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    Ogre in the Playground
     
    nonsi's Avatar

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    Apr 2010

    Default Redesigned Monsters + New Monsters

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    Redesigned Monsters

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    Dragons:
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    Dragons are awesome.
    In fact, they're so awesome that they're in the game's title.

    Here's a new perspective on how their complex mechanics can be greatly simplified and unified.
    At the same time, I'm overhauling a lot of the fluff for dragons, throwing away standard dragon hierarchies and relationships, and introducing changes to the concept of dragon social structure.




    The Fluff
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    Dragons are creatures that have inspired great wonder and awe throughout any civilization that has encountered them. Whether these creatures have become great patrons or terrible enemies, they almost always have an enormous impact on the development of the "less gifted races", as non-dragons are oft-called. So well-known are these creatures, that many con artists and cheats have taken to selling forged documents and manuscripts detailing the lives of these creatures, leading to a great deal of misinformation about them.

    Many have believed the various races of Dragons to be truly independent breeds. So deeply entrenched is this belief that many insist that there are racial rivalries among dragons, and that metallic dragons eternally war with chromatic (a non-realistic distinction, as will soon be explained below). In reality, this is nonsense, for the truth of the Dragons is that they are all different races of the same species.
    Even in infancy, a dragon's power is driven by its feed; of the dozens of dragons hatched in a single clutch, only one or two reach the Very Young age category, having devoured their siblings and survived on the traces of magical energy stored in the meat. It is worth of note, however, that dragons maintain a strong taboo against cannibalism once past wyrmlinghood, and many Good dragons later regret their inability to restrain their instincts at birth.

    The voracious nature of the Dragon is widely misunderstood, and many scholars note that these magnificent creatures can survive on mere rock and stone. What so many have failed to realize is that these rocks and stones are a part of their flight and breath weapon mechanism.

    The tendency of dragons to hoard precious items stems from an inborn attraction to shiny stuff (much like crows) and because compared to their superior minds, the life of a dragon are usually excruciatingly boring.
    Items are also kept for their aesthetic value or as a prized morsel for some special occasion.




    The Mechanics
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    Type:
    A dragon is a winged, reptilelike creature, with magical abilities.


    Color:
    There are exactly 6 dragon types, all of equal power:
    - Black (Obsidian)
    - Blue (Sapphire)
    - Green (Jade)
    - Rainbow (Diamond). Rainbow dragons are extremely rare and are known to but a handful few.
    - Red (Gold)
    - White (Silver).
    The "color" indicated in parenthesis is how they appear when exposed to sunlight - that's the source of the chromatic-metallic-gemstone distinction myth.


    Draconic Magic:
    The source of all dragons' (Sp) abilities is their innate ability to use invocations.
    A dragon gains invocations as a Sorcerer of 2/3 its HD (2 Sorcerer levels per age category). It may select any invocation from the Sorcerer or DFA, except Shape & Essence invocations.
    Dragons also receive a Breath Effect when they reach their Young age and again every time they advance 2 age categories thereafter. Dragons cannot use their racial Breath Effect to gain different breath damage types, but they may do so by taking levels in the DFA class, gaining much less potent breath weapon (not too likely).


    Features:
    Dragons have the following features:
    - HD: d12
    - BAB: Full
    - Good saves: All.
    - Skill points: 20 + 5 / HD


    Traits:
    A dragon possesses the following traits:
    - Dragons eat, sleep and breathe.
    - Darkvision 120', lowlight vision x4 (x2 within daylight), +4 to all Listen & Spot checks.
    - Amphibian: Dragons breath under water as easily as they do in the open air and have a swim speed equal to 1/2 their land speed.
    - Immortal: Dragons have no maximum age and never die of old age.


    Languages:
    All Dragons speak Draconic and Common.



    Dragon Statistics

    Dragons by Age:
    Code:
    Age            Size  Years           Hit Dice (hp)    CR   STR DEX CON INT WIS CHA    BAB/    Attack   Fort Ref  Will   Breath(DC)
                                                                                        Grapple                                   
    ==================================================================================================================================
    Wyrmling        T    0-5             3d12+3 (39)       4   11  10  13  10  11  10     +3/-5     +5      +4   +3   +3      2d8(12)
    Very young      S    6-15            6d12+6 (78)       5   13  10  13  10  11  10     +6/+3     +8      +7   +5   +5      4d8(14)
    Young           M    16-25           9d12+18 (126)     7   15  10  15  12  11  10    +9/+11    +11     +10   +7   +6      6d8(16)
    Juvenile        M    26-50           12d12+24 (168)   10   17  10  15  14  11  12   +12/+15    +15     +11  +10   +9      8d8(18)
    Young adult     L    51-100          15d12+45 (225)   13   19  10  17  14  13  14   +15/+23    +18     +13  +11  +11     10d8(20)
    Adult           L    101-200         18d12+72 (288)   15   23  10  19  16  13  16   +18/+28    +23     +17  +14  +14     12d8(23)
    Mature adult    H    201-400         21d12+105 (357)  18   27  10  21  16  15  16   +21/+37    +27     +20  +15  +15     14d8(25)
    Old             H    401-600         24d12+120 (408)  20   29  10  21  18  15  16   +24/+41    +31     +23  +17  +16     16d8(27)
    Very old        H    601-800         27d12+162 (486)  21   31  10  23  18  17  18   +27/+45    +35     +25  +18  +18     18d8(29)
    Ancient         G    801-1,000       30d12+180 (540)  23   33  10  23  20  17  18   +30/+52    +37     +27  +20  +19     20d8(31)
    Wyrm            G    1,001-1,200     33d12+231 (621)  24   35  10  25  20  19  20   +33/+57    +41     +29  +21  +21     22d8(33)
    Great wyrm      C    1,201 or more   36d12+288 (720)  26   37  10  27  22  21  22   +36/+63    +41     +31  +23  +23     24d8(36)

    Dragons by Age (Cont.):
    Code:
    Age             Speed                     Init   AC                                         SR   DR        Frightful   Warlock Level
                                                                                                               Presence    Invocations
    ====================================================================================================================================
    Wyrmling       40’, fly 150’ (good)       +0     14 (+2 size,  +2 nat.), touch 12, f-f 14   13   -            -        2
    Very young     40’, fly 150’ (good)       +0     16 (+1 size,  +5 nat.), touch 11, f-f 16   16   -            -        4
    Young          40’, fly 200’ (average)    +0     18 (          +8 nat.), touch 10, f-f 18   19   5/magic      -        6
    Juvenile       40’, fly 200’ (average)    +0     21 (         +11 nat.), touch 10, f-f 21   22   5/magic      -        8
    Young adult    60’, fly 200’ (average)    +0     23 (-1 size, +14 nat.), touch 9,  f-f 23   25   10/magic    17        10
    Adult          60’, fly 200’ (average)    +0     26 (-1 size, +17 nat.), touch 9,  f-f 26   28   10/magic    20        12
    Mature adult   60’, fly 200’ (poor)       +0     28 (-2 size, +20 nat.), touch 8,  f-f 28   31   15/magic    21        14
    Old            60’, fly 200’ (poor)       +0     31 (-2 size, +23 nat.), touch 8,  f-f 31   34   15/magic    23        16
    Very old       60’, fly 200’ (poor)       +0     34 (-2 size, +26 nat.), touch 8,  f-f 34   37   20/magic    25        18
    Ancient        80’, fly 250’ (clumsy)     +0     35 (-4 size, +29 nat.), touch 6,  f-f 35   40   20/magic    27        20
    Wyrm           80’, fly 250’ (clumsy)     +0     38 (-4 size, +32 nat.), touch 6,  f-f 38   43   25/magic    29        22
    Great wyrm     80’, fly 250’ (clumsy)     +0     37 (-8 size, +35 nat.), touch 2,  f-f 37   46   25/epic     32        24



    Dragon Abilities and Natural Attacks by Size:
    Code:
    Size		Space/Reach  	1 Bite	2 Claws	1 Tail Slap	2 Wings	1 Crush	1 Tail Sweep
    ============================================================================================
    Tiny		2.5'/0'		1d4	1d3	-		-	-	-
    Small		5'/5'		1d6	1d4	-		-	-	-
    Medium		5'/5'		1d8	1d6	1d6		-	-	-
    Large		10'/5'		2d6	1d8	1d8		1d6	-	-
    Huge		15'/10'		2d8	2d6	2d6		1d8	2d8	-
    Gargantuan	20'/15'		4d6	2d8	2d8		2d6	4d6	2d6
    Colossal	30'/20'		4d8	4d6	4d6		2d8	4d8	2d8



    Dragons' Breath Weapon length & area by Size:
    Code:
    Dragon Size	Line*	Cone*
    ==============================
    Tiny		30'	15'
    Small		40'	20'
    Medium		60'	30'
    Large		80	40'
    Huge		100'	50'
    Gargantuan	120'	60'
    Colossal	150'	75'
    
    * A line is always 5' high and 5' wide. A cone is as high and wide as its length.



    Draconic Ability Additions And Tweaks

    Wing:
    Even secondary attacks add full Str-bonus to damage.


    Crush (Ex):
    Crush attacks are effective only against opponents 2 or more size categories smaller than the dragon. A crush attack deals the indicated damage plus the dragon's Strength bonus.


    Tail Sweep (Ex):
    Creatures within the swept area are affected if they are 3 or more size categories smaller than the dragon.


    Breath Weapon (Su):
    A blast from a breath weapon always starts at any intersection adjacent to the dragon and extends in a direction of the dragon's choice, with an area as noted in the table above.
    Creatures caught in the area can attempt a Ref save take ½ damage. Those that fail must make a second save or suffer the breath weapon's side effect. The DC for both is the same: [10 + 1/2 dragon's HD + CON-mod].
    All dragons are immune to their own breath weapon's damage type and to all draconic breath weapons' secondary effects (but gain no resistance vs. the damage of the other breath weapons).
    Breath Weapon Types:
    - Black (Tar - line): On a second failed save, this black acid does additional [1d6 / age category)] in the following round and [1d4 / age category)] in the round after that.
    - Blue (Lightning - line): Victims who fail their second save are stunned for 1 round.
    - Green (Smoke - cloud): On a second failed save, the toxic fumes render a target dazed and blind for 1 round, due to suffocation and burning eyes.
    - Rainbow (Light - cone/line): A Rainbow dragon's breath weapon produces multicolored flash that shines in all the colors of the rainbow. Its secondary effect is blindness for 1 round and dazzled for 1d4 more rounds.
    - Red (Flame - cone): This breath weapon causes items to ignite on a second failed save.
    - White (Frost - cone): If the victim fails its second save, it takes -2 DEX and all carried items (save for each separately) become crystallized and take a permanent -5 to their hardness.


    Frightful Presence (Ex):
    A young adult or older dragon can unsettle foes with its mere presence. The ability takes effect automatically whenever the dragon attacks, charges, or flies overhead. Creatures within a radius of [30' x the dragon's age category] are subject to the effect. A potentially affected creature that succeeds on a Will save (DC [10 + ½ dragon's HD + Cha-mod]) is unaffected, and no creature can be affected by a given dragon's frightful presence more than once in a 24 hour period. On a failure, creatures with 4 or less HD become panicked until they no longer have line of sight to the dragon, while those with 5 or more HD become shaken for as long as they have line of sight to the dragon. Dragons are immune to draconic Frightful Presence.





    Dragon Feats
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    Alternative Breath (Dragon)
    Not all dragon's breath weapon is lethal...
    Requirements: Dragon, Draconic Energy
    Benefits: Select one alternate breath weapon type from the table below. You can cause your breath weapon to deal that status effect, rather than damage; additionally, the save type changes (Fort or Will, rather than reflex) as listed below.
    - Paralysis (Fort): Subject must save or be Paralyzed for 1d6 rounds, plus 1 round per size category above Tiny.
    - Sleep (Fort): Subject must save or be rendered unconscious for 1d6 rounds, plus 1 round per size category above Tiny.
    - Repulsion (Will): Subject must save or be rendered unconscious for 1d6 rounds, plus 1 round per size category above Tiny. This is a mind-affecting enchantment effect.
    - Weakness (Fort): Subject must save or suffer 1 point of strength damage, plus 1 per size category above Tiny.
    - Slow (Will): Subject must save or be Slowed (as the spell) for 1d6 rounds, plus 1 round per size category above Tiny.
    Breath weapon shape, range, save DC, and recharge time remain the same as from your base breath weapon.


    Aquatic (Dragon)
    You've developed an affinity for the water, and find that you're as much at home in it as you are on land.
    Requirements: Dragon
    Benefits: You gain a swim speed equal to your land speed, and the ability to breath water.


    Burrowing (Dragon)
    You've tapped into your earthen heritage, and learned the trick of sliding easily through stone and dirt.
    Requirements: Dragon
    Benefits: You gain a burrow speed depending on your size category (Tiny: 5', Small: 10', Medium: 15', Large: 20', Huge: 20', Gargantuan/Colossal: 30'). You can burrow through anything less than solid stone. If you move no faster than your speed as a 1-round action, you may leave a tunnel behind you as you burrow.


    Strong Flyer (Dragon)
    You are better at flying than most of your kind.
    Prerequisite: Dragon, fly speed
    Benefits: Your fly speed increases by 10’, and your flight maneuverability goes up by one step.
    Special: You can select this feat multiple times. Its effects stack. If this would cause you to exceed Perfect maneuverability, you treat winds as being one category less for purposes of how they affect your flight for every step above Perfect flight you would have.


    Lesser Shapeshifting (Dragon)
    With practice, you extend your natural camouflage abilities to be able to mimic the form of a few common creatures.
    Requirements: Dragon, level 5
    Benefits: You gain the supernatural ability to Change Shape three times per day. This functions much like Beast Shape I (if you choose an animal) or Alter Self (if you choose a humanoid), except it lasts until you dismiss it.

    Greater Shapeshifting (Dragon)
    With practice, you extend your shapeshifting abilities to be able to mimic the forms of some of many creatures.
    Requirements: Dragon, Lesser Shapeshifting, level 9
    Benefits: You gain the ability to use Polymorph on yourself as a supernatural ability a number of times per day equal to the number of Dragon feats you possess, except that it lasts until you dismiss it.


    Feel the Air (Dragon)
    Your senses are exceptionally sharp, and you can tell many things about your surroundings by the feel of the shifting air on your wings
    Requirements: Dragon, Strong Flyer
    Benefits: You gain blindsense at a radius of 10' per Dragon feat you possess.

    Sensitive (Dragon)
    You've tapped even deeper into your earthen heritage, and learned to hear the whispers of the stones
    Requirements: Dragon, Burrowing
    Benefits: You gain tremorsense out to a distance of 10' per Dragon Feat you posses.

    Whispers of the currents (Dragon)
    Your ties to the water are exceptionally strong, and you can tell what else is in the water around you, even with your eyes closed.
    Requirements: Dragon, Aquatic
    Benefits: You gain a limited form of blindsense, which only works to detect creatures touching the same body of water that you are. The range is 10' per Dragon feat you posses.




    Draconic Evolution via Levels
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    Dragons have one characteristic that sets them apart from all others: In addition to gaining HD via age progression, dragons may also gain racial HD and size increase by actual leveling via experience.
    Example: a typical juvenile dragon may gain 3 levels via experience and become young adult.

    Dragons don't gain additional ability-score increase from racial leveling. They have those built into their racial HD.





    Giants:
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    Tha title "Giant" inspires awe and reverence. However, in 3.5e giants are spectacularly underwhelming and need a massive upgrade.
    The proposed changes below attempt to do just that, and yet, at the same time remain as true as possible in spirit to the official giants.

    Note: Not all the official 3e giants are specified below. That's because those roles either make no sense thematically (Sun Giant) or can be taken by several other types (no reason why Hill/Stone/Frost/Cloud giants couldn't be encountered in a forest, and Storm giants thrive in the ocean depths).



    Giant Type Redefinition:
    Code:
    HD: 				d10
    BAB: 				high  (1:1)
    Good Saves: 			Fort, Will
    Ability Scores:			As given by official WotC materials
    Skill Points Per Level: 	4
    Challenge Rating:		Equal to the giant's #HD	(Titan has CR 23)
    Shared Special Attacks:		Rock Throwing
    Shared Special Qualities:	Low-light Vision, Rock Catching, Steadfast Determination (bonus feat)
    Shared Feats:			Imp. Bull Rush, Cleave, Awesome Blow, Mighty Swing	(all giants are ferocious combatants that excel at fighting vs. multiple foes)


    Ability Scores
    Code:
    Giant		Str	Dex	Con	Int	Wis	Cha
    ===========================================================
    Hill		25	 8	19	 6	10	 7
    Stone		27	15	19	10	12	11
    Frost		29	 9	21	10	14	11
    Fire		31	 9	21	10	14	11
    Cloud		35	13	23	12	16	13
    Storm		39	14	23	16	20	15
    Titan		43	12	39	21	28	24
    Mountain	43	10	37	 6	 8	 7


    Calculated Combat Stats
    Code:
    Giant		Size		HD		AC		 F  /  R  /  W		BAB/Grpl	Melee Attacks	Melee Damage	Range Attacks	Range Damage	Slam Attack	Additional* Feats
    =========================================================================================================================================================================================================
    Hill		Large		9 (127)		20 (Unchanged)	+13 / +3  / +10		+9/+20		+15/+10		2d8+10		+8		2d6+7		1d8+7
    Stone		Large		12 (156)	25 (Unchanged)	+16 / +6  / +12		+12/+24		+18/+13/+8	2d8+12		+14		2d8+8		1d8+8		Precise Shot	
    Frost		Large		13 (195)	21 (Unchanged)	+17 / +3  / +13		+13/+26		+21/+16/+11	3d6+13+1d6	+12		2d6+9+1d6	1d8+9+1d6	Imp. Sunder	
    Fire		Large		14 (210)	23 (Unchanged)	+18 / +3  / +13		+14/+28		+22/+17/+12	3d6+15+1d6	+13		2d6+10+1d6	1d8+10+1d6	Imp. Sunder	
    Cloud		Huge		15 (240)	25 (Unchanged)	+21 / +6  / +15		+15/+35		+23/+18/+13	4d6+18		+16		2d8+12		2d6+12		Imp. Sunder, Imp. Overrun
    Storm		Huge		18 (288)	27 (Unchanged)	+20 / +9  / +17		+18/+40		+30/+25/+20/+15	4d6+21+1d6	+20/+15/+10/+5	3d6+14+1d6	2d6+14+1d6	Imp. Sunder, Imp. Overrun, Combat Reflexes
    Titan		Gargantuan	20 (480)	36		+28 / +17 / +26		+20/+48		+35/+30/+25/+20	4d6+27		+35/+30/+25/+20	2d6+19+1d6	3d6+16		Imp. Sunder, Brutal Throw, Blind-Fight
    Mountain	Gargantuan**	25 (575)	35		+30 / +8  / +22		+25/+57		+37/+32/+27/+22	4d8+24		+37		4d8+16		4d6+16		Powerful Charge, Improved Powerful Charge, Combat Reflexes, Track, Brutal Throw
    
    
    * Those are mere thematically-appropriate suggestions. Giants are free to choose different feats, if such choices would serve them better (such as Powerful Charge, Combat Brute etc).
    
