with it, so I'll leave the details to someone else and just leave it at this: different verbs can be substituted too, to speak to someone with honor. This is particularly used in business and day-to-day when buying something from shops.

    Also, a general rule of thumb is this: the longer and more vague something is in Japanese, the more polite it tends to be.

    Hopefully at least some of that made sense; I'm sure someone else can explain much clearer than I did since I think most of it diverged into rambling...
    Last edited by AmberWynne; 2014-07-25 at 09:21 PM.
    “Courage is not the absence of fear, but rather the judgement that something else is more important than fear.”
    ― Meg Cabot

    Avatar by me!

  12. - Top - End - #12
    Orc in the Playground
     
    Domino Quartz's Avatar

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Auckland, NZ
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Questions about Japanese

    Thank you for your answer. That was the sort of answer I was looking for.
    Spoiler: Out-of-context quotes
    Show

    Quote Originally Posted by The Giant View Post
    Do not pass Go, do not collect $200.
    Quote Originally Posted by Kish View Post
    ...He would have to stay there permanently (without cake, somehow not breathing) for the prophecy to be fulfilled.
    Quote Originally Posted by ChristianSt View Post
    Maybe Blackwing is a Schrödinger's familiar.
    Any given member of the Order needs to do a quantum measurement to see if they remember him

    Azurite Name Inspirations
    Click here to find out why some people's misuse of the plural first-person pronoun annoys others.
    Rich is a better writer than that!
    Free speech?

  13. - Top - End - #13
    Ettin in the Playground
     
    Brother Oni's Avatar

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Cippa's River Meadow
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Questions about Japanese

    Quote Originally Posted by Domino Quartz View Post
    Another question I have (not directly related to the original topic, but another thing about Japanese) is: What is the difference between the meanings of the words "yokai", "oni", and "ayakashi/ayashi"?
    Yokai = very broad generic term for a supernatural creature: wikipedia link.

    Oni = Japanese ogre. Large monstrous humanoid, typically heavily muscled and physically powerful, with two horns growing from their head and usually regarded as evil: link. Oni are a subset of yokai.

    Ayakashi: collective name for yokai that appear above water: link.

    Ayashi: depends on the character. Among other meanings, it can be a name, an adjective meaning strange, mysterious, inexplicable, etc (怪しい) - you'll need to be more clear what meaning you're after.

    Quote Originally Posted by AmberWynne View Post
    I'm not a native speaker, but I was fortunate enough to spend the better part of a year in Japan when I was younger, and I consider(ed) myself somewhat fluent, so I can try to answer. And of course I'm happy to be corrected by someone more knowledgeable.
    No need to worry, it's all perfectly correct.

    Quote Originally Posted by Domino Quartz View Post
    Thank you for your answer. That was the sort of answer I was looking for.
    If AmberWynne's answer was the sort of thing you were looking for, then why didn't you clarify your question after everybody else's answers?
    Last edited by Brother Oni; 2014-07-26 at 02:24 AM.

  14. - Top - End - #14
    Ettin in the Playground
     
    Bhu's Avatar

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Hell itself (Ohio)
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Questions about Japanese

    Quote Originally Posted by Brother Oni View Post
    Yokai = very broad generic term for a supernatural creature: wikipedia link.


    Ayakashi: collective name for yokai that appear above water: link.
    http://hyakumonogatari.com/2013/08/2...an-in-english/ Another link you might fins useful


    I'd heard some differing things on Yokai. I've seen several places talking about Yokai referring to any supernatural occurrence (of which monsters are but one). It's kind of like the dichotomy between manga and comics. In america we use comics for the local stuff and manga for the asian, whereas Japan just says manga. Yokai is so often used in conjunction with monsters it's assumed it refers to the monsters themselves rather than the supernatural as a whole.

    But I could be wrong.

    http://hyakumonogatari.com/2012/10/2...an-in-english/ linky

    Oni were originally like trolls, djinn etc. Invisible spirit or elemental presences that caused problems or death that were later anthropomorphized into ogre like beings.
    Last edited by Bhu; 2014-07-26 at 02:34 AM.
    Revised avatar by Trixie, New avvie by Crisis21!
    Mah Fluffy Death Critters
    Orcs and Goblins
    Behold the Power of Kitteh!
    Backup threads available here

  15. - Top - End - #15
    Orc in the Playground
     
    Domino Quartz's Avatar

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Auckland, NZ
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Questions about Japanese

    Quote Originally Posted by Brother Oni View Post
    Yokai = very broad generic term for a supernatural creature: wikipedia link.