    ** Mountain giants are Gargantuan w/ Powerful Built (effectively Colossal)

    Special Attacks & Qualities
    Code:
    Giant		Special Abilitie
    ============================================================================================================================================
    Hill		Special Attacks:	SLAs: 3/day: Magic Stone
    		Special Qualities:	--
    Stone		Special Attacks:	SLAs: 3/day: Magic Stone. 1/day: Stone Shape and either Transmute Rock to Mud / Mud to Rock[/B]
    		Special Qualities:	Darkvision 60'
    Frost		Special Attacks:	Frost weapon property to all melee weapon attacks and thrown rocks; SLAs: 3/day: Fire Shield [Cold]. 1/day: Cone of Cold
    		Special Qualities:	Immunity to cold, vulnerability to fire
    Fire		Special Attacks:	Flaming weapon property to all melee weapon attacks and thrown rocks; SLAs: 3/day: Fire Shield [Fire]. 1/day: Flame Strike (all the damage is fire damage)
    		Special Qualities:	Immunity to fire, vulnerability to cold
    Cloud		Special Attacks:	SLAs: 3/day: Levitate, Fog Cloud. 1/day: Solid Fog, Gaseous Form
    		Special Qualities:	Oversized Weapon, Scent, Ignore Fog Impediments
    Storm		Special Attacks:	Shock weapon property to all melee weapon attacks and thrown rocks; SLAs: 3/day: Levitate. 2/day: Control Weather. (Su): 3/day: Chain Lightning
    		Special Qualities:	Freedom of Movement, Immunity to Electricity, Water Breathing
    Titan		Special Attacks:	SLAs: As Given, Conjure Javelins (endless supply of +3 javelins of Shocking Burst)
    		Special Qualities:	Change shape (w/ Powerful Built), DR 15/lawful, Darkvision 60', SR 32; Always Active: True Seeing
    Mountain	Special Attacks:	Crush 2d8+24, Fling, Improved Grab, Trample 4d8+24
    		Special Qualities:	Darkvision 60', Scent


    Skills
    Code:
    Giant		Skill Points	Skills
    ================================================================================================================================
    Hill		30		Climb +14, Jump +14, Listen +8, Spot +8
    Stone		60		Climb +18, Hide +8*(+16 in rocky terrain), Jump +18, Listen +11, Move Silently +12, Spot +11
    Frost		64		Climb +19, Craft (any one) +12, Intimidate +14, Jump +19, Listen +12, Spot +12
    Fire		70		Climb +20, Craft (any one) +12, Intimidate +16, Jump +20, Listen +14, Spot +14
    Cloud		87		Climb +21, Craft (any one) +13, Diplomacy +10, Intimidate +16, Listen +13, Perform (stringed instruments) +11, Sense Motive +16, Spot +16
    Storm		120		Climb +26, Concentration +26, Craft (any one) +15, Diplomacy +10, Intimidate +18, Jump +24, Listen +22, Perform (sing) +12, Sense Motive +15, Spot +22, Swim +22*(+30 due to Swim Speed)
    Titan		N/A		As given (for simplicity's sake)
    Mountain	64		Jump +36, Listen +20, Spot +20



    Giant Feats:
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    Stomp
    Requirements: Large (or larger) giant
    Benefit: Using his great size and mass, as a standard action, the giant can stamp his foot or slam his fist to the ground, causing it to shake.
    All creatures smaller than the giant within its [base land speed minus 30’] must make a Balance check vs. DC [10 + Str-bonus) or fall prone.

    Earthquake (Su)
    Requirements: Gargantuan giant, Stomp, Adamantine warhammer (or Greathammer)
    Benefit: When wielding an adamantine war hammer (or Greathammer) 2-handed, the giant may strike the ground to produce Earthquake spell effect centered on himself.
    The giant is unaffected by that earthquake to any degree.
    This feat may be applied once per hour and no more than a daily number equal to 1/3 the giant’s Con-bonus.




    New Monsters

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    Alicorn:
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    I've never encountered an official D&D crossbreed between the Unicorn and Pegasus. It's just something that always felt missing from the monster list.
    ("Alicorn" - not an ideal name, but "Pegacorn" and "Unipeg" just sound bad)

    Alicorn
    Large Magical Beast
    Hit Dice: 5d10+25 (75 HP)
    Initiative: +3
    Speed: 60' (12 squares), fly 120' (average)
    Armor Class: 19 (–1 size, +3 Dex, +7 natural), touch 12, flat-footed 16
    Base Attack/Grapple: +5/+12
    Attack: Gore +11 melee (2d6+7 + 2d6 Horn Blast)
    Full Attack: Gore +11 melee (2d6+7 + 2d6 Horn Blast) and 2 hooves +9 melee (1d6+3 + 1d8 Thunder Hooves)
    Space/Reach: 10'/5'
    Special Attacks: Horn Blast 2d6 (+ deafness), Royal Voice, Thunder Hooves 1d8 (+ prone), Trample 1d6+10
    Special Qualities: Darkvision 60', low-light vision, magic circle against evil, scent, spell-like abilities, immunity to poison, disease, and compulsion.
    Saves: Fort +9, Ref +7, Will +11
    Abilities: Str 24, Dex 18, Con 21, Int 10, Wis 20, Cha 28
    Skills: Diplomacy +15, Intimidate +15, Listen +12, Sense Motive +11, Spot +12
    Feats: Flyby Attack, Improved Natural Attack (gore), Multiattack
    Environment: Any
    Organization: Solitary or pair
    Challenge Rating: 7
    Treasure: Standard
    Alignment: Always Chaotic Good
    Advancement: See below
    Level Adjustment: +6


    Description

    The Alicorn is a magnificent winged version of the Unicorn.
    Alicorns are regal creatures whose lordly bearing fills all who see them with awe and reverence.
    Alicorns have deep, wisdom-filled eyes, a long spiraling horn, and flowing golden manes and tails. Males sport a beard. Their wings are white, with a touch of colored feathers that span the entire rainbow spectrum. Their natural fur is either white, silver or platinum in color.
    Alicorns are wise and kind creatures who encourage friendship and harmony. They believe in the goodness inherent in all individuals, no matter what past wrongs they have committed. Despite their good nature and patience, they are stalwart in the face of evil. If an evil creature cannot be reasoned with, an alicorn will mete out justice in the best way possible.
    Alicorns do not share their lesser cousins' rigid restriction regarding who's entitled to ride them. They judge deeds rather than origin. Nevertheless, it is more likely to encounter a unicorn with a rider than an alicorn.
    Alicorns speak Common, Sylvan, Celestial, and Draconic.



    Combat


    Horn Blast (Su): 2d6 sonic damage, Fort save DC 18 or go Deaf. An alicorn may choose if to use this power or not on each attack anew. An alicorn's horn counts as both magical and silver for the purpose of overcoming DR.

    Magic Circle Against Evil (Su): Continuously active

    Royal Voice (Su): Once per hour, an alicorn may duplicate the effect of Fear spell (receives the sonic descriptor) as a supernatural ability (DC 24).

    Spell-Like Abilities (CL 7): At will – Detect Evil/Good as a free action, Purify Food and Drink; 3/day – Cure Light Wounds; 1/day – Cure Moderate Wounds, Globe of Invulnerability, Neutralize Poison, Remove Disease. The save DC is Cha-based.

    Thunder Hooves (Su): 1d8 sonic damage, Ref save DC 18 or fall Prone. An alicorn may choose if to use this power or not on each attack anew

    Trample (Su): Reflex half DC 16. The save DC is Str-based.


    Level Advancement
    An alicorn may advance in the Priest class, including the following variants: Cleric, Exorcist, Healer and Oracle. An alicorn will only serve a CG deity.


    Cerberus:
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    I've seen a few attempts at making a decent Cerberus, but this one here is the first (and so far only one) I've seen that could rise to the task of guarding the gates of hell.


    Chupacabra:
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    Chupacabra

    Small Monstrous Humanoid
    Hit Dice: 3d8+9 (33 HP)
    Initiative: +5
    Speed: 40' (on all four) / 20’ (upright) / 20’ climbing speed
    Armor Class: 19 (+1 size, +5 Dex, +3 natural), touch 16, flat-footed 19
    Base Attack/Grapple: +3/+5
    Attack: Claw +8 melee (1d4 + 2)
    Full Attack: 2 Claws +8 melee (1d4 + 2), Bite +8 melee (1d4 + 1)
    Space/Reach: 5'/5'
    Special Attacks: Blood Drain, Improved Grab, Latch, Pounce
    Special Qualities: Camouflage, Darkvision 60', low-light vision, Scent, Uncanny Dodge
    Saves: Fort +4, Ref +8, Will +5
    Abilities: Str 14, Dex 20, Con 17, Int 9, Wis 15, Cha 8
    Skills: Climb +16, Hide +23, Jump +16, Listen +8, Move Silently +19, Spot +9
    Feats: Improved Grapple, Multiattack
    Environment: Warm plains
    Organization: Solitary, pair, raiding party (3-6) or horde (7-16)
    Challenge Rating: 4
    Treasure: Standard
    Alignment: Usually NE
    Advancement: 4-6 HD (small), 7-9 HD (medium)
    Level Adjustment: +3

    Chupacabra are small, bestial humanoids with unusual agility. Thay feed on blood – typically mammalian livestock, unless none is available, in which case they might even acquire a taste for small humanoids and children.
    They resemble slender apes with faces similar to that of vampire bats, only with tiny pointy ears and large red eyes. They have oversized claws and a row of spines along their backs.
    Despite their intelligence, Chupacabra have not yet developed a culture and they function as the most primitive of hunting tribes.

    Chupacabra speak their own language, which consists of squeaks, clicks, whistles and growls. They also understand (but cannot speak) the local dialect (usually Common).


    Combat

    Chupacabra prefer ambush tactics, grappling (or climbing onto) their prey and draining blood.
    Once a chupacabra has its share of blood (see below), it retreats to digest its meal.
    If outnumbered or out matched, they do not tend to stick around until the bitter end, but that doesn’t mean they won’t try again.

    Blood Drain (Ex): A chupacabra drains 1d3 Con points (1d4 if medium) whenever it maintains a grapple. It can feed on 12 points before it has had its fill. Anything beyond that makes the creature fatigued until at least 1 hour passes, or it expels some of the blood by vomiting (a standard action expels 1 point worth of blood).

    Improved Grab (Ex): When a chupacabra hits a creature up to 1 size larger with one of its claws, it can attempt to start a grapple as a free action w/o provoking AoOs.

    Latch (Ex): Chupacabra may latch onto targets of two size categoried larger than themselves (or more), replacing opposed Grapple checks with Climb checks. This does not grant a chupacabra the ability to pin opponents of two size categories (or more) above it.

    Pounce (Ex): When a chupacabra makes a charge, it can follow with a full attack when using its natural weapons.

    Camouflage (Ex): Chupacabras can change their coloration to blend with their surroundings, which enables them to hide w/o cover or concealment.

    Uncanny Dodge Chupacabra don’t lose their Dex-bonus to AC when flatfooted.

    Skills: Chupacabra are outstanding hunters, gaining a +8 racial bonus to Climb, Hide, Jump and Move Silently. Chupacabra are natural climbers, having climbing speed of 20’ and may take 10 on climbing, even when threatened or distracted. Chupacabra also gain +2 to Listen and Spot checks.



    Cyclops
    Spoiler
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    Cyclops

    Large Giant
    Hit Dice: 15d10+80 (224 HP)
    Initiative: +1
    Speed: 50’
    Armor Class: 23 (-1 size, +1 Dex, +10 natural, +3 hide), touch 10, flat-footed 20
    Base Attack/Grapple: +15/+36
    Attack: Greatclub +26 (3d8+11) or Slam +26 (1d6 + 11) or rock +22 range (2d8+11)
    Full Attack: Greatclub +26/+21/+16 (3d8+11) or 2 Slams +26 (1d6 + 11) or 2 rocks +22 range (2d8+11)
    Space/Reach: 15'/15'
    Special Attacks: Befuddling Gaze, Improved Grab, Restraining Bite
    Special Qualities: Low-light Vision, Poor Depth Perception, Powerful Built
    Saves: Fort +22, Ref +6, Will +8
    Abilities: Str 33, Dex 12, Con 21, Int 8, Wis 8, Cha 6
    Skills: Climb +22, Intimidate +10, Jump +25, Listen +11, Spot +9
    Feats: Imp. Bull Rush, Cleave, Awesome Blow, Mighty Swing, Improved Sunder, Brutal Throw
    Environment: Any hills, mountains or forests.
    Organization: Solitary, pair, gang (2-5) or band (6-9 plus 35% noncombatants).
    Challenge Rating: 15
    Treasure: Standard
    Alignment: Usually CE
    Advancement: By character class
    Level Adjustment: +4

    Cyclopes come in a variety of appearances. They’re all giants that possess a single large eye in the center of their foreheads and are roughly 18’-tall. A cyclops can look like an oversized human or half-orc with an unnaturally large mouth. Some have a single conical horn of no particular functionality protruding from the top of their head.
    Cyclopes typically wield a huge Great Club or Morningstar, which they make out of an uprooted tree.
    Cyclopes are aggressive and enjoy raiding caravans, taking whatever goods interest them, and capturing humanoids for food. Whether alone or in a small band, cyclopes lair in shallow caves on mountainsides. They seem to be particularly bad-tempered and rarely bargain or trade, preferring to attack any and all interlopers, including other giants.

    Writer’s Note:
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    The Cyclops is a giant, but its place in Greek mythology makes it deserve its own entry.
    The guidelines behind the cyclops’ remake are:
    • The Greek mythology creature easily handled a group of seasoned warriors – meaning that it's supposed to be quite powerful.
    • In the few scenarios I saw on screen that involve a cyclops, people tend to lose their heads around it (panicking, make poor judgement calls, etc.).
    • Polyphemus quickly ate 4 people as their comrades ware helpless to assist.



    Combat:

    Cyclopes are easily tricked, but they fight fiercely and to the death.

    Befuddling Gaze (Su)
    Once per round, as a free action, a target that a cyclops stares at and sees the cyclops w/o averting its eyes is assaulted by a negative mind-affecting effect (Will save vs. DC 17 to negate) chosen at random from the following possibilities:
    • Confusion: As the 4th level spell.
    • Fear: As the 4th level spell.
    • Mental Damage: 1d4 damage to either Int or Wis (50:50); minimum 3.

    Improved Grab
    This ability is detailed here.
    This ability is triggered by a successful Slam attack made by the cyclops.

    Poor Depth Perception
    Cyclopes suffer a -4 penalty on all range-associated attack rolls (including rock catching) and -2 on all Search and Spot checks (already calculated above).

    Restraining Bite
    A creature successfully grabbed may be transferred to the cyclops’ mouth as a swift action, which is rendered Restrained and taking 1d6+13 piercing damage per round, until it succeeds or an opposed Grapple check vs. the cyclops or the cyclops is no longer conscious.
    Only a single creature may be held at a time. A cyclops can swallow a Medium or smaller creature whole, but won't swallow live victims, because its internal anatomy is not built to handle internal damage.


    Druj:
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    This is a 3.5e conversion of a BECMI D&D monster... my all-time favorite undead.

    Druj

    Size/type: Diminutive Undead
    Hit Dice: 14d12 (105 hp, w/ Toughness)
    Initiative: +8 (+4 Dex, +4 Improved Initiative)
    Speed: fly 30' (perfect)
    AC: 24 (+4 Dex, +6 natural, +4 size), touch 18, flat-footed 20
    Base Attack/Grapple: +7 / -5 (+11)
    Attack: Hand +11 melee (1d4 + poison) / Eye +11 melee (0 + poison) / Skull +11 melee (2d4 +poison)
    Full Attack: Hand +11 melee (1d4 + poison) / Eye +11 melee (0 + poison) / Skull +11 melee (2d4 +poison)
    Space/Reach: 1' / 0'
    Special Attacks: death's grasp, spirit's gaze, skull fright, poisonous aura, poison touch, split essence
    Special Qualities: Blindsight 60', spell-like abilities, spell immunity, undead traits, daytime powerlessness, DR 15/magic
    Saves: Fort +4, Ref +8, Will +13
    Abilities: Str 10, Dex 19, Con -, Int 13, Wis 14, Cha 22
    Skills: Hide +30, Intimidate +23, Listen +16, Move Silently +30, Search +14, Spot +16
    Feats: Ability Focus (Finger of Death), Combat Reflexes, Improved Initiative, Iron Will, Toughness
    Environment: Any Land
    Organization: Solitary
    CR: 12
    Treasure: None
    Alignment: Usually NE
    Advancement: —
    Level Adjustment: —

    Druj appear as body parts; a hand, an eye, or a skull, floating around in a horrible way. They have a sickly decayed appearance, and emit a pale green/blue/purple glow. Druj are highly intelligent and malevolent, and are far more dangerous than they may seem.
    Druj are travelers, rarely staying in one place for more than one night; they become incorporeal (non-voluntary), invisible and nearly powerless (except to move) with the light of dawn, regaining their physical body and powers at dusk.
    Druj are usually encountered singly, unless commanded by powerful necromantic means. In such case, two druj eyes might rest within a druj skull, accompanied by two druj hands. No more than these five druj can ever be found in one place, and smaller groups (a druj skull with one druj eye, for example) are much more likely.
    As destructive as they are, druj usually move on before they can cause any great local impact. Should one decide to settle down, however, the effects are disastrous, as a druj tends to kill everything in its vicinity.


    Combat

    Druj frequently use their Animate Dead ability to turn victims they have slain into zombies, which they use to defend themselves and to harass enemies. The zombies under its control can be turned by clerics and paladins, but they have a +4 bonus to resist turning.
    When a druj splits (see below), its spellcasting form will often hang back to use its abilities, while its other parts attack in melee.
    A druj normally has no treasure, though it may occasionally serve as a guard for some special item.

    Daytime Incorporeality (Su): The druj is almost totally powerless during daytime hours. It cannot attack or use any spell like ability, and its aura is suppressed. It usually moves without rest during the day.

    Spirit's Gaze (Su): Once each round as a free action, an eye druj may gaze at an opponent up to 30' away. The victim must make a successful Fortitude saving throw (DC 25, Cha based) or be paralyzed for 1d4 rounds. The victim needs not meet the druj's gaze to be affected.

    Death's Grasp (Su): When a hand druj hits an opponent in melee, it can attempt to start a grapple as a free action without provoking an attack of opportunity. If the hand druj wins the grapple check, it establishes a hold and inflicts [1d4 + (10 - the targets natural/armor AC)] damage each round. A hand druj can never establish a pin, but as long as it has a hold it counts as a large creature for the purpose of opposed Grapple checks made to break the hold.

    Skull Fright (Su): When a target is first attacked in a night by a skull druj, the victim must make a successful DC 25 Will saving throw or be paralyzed with fear for 1 round. The save DC is Cha-based (with an additional +12 bonus). This is a necromancy (fear, mind-affecting) effect.

    Poisonous Aura (Su): The poisonous presence of a druj causes all consumable items within 30', including normal food and water, holy water, all rations and even magical potions to become spoiled and useless (but not poisoned), with no saving throw allowed. Even living plants and small insects within this area are paralyzed, dying if the druj remains there more than an hour. This effect negates all forms of plant control, insect swarms and plagues, both normal and magical.

    Poison Touch (Ex): the druj's touch is poisonous to the living. Primary and secondary 2d6 con, save DC 17.

    Split Essence (Ex): A druj can split its essence, creating four identical forms instead of one. Each of the forms can attack separately, but only one of the forms is able to use spell like abilities. That form can often be distinguished, as it will hover nearby while the other forms attack. If that form is slain, one of the surviving forms immediately gains access to all unused spell like abilities. If turned while split, the parts of a druj turned are forced to reunite into one creature, remaining united for 1d4 + 1 rounds. If turned while united, turning is handled normally.
    - When a druj splits, each part has its own set of HP.
    - If one of the parts is slain, it does not appear during that night on a repeated split.
    - A reunited druj, has as many HP as the highest among the group. Every time a reunited druj takes damage that doesn't bring it to 0 HP or less, the druj's HP are those of the form with the highest HP left.
    - Each night, the monster's HP replenish.

    Blindsight (Ex): Druj have blindsight out to 60'.

    Spell Immunity (Ex): Druj are unaffected by spells lower than 4th level.

    Spell-Like Abilities (Sp): (at will) Animate Dead, Deeper Darkness, Finger of Death, Silence, Telekinesis.

    Skills: Druj have a +12 bonus to all Hide skill (diminutive). They also fly with extreme silence and have an inherent +12 bonus to all Move Silently checks.



    Gaj:
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    This is a remake of a psionic DurkSun monster.

    Gaj

    Large Aberration
    Hit Dice: 7d8+21 (87 HP – with Toughness)
    Initiative: +1
    Speed: 30' (6 squares), Burrow 20'
    Armor Class: 21 (-1 size, +1 Dex, +11 natural), touch 10, flat-footed 20
    Base Attack/Grapple: +5/+13
    Attack: Bite +9 melee (2d6+4)
    Full Attack: Bite +9 melee (2d6+4) and 3 tentacle slaps +7 melee (1d4+2 plus 1d4 Int)
    Space/Reach: 10'/5'
    Special Attacks: Domination, Improved Grab, Int damage, poison gas, spell-like abilities
    Special Qualities: Darkvision 60', DR 5/adamantine, immune to mind affecting effects, spell like abilities
    Saves: Fort +5, Ref +3, Will +8
    Abilities: Str 18, Dex 12, Con 16, Int 12, Wis 14, Cha 17
    Skills: Autohypnosis +7, Climb +6, Concentration +6, Hide +7 (+15*), Intimidate +7, Jump +6, Listen +6, Spot +10
    Feats: Multiattack, Iron Will, Toughness
    Environment: Rocky plateau or dunes
    Organization: Solitary or pair
    Challenge Rating: 9
    Treasure: None
    Alignment: Always neutral evil
    Advancement: 8-14 HD (Large), 15-21 HD (Huge)
    Level Adjustment: —

    *A gaj receives a +8 bonus to Hide checks in rocky or sandy areas.


    Description

    This horrific beast looks like a twisted cross between a spider and a tortoise. From its huge bulbous head grow three large, feather-like antennae, six compound eyes, and a pair of powerful mandibles. Its body is 6' in diameter and covered by a scaly, rust -orange shell. Six four-jointed legs ending in webbed feet sprout from beneath the shell.

    A gaj is a predatory insectoid creature that feeds by draining the intelligence of other creatures. These creatures spend their time hunting such "food"; though they can partially subsist on meat for up to a week. If a gaj locates an area with an abundant supply of prey, it will establish a den in a shallow burrow. There, it will send a mental broadcast to all nearby gaj in search of a mate. After breeding, females lay 2-6 eggs, which are tended by both parents and hatch in one month. Gaj infants stay with their parents for about three months and then leave to establish their own territories. No familial bond remains.

    Gaj are carnivores and require flesh to survive, but they also need to consume the mental energy of other sentient creatures to live. They prefer to live in rocky areas where their shells serve as camouflage, or in sandy areas where they can hide themselves from predators in a shallow burrow, so almost every encounter begins with an ambush by the creature.


    Combat

    Domination (Su): 3 times per day, a gaj uses a modified form of Dominate Person effect to compel its prey to come within range of its mandibles. This dominate effect extends to animals, fey, giants, magical beasts and monstrous humanoids (DC 17), and may be activated once per round as a free action on the monster's turn. Once the gaj has a creature in its grip, it will wrap one of its antennae around the victim's head and begin to damage the victim's Int.
    The victim is allowed a save each round to break the effect. As long as the target is both dominated and held in a gaj's mandibles, it is considered paralyzed and takes a -5 penalty on Will saves to resist Gaj domination.
    Unless engaged in combat, a gaj will deal no deal damage with its mandibles to the paralyzed while feeding with an antenna, exploiting its meal to the fullest.
    Once a prey is securely paralyzed, a gaj may direct a secondary (and tertiary) dominate at another victim. The second and third victims caught in a gaj's antenna but not held by its mandibles are not counted as paralyzed. They may defend themselves normally, but are compelled not to depart from the gaj feeding on them or attack it.

    If and when forced into melee combat, a gaj uses an array of offensive powers.

    Improved Grab (Ex): To use this ability, a gaj must hit with its bite attack. It can then attempt to start a grapple as a free action without provoking AoOs.
    The gaj gets a +4 bonus on tentacle slap attacks against a grappled foe, canceling out the usual –4 penalty for attacking a grappled opponent.

    Int Damage (Su): A creature hit by a gaj's antenna suffers 1d4 points of Int damage. For each 4 points of Int damage dealt, a victim must make a Fort save vs. DC 17 or suffer 1 point of Int drain.

    Poison Gas (Ex): Three times per day, as a standard action, a gaj may emit a cloud of noxious gas from its abdomen.
    This ability is similar in effect to Stinking Cloud spell, with two distinctions:
    - Range is restricted to 10'.
    - Each round inside the cloud, a target that fails its saves also takes 1 point of Con damage, with no secondary damage.
    Gaj are immune to this effect.

    Spell-Like Abilities (CL 10): Probe Thoughts (SC, p.162) – 3 / day; Detect Life – free action at will.


    Gaj often use their burrowing ability to create deadfalls and pits for the unwary.




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    Ogre in the Playground
     
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    Gakarak:
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    This is a remake of a monster appearing in the OD&D AC9 Creature Catalogue.

    Gakarak

    Size/Type: Huge Plant
    Hit Dice: 16d8+96 (224 hp)
    Initiative: -1 (-1 Dex)
    Speed: 45' (9 squares)
    AC: 20 (-2 size, -1 Dex, +13 natural), touch 7, flat-footed 20
    Base Attack/Grapple: +12/+34
    Attack: Slam +20 melee (2d6 +10)
    Full Attack: 2 Slams +20 melee (2d6 +10) or 4 thorn darts +20 (1d8 +10; 100' range increment) or 1 Stomp +20 (2d6 + 15)
    Space/Reach: 15' /15'
    Special Attacks: Animate trees, Entangle, Improved Grab, Plant Growth
    Special Qualities: Anchored, Damage reduction 15/slashing, electricity immunity, fast healing 5, low-light vision, plant traits, teleport through vegetation, wooden weapon immunity
    Saves: Fort +16, Ref +4, Will +7
    Ability Scores: Str 31, Dex 9, Con 23, Int 10, Wis 15, Cha 10
    Skills: Concentration +12, Intimidate +10, Knowledge (nature) +12, Listen +12, Search +12, Sense Motive +12, Spot +12, Survival +12
    Feats: Brutal Throw (CAdv, p.106), Improved Bull Rush, Improved Grapple, Knockback (RoS, p.142), Multigrab (Serpent Kingdoms, p. 146), Greater Multigrab (Serpent Kingdoms, p. 146)
    Environment: Any forests
    Organisation: Solitary, or Brood (2-5)
    Challenge Rating: 18
    Treasure: None
    Alignment: Always Neutral
    Advancement: 17-32 HD (Huge); 33-48 HD (Gargantuan)
    Level Adjustment: ––


    A gakarak is an 18'-tall bipedal entity that is often mistaken for a treant, although it is much darker in color and is usually shrouded in ancient, blackening mosses and lichens.
    Gakaraks are some of the oldest living creatures on the Prime Plane. They dwell deep in the heart of ancient forests, where they brood on their eons-old hatred of humans and humanoids, all of whom they consider to be hateful tree-slayers. They resent incursions into their forests and will do their utmost to deter anyone from entering. The long-nurtured anger of a gakarak pervades the entire forest with an atmosphere of impending doom.
    Gakaraks speak their own language (an ancient form of treant), plus Sylvan. Most also can manage a smattering of common and just about all other humanoid tongues
    at least enough to say "Get away from my trees!"



    Combat

    Gakaraks prefer to avoid all contact with humans and other trespassers in their forests. Thus they will make liberal use of their plant growth ability to redirect intruders.
    Should they have to fight, they will first animate trees and fire thorn darts at a distance. Should it be engaged in melee, it can make two slam attacks.

    Anchored (Su): A gakarak cannot be teleported away from his forest. Any such attempt immediately fails.

    Animate Trees (Sp): A gakarak can animate trees within 180' at will, controlling up to six trees at a time.
    It takes 1 full round for a normal tree to uproot itself. Thereafter it moves at a speed of 30 feet and fights as a treant.
    Animated trees lose their ability to move if the gakarak that animated them is incapacitated or moves out of range.
    The ability is otherwise similar to liveoak (caster level 16th).

    Entangle (Su): Any creature hit by the gakarak's slam attack must make a Ref save vs. DC 20 (Wis based) or become entangled by the grasses, weeds and vines that grow around him for 1d4 rounds. An entangled creature can take no other action, except for trying to break free. The creature can break free and move half its normal speed by using a full-round action and make a DC 20 Str check or a DC 20 Escape Artist check.

    Stomp: If the target is smaller than the gakarak, it must succeed in an opposed check vs. Trip (no counter-Trip attempt allowed) or be rendered Prone.

    Improved Grab (Ex): This ability is detailed here.
    A gakarak's favored combat tactics, once melee commences, is to grab its opponents and use them as clubs or projectiles.
    • If there's an opponent within reach, a gakarak will use a grabbed victim to whack it, dealing damage to both on a successful hit. In such case, the target that's not grabbed cannot be grabbed and is not subject to entanglement.
    • If an opponent is out of reach, a gakarak may hurl its grabbed victim, with a range increment of 30'. Whether the attack hits or not, the thrown victim takes damage and is automatically prone. If the attack hits, the target takes damage and must make a Fort save vs. DC equal to the damage dealt or become prone as well.
    • If no other opponents are available, the gakarak may simply whack the grabbed victim against the ground, dealing normal damage.

    A gakarak may have up to 2 opponents grabbed simultaneously. If two opponents are grabbed, a gakarak may smash them against one another, dealing damage to both of them - twice in a single round.

    Plant Growth (Sp): 3/day, a gakarak can use the plant growth ability. This ability is identical to the druid spell of the same name (caster level 16th) with the exception that the affected area is a 360' radius.

    Teleport Through Vegetation (Su): A gakarak may, at will, as a standard action, teleport without error to any location within its home forest simply by touching a plant within the forest.

    Damage Reduction (Su): A gakarak has damage reduction of 15/slashing.

    Electricity Immunity (Ex): A gakarak is unaffected by electrical damage.

    Fast Healing (Su): A gakarak has a fast healing rate of 5 HP per round.

    Wooden Weapon Immunity (Ex): A gakarak cannot be damaged by wooden weapons (clubs, staves and other weapons composed entirely of wood).
    Projectiles that have any wooden parts in them are simply repelled when they reach a distance of 5'.

    Plant Traits: A plant creature possesses the following traits (unless otherwise noted in a creature's entry):
    • Immunity to all mind-affecting effects (charms, compulsions, phantasms, patterns, and morale effects)
    • Immunity to poison, sleep effects, paralysis, polymorph, and stunning
    • Not subject to precision damage
    • Plants breathe and eat, but do not sleep.




    Phoenix:
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    Phoenix

    Small Outsider (Good, Extraplanar, Fire)
    Hit Dice: 3d8+3 (27 hp)
    Initiative: +6
    Speed: 20' (2 squares), fly 60' (good)
    Armor Class: 18 (+1 size, +2 dex, +5 Natural), touch 13, flat-footed 16
    Base attack/Grapple: +3/-1
    Attack: Talons +6 melee (1d4+1d4 fire)
    Full attack: 2 talons +6 melee (1d4+1d4 fire) and bite +1 melee (1d4+1d4 fire)
    Space/reach: 5ft./5ft.
    Special attacks: Burn, Spell-like abilities
    Special qualities: darkvision 60', immunity to fire, vulnerability to cold, regeneration 5, Magic Circle Against Evil
    Saves: Fort +4, Ref +5, Will +5
    Abilities: Str 10, Dex 15, Con 12, Int 10, Wis 14, Cha 12
    Skills: Diplomacy +7, Heal +8, Knowledge (any two) +6, Listen +8, Sense Motive +8, Spot +8, Tumble +8
    Feats: Flyby attack, Improved Initiative
    Environment: Any good-aligned plane
    Organization: Solitary or pair
    Challenge Rating: 3
    Treasure: None
    Alignment: Always neutral good
    Advancement: 4-6 HD (small)
    Level adjustment: --
    A phoenix appears as an eagle-like bird, with a body wreathed in gold, amber & crimson feathers that dance like fire when it takes flight.
    A phoenix can speak common, auran, ignan, and celestial.


    Alternate Form (Ex)
    When a phoenix is slain it bursts into flames and reverts to this form of a diminutive egg, colored with flame patterns of the phoenix' colors.
    The flames deal 3d8 fire damage to anyone within 10' radius and the egg appears in a small pile of ashes.
    In this form the phoenix is treated as having Str & Dex of 0 and thus unable to move on its own power.
    In addition, the phoenix loses access to its spell-like abilities.
    The phoenix may still take damage in its egg form. If slain in egg form, a phoenix is truly dead and will not rise again.
    Once fully healed, the egg bursts into flames again, this time dealing 1d4 damage, and the phoenix reclaims its bird form.
    Once per 24 hours, a phoenix may voluntarily burst into flames to assume its egg form. A phoenix in voluntarily assumed egg form has darksight out to 10' and can hear, and it may reform as an immediate action.

    Burn (Ex)
    A phoenix's natural attacks deal their normal damage plus fire damage from the phoenix’s flaming talons and beak. Those hit by a phoenix's natural attack must succeed on a Reflex save or catch on fire. The flame burns for 1d4 rounds. The save DC is 12. A burning creature can take a move action to put out the flame. The save DC is Con-based.
    Creatures hitting a phoenix with natural weapons or unarmed attacks take fire damage as though hit by the phoenix’s attack, and also catch on fire unless they succeed on a Reflex save. Merely touching the phoenix does not activate this ability, only violent action.

    Regeneration
    A phoenix takes lethal damage from Evil-aligned weapons, from attacks by creatures with the Evil subtype and from spells and effects with the Evil descriptor.