    Oni = Japanese ogre. Large monstrous humanoid, typically heavily muscled and physically powerful, with two horns growing from their head and usually regarded as evil: link. Oni are a subset of yokai.

    Ayakashi: collective name for yokai that appear above water: link.

    Ayashi: depends on the character. Among other meanings, it can be a name, an adjective meaning strange, mysterious, inexplicable, etc (怪しい) - you'll need to be more clear what meaning you're after.
    Again, thank you for your answer.

    Quote Originally Posted by Brother Oni View Post
    If AmberWynne's answer was the sort of thing you were looking for, then why didn't you clarify your question after everybody else's answers?
    Sorry about that. I guess I didn't know exactly what sort of answer I wanted until I got it.
    Spoiler: Out-of-context quotes
    Show

    Quote Originally Posted by The Giant View Post
    Do not pass Go, do not collect $200.
    Quote Originally Posted by Kish View Post
    ...He would have to stay there permanently (without cake, somehow not breathing) for the prophecy to be fulfilled.
    Quote Originally Posted by ChristianSt View Post
    Maybe Blackwing is a Schrödinger's familiar.
    Any given member of the Order needs to do a quantum measurement to see if they remember him

    Azurite Name Inspirations
    Click here to find out why some people's misuse of the plural first-person pronoun annoys others.
    Rich is a better writer than that!
    Free speech?

  16. - Top - End - #16
    Ettin in the Playground
     
    Brother Oni's Avatar

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Cippa's River Meadow
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Questions about Japanese

    Quote Originally Posted by Bhu View Post
    I'd heard some differing things on Yokai. I've seen several places talking about Yokai referring to any supernatural occurrence (of which monsters are but one). It's kind of like the dichotomy between manga and comics. In america we use comics for the local stuff and manga for the asian, whereas Japan just says manga. Yokai is so often used in conjunction with monsters it's assumed it refers to the monsters themselves rather than the supernatural as a whole.

    But I could be wrong.
    It's not wrong, it's that you have a unified view of Japanese folklore, which isn't true.

    Since travel was restricted to either horse or by foot back in medieval times (if a person got the necessary permission to travel), communities were very insular. This resulted in very localised mythology that when collected and viewed as a whole, often results in different or even contradictory terms for the same word.

    America is a comparatively new country, so didn't have as many generations of isolated inhabitants developing their own mythology, language and customs: take a look at the UK - we're approximately 1/3 the size of Texas, yet we have as many, if not more regional accents and dialects than the whole of America.

    Japanese doesn't distinguish between certain terms - nezumi (鼠) is used as a generic term for rats and mice for example. Similarly in English, aunt is used as a generic term for a female relation of your parent's generation, whereas in Chinese there are different terms depending on whether they're paternally or maternally related, whether they're older or younger than the parent in question (the order matters as well if there's more than one) and whether they've married into your family or not.

  17. - Top - End - #17
    Ogre in the Playground
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Questions about Japanese

    For a game I'm running: how intelligible would a Japanese person from ca. 1600 be to a modern speaker? A high-class courtier type, not a random peasant.
    So far I'm just running on similarities between modern English and Elizabethan (i.e. pretty darn close).

  18. - Top - End - #18
    Ettin in the Playground
     
    Brother Oni's Avatar

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Cippa's River Meadow
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Questions about Japanese

    Quote Originally Posted by BWR View Post
    For a game I'm running: how intelligible would a Japanese person from ca. 1600 be to a modern speaker? A high-class courtier type, not a random peasant.
    So far I'm just running on similarities between modern English and Elizabethan (i.e. pretty darn close).
    The problem is, 1600 is right on the border of the changeover between Late Middle Japanese (which looks to be somewhat harder to understand) and Early Modern Japanese which is just an older version of modern Japanese (starts mid-19th Century).

    Written form is very different though as that's been standardised and updated a number of times since then.

    I tried asking my wife and she just shrugged her shoulders - I think I'm pushing it with the mythology and the history of Japanese language is well outside her interests.

  19. - Top - End - #19
    Firbolg in the Playground
     
    Closet_Skeleton's Avatar

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Ēast Seaxna rīc
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Japanese honorifics

    Quote Originally Posted by BWR View Post
    What sort of cats have you come across? The ones I've known have preferred -kami. Those damn Egyptians should never have started. Now all cats feel entitled.
    -kami isn't a real honorific as far as I know.