    Spell-like abilities
    - Always active: Detect Evil, Detect Magic, See Invisibility, Magic Circle Against Evil.
    - At will: Aid, Burning Hands, Color Spray.
    - 1/day: Continual Flame, Invisibility.
    Caster level 5th. The save DCs are Cha-based.



    Randara:
    Spoiler
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    This is a remake of a monster appearing in the OD&D AC9 Creature Catalogue.

    Randara

    Size/Type: Medium, Untyped Shapechanger (see below)
    Hit Dice: 15d8 (120 hp)
    Initiative: +9
    Speed: Varies (see below)
    AC: 15 (+5 Dex) and see below
    Base Attack/Grapple: Varies (see below)
    Attack: Varies (see below)
    Full Attack: Varies (see below)
    Space/Reach: Varies (see below)
    Special Attacks: Varies (see below)
    Special Qualities: Change shape, DR: 10/magic, SR: 26, Nature Sense, spells-like abilities
    Saves: Fort +9, Ref +14, Will +14
    Abilities: Str 13, Dex 20, Con 10, Int 14, Wis 16, Cha 13
    Skills: Balance +13, Bluff +11, Diplomacy +11, Disguise +19, Gather Information +13, Hide +13, Intimidate +9, Knowledge (local) +10, Listen +15, Move Silently +13, Search +13, Sense Motive +11, Spot +15
    Feats: Alertness, Combat Reflexes, Investigator, Improved Initiative, Iron Will, Track
    Environment: Any
    Organization: Solitary
    CR: 13
    Treasure: Double Standard
    Alignment: Always neutral evil
    Advancement: by character class
    LA: +2


    Randara are evil beings of legendary power. They delight in using their shapeshifting to trap innocent folks as food.
    Randara are true shapeshifters. They have no natural form and their origin is completely unknown.
    Randara use the traits of whatever creature they turn into, as detailed below.

    Randara most often appear as humans or humanoids, but can also take the shapes of small, cuddly animals.
    Randara are very fond of human flesh. They often take forms designed to catch humans off-guard. Usually, a randara seeks out a human settlement and looks for someone with modest power and respect. After stalking the victim for weeks, learning as much about the individual as possible, the randara murders its prey and impersonates the victim. Once established in a respectable position, the randara can use its new identity to lure more prey.

    Randaras are voracious hunters of human and humanoid flesh.


    Combat

    A randara's attack varies with its chosen form; for example, in human form, it uses weapons, but in the form of a dog, it bites. The above stats assume a human form w/o equipment.

    Randara are patient and subtle hunters, but strike quickly and violently when they have decided to finish off their prey.

    Change Shape (Su): A randara can change shape an unlimited number of times per day as a standard action.
    A randara has the ability to assume the form of any of the following:
    - Aberration.
    - Animal
    - Fey
    - Giant
    - Humanoid (even duplicating the appearance of a specific individual)
    - Monstrous Humanoid
    - Plant
    - Vermin
    A randara may assume the form of creatures ranging from Tiny to Large size.
    A randara can stay in a particular shape indefinitely, given that after transformation is complete, the chosen form represents the monster's true type and size (in addition to being a shapechanger)... meaning that when killed, a randara maintains its form, and True Seeing reveals nothing interesting about it.
    Changing shape results in the following changes to the randara:
    • A randara acquires the type, subtype and size of its chosen form.
    • A randara acquires the natural weapons, movement modes, and extraordinary special attacks and qualities of its chosen form.
    • A randara's physical ability scores change according to the chosen form's ability-shift from 10. A randara's mental ability scores remain unchanged.
    • A randara retains its hit points and saves, modified according to the chosen form's ability-shift from 10.
    • A randara's AC changes according to its current Dex-mod and natural armor.
    • A randara retains any spellcasting ability, provided it assumes humanoid or monstrous humanoid form.
    • A randara is effectively camouflaged as a creature of its new form, and gains a +10 bonus on Disguise checks if it uses this ability to disguise itself as a particular individual.

    Nature Sense (Ex): Same as the Druid's ability of the same name, restricted to the material prime. Randara are masters of adapting to various environments.

    Spell-like Abilities (Sp): At will: Detect Thoughts; 1/day: Charm Person. (CL 15)



    Reflecter:
    Spoiler
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    This is a remake of a monster appearing in the OD&D AC9 Creature Catalogue.

    Reflecter

    Medium Construct-like Alien Humanoid (Extraplanar)
    Hit Dice: 6d10+30 (90 hp)
    Initiative: +4 (+4 Dex)
    Speed: 40'
    Armor Class: 24 (+4 Dex, +10 natural), touch 14, flat-footed 20
    Base Attack/Grapple: +6/+14
    Attack: Fist +10 (1d8+4)
    Full Attack: 2 Fists +10/+5 (1d8+4)
    Space/Reach: 5' /5'
    Special Attacks: Energy Blast (6d6)
    Special Qualities: Alien Mind, Bio-Isolated, DR 10/epic+BoS, Spell Deflection, Spell Immunity, Energy Immunity, Extra Fast Healing, Superior Vision
    Saves: Fort +8, Ref +7, Will +5
    Abilities: Str 18, Dex 18, Con 20, Int 15, Wis 14, Cha 10
    Skills: Balance +5, Climb +8, Disable Device +9, Escape Artist +5, Hide +9, Jump +7, Listen +9, Move Silently +9, Search +9, Spot +9, Survival +5
    Feats: Improved Bull Rush, Improved Disarm, Improved Grapple, Improved Trip
    Environment: Any land, Unknown planar origin
    Organization: Solitary, or Crew (2-5)
    Challenge Rating: 7
    Treasure: Standard coins, Triple items
    Alignment: Neutral Good
    Advancement: (see below)
    Level Adjustment: —


    Description

    Reflecters appear as mobile human statues made of perfectly reflective silvery metal. They wear no garb and use no weapons, though they may employ mechanical tools.
    They communicate amongst themselves via telepathy. Although no real communication has ever been established with them beyond rudimentary gestures, these odd creatures are rumored to be visitors from the far future, "time travelling" to collect valuables.

    Reflecters come from a far off world that was almost obliterated by magical wars. To guarantee their long term survival, they have spent centuries in research for augmenting their biology to resist magic and other hazards. They were too successful. In doing so, they over-compensated, rendering themselves restricted in their potential to explore and evolve. Since then, they've unsuccessfully spent eons in an attempt to regain some access to magic. They travel the multiverse, collecting magical items and dead magical creatures, researching them in an attempt to break the glass ceiling they have imposed upon themselves.

    Treasure collected by reflecters is always neatly stored in chests and sacks, all tied together with rope. Once a large amount of treasure has been collected, all reflecters in a lair will gather during the next full moon, when they and the treasure all vanish at midnight.
    If magical treasure is stolen from them, reflecters will track the thieves and try to regain the items. However, if offered any book, map, or scroll (magical or otherwise) in exchange for a stolen magic item, reflecters may accept the substitution(s). They will not, however, accept such a trade for items already in their possession.

    Reflecters are quite non-aggressive - their vast array of immunities keeps them well protected. They will only attack to defend themselves and their treasure. They do not use weapons, armor or shields.
    Reflecters never acquire treasure through violence, though scholars say they are not above theft. They will, however, use any means available to reacquire their treasure from thieves, including violence.
    Reflecters prefer to first subdue their opponents, wresting from their possession whatever treasure was stolen from them. If they have an option of leaving with their collected treasure, reflecters will choose retreat over killing their opponents or fighting to the death.

    If slain, a reflecter is found (if it can be opened!) to be a hard shell filled with brain-like material, but no other organs of any sort. The outer shell remains perfectly intact until it dies; however, another 60 points of sundering damage must be inflicted before the shell can be opened (treat a reflecter's body as having a hardness of 10).


    Combat

    Should reflecters find themselves in combat with opponents that are too tough to subdue without significant risk, they resort to using their energy blast. When their energy blast is not available to them, reflecters strike with their powerful fists.

    Alien Mind (Ex): A reflecter's alien mind and adaptable senses make it immune to all mental manipulations, with the exception of the use of Bluff, Diplomacy and Sleight of Hand.

    Bio-Isolated (Ex): Reflecters are immune to poison, paralysis, stunning, disease, death effects, necromancy effects, and energy drain. Furthermore, reflecters are not subject to precision damage, nonlethal damage, ability damage, ability drain, fatigue, exhaustion, sickness, and nausea. Reflecters do not need to breathe, eat, or sleep though they may eat if they so choose.

    Damage Reduction: A reflecter has DR 10/ epic and either Bludgeoning or Slashing. Piercing attacks are always partially blocked.

    Energy Blast (Su): A reflecter may make one Energy Blast attack as a standard action that doesn't provoke AoOs. This blast may either appear as a 60' bolt, which acts as a lightning bolt originating from the reflecter's body, or as a 120' ray attack, which is a ranged touch attack. The attacks deal 1d6 points of damage per Hit Die of the reflecter. Half the damage dealt is Force damage; the other half is Cold, Fire or Electricity (DM's choice). The bolt allows a Reflex save (DC 15) for half damage. The ray has no save. The save DC is Wis-based. Once used, a reflecter's Energy Blast requires 1d4 rounds to recharge.

    Energy Immunity(Ex): Reflecters are immune to acid, cold and electricity damage, and have fire resistance 20.

    Extra Fast Healing (Ex): As Fast Healing 1 but reflectors automatically stabilize when at negative hit points.

    Fists (Ex): A reflecter's fists strike like sledgehammers, ignoring DR and hardness, and dealing full damage to objects.

    Spell Deflection (Su): Spells and spell-like abilities cast directly at a reflecter are deflected away, striking the nearest creature within line of effect – including the caster – for full effect (as if the caster was standing in place of the reflecter when casting the spell). Gaze attacks in specific are always reflected back at the originator.

    Spell Immunity (Ex): A reflecter ignores the effects of spells and spell-like abilities that directly target it. This works exactly like SR, except that it cannot be overcome. Despite being alive, a slain reflecter cannot be brought back from the dead and cannot be raised, reincarnated or resurrected. The spells below can directly affect reflecters in the manner listed:
    · Limited wish removes a reflecter's DR for 1 minute. Wish and miracle remove a reflecter's DR for 10 minutes. Wish cast by a deity also removes their spell immunity for 1 minute, making it possible to bring them back from the dead.
    · A gate spell affects them normally.
    · Spells that change the environment affect reflecters normally – provided that the environmental augmentation is not magical in and on itself. For example, a transmute rock to mud affects them normally, but they ignore solid fog.
    ·
    Superior Vision (Ex): Reflecters' sensory capabilities are beyond the understanding of most mortals. Reflecters' sight stretches 4 times farther than that of humans, and they see in perfect darkness (including magical darkness) just as they would in full daylight.


    Level Advancement
    If a reflecter ever takes levels in a class, it is always in the Time Bender class. Each 2 Time Bender levels count as 1 HD for determining their Energy Blast damage.
    Reflecters cannot take the Diehard feat. They are incapable of overcoming their body's tendency to shut down when below 0 HP.



    Revenant:
    Spoiler
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    This is my translation of the 5e Revenant – a concept that was badly missing from RPG all these years.


    Revenant

    Medium, undead-possessed corpse
    Hit Dice: 12d8+48 (198 hp)
    Initiative: +6
    Speed: by creature type (usually 30’)
    Armor Class: 12 or better (by equipment)
    Base Attack/Grapple: +6/+10
    Attack: Slam +10 (1d6 + 4)
    Full Attack: 2 Slams +10 (1d6 + 4)
    Space/Reach: 5' /5'
    Special Attacks: Vengeful Strike (4d6), Vengeful Glare
    Special Qualities: Alive, Turn Immunity, Darkvision 60’, Regeneration 10, Rejuvenation, Vengeful Track,
    Saves: Fort +8, Ref +6, Will +12
    Abilities: STR 18, DEX 14, CON 18, INT 13, WIS 16, CHA 18
    Skills: Balance +6, Climb +10, Diplomacy +10, Disable Device +9, Escape Artist +10, Hide +10, Intimidate +9, Jump +12, Listen +13, Move Silently +10, Spot +13 and Swim +10
    Feats: Alertness , Improved Initiative, Great Fortitude, Iron Will, Lightning Reflexes, Toughness
    Environment: Any land
    Organization: Solitary
    Languages: the ones it knew in life
    Challenge Rating: 9
    Treasure: none
    Alignment: Neutral
    Advancement: (see below)
    Level Adjustment: —

    A revenant forms from the soul of a mortal who met a cruel and undeserving fate (betrayal in most cases). It claws its way back into the world to seek revenge against the one who wronged it.
    The revenant reclaims its mortal body and superficially resembles a zombie. However, instead of lifeless eyes, a revenant's eyes burn with resolve and flare in the presence of its adversary. If the revenant's original body is destroyed or is otherwise unavailable, the spirit of the revenant enters another humanoid corpse.
    Regardless of the body the revenant uses as a vessel, its adversary always recognizes the revenant for what it truly is.


    Combat

    Hunger for Revenge: A revenant has only one year to exact revenge. When its adversary dies, or if the revenant fails to kill its adversary before its time runs out, it crumbles to dust and its soul fades into the afterlife. If its foe is too powerful for the revenant to destroy on its own, it seeks worthy allies to help it fulfill its quest.

    Divine Justice: No magic can hide a creature pursued by a revenant, which always knows the direction and distance between it and the target of its vengeance. In cases where the revenant seeks revenge against more than one adversary, it pursues them one at a time, starting with the creature that dealt it the killing blow.
    If the revenant's body is destroyed, its soul flies forth to seek out a new corpse in which to resume its hunt.

    Regeneration (Ex): The revenant regains 10 HP at the start of its turn. If the revenant takes fire or radiant damage, this trait doesn't function at the start of the revenant's next turn.
    The revenant's body is destroyed only if it starts its turn with 0 or less HP and doesn't regenerate to positive HP.

    Rejuvenation (Su): When the revenant's body is destroyed, its soul lingers. After 24 hours, the soul inhabits and animates another corpse on the same plane of existence and regains all its hit points. While the soul is bodiless, a wish spell can be used to force the soul to go to the afterlife and not return.

    Turn Immunity: Revenants are immune to effects that turn/rebuke undead.

    Vengeful Tracker: The revenant knows the distance to and direction of any creature against which it seeks revenge, even if the creature and the revenant are on different planes of existence. If the creature being tracked by the revenant dies, the revenant knows.

    Vengeful Glare: The revenant targets one creature it can see within 30' of it and against which it has sworn vengeance. The target must make a DC 15 Wisdom saving throw. On a failure, the target is paralyzed until the revenant deals damage to it, or until the end of the revenant's next turn. When the paralysis ends, the target is frightened of the revenant for 1 minute. The frightened target can repeat the saving throw at the end of each of its turns, with a cumulative -2 if it can see the revenant, ending the frightened condition on itself on a success.


    Vorlon:




    Templates

    Spoiler
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    Empath:
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    You’re blessed with unnatural intuition and mental empathy.
    Requirements: on character creation only
    Benefits: You gain a +2 Wis increase, as well as the following 3 benefits:
    1. As a move action, you may concentrate to feel the mental state of an individual creature within 30’ (doesn’t provoke AoOs). You may tell if the creature is happy, worried, anxious, fascinated, amused, angry, depressed and so on. You may even tell whatever mixed emotions the creature is experiencing.
    2. As a free action, you may converse telepathically with a creature within 30’. This form of telepathy is language-based.
    3. Your intuition grants you +2 on all opposed Wis-vs.-Cha and Cha-vs.-Wis skill checks.
    LA: +1



    Nosferatu: (monstrous humanoid)
    Spoiler
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    Writer's Notes:
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    Nowadays, many vampire sagas regard vampires as a biological anomaly.
    I first came upon the name "Nosferatu" (a vampire with character class features) in the very 1st OD&D gazetteer "Grand Duchy of Karameikos" and was fascinated with the idea ever since, even though I was never really a necro-freak.
    For a long time I've been toying with this concept, trying to concoct something that would be both playable and as close as possible to modern days folklore.




    Powers, Abilities & Special Properties
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    HD: A Nosferatu has +2 racial HD (+16HP; 1:1 BAB progression; Good Fort & Ref)
    Abilities: STR +6, DEX +2, CON +2 & CHA +4
    Skills: +8 racial bonus to Climb, Hide, Jump, Listen Move Silently & Spot; +4 racial bonus to Bluff & Intimidate.
    Fast Moving: All Nosferatu gain +10’ increase to their land speed.
    Climbing Speed: 20' or equal to ground speed (whichever is lower).
    Natural Attack: 2 Claws (1d4 + STR-mod), 1 Bite (1d3) - modify appropriately for small/large Nosferatu.
    Pounce: When charging, a Nosferatu can make full natural attack.
    Blood Drain: Same mechanics as given for the Vampire, but dealing 1d3 CON damage per round (modify CON damage according to size, the same as for weapons' damage).
    Terrifying Transformation: The Nosferatu may demoralize (see Intimidate for details) a single opponent that witnesses his transformation to monstrous form (see details in the spoiler below). If the opponent has seen such a transformation in the past, it gains a +4 bonus to resist the effect. If the opponent is aware of the Nosferatu's nature, it gains an additional +4 bonus to resist.
    Darkvision: 60', or 30' increase (up to 120')
    Lowlight Vision: As Elves, or +1 range multiplier (up to *4)
    Scent: See the DMG for more details
    Natural Armor: The base creature's natural armor is improved by +2.
    DR: 5/Silver
    Cold & electricity Resistance: 5
    Regeneration: 1
    Immunities: Nosferatu are immune to all non-magical poisons and diseases, to non-lethal damage and to aging attacks & magical effects (limitless lifespan).
    Non-Fatality: While Nosferatu take full precision damage, they can only be coup-de-graced with slashing weapons (decapitated) and they automatically stabilize.
    LA: +3


    Mortal Form
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    While equipped with all their combat faculties, Nosferatu have a frightening monstrous appearance.
    - They have sharp and protruding canines and fingernails
    - Their irises are colored pale blue
    - Their skin turns pale gray
    - Their facial features become sharp and rough

    To go about in civilization, Nosferatu hide their true nature, which hinders their combat prowess as follows:
    - They lose their natural form of attack and Pounce
    - They lose their climbing speed
    - They lose their skill modifiers
    - They lose their movement increase
    - Their STR bonus degrades to +2
    - Natural armor, DR and Resistances are suppressed

    Changing to/from monstrous form is a move action that doesn't provoke AoOs.




    Hindrances
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    Fire Sensitivity: A Nosferatu takes 50% more damage from fire-based attacks. Fire-based damage does not regenerate. Fire damage is healed only by feeding or with spells (rest and natural means have no effect).
    Light Sensitivity: Blinded for the 1st round of exposure and dazzled for the time it remains in bright light. Within sunlight or Daylight effect, Nosferatu take 1HP/min fire-equivalent damage and they don't regenerate.
    Silver: Affects Nosferatu just as Dark Reaver Powder would affect humans on specific cases (solution, powder, etc).
    Garlic: Causes Nosferatu to be sickened (a very large amount would make a Nosferatu nauseated)
    Wooden Stake: A wooden stake through the heart (Coupe-de-Grace / attack roll exceeds AC by +10) paralyses a Nosferatu


    Feeding:
    Spoiler
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    Blood Quota
    An Xth level Nosferatu needs to drain X/2 CON points a day (not enough to kill a victim).
    Draining blood from non-sentient mammals: The CON of these creatures only counts 1/2 for the Nosferatu's requirements.
    Draining blood from non-mammals: counts 1/4 for the Nosferatu's requirements.
    A dose of blood heals a Nosferatu of 2d3 points of damage and a single physical ability damage (the one most severely drained, in case of multiple ability damage).
    Draining the blood of a Nosferatu yields no feeding reward for the attacker, but it does cause CON damage to the target.

    Bloodlust
    A Nosferatu that has not fed for 48 hours must succeed Fort & Will saves (DC 10) to avoid bloodlust. With each passing 6 hours thereafter, make another check with a cumulative +1 DC increase.
    A failed save also does 1d3 points of ability damage to STR / DEX / AGI / CON and 1 point of ability damage to INT / WIS / PER / CHA (cycle on both cases).

    Covering one's identity
    A Nosferatu's bite contains a powerful sedative that acts on the target as Deep Slumber spell (single target; DC +4; Fort save instead of Will) and causes amnesia regarding the last 5 minutes. After 4 hours there's no evidence of the bite, making it harder to determine what happened to the victim (note that the sedating saliva has no affect on 11+ HD creatures).
    Nosferatu have an unusual ability of assessing their potential victim's level of power and its chances of becoming an easy meal (is it alive... can it be sedated... how physically strong is it...)
    When feeding, Nosferatu go to great lengths not to harm their meal, since too many bodies leave a hot trail to follow.




    Becoming a Nosferatu
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    The process of becoming a Nosfertu is the same for all.
    1. The target of a Nosfertu's bite must be brought from perfect health to CON=0 by blood drain.
    2. Then the Nosfertu cuts-open a vain (standard action) and feeds the target (which dies if not fed within 1 minute), taking 2d3 blood-drain damage himself (when feeding a medium sized victim). The victim falls into a coma.
    3. Finally, the target must make a successful Fort save against DC 13 or remain comatose (curable by Restoration/Heal in case of failure).
    4. 8 hours later, the "victim" wakes up as a Nosferatu.



    Societies
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    Nosferatu don't breed – not with non-Nosferatu and not amongst themselves. There's no "next generation" for a Nosferatu.
    Their affliction renders them forever sterile, and there's no known method of reversal for being a Nosferatu, short of a Miracle (not even Reincarnation does the trick).
    Nosferatu groupings beyond mates are extremely rare, as they rival one another on feeding grounds and need to maintain low profile.



    Veteran Nosferatu
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    With the passing of the years, Nosferatu evolve in power as follows:

    Elder (10-99 years):
    - Racial HD: +1 (+3 total)
    - Feeding: The Nosferatu only needs X CON-points per week and the bloodlust check durations are doubled.
    - Terrifying Transformation: Affects all opponents within 30' that witness the Nosferatu's transformation.
    - Regeneration: 3
    - Fire Sensitivity: Diminishes to +20%.
    - Silver: No longer has secondary effect.
    - Cold & electricity Resistance: 10.
    - Sunlight / Daylight: No longer cause continual damage, but still suppresses regeneration.
    - Garlic: Can no longer cause a Nosferatu to become nauseated.
    - STR-Boost: +2 increase (in both forms)
    - Alternate Form (Su): The nosferatu can assume the shape of a dire bat, giant rat, wolf or dire wolf as a standard action. While in its alternate form, the nosferatu loses its natural attacks and any supernatural special abilities it has, but it gains the natural weapons and (Ex) abilities of its new form. It can remain in that form until it assumes another or until the next sunrise.
    - Children of the Night (Su): Once per day, the nosferatu can call forth 1d6+1 rat swarms, 1d4+1 bat swarms, or a pack of 3d6 wolves as a standard action. These creatures arrive in 2d6 rounds and serve the nosferatu for up to 1 hour.
    - Enlarge Person (Sp): As the 1st level spell of the same name, applied to self only.
    - LA: +4

    Ancient (100-999 years):
    - Racial HD: +1 (+4 total)
    - Feeding: The Nosferatu only needs X*2 CON-points per month and the bloodlust durations are doubled again.
    - Terrifying Transformation: Opponents that are overcome become Frightened for 2d4 rounds.
    - Regeneration: 5
    - Fire Sensitivity: Gone.
    - Silver: No longer has effect.
    - Cold & electricity Resistance: 15.
    - Sunlight / Daylight: No longer suppresses regeneration.
    - Garlic: No longer has any effect.
    - STR-Boost: +2 increase (in both forms)
    - Drain Thoughts (Su): For every CON-point you drain from a victim, you may probe their memories for any specific fact in their lives or use Knowledge check of which they're capable.
    - Inhuman Speed (Ex): As a swift action, the nosferatu may move up to its move speed plus 15 ft. Once it has used this ability, it must wait 5 rounds before it can use it again.
    - Wings (Ex): double land speed, avg maneuverability.
    - LA: +5

    Eternal (1000+ years):
    - Racial HD: +1 (+5 total)
    - Feeding: The Nosferatu regains the ability to consume normal food, but needs negligible amounts.
    - Terrifying Transformation: Opponents that are overcome become Panicked for 3d6 rounds.
    - Regeneration: 10
    - Cold & electricity Resistance: 20.
    - Non-Fatality: Absolute – a severed extremity (including the head) reattaches immediately. In order to kill an eternal nosferatu, one must use Disintegrate or similar spells, or burn to death's threshold and beyond - until the entire body is totally incinerated.
    - Fire Damage: Is now also regenerated
    - Wooden Stake: No longer paralyses
    - STR-Boost: +4 increase (in both forms)
    - Dominate (Sp): The nosferatu can crush an opponent's will just by looking onto his or her eyes. This is a gaze attack that requires a standard action. This power otherwise functions as Dominate Person spell, with the CL equals the nosferatu's ECL.
    - Wracking Pain (Ex): Whenever the nosferatu drains blood from a creature, that creature must make a Fort save vs. DC [10 + ½ the nosferatu's total HD + STR-mod] or be overcome by pain, becoming nauseated for 2d4 rounds.
    - Shout (Sp): As the spell, usable 1 / 5 rounds. At ECL 15 and on, an eternal nosferatu can use this ability #3/day to produce the effect of Greater Shout.
    - LA: +6




    Vatborn Creature:
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    This template is detailed here.



  3. - Top - End - #33
    Ogre in the Playground
     
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    Apr 2010

    Default The Godly Campaign

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    The Godly Campaign

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    The Godly Campaign (inspired by this work)


    I've been interested in formulating rules for deities practically ever since I'd encountered the Epic Level Handbook. It always struck me as full of bad rules and poorly thought out monsters.
    A few years later I came to know of "Deities and Demigods".
    While "Deities and Demigods" definitely made more sense, I want deities to have a bigger added value than just being for epic characters what epic characters are to mortals.
    Deities should be inherently more powerful than mortals, regardless of how you build them. A certain mortal could be more capable than a certain deity at certain things, should that certain mortal put a lot of resources into them while the certain deity had never bothered giving them a second thought.
    Relying on the above, the set of rules for deities could be significantly narrowed down and generalized.



    From the SRD:
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    The following godly traits are to be taken from the SRD as given (with notes):
    • Immunities (not including energy immunity)
    • Spell Resistance
    • Immortality
    • Senses
    • Remote Sensing
    • Portfolio
    • Communication
    • Godly Realm (see below)
    • Travel

    Other official materials and information regarding deities are to be ignored.
    Everything else about deities that pertains to this overhaul codex is detailed below.


    Godly Realm
    If two godly realms ever overlap, if both deities are of the same rank then the overlapping areas cancel each other out, otherwise the realm of the higher ranked deity overshadows that of the lower ranked deity where they overlap.
    Whenever a divine rank is gained, a deity may choose a new realm – in place of the old one.
    Lesser deities may own two realms.
    Intermediate deities may own three realms.
    Greater deities may own four realms.




    Divine Spark (becoming a god):
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    A PC or NPC gains the ability to take divine ranks by upholding 3 simple prerequisites.
    In order to gain divine spark, a character must possess:
    1. 10 levels or more in any one class.
    2. 20 class levels or more overall.
    3. 100 permanent Worship Credit points or more* (see next spoiler below)

    * Under these rules, Jesus' divinity could be explained if he was built as a pacifist Healer/Bard/Mage "Diplomancer".


    There are two quicker routes for obtaining Divine Spark – in both cases requirements #1 and #2 (above) are mandatory.
    1. A divine being can grant someone the necessary Credit points to bestow Divine Spark upon it. This is always the culmination of a very long quest on behalf of the bestower (e.g. heroic quests (see "Becoming Immortal, p.43 and on), villainous quests etc.), which almost always starts by the candidate to godhood petitioning the bestower deity.
    2. Delivering a killer blow to a deity automatically and permanently transfers 100 Credit points from the deity to the slayer.


    This is not where requirements end as far as deities are concerned:
    To rise to the Status of Demigod (see below), a character must possess 20 levels in at least one class.
    To rise to the Status of Lesser Deity (see below), a character must possess 20 levels in at least two classes.
    To rise to the Status of Intermediate Deity (see below), a character must possess 20 levels in at least three classes.
    To rise to the Status of Greater Deity (see below), a character must possess 20 levels in at least four classes.




    Worship and Divine Ranks:
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    The measure of what makes a god more powerful is its Divine rank, which is determined by the amount of its worshipers and the conviction of their belief.
    There are varying degrees of faith with varying levels of reward to the recipient divine being.

    Worshipers
    Each level of faith (of the 7 degrees detailed below) grants an amount of worship Credit which directly accumulates to advance a deity in Divine Ranks:
    • Acknowledgement: 1/10
    • Occasional Prayers: 1/2
    • Daily Prayers: 1
    • True Believer (True Believer feat): 2
    • Blind Faith (Sacred Vow + Vow of < something > . . . according to your declared ethos): 4
    • Zealot (willing to lay down their lives at your name): 5
    • Priest: [(Class Level ^ 2) * Degree of Worship (no less than daily prayers)]
    All the above are multiplied by the followers' Cha-bonus (minimum 1).
    Special: If a mortal dies of oldage as a believer, his/her Credit points are never deprived of the subject of their faith.

    Rank Min Worship Credit Category of Power Max # Priests *
    0 100 (Divine Spark) Quasi Deity (or "Temporal") 0
    1 1000 Demigod (or "Celestial") 5
    2 2000 10
    3 5000 15
    4 10000 20
    5 20000 25
    6 50000 Lesser Deity (or "Empyreal") 50
    7 100000 100
    8 200000 150
    9 500000 200
    10 1000000 250
    11 2000000 Intermediate Deity (or "Eternal") 500
    12 5000000 1000
    13 10000000 1500
    14 20000000 2000
    15 50000000 2500
    16 100000000 Greater Deity (or "Hierarch") 5000
    17 200000000 10000
    18 500000000 15000
    19 1000000000 20000
    20 2000000000 25000



    * Deities don't have infinite amount of resources for the purpose of granting Priest spells. The indicated number specifies how many priests can be granted divine spells simultaneously. This is the reason why civilization is not flooded by hordes of priests. Deities need to pick them up carefully. This is also the force that drives deities to be involved in the affairs of their followers, and choose only the most promising candidates as active priests.


    Many things are influenced by a deity's Divine Rank:
    • A deity receives its divine rank as perfection bonus to the following game stats:
    • All Checks (skill checks, ability checks, level checks, turning checks etc)
    • Deflection bonus to AC.
    • The DC of any spell or ability (Ex/Su/Sp)
    • SR Penetration
    • Regeneration
    • Outsider HD: Divine ranks are expressed as Outsider HD.
    • Feats: A deity gains a general feat slot per divine rank. This is in addition to feats gained by racial HD, class levels, templates or any other source.
    • Ability Increase. Deities gain +1 to any chosen ability score upon gaining a divine rank.
    • Divine Aura (Ex): The mere presence of a deity of rank 1 or higher deeply affects mortals.
    • The deity’s non-divine followers receive a +1 per category of power morale bonus on attack rolls, saves, and checks.
    • The deity’s non-divine foes receive a -1 per category of power morale penalty on attack rolls, saves, and checks.
    A deity's divine aura extends as shown in the table below, under "Progress by Category of Power".
    Turn/Rebuke Undead: All deities can Turn/Rebuke Undead, at least as well as a 20th level priest. This ability is intrinsic to being a deity.
    • They add their divine rank to that.
    • They add whatever actual Priest levels they possess on top of that. A deity with levels in Ur-Priest adds either Turn or Rebuke to the total. The other aspect (Rebuke/Turn respectively) does not accumulate.
    • Granting Spells: Contrary to the belief that deities provide all spells that priests cast and all class abilities, the truth is that they directly provide two things to their priests:
    1. The ability to channel divine energy in the first place.
    2. Spells and benefits of domains.
    It is well within the realm of possibilities (although a rare occasion) that a priest (as a Priest) would be able to do things (e.g. cast spells and turn undead) that its patron deity cannot.
    If one of a deity's priests violates its ethos, the deity is immediately aware of it and can take proper actions on the matter (i.e. deprive the transgressor of some/all priestly powers) until proper atonement is made.



    Bypassing DR:
    Deities resonate divine power into their physical attacks, which counts as Magic and Epic for the purpose of bypassing DR.
    In addition, all deities resonate powerful alignment into their attack (e.g. physical attacks of a Lawful deity count as Axiomatic). Neutral deities deal extra 2d6 vs. any opponent of double-extreme alignment (LG, CG, LE, CE).



    Losing Credit:
    Some things may cause deities to lose Credit.
    A deity might lose Credit to the point of dropping in divine rank – all the way to divine rank 0.
    If a deity's Credit drops to 0, it fades away from reality. Should faith be reignited by (a) devoted mortal(s), the deity will reappear once it has gained 100 Credit points once again.



    What deities do with Credit:
    Credit granted by followers is a form of currency among the gods.
    Much like souls are traded as currency in the Abyss and in the Nine Hells true gods trade Credit. The soul of a mortal decides who gains it Credit and in essence where it goes after death, however that Credit, once earned by a deity, is only tied to that particular follower in that the god only has it as long as they are faithful. Deities trade Credit among themselves for favors, rights to territory and followers, to settle disputes among themselves and in rare cases between their faithful.
    Credit can only be traded willingly, no amount of force, magic or salient divine abilities can coerce a god to give up Credit. As well no deity can give up enough Credit to fall a rank, the only way for a god to drop divine ranks is to lose its followers. For example, a Rank 6 god needs a minimum of 50,000 Credit, if a Rank 6 god has 55,000 Credit it can freely trade 5,000 Credit to other deities. If that god trades all 5,000 of its excess then loses a single follower, dropping its total below 50,000 Credit, it will drop one rank.
    Deities that drop ranks readjust their bonuses granted by divine rank and lose access to any salient divine abilities that they no longer meet the prerequisite for.



    Slain Deities:
    A slain deity vanishes, and is then automatically reformed after a number of days equal to [101 – (3 * Divine Rank)]
    A deity slain within its own realm is reformed after a number of days equal to [101 – (5 * Divine Rank)].
    Each time a deity is slain, it is drained of 1/10 % Credit points it possesses, but no less than 100 Credit points. This drain is the essence that maintains the deity's existence and is required for reforming it.
    When a deity is slain, its priests are deprived of spells until it reforms.
    A deity may reform itself anywhere where its Remote Sensing functions at the instant of "death".
    Special: Divine souls are completely beyond the reach of any form of manipulation – mortal as well as divine.



    Renouncing Godhood:
    Deities are more ambitious than any human in RL history. Nevertheless, even a deity might get tired of the endless race to accumulate followers.
    A deity might find alternative means to gain limitless lifespan, or simply get bored with eternal existence altogether.
    Renouncing godhood requires dropping below 100 Credit, but above 0 Credit.
    From that point, the deity may simply burn away its remaining Credit points for the purpose of shedding divinity.



    Rules that apply to deities:
    Deities are not to directly intervene in the affairs of mortals (in their true form or via avatars). Direct intervention leads to anarchy that hurts everyone. The deific community prohibits it.
    Nevertheless, like in any other social structure, not everyone's willing to abide by the rules.
    Transgressors that are caught are punished harshly (see Depower and Divine Manacles salient divine abilities below).
    Note: Revealing one's self to priests or to mortals for the purpose of setting them on the path of priesthood does not constitute violation of intervention.




    Progress by Category of Power:
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    The table below details other progression info regarding deities.