    I only have two years of GCSE Japanese so I could be wrong but I've never heard it in an anime. Kami-sama gets used for 'Christian or non-specific god' and most gods just get a -sama.

    Quote Originally Posted by BWR View Post
    For a game I'm running: how intelligible would a Japanese person from ca. 1600 be to a modern speaker? A high-class courtier type, not a random peasant.
    So far I'm just running on similarities between modern English and Elizabethan (i.e. pretty darn close).
    Well, the most important thing is that like ca. 1600 French, there was no one Japanese language. The dominant language was that of the court of Kyoto which is an ancestor to modern Kansai-ben, while modern standard Japanese is based on the dialect spoken in Tokyo. So it really depends on 'A Japanese person from what province'. Some of the vanished dialects would be unintelligible and a modern Kansai-ben speaker would probably have an easier job than a standard Japanese speaker.

    It takes a specialist to translate ca. 1600 written material to modern Japanese, so it really isn't as simple as English which was a pretty unified language (Scots and Doric being the only well known variants different enough to be considered a separate language rather than a mere dialect).

    Quote Originally Posted by Brother Oni View Post
    It's not wrong, it's that you have a unified view of Japanese folklore, which isn't true.
    Japanese folklore was heavily collected in the 19th century, possible growing out of the popularity of Obake karuta. I assume the term Yokai because popular around that time.

    A process of collecting regional tales concurrent with the central authority enforcing the capital's language on everyone makes the plethora of confusing terms quite understandable.
    "that nighted, penguin-fringed abyss" - At The Mountains of Madness, H.P. Lovecraft

    When a man decides another's future behind his back, it is a conspiracy. When a god does it, it's destiny.


  20. - Top - End - #20
    Ogre in the Playground
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Japanese honorifics

    Quote Originally Posted by Closet_Skeleton View Post
    -kami isn't a real honorific as far as I know.
    Well, what do you expect from cats?

    Well, the most important thing is that like ca. 1600 French, there was no one Japanese language. The dominant language was that of the court of Kyoto which is an ancestor to modern Kansai-ben, while modern standard Japanese is based on the dialect spoken in Tokyo. So it really depends on 'A Japanese person from what province'. Some of the vanished dialects would be unintelligible and a modern Kansai-ben speaker would probably have an easier job than a standard Japanese speaker.

    It takes a specialist to translate ca. 1600 written material to modern Japanese, so it really isn't as simple as English which was a pretty unified language (Scots and Doric being the only well known variants different enough to be considered a separate language rather than a mere dialect).
    The character in question is actually from Kyoto, so that should make things easier. Since this is spoken communication, not written, it should be ok-ish. Especially since the PC actually did study history of Japanese language and writing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Brother Oni View Post
    the history of [...] language is well outside her interests.
    Does not compute.

  21. - Top - End - #21
    Titan in the Playground
     
    Asta Kask's Avatar

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Gothenburg, Sweden
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Questions about Japanese

    Quote Originally Posted by Bhu View Post
    Oni were originally like trolls, djinn etc. Invisible spirit or elemental presences that caused problems or death that were later anthropomorphized into ogre like beings.
    What CR is Yoko Oni?

    Brother Oni - I have the same problem with friends who insist that a morning star is this or the other thing - we're talking about a thousand years of usage and a continent to develop regional differences.
    Avatar by CoffeeIncluded

    Proud child of the Enlightenment

    Captain Kirk: [Listen], there are a million things in this universe you can have and there are a million things you can't have. It's no fun facing that but that's the way things are.

    Current Status

  22. - Top - End - #22
    Ettin in the Playground
     
    Bhu's Avatar

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Hell itself (Ohio)
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Questions about Japanese

    Quote Originally Posted by Asta Kask View Post
    What CR is Yoko Oni?

    Brother Oni - I have the same problem with friends who insist that a morning star is this or the other thing - we're talking about a thousand years of usage and a continent to develop regional differences.
    The problem comes from translating it to game mechanics. In discussing folklore you're allowed to be general, but with mechanics you are required to be specific. Myths may use the term spirit, ghost, demon, ogre, etc., interchangeably, but when making something for a system I am obligated to arbitrarily decide "This is a spirit, this is a ghost, etc".

    It's a pain in the behind sometimes.
    Revised avatar by Trixie, New avvie by Crisis21!
    Mah Fluffy Death Critters
    Orcs and Goblins
    Behold the Power of Kitteh!
    Backup threads available here

  23. - Top - End - #23
    Titan in the Playground
     
    Asta Kask's Avatar

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Gothenburg, Sweden
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Questions about Japanese

    Yep. Preparing a campaign based on Swedish folklore at the moment, and I noticed that.
    Avatar by CoffeeIncluded

    Proud child of the Enlightenment

    Captain Kirk: [Listen], there are a million things in this universe you can have and there are a million things you can't have. It's no fun facing that but that's the way things are.