    Divine Rank Domains DR Speed Increase Divine Aura Max # Divine Identities Avatars / Mortal Identities Maximum Ability Increase
    Quasi-Deity (0)
    0
    10/—
    10'
    —
    1
    0
    —
    Demigod (1-5)
    3
    15/—
    20'
    10' / rank
    2
    1
    25
    Lesser Deity (6-10)
    4
    20/—
    30'
    100' / rank
    3
    2
    50
    Intermediate Deity (11-15)
    5
    25/—
    40'
    1000' / rank
    4
    3
    75
    Greater Deity (16-20)
    6
    30/—
    50'
    1 mile / rank
    5
    4
    100


    Domains
    This is the number of domains in the deity's domains from which priests must choose their first 2 domains.
    A deity may use any spell from any of its domains as (Su) abilities as often as desired.


    DR
    Any damage applied to the deity is reduced by the indicated amount, which stacks with any other resistance/reduction the deity possesses. Nothing bypasses godly DR.


    Speed Increase
    Deities move faster than normal. The indicated number is added to all movement modes the deity possesses.


    Max # Divine Identities:
    This is the number of different identities a deity can be known as by different believers.
    The monotheistic god of earth, under these rules, would be at the very least a lesser deity (probably on the higher scale of intermediate – according to the number of believers), under the realization that "Elohim" (Judaism), "Allah" (Islam) and "Deus" (Christianity) are all different sets of rules for worshiping the same monotheistic god.
    The choice of a divine identity can never be undone. It is the most prominent factor in a deity's existence.


    Avatars
    Deities of Demigod status or higher can create exact duplicates of themselves – each of which counts as a Quasi-deity.
    2 avatars may be combined to produce one avatar of Demigod status (divine rank no higher than your divine rank minus 5).
    3 avatars may be combined to produce one avatar of Lesser Deity status (divine rank no higher than your divine rank minus 5).
    4 avatars may be combined to produce one avatar of Intermediate Deity status (divine rank no higher than your divine rank minus 5).
    Avatars may not create more avatars.
    A slain avatar is inaccessible for 30 days.

    Mortal Identities
    Instead of a divine avatar, a deity can create a mortal identity, a character/creature that comes with a full set of facade memories, background and history.
    Mortal Identities fool any and all means of detection and divination, serving as perfect tools for bypassing divine sensing and scrutiny (i.e. no form of detection can identify a deity's mortal identity as one).
    Another important reason for using mortal identities is that deities don't gain XP directly (in true form or via avatars). Only their Mortal Identities can earn XP for them.
    Mortal Identities of demigods are extremely limited and frail in comparison to divine powers. The mortal Identity may have no more overall ECL than the deity's divine rank +5.
    When one becomes a lesser deity, more powerful mortal identities may be formed by using multiple avatars. Multiple avatars may be joint for increasing ECL of a mortal identity by 5 per additional avatar used ([10/15/20 + divine rank] for 2/3/4 avatars).
    A mortal Identity may be created with whatever mundane gear the deity wishes, up to 1000gp per divine rank (multiply by the number of avatars used for creating the mortal identity), and that's it. Gear created for a mortal identity persists until it is slain or recalled by the deity.


    Maximum Ability Increase
    After all HD have been taken into account and after all feats are exhausted, deities with positive divine ranks have one more means of elevating their ability scores.
    Credit points may be used for increasing one's own ability scores.
    Each point increase requires an investment of Credit points equal to the Arithmetic Progression from 1 and all the way to the [current value + 1].
    (Example: raising an ability score from 27 to 28 via Credit investment would cost (1 + 28) * 28 / 2 = 29 * 14 = 406 Credit points)
    And still, deities cannot increase their ability scores indefinitely.
    There's only so far that a deity can elevate its ability scores via Credit points. Those values are presented in the table above.




    Salient Divine Abilities:
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    Many officially proposed salient divine abilities just mimic things that can be done via spells, or pose nothing more than stat-enhancements.
    Both seem quite pointless to me, given that this set of rules provides the means to be just as powerful as one wishes to be on whatever aspect one fancies.
    I regard salient divine abilities as nice-to-have additions that I wouldn't categorize as tools of the trade for being a god, but OTOH are obviously things that no mortal could ever hope of achieving.

    Normally, a deity gains one salient divine ability every time it rises in category of power.
    A deity may also trade 3 feats gained from leveling in divine rank and gain a single salient divine ability in exchange.
    Note: Effects that are generated by salient divine abilities are not spell effects. They're not affected in any way by anti-magic or dead magic zones.


    Alter Reality
    The deity can change reality to suit itself.
    Benefit: This ability is similar to the wish spell, but has a far wider scope.
    The deity merely thinks of something and then makes it so. Doing this requires at least a standard action.
    The deity can duplicate any spell of 9th level or lower. The duplicated spell has no material component or focus, and the DC of its saving throw (if one is allowed) is [20 + divine rank + Cha-mod]. The deity can also duplicate a spell with any metamagic feat, so long as the metamagic feat is within the grasp of a 20-levels character build.
    The deity can render a magical or supernatural effect permanent. Such effects cannot be undone or suppressed by mortal means.
    The deity can reshape a landscape, creating any type of terrain the deity can imagine. Each 27000 cubic feet of material (30' cube is the simplest form of this amount) to be reshaped requires 1 round of effort.
    This ability also allows retraining (applied to self or others) of otherwise unretrainable features, such as certain feats and class levels.
    Cooldown: Every time this ability is used, it becomes inaccessible for a number of rounds equal to the effect's equivalent SL. Effects that are beyond the capabilities of mortals count as 10th SL.


    Create species.
    The deity is a maker of new life.
    Benefit: The deity can create entirely new non-construct creatures (constructs are basically sophisticated magical items).
    Creating a new creature costs 5 Credit points per CR.


    Depower
    You are judge, jury and executioner among the deities.
    Prerequisites: Divine rank 16, any lawful, Power of Truth salient divine ability
    Benefit: You may declare an arrest command vs. a transgressor deity that has intervened in the affairs of mortals.
    You must select an enforcer deity to carry out your command (see Divine Manacles below).
    When the transgressor is brought before you, the usual outcome is to drain a portion of its Credit points, though the accused is always given an opportunity to defend itself or have another deity argue on its behalf.
    Depower requires contact for 1 round and drains 10/100/1000/10000/100000 Credit points – according to the transgressor's category of power.
    The officer gains 5% of the amount drained. Once the toll is applied, the transgressor is usually slain by enforcer (issuer's discursion).
    Note: a deity may not use this power to abuse rank. It must be convinced of the guilt of the accused.


    Diamond Prison
    You are a jailer of deities.
    Prerequisites: Divine rank 11, any lawful, Divine Manacles salient divine ability, Diamond Glass chamber (see below)
    Benefit: Sometimes, rogue deities are loose cannons that need to be kept away from "the game" for a long period of time.
    This power requires a chamber made exclusively out of Diamond Glass (see the spell, post #28).
    The chamber must have the following characteristics:
    1. Airtight.
    2. Has a single entrance.
    3. No larger than Gargantuan.
    4. The entrance must be sealed by a lock that requires Disable Device DC of 60 or more to open without the proper key(s) (or an incredibly difficult mathematical riddle, such as a 7x7 magic square).
    Magic of all kinds doesn't operate inside a Diamond Prison, nor do Sp/Su/Ex abilities or salient divine abilities.
    A Diamond Prison also applies a powerful compulsion that denies an imprisoned deity from harming itself in an attempt to liberate its soul and escape. There are no resistances, counter measures or workarounds to this compulsion other than breaking free of the Diamond Prison.
    Only two things penetrate a Diamond Prison: 1) light. 2) Credit. A deity trapped inside a Diamond Prison cannot grant Priest spells or create avatars / mortal identities. Therefore, imprisoned deities gradually lose Credit.
    While a deity is imprisoned, the divine judge and the divine jailer are continuously aware of the amount of its Credit points. They and they alone may also communicate telepathically with the prisoner. This assists in determining when the transgressor "has payed its dept to the divine society" (if ever).
    Special: The deity must be the one to construct the chamber, with the proper crafting skill.


    Divine Intensification
    In times of great needs, the deity is willing to make great sacrifices to produce effects of greater potency.
    Benefit: The deity may sacrifice Credit points to increase the DC of a spell/effect/power it executes.
    1 Credit increases the effect's DC by +1. Each further increase doubles the Credit cost (2 Credits for +2, 4 Credits for +3, 8 Credits for +4 etc, to a maximum equal to the deity's divine rank).
    If and when relevant, the noted modifiers above are doubled for the purpose of overcoming SR.


    Divine Manacles
    You're an officer among the divine ranks, answering only to a greater deity.
    Prerequisites: Divine rank 6, any lawful
    Benefit: This ability allows the enforcer deity – with the blessing of a greater deity – to arrest a rogue deity that has directly intervened in the affairs of mortals.
    Applying divine manacles is done via a melee touch attack that requires an investment of 100 temporary Credit points.
    The power takes effect if the issuer deity's check (1d20 + divine rank + Cha-mod) overpowers that of the transgressor (1d20 + divine rank + Int-mod)
    If the power takes effect, the enforcer deity has the transgressor dominated and immobile by what appears to be actual manacles fashioned according to the enforcer's vision.
    Divine Manacles last for 24 hours and are indestructible for the duration.


    Empower/Diminish
    Empower: By touch, as a standard action, the deity may grant a recipient one level of experience.
    This costs 5 Credit points, plus the Arithmetic Progression from 1 and all the way to the target's new ECL after the enhancement (Example: elevating a Warrior 5 / Rogue 3 human to Warrior level 6 requires [5 + (1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 + 7 + 8 + 9)] = 50 Credit points).
    A deity may not elevate the target to a higher class level in a given class than the deity possesses (meaning that a deity cannot self-empower).
    For the purpose of calculating the costs of this power, each divine rank adds +5 to the target's ECL (making the price for empowering other deities extremely costly).
    Diminish: By touch, as an attack action, the deity may irrevocably deprive a recipient of one level of experience.
    This costs the targets level (prior to the decrease) in Credit points (Example: diminishing a 5th level Warrior to 4th level would cost 5 Credit points).
    Note: Both cases allow a save and the effect counts as a 10th level spell. If the save is successful, Credit points are not expended.


    Extra Attack
    Benefit: The deity adds an additional extremity to its physical body (an arm, a tail, a second head, a venomous snapping tongue, etc.)
    The extra organ attacks either with equal potency to a mirrored organ or roughly as well as the deity's most potent physical attack (the latter is subject to DM's judgement).
    Extra organs act completely independent of the deity's regular actions and enhance its action economy.


    Extra Domain
    Prerequisite: Divine rank 6
    Benefit: The deity chooses a domain to add to its list of domains. The deity can grant spells and powers from that domain and use those spells and powers personally.
    Note: A deity can have this ability multiple times, choosing a new domain each time.


    False Identity
    You may bestow a target creatures with an entirely false set of abilities and memories, masking its true identity.
    The process of transforming a target in such way requires 1 hour of uninterrupted concentration per ECL, and the target must be willing or helpless.
    The result possesses the same ECL as the target's original ECL.
    The false identity persists as long as the target is alive. Once the target dies for any reason (oldage, slain in battle, etc.), the target continues as it was at the moment just before it was transformed (including age, class level, XP, HP, ability scores, conditions, tolerance/spellpoints and memories).


    Gift of Life
    The deity can restore any previously living mortal creature to life.
    Benefit: The deity restores the dead creature to life, no matter how long the creature has been dead or what the condition of the body.
    This ability works like the true resurrection spell, except that there is no material component and the amount of time the subject has been dead is irrelevant.
    This ability can restore a creature to life against its will, but only with the permission of whatever deity rules the underworld (Hades, Osiris, Hel) or the divine realm where the mortal’s soul resides.
    This ability can resurrect an elemental or outsider and can resurrect a creature whose soul is trapped, provided the soul is not held by a deity of higher rank than the one using this ability.
    This ability cannot restore life to a creature that has been slain by the Hand of Death ability or the Life and Death ability of a deity with a higher rank.
    Cooldown: Every time this ability is used, it becomes inaccessible for a number of rounds equal to the target creature's HD or CR (whichever's higher).


    Hand of Death
    The deity can slay any living mortal creature.
    Benefit: The deity points to any mortal within the deity’s sensory range and snuffs out its life. There must be an unbroken line of effect between the deity and the target.
    This ability works like the destruction spell, except that there is no material component. The mortal is allowed a Fortitude saving throw vs. DC [20 + divine rank + Cha-mod]. Even if the save succeeds, the subject takes 10d6 points of damage, which may kill it anyway.
    If the attack kills the mortal (either through a failed saving throw or through damage), the mortal cannot be raised or resurrected afterward, except by a deity of equal or higher rank using the Gift of Life or Life and Death salient divine ability.
    Cooldown: Every time this ability is used, it becomes inaccessible for a number of rounds equal to the target creature's HD or CR (whichever's higher).


    Instant Item Creation
    Prerequisites: Able to cast or mimic Enchant Item and True Creation spells.
    Benefit: You can create items (magical or otherwise) out of thin air as a swift action.
    Items created in such manner persist for 1 hour per divine rank.
    A deity may pay 1 Credit per 10000gp to make such items as real as any crafted item.
    The items' maximum total daily value is as follows:
    • Demigod: Divine Rank * 1000
    • Lesser Deity: Divine Rank * 10000
    • Intermediate Deity: Divine Rank * 100000
    • Greater Deity: Divine Rank * 1000000


    Know Death
    The deity knows when and how creatures will meet their end.
    Benefit: The deity knows the exact moment and circumstances of any mortal creature’s death just by looking at the creature. Some deities choose to make cryptic comments about the creature’s future demise, while others are saddened by the knowledge.


    Know Secrets
    No secrets can be kept from the deity.
    Benefit: The deity can learn a creature’s entire history (including any embarrassing or vital secrets it might know) just by looking at it.
    This ability is similar to the legend lore spell, except that it delivers instant results and the subject is not allowed a save.


    Life and Death
    The deity can kill a mortal creature almost anywhere. Likewise, the deity can bestow life upon any dead mortal being almost anywhere.
    Prerequisites: Divine rank 6, Gift of Life salient divine ability, Hand of Death salient divine ability.
    Benefit: The deity designates any mortal and snuffs out its life. Or the deity can designate any dead mortal and restore it to life.
    This ability works across planar boundaries and penetrates any barrier except a divine shield. However, the subject must be in a location the deity can sense, either within the deity’s sense range or in a location the deity can perceive through its remote sensing ability. If the deity cannot see the subject, the deity must unambiguously identify the subject in some fashion, such as by reciting the subject’s time and place of birth or death, listing the subject’s notable or infamous deeds, or something similar.
    If the deity chooses to kill a mortal, the ability works like the destruction spell, except that there is no material component or saving throw. The mortal cannot be raised or resurrected afterward, except by a deity of equal or higher rank using the Gift of Life or Life and Death.
    If the deity restores life to a mortal, this ability works like the true resurrection spell, except that there is no material component and the amount of time the subject has been dead is irrelevant.
    This ability cannot restore a creature to life against its will, but it can resurrect an elemental or outsider. It can resurrect a creature whose soul is trapped (as the trap the soul spell in the Player’s Handbook), provided the soul is not held by a deity of higher rank than the one using this ability.
    This ability cannot restore life to a creature that has been slain by the Hand of Death or Life and Death of a deity with a higher rank.
    Cooldown: Every time this ability is used, it becomes inaccessible for a number of rounds equal to the target creature's HD or CR (whichever's higher).


    Lord of Shapes and Forms
    Prerequisites: Alter Reality salient divine ability
    Benefit: You gain the following benefits:
    1. Constant Shapechange.
    2. Limitless Polymorph Any Object.
    3. A Thousand Faces feature (same as the Druid)
    All ignore anti-magic.


    Mass Life and Death
    The deity can kill large numbers of mortal creatures almost anywhere. Likewise, the deity can bestow life upon large numbers of dead mortals almost anywhere.
    Prerequisites: Divine rank 11, Gift of Life salient divine ability, Hand of Death salient divine ability, Life and Death salient divine ability.
    Benefit: The deity can designate any number of mortals and snuffs out their lives. Or the deity can designate any number of dead mortals and restore them to life.
    No two mortals affected by a single use of this ability can be more than one mile apart per rank of the deity. The ability is otherwise identical with the Life and Death salient divine ability.
    Cooldown: Every time this ability is used, it becomes inaccessible for a number of rounds equal to the target creatures' total HD or CR (whichever's higher).


    Mortal-Bane Presence
    The deity’s mere proximity is fatal to mortals.
    Prerequisites: Divine rank 6, Hand of Death salient divine ability
    Benefit: Any mortal who approaches within 10' per divine rank of the deity in its natural (non-avatar) form dies immediately, unless a Will save vs. DC [20 + divine rank + Cha-mod] is made each round anew.
    This ability may be turned on and off as a free action.
    Special: Mortal-Bane Presence doesn't affect Ex-deities (see Renouncing Godhood above).


    Physical Modifications
    Benefit: The deity can make any number of physical modifications to its true form that don't translate to combat improvements, movement enhancement, added/enhanced senses or environment adaptation.
    This could take the form of an extra eye on the forehead, female breasts, both-gender genitalia, elongated ears, small horns, inherent tattoos, skin pattern alterations, added scales/gills, hair growth/removal, etc.
    There are practically infinite possible expressions of this ability.
    This is not a shape-shifting ability. Once the changes have been selected by this ability they are fixed. However, the deity may later on introduce a single modification whenever a new divine rank is gained.
    Special: If the deity also possesses the Universal Graft salient divine ability, any added organ may be exchanged for an appropriate universal graft.


    Pocket Reality
    The deity can create realities within existing realities.
    Benefit: The deity can create a demiplane – a pocket dimension nested within a given plane of existence and accessible from a given location via a given means.
    Entering and exiting could have different means or the same means. They could be magical or non-magical, ritualistic or simple.
    A demiplane constitutes a deity's godly realm on an outer plane (for whatever that means), and its size is accordingly.
    At first, the fledgling demiplane grows at a rate of 1' in radius per day, up to the maximum radius. At a future time, if and when the deity rises in category of power and his/her godly realm limits increase, the demiplane renews its expansion until it reaches the new size limit.
    The deity determines the environment within the demiplane when s/he first activates this ability, reflecting most any desire the deity can visualize.
    The deity determines factors such as atmosphere, water, temperature, and the general shape of the terrain.
    This ability cannot create life (including vegetation), nor can it create construction (such as buildings, roads, wells, dungeons, and so forth).
    The deity must add these things in some other fashion if s/he desires.
    This ability may be used as often as desired for abandoning an existing godly realm and establish a new one, at a cost of 5 Credit points, but not while the existing demiplane is in a process of expansion.
    The deity alone may use Gate spell or Teleportation Circle spell (provided it has the ability to cast either of them on its own) to gain access to and from his/her pocket reality.


    Possess Mortal
    The deity can infuse some of its energy into a mortal, turning the mortal into an extension of the deity.
    Benefit: The deity can possess any mortal in any location the deity can sense. Unwilling mortals can attempt Will saves vs. DC [20 + divine rank + Cha-bonus].
    The possessed mortal effectively becomes an avatar of the deity.
    The deity can draw on all the possessed mortal’s memories, and senses what the mortal senses. Each mortal possessed counts as a remote location where the deity is sensing and communicating.
    While the deity is in possession, the mortal’s abilities are unchanged, and on top of that the mortal gains the normal benefits granted for being a Quasi-Deity (or higher, if multiple avatars are used).


    Power of Truth
    The deity can discern lies and compel creatures to tell the truth.
    Benefit: The deity can compel any non-divine creature within its aura to refrain from telling lies or use falsehood of any sort, with no save allowed.
    This power also affects deities of lower power category, but those are allowed a Will save vs. DC [20 + divine rank + Cha-bonus]. Even if the save is successful, the deity knows that it's being lied to.
    Non-divine creatures may also be compelled to actively tell the truth whenever asked, but are entitled to a Will save vs. each such attempt. If successful, the deity may not make the same request vs. the same mortal during the next 24 hours. This option is not applicable vs. deities.


    Rebirth
    The deity can set the soul of the deceased on the path of a new life cycle.
    Prerequisites: Divine rank 6, Gift of Life salient divine ability
    Benefit: You may take a soul from the afterlife and impregnate a female of whatever species, tying the deceased's soul to a new body.
    The reincarnated mortal gains the Reincarnated Legend template.

    Reincarnated Legend (template)
    Spoiler
    Show

    In a past life you were a great hero, and you've been sent back by the gods in a new mortal shell in a time of great need.
    Prerequisites: Must be selected at character creation.
    Benefits: You gain the following benefits.
    Prodigy: You're either exceptional or radical:
    • Exceptional: You gain an inherent +1 bonus to two ability scores. This bonus increases by +1 at levels 7 and 14.
    • Radical: You gain an inherent +2 bonus to one ability score. This bonus increases by +1 at levels 6, 12 and 18.
    Note: a reincarnated legend's elevated ability scores reflect his/her passed life.
    Divine Intervention: +2 on all saves. Reincarnated legends are exceptionally hardy and alert, and tend to survive many ordeals that are expected to bring them down.
    Early Bloomer: whatever your first class is, you begin play at minimum adult age.
    LA: +1

    Alternatively, this power also allows the deity to use the chosen soul for awakening non-sapient creatures (including plants), or inhabiting objects / constructs / magical items.
    Awaken:
    Just as with rebirth, the option of Awaken forever ties the soul to the physical body it inhabits.
    The inhabited creature gains the soul's mental abilities it had just before death took place (ignoring any ability damage/drain).
    The creature remembers facts about the soul's past life, but does not possess its actual past life experience and abilities.
    (this, of course, removes Awaken spell from the game)
    Inhabit:
    Unlike in the case of Awaken, inhabiting souls are liberated upon the destruction of the object.
    The object's mental stats and alignment are those of the inhabiting soul.
    An inhabiting soul may not voluntarily harm the object it is inhabiting.
    An inhabiting soul knows that it was once alive, but nothing beyond that. From time to time, it receives vestigial flashbacks from its passed life.
    • An inhabited non-magical object or a magical vehicle behaves on the mechanical level as a free willed animated object (according to the Animate Objects spell).
    • A construct simply gains sentience.
    • Other magical items – which have to be either wielded items or wearable items – follow the rules of intelligent weapons.
    In both cases of Awaken and Inhabit, recalculate the creature's skill points. Whatever skill points added - those points are used to buy ranks in skills from the soul's previous life.


    Sunder and Disjoin
    The deity can destroy weapons and items used against it in combat.
    Benefit: If any weapon or item is used against the deity in combat, the deity can destroy it with a touch. Treat a successful touch as a combination of Disintegrate and Disjunction spells, both targeted exclusively at the touched item. The save DC for both effects is [20 + divine rank + Cha-bonus]. An item remains vulnerable to this ability for up to one day after being used against the deity.


    Universal Graft
    Prerequisites: Create Species salient divine ability, Instant Item Creation salient divine ability
    Benefit: A universal graft is a powerful magical item that contains some of the essence of the deity (25 Credit points).
    The deity must choose a single inanimate object that will pose the item's true form. The item must be something that a tiny creature can lift off the ground. When the item is held, its size and shape change to that of an organ it's supposed to replace. For all intents and purposes, a universal graft functions as a normal organ where it resides. The organ is predetermined (e.g. eye, hand, tongue, foot etc.) upon the creation of the universal graft and may not be changed later on.
    In addition, a universal graft may possess magical powers, as specified for Instant Item Creation salient divine ability. Unlike other magical items, a functioning universal graft doesn't count as an item slot - meaning that it can have multiple spell effects active simultaneously and they would not interfere with one another.
    Regardless of what the item is made of, its hardness increases by 20 points, plus 1 point per divine rank. In addition, it gains 5 HP per divine rank.
    If a universal graft is damaged, it is completely mended at the beginning of the next round. If it is utterly destroyed, the deity is immediately aware and may reform it in its hand by paying 5 Credit points.

    Spoiler: Sample Universal Graft
    Show

    Eye of Odin

    The Eye of Odin is among the most powerful divination items known, but it also bestows a plethora of other benefits upon its user. It is an embodiment of Odin's all-knowing nature, might and majesty.
    The eye appears as a 4" sapphire. When held, its size changes to fit that of the holder's eyeballs. It activates by placing it inside an empty eye-socket, where it changes to resemble a murky-white blind eye, but it otherwise functions as a healthy eye for all intents and purposes. In fact, historically, most who previously ever wielded its powers had voluntarily gouged out an eye to do so.

    The eye bestows many powers upon its user:

    Always active:
    • +4 enhancement bonus to Str, Int, Wis & Cha
    • Arcane Sight
    • Darkvision
    • Death Ward
    • Detect Chaos / Evil / Good / Law
    • Discern Lies
    • Freedom of Movement
    • Mind Blank
    • See Invisible
    • Tongues
    • True Seeing

    3 / day:
    • Detect Thoughts
    • Divination
    • Lightning Bolt

    1 / day:
    • Analyze Dweomer
    • Vision
    • Moment of Prescience




    Ichor, Ambrosia and Nectar:
    Spoiler
    Show

    Deities don't have blood coursing through their veins, but a golden fluid called Ichor.
    Ichor is a universal poison to all non-divine beings (DC = [10 + 1/2 HD + Con-bonus]).
    When a deity is slain, its Ichor may one day grant immortality. If at least 90% of its Ichor is collected and placed in a sealed vial for 100 years, it is transformed into a liquid called Nectar. Nectar is not poisonous. in fact, once a mortal consumes the entire amount, it rejuvenates to adulthood and gains a limitless lifespan. Nectar that remains exposed to air for 100 years solidifies and becomes Ambrosia.
    Special: 20th level Radiant Soul deities possess transformed Ichor in their natural incorporeal form. When such a deity is slain, its Ichor rematerializes and is spilled as any fluid would.



    Overdeities (beyond godhood):
    Spoiler
    Show

    A rank-20 deity that has obtained 5 billion Credits, 20 levels in 5 character classes and a score of 100 in all ability scores becomes an overdeity.
    For all game purposes, an overdeity is an omnipotent being.
    • An overdeity possesses the best version of features, powers, qualities, resistances and immunities of all classes, races and monsters (including deities). It knows all feats and all skills and skill-tricks. It may use any magic or invocation as often as desired as a free action, counting as CL 100, and elevate spells via metamagic all the way to SL 20.
    • Everywhere it goes, an overdeity is considered to be in its realm. This automatically makes it adaptable to any environment – even beyond the known cosmology.
    • An overdeity never fails a check, considering any dice roll to produce the best possible outcome.
    • An overdeity counts as Divine Rank 25.
    • An overdeity may have up to 5 avatars, and may use all of them to create an avatar of a greater deity.
    • An overdeity doesn't need worshipers. In fact it has a limitless amount of character resources.


    Basically, an overdeity is a MacGuffin, not something one's supposed to fight. It can do whatever the DM wishes it to, to the point of ignoring verisimilitude.




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    Default Re: 3.5e Overhaul – Fixing ALL 3.5e's problems (P.E.A.C.H)

    This is awful. Everytime I looked at an area of text, its just one irrelevant change after another. And I'm sitting here thinking of all the broken stuff. I'm not joking here. Every single time I looked at a clump of text it was like "whelp, that part failed ... maybe the next part will have something worth reading." ... "nope, combined skills rewarding low skill-point casters" ... "let's see here tons of combat feats missing, uh," "Yup, no thought bottle mentioned"

    You didn't fix anything. I'd start analyzing all the random stuff here like additional body slots (hint, rings of protection are not the problem, even if they did stack in 3.5), but this stuff doesn't deserve the effort. You just threw 3.5 out of the window and made your own "Unommon (sic)" material. Go play 4e or pathfailure or Legend or whatever if you like that strategy. Leave fixing D&D to people who actually know all the material and how it interacts.

    Normally, I wouldn't have bothered to mention just how incomplete/bad this is, but the gawdy sig ... this is not close to "ALL"
    Last edited by VisitingDaGulag; 2015-08-02 at 12:31 PM.

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    Default Re: 3.5e Overhaul – Fixing ALL 3.5e's problems (P.E.A.C.H)

    While there is definitely some fixing going on, there is also a lot of re-flavoring. You can't really call it a fix if you change all the fluff. That being said, this is a perfectly viable project. I'd call it an alternate system based on 3.P though, not a fix of 3.5.

    As for the actual material, the only thing I've studied in detail so far is the warlock, which seems good. The modified invocations and epic feats being moved to pre-epic help give it a better power curve.

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    Default Re: 3.5e Overhaul – Fixing ALL 3.5e's problems (P.E.A.C.H)

    Quote Originally Posted by VisitingDaGulag View Post
    This is awful. Everytime I looked at an area of text, its just one irrelevant change after another. And I'm sitting here thinking of all the broken stuff. I'm not joking here. Every single time I looked at a clump of text it was like "whelp, that part failed ... maybe the next part will have something worth reading." ... "nope, combined skills rewarding low skill-point casters" ... "let's see here tons of combat feats missing, uh," "Yup, no thought bottle mentioned"

    You didn't fix anything. I'd start analyzing all the random stuff here like additional body slots (hint, rings of protection are not the problem, even if they did stack in 3.5), but this stuff doesn't deserve the effort. You just threw 3.5 out of the window and made your own "Unommon (sic)" material. Go play 4e or pathfailure or Legend or whatever if you like that strategy. Leave fixing D&D to people who actually know all the material and how it interacts.

    Normally, I wouldn't have bothered to mention just how incomplete/bad this is, but the gawdy sig ... this is not close to "ALL"
    I don't necessarily agree with a huge number of the changes here either, but it's not really fair to say that the important things haven't been fixed. (Just to note, the deflection bonuses from rings of protection doesn't stack with other rings of protection - even if they did, that's hardly broken compared to the real issues brought up with 3.5's game mechanics.)

    I'm sure the author of the rules changes would appreciate something more in-depth of an analysis in regard to how fixed or not fixed this 3.5e rewrite manages in terms of repairing the problems that the 3.5 edition rules have. It is certainly within the author's purview to make any other alterations - cosmetic or otherwise - that the author sees with the rules.

    Saying: "You didn't fix anything, just play this other game" is just not informative at any level. Perhaps you could find one or more examples of how this 3.5e overhaul fails to meet its goals and explain it so it can be addressed.
    Currently working on Finding the Path in the Forgotten Realms as a massive conversion of the forgotten realms campaign setting (circa 3.5 edition and prior) into pathfinder 1st edition (as I've no interest in 2nd edition).

    Please, if you have an opinion, feel free to meander over to my thread in the link above and post a comment. Thank you.

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    Default Re: 3.5e Overhaul – Fixing ALL 3.5e's problems (P.E.A.C.H)

    Quote Originally Posted by VisitingDaGulag View Post
    This is awful. Everytime I looked at an area of text, its just one irrelevant change after another. And I'm sitting here thinking of all the broken stuff. I'm not joking here. Every single time I looked at a clump of text it was like "whelp, that part failed ... maybe the next part will have something worth reading." ... "nope, combined skills rewarding low skill-point casters" ... "let's see here tons of combat feats missing, uh," "Yup, no thought bottle mentioned"

    You didn't fix anything. I'd start analyzing all the random stuff here like additional body slots (hint, rings of protection are not the problem, even if they did stack in 3.5), but this stuff doesn't deserve the effort. You just threw 3.5 out of the window and made your own "Unommon (sic)" material. Go play 4e or pathfailure or Legend or whatever if you like that strategy. Leave fixing D&D to people who actually know all the material and how it interacts.

    Normally, I wouldn't have bothered to mention just how incomplete/bad this is, but the gawdy sig ... this is not close to "ALL"
    Congratulations. You just managed to slander not just my work, but also the combined brain power of dozens of homebrewers who directly and indirectly contributed their materials and/or critique to this codex (some of which are the best and most brilliant I've ever seen on any forum) - and all that without the slightest explanation of what's not functioning properly in your view (no - those thought fragments are not useful critique, and you got it all wrong (as Neoxenok explained regarding rings of protection) or just didn't get to the relevant part because you didn't even ask).

    Being an active part in various forums of various natures since the previous millennium, I can honestly say that this is the least useful critique (towards myself or anyone else) that I've ever encountered.


    Be proud my fiend - this is an unprecedented achievement.

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    Default Re: 3.5e Overhaul – Fixing ALL 3.5e's problems (P.E.A.C.H)

    Quote Originally Posted by ImperatorV View Post
    While there is definitely some fixing going on, there is also a lot of re-flavoring. You can't really call it a fix if you change all the fluff. That being said, this is a perfectly viable project. I'd call it an alternate system based on 3.P though, not a fix of 3.5.

    As for the actual material, the only thing I've studied in detail so far is the warlock, which seems good. The modified invocations and epic feats being moved to pre-epic help give it a better power curve.
    The building blocks of the game are 3.5e:
    - BAB
    - Saves
    - The mechanics of skills & feats & skill-tricks.
    - Conditions (untouched)
    - Almost all official class features taken as is. Rage has been modified to prevent it from being a no-brainer must have and some Rogue special abilities have been improved just because their official version is so meh.
    - Most spells.

    If anything was taken from PF, it was hand-picked (e.g. PA & Combat Expertise) / coincidental / drawn from in spirit (Mage's Bonded Item).


    Yes, most classes were reinvented (for the main reason of creating far richer classes and removing the need for PrCs), as well as magic item creation, and the vancian spellcasting approach has been replaced with two alternatives of spell points, but the majority of the other stuff constitutes enrichment of existing stuff rather than replacement.

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    Default Re: 3.5e Overhaul – Fixing ALL 3.5e's problems (P.E.A.C.H)

    Quote Originally Posted by VisitingDaGulag View Post
    This is awful. Everytime I looked at an area of text, its just one irrelevant change after another. And I'm sitting here thinking of all the broken stuff. I'm not joking here. Every single time I looked at a clump of text it was like "whelp, that part failed ... maybe the next part will have something worth reading." ... "nope, combined skills rewarding low skill-point casters" ... "let's see here tons of combat feats missing, uh," "Yup, no thought bottle mentioned"

    You didn't fix anything. I'd start analyzing all the random stuff here like additional body slots (hint, rings of protection are not the problem, even if they did stack in 3.5), but this stuff doesn't deserve the effort. You just threw 3.5 out of the window and made your own "Unommon (sic)" material. Go play 4e or pathfailure or Legend or whatever if you like that strategy. Leave fixing D&D to people who actually know all the material and how it interacts.

    Normally, I wouldn't have bothered to mention just how incomplete/bad this is, but the gawdy sig ... this is not close to "ALL"
    P.E.A.C.H
    Please Evaluate And Critique Honestly.

    Although you may not agree with someones work a thread marked with a P.E.A.C.H. (or a P.E.A.R., as the case may be) is requesting constructive criticism and helpful feedback. You may have not intended it by your comment was both hurtful, unhelpful, and just downright mean. nonsi's fix / houserule / homebrew rules collection may not be for you or your gaming group (which is perfectly fine: I know in it's entirety it's not the super math heavy completely bonkers we all need dice rollers game my players enjoy) but not everyone's gaming group has the same type of "broken" as every other one and not every group has the same "problems" as every other. Try and provide more specific examples of individual content you view as problematic and why that may be the case - that way you comment is view as less of an attack and more of a critique. When people work hard on something and put effort into it it can be pretty upsetting to receive feedback that is seemingly negative in nature.

    @nonsi
    I've been discussing your Strain & Tolerance system with my group and we plan to implement it with the next game I run. Several of my players detest tracking spell slots and weren't a fan of the psionic power point system either and this offered a wonderful alternative that everyone found interesting and thematically appealing. I'll gladly provide feedback once I have a better feel for it. I've been using your Spelltheif and Soulknife, as well and they have left a much better taste in my mouth than the WoTC vanilla versions. Keep doing your thing.
    It is by my pen that I do swear
    To write up classes and content with care.
    To review, critique, and P.E.A.C.H. those in need
    These are the words of the homebrewer's creed

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    Default Re: 3.5e Overhaul – Fixing ALL 3.5e's problems (P.E.A.C.H)

    .
    Quote Originally Posted by necroon View Post
    @nonsi
    I've been discussing your Strain & Tolerance system with my group and we plan to implement it with the next game I run. Several of my players detest tracking spell slots and weren't a fan of the psionic power point system either and this offered a wonderful alternative that everyone found interesting and thematically appealing. I'll gladly provide feedback once I have a better feel for it. I've been using your Spelltheif and Soulknife, as well and they have left a much better taste in my mouth than the WoTC vanilla versions. Keep doing your thing.

    You know, out of my proposed 15 classes, those two are the only classes whose collection of features and general makeup was not suggested by others (not that I've seen anyway).
    It warms my heart to know that they turned out ok and fun classes and that you enjoyed them, since I had no way of knowing if they'd function as expected.
    You just made my day. For that reason alone, the insults were worth it


    Btw, check out the spell-points alternative to strain & tolerance (post #4, 2nd spoiler).
    I believe it achieves more or less the same result as strain & tolerance, but with simpler mechanics.
    It will probably also make it easier for you to tweak it to reach your sweat spot (using some of the ideas given in this thread).
    It is based on the psionic cost values, but without the burden of extra payment.

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    Default Re: 3.5e Overhaul – Fixing ALL 3.5e's problems (P.E.A.C.H)

    wow, this is incredible. I have a long list of home rules I've taken from the assorted 3.5 fixes to take the stage and i am adding a lot from this. so far i've looked at the general fixes and not at the individual classes, but I love the full attack fix and the twf fixes the most so far, excellent job, to you and everyone who helped.

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    Default Re: 3.5e Overhaul – Fixing ALL 3.5e's problems (P.E.A.C.H)

    Quote Originally Posted by ArkenBrony View Post
    wow, this is incredible. I have a long list of home rules I've taken from the assorted 3.5 fixes to take the stage and i am adding a lot from this.
    Hi ArkenBrony, glad to hear you find this project useful.



    Quote Originally Posted by ArkenBrony View Post
    so far i've looked at the general fixes and not at the individual classes,
    Do look at the classes when you have the time. I'm quite certain you'll find them interesting, and useful at least as an inspiration source
    They're designed to be versatile, fun and balanced vs. one another (as much as possible in practice, even if not in tire) at each level.
    They're designed to work together (or individually) to produce just about any medieval-fantasy character concept I've ever encountered (save maybe SAURON (LotR), which isn't PC-practical anyway so no biggie).
    Notice post #10 (Classes – Intro) for more details on how they work together.



    Quote Originally Posted by ArkenBrony View Post
    but I love the full attack fix and the twf fixes the most so far.
    Yes, full attack and martial action economy have taken a serious blow ever since 3.0e was introduced to the world. The fix is quite simple, but oddly it took too long to come up with.
    Out of everything in the codex, if I had to offer but a single rule to adopt to core 3.5e, the modification to iterative attacks would win hands down.

    Regarding TWF – did you notice the new Double Weapon Fighting feat? It was inspired by Spinning Halberd feat. I didn't like it that such option was limited to a single weapon and that it had such a high price tag.





    Btw, if you encounter something in the overhaul codex that's not 100% clear, please let me know so that I can both clarify and improve the wording.
    Ditto if you encounter any contradictions.

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    Default Re: 3.5e Overhaul – Fixing ALL 3.5e's problems (P.E.A.C.H)

    still going through it. again I have to say this is amazing, but as i read i'm finding some questions/objections.

    - Prismatic Wall/Sphere: Belong to the Conjuration school, not Abjuration. Also, the caster is not immune to the effects of his own wall/sphere (spell effects don't "recognize" their caster).
    why is it so important that it not be abjuration? i thought energy fields fit the description of abjurations.

    Enchant Item (Universal)
    ...
    Druids are limited to items made of wood, stone & animal remains (bones, hide, tendons etc).
    that seems a bit harsh, don't druids use metal weapons?

    ----

    I love the warrior and rogue, i'll have to come back later for the rest. this is truly amazing.

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    Default Re: 3.5e Overhaul – Fixing ALL 3.5e's problems (P.E.A.C.H)

    Quote Originally Posted by ArkenBrony View Post
    still going through it. again I have to say this is amazing, but as i read i'm finding some questions/objections.
    Questions, objections and reservations are good. They consistently help make this codex better.



    Quote Originally Posted by ArkenBrony View Post
    why is it so important that it not be abjuration? i thought energy fields fit the description of abjurations.
    To be honest, I don't quite remember what was the trail of thought against Abjuration.
    I've removed that clause.
    Now that I think of it, some spells are so elaborate that they seem to belong to several spell schools. Unfortunately, to this day I'm unable to come up with satisfying rules for composite spells, and I'm not sure there are enough such spells to warrant ruling on the subject.



    Quote Originally Posted by ArkenBrony View Post
    that seems a bit harsh, don't druids use metal weapons?
    This is very much intentional.
    Nature magic - in my view - should enhance only things that appear in their natural forms.
    My Druid comes with the following clause: "Equipment Restrictions: Druids are prohibited from using metal combat gear at all."
    Metal symbolizes industry. If druids use industrial items to defend themselves, what validity does it leave for their preachings?
    I'm also considering prohibiting any kind of usage of anything that could be categorized - even vaguely - as "clockwork" (e.g. "Apparatus of Kwalish" or machinery that's steam-driven or fire-driven), but those don't come up often enough to warrant ruling, so for now I leave it for DM's decision.



    Quote Originally Posted by ArkenBrony View Post
    I love the warrior and rogue, i'll have to come back later for the rest. this is truly amazing.
    If by any chance you have a character concept that you wish to create and can't find how to do it using the codex' classes, let me know. There's more than a decent chance that I'll be able to help.

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    Default Re: 3.5e Overhaul – Fixing ALL 3.5e's problems (P.E.A.C.H)

    I only read the weapon section and I must say that I don't like your changes at all.

    First off, here is the dart: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dart_%28missile%29 It is a historical weapon.

    Your removal of the dire flail because "Totally unwieldy, a problem to carry around and dangerous to the user." points out the problem with ALL double weapons. So why is the double axe and two-bladed sword not removed? Having both ends of a weapon being dangerous only limits one's ability to use said weapon without cutting oneself. With the exception of the staff, they just were not used in real-life. And not being true to life is the point made on why you (erroneously) removed the dart.

    Why all the fixation on making pole arms double weapons? As I've already pointed out, double weapons are terrible and were not used historically. Here's a video if you need the extra convincing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TPXOOKEnvoQ That said, every weapon can deal bludgeoning damage with a handle (or pommel) strike. It should be a common sense rule.

    A pick head does not deal bludgeoning damage. Hammers are used to break rocks, picks are used to get into cracks and to dig. I have a rock hammer and I've almost never used the pick end because it doesn't break rocks.

    A blowgun would need exotic weapon proficiency. You have to have powerful lungs to be able to use one effectively and consistently and it would take lots of practice to build your lung muscles up to that level.

    The buckler axe: I assume you are saying you get a shield bonus from it even if you use it to attack, otherwise there would be no advantage over using an axe and a buckler. Anyway, it should still be either shield or axe. If you use it to attack then you aren't defending with it so you lose that shield bonus to AC. And there is no point to using it as a second shield. The AC from shields comes from its coverage of the body. A small shield covers your torso for +1, a large shield covers much of your head and down to your crotch for +2. Adding another shield in would not grant you any more coverage unless you are standing like a moron with your buckler at your knees, or covering your eyes so you can't see your enemy attacking.

    Just a note, even though the game is turn based you have to remember that all of a round is happening at the same time. One person doesn't attack, then defend against the enemy's attack. They are effectively attacking and defending within the same 6 seconds. So you can't use a buckler as a weapon and a shield at the same time. It just isn't possible.

    3 section staff has too many rules and prerequisites. Its more of a feat than it is a weapon.

    The throwing iron is for flavour? It is a thrown weapon that does piercing damage, like a shuriken or a dagger. But if its only in for flavour then you shouldn't be removing any weapons since they could all be used for flavour.

    Tonfa: One again, if you are using it as a shield then you aren't attacking with it. You can't have both. Two weapon defense covers the usage of a weapon for parrying. So if you want to get a shield bonus out of it you would have to be using it as a shield and not a weapon.
    EDIT: I just noticed the wording on TWD says it grants a shield bonus when fighting with 2 weapons. I always thought it was a dodge bonus. Oh well. Either way I don't agree with a shield bonus coming from a weapon when it is being used to attack.

    Turtlesting has all the same issues I pointed out with the buckler axe.

    Anyway, that's just the issues I found with your weapon reworking. I don't think I'm going to try reading anything else.
    Last edited by Chaos_Laicosin; 2015-09-05 at 12:53 AM.

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    Default Re: 3.5e Overhaul – Fixing ALL 3.5e's problems (P.E.A.C.H)

    Quote Originally Posted by Chaos_Laicosin View Post
    I only read the weapon section and I must say that I don't like your changes at all.
    That's perfectly fine my friend. I live in peace with the fact that "you can't please them all".



    Quote Originally Posted by Chaos_Laicosin View Post
    First off, here is the dart: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dart_%28missile%29 It is a historical weapon.
    Well, the following opening statement kind'a kills the argumant on "Dart":
    "The term has been used to describe an extremely wide variety of projectiles, from heavy spear-like ammunition for siege engines or atlatls to tiny poisoned needles for use in blowguns."



    Quote Originally Posted by Chaos_Laicosin View Post
    Your removal of the dire flail because "Totally unwieldy, a problem to carry around and dangerous to the user." points out the problem with ALL double weapons. So why is the double axe and two-bladed sword not removed? Having both ends of a weapon being dangerous only limits one's ability to use said weapon without cutting oneself. With the exception of the staff, they just were not used in real-life. And not being true to life is the point made on why you (erroneously) removed the dart.
    What distinguishes the "Dire Flail" is that while you strike with one side, focused on your enemy, the other side dangles and makes random and unpredictable movements (and it has spikes on all sides).
    Also, imagine walking around with such a bulky weapon with both ends loose and ready for combat. You'd have to compensate at just about every movement you make to avoid getting hurt.
    Finally, every time you attempt to strike an opponent, you'd have to compensate vs. the unpredictable movement of the backside (which is quite heavy).



    Quote Originally Posted by Chaos_Laicosin View Post
    Why all the fixation on making pole arms double weapons? As I've already pointed out, double weapons are terrible and were not used historically. Here's a video if you need the extra convincing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TPXOOKEnvoQ That said, every weapon can deal bludgeoning damage with a handle (or pommel) strike. It should be a common sense rule.
    1. I was talking specifically about Halberd and Spear (not Longspear). Being useful for set vs. charge doesn't define a weapon as pole weapon.
    2. The so called weapon shown in the vid is not a 2-Bladed-Sword, but an interpretation of a bad drawing. This, this and this seem "wieldy" enough for me to let it slide.



    Quote Originally Posted by Chaos_Laicosin View Post
    A pick head does not deal bludgeoning damage. Hammers are used to break rocks, picks are used to get into cracks and to dig. I have a rock hammer and I've almost never used the pick end because it doesn't break rocks.
    1. Fact: With a single well aimed strike, I can use a pick to shatter a man's pelvis at any point struck. I doubt you can do the same with a rapier.
    2. Practicality: In my codex there are alternative rules to Critical Hits, which make the benefit granted by picks at core nonviable. Without the proposed change, there would be no reason taking it.
    3. Question: What exactly is the difference between a pick and a rock hammer? If you're proficient with a weapon, you'd know which side to use vs. the surface you're hitting.



    Quote Originally Posted by Chaos_Laicosin View Post
    A blowgun would need exotic weapon proficiency. You have to have powerful lungs to be able to use one effectively and consistently and it would take lots of practice to build your lung muscles up to that level.
    Fair enough.



    Quote Originally Posted by Chaos_Laicosin View Post
    The buckler axe: I assume you are saying you get a shield bonus from it even if you use it to attack, otherwise there would be no advantage over using an axe and a buckler. Anyway, it should still be either shield or axe. If you use it to attack then you aren't defending with it so you lose that shield bonus to AC.
    You're assuming that striking and defending always happens at the very same instance.
    If that was the case, then there would be no justification behind the Improved Shield Bash feat.
    Martial combat is a lot more dynamic you know.


    Quote Originally Posted by Chaos_Laicosin View Post
    And there is no point to using it as a second shield. The AC from shields comes from its coverage of the body. A small shield covers your torso for +1, a large shield covers much of your head and down to your crotch for +2. Adding another shield in would not grant you any more coverage unless you are standing like a moron with your buckler at your knees, or covering your eyes so you can't see your enemy attacking.
    A buckler doesn't work the same way as a heavy/tower shield.
    A buckler's AC bonus stems from timing and momentum.



    Quote Originally Posted by Chaos_Laicosin View Post
    Just a note, even though the game is turn based you have to remember that all of a round is happening at the same time. One person doesn't attack, then defend against the enemy's attack. They are effectively attacking and defending within the same 6 seconds. So you can't use a buckler as a weapon and a shield at the same time. It just isn't possible.
    See the movie "Troy" if you haven't already. That epic one-on-one will tell you a thing or two about fighting with a shield.



    Quote Originally Posted by Chaos_Laicosin View Post
    3 section staff has too many rules and prerequisites. Its more of a feat than it is a weapon.
    So what?
    If it's too rule-heavy for you, don't use it.
    I built it to work as close to reality as I know. Even veteran fighters get themselves wacked on the head without proper training and agility.
    I'm not really kidding myself that anyone would use the overhaul codex to the letter. Whatever doesn't fit for you, you can just ignore or change to your heart's content.



    Quote Originally Posted by Chaos_Laicosin View Post
    The throwing iron is for flavour? It is a thrown weapon that does piercing damage, like a shuriken or a dagger. But if its only in for flavour then you shouldn't be removing any weapons since they could all be used for flavour.
    It's more than a flavor thing.
    A throwing iron could penetrate holes where a shuriken would get stuck (assassination, trap activation etc).
    A shuriken can sever a rope while a throwing iron can't.



    Quote Originally Posted by Chaos_Laicosin View Post
    Tonfa: One again, if you are using it as a shield then you aren't attacking with it. You can't have both. Two weapon defense covers the usage of a weapon for parrying. So if you want to get a shield bonus out of it you would have to be using it as a shield and not a weapon.
    I think you might find this YouTube video interesting.
    And the "figure-8" motion shown here could explain to you how you can actually block and strike at the same time.



    Quote Originally Posted by Chaos_Laicosin View Post
    Turtlesting has all the same issues I pointed out with the buckler axe.
    Turtlesting is actually from an official game supplement. I just don't remember where from right now.



    Quote Originally Posted by Chaos_Laicosin View Post
    Anyway, that's just the issues I found with your weapon reworking. I don't think I'm going to try reading anything else.
    Whatever works for you.

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    Default Re: 3.5e Overhaul – Fixing ALL 3.5e's problems (P.E.A.C.H)

    So, of the thousands and thousands of words you've posted here, I probably read about 10%, and some of that I only skimmed. There's a *lot* of content here. As a player who's primarily familiar with D&D 5e, I'm not even sure what to make of some of your corrections -- I have no idea if Monks are over- or under-powered in D&D 3.5, or whether your changes help or hurt that part of the game balance. I almost think that the kind of player you're looking for -- the kind of player who, even now that D&D 3.5 is years out of date, is still intimately familiar with the D&D 3.5 rules and can intelligently assess whether hundreds of house rules would collectively be an improvement to the old system -- will overwhelmingly tend to be irrationally fond of the old rules and unwilling to consider major changes with an open mind. Anyone who had an open mind about rules changes has probably migrated to Pathfinder or 4e or 5e by now.

    That said, I love-love-love your Strain-Tolerance system for spellcasters, and I plan to adapt it for any campaigns in any system that I run in the future. I think it's an elegant, accurate, flexible, fair system that captures the fun of fantasy spellcasting without hemming players in or letting wizards run amok.

    I am potentially a fan of some of your extra combat mechanics, like Overrun and Play Dead and so on, and I would be open to giving your Grapple rules a try in a session with another DM, but the overall level of complexity is higher than I would want -- I want to find ways to give martial characters interesting tactical options during combat without urging players to spend multiple minutes poring over a two-page list of "standard" combat options (in addition to the tricks they learn as part of their class or because of their special items). I think 5e simplifies things too much by reducing all combat mechanics to "roll an opposed STR or DEX check; if you win you get advantage on your next attack," but I think your system has some excess complexity that can and should be trimmed down by 30-40% or so.

    Finally, this is kind of nitpicky, but I object to 10*STR pounds as a "Standard Load" of encumbrance, even for heroes. Unless I missed something, 10 STR still represents average strength for an average human (rather than for an average heroic human), and if you have average physical traits, even if you are in good shape and you work outdoors for a living, you're not going to be able to swing a sword, dodge an arrow, or jump over a creek while carrying 100 lbs. on your back.

  18. - Top - End - #48
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    Default Re: 3.5e Overhaul – Fixing ALL 3.5e's problems (P.E.A.C.H)

    Quote Originally Posted by Argothair View Post
    So, of the thousands and thousands of words you've posted here, I probably read about 10%, and some of that I only skimmed. There's a *lot* of content here. As a player who's primarily familiar with D&D 5e, I'm not even sure what to make of some of your corrections -- I have no idea if Monks are over- or under-