    Current Status

  24. - Top - End - #24
    Ogre in the Playground
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Questions about Japanese

    Quote Originally Posted by Asta Kask View Post
    Yep. Preparing a campaign based on Swedish folklore at the moment, and I noticed that.
    Are you familiar with Draug? Rather specifically Norwegian but there should be some stuff you can steal.

  25. - Top - End - #25
    Ettin in the Playground
     
    Bhu's Avatar

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Hell itself (Ohio)
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Questions about Japanese

    Quote Originally Posted by Asta Kask View Post
    Yep. Preparing a campaign based on Swedish folklore at the moment, and I noticed that.
    Got a link? Always been interested in what would be considered obscure folklore (obscure from the point of origin in which I live anyway).
    Revised avatar by Trixie, New avvie by Crisis21!
    Mah Fluffy Death Critters
    Orcs and Goblins
    Behold the Power of Kitteh!
    Backup threads available here

  26. - Top - End - #26
    Titan in the Playground
     
    Asta Kask's Avatar

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Gothenburg, Sweden
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Questions about Japanese

    The source material is in Swedish, so... problem.
    Avatar by CoffeeIncluded

    Proud child of the Enlightenment

    Captain Kirk: [Listen], there are a million things in this universe you can have and there are a million things you can't have. It's no fun facing that but that's the way things are.

    Current Status

  27. - Top - End - #27
    Ettin in the Playground
     
    Bhu's Avatar

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Hell itself (Ohio)
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Questions about Japanese

    I'll use Google to translate!

    Yeah, I can't believe I said that with a straight face either...
    Revised avatar by Trixie, New avvie by Crisis21!
    Mah Fluffy Death Critters
    Orcs and Goblins
    Behold the Power of Kitteh!
    Backup threads available here

  28. - Top - End - #28
    Titan in the Playground
     
    Asta Kask's Avatar

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Gothenburg, Sweden
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Questions about Japanese

    I'm looking at a Chinapan setting (i.e. a mixture of China and Japan in a most unhistorical way) with the Empire divided into warring states and also struggling against the corrupting outside forces of the Crimson King (shamelessly stolen from the Dark Tower series). A sort of Warhammer/Rokugan mash-up.

    What would be a good translation of the Crimson King?
    Avatar by CoffeeIncluded

    Proud child of the Enlightenment

    Captain Kirk: [Listen], there are a million things in this universe you can have and there are a million things you can't have. It's no fun facing that but that's the way things are.

    Current Status

  29. - Top - End - #29
    Barbarian in the Playground
     
    Shinken's Avatar

    Join Date
    Mar 2014

    Default Re: Questions about Japanese

    Quote Originally Posted by Asta Kask View Post
    I'm looking at a Chinapan setting (i.e. a mixture of China and Japan in a most unhistorical way) with the Empire divided into warring states and also struggling against the corrupting outside forces of the Crimson King (shamelessly stolen from the Dark Tower series). A sort of Warhammer/Rokugan mash-up.

    What would be a good translation of the Crimson King?
    I like Guren-ou, but that's just me.
    Do the impossible. See the invisible. Row row fight the powah!
    Touch the untouchable. Break the unbreakable. Row row fight the powah!

    3DS Friend Code: 4442-0172-6654 Safari: Flying (Pidgey, Hoothoot, Fletchinder)

    Homebrew by me: Abyssal Inheritor (martial Acolyte of Skin), Veiled Blade (PoW Soulknife archetype), Accursed Striker (PoW Witch archetype)

  30. - Top - End - #30
    Ettin in the Playground
     
    Brother Oni's Avatar

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Cippa's River Meadow
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Questions about Japanese

    Quote Originally Posted by Asta Kask View Post
    I'm looking at a Chinapan setting (i.e. a mixture of China and Japan in a most unhistorical way) with the Empire divided into warring states and also struggling against the corrupting outside forces of the Crimson King (shamelessly stolen from the Dark Tower series). A sort of Warhammer/Rokugan mash-up.

    What would be a good translation of the Crimson King?
    Kurenai no Ou sounds better in my opinion. Guren is crimson as in the crimson lotus flower but there's a number of variations and readings of crimson (link).

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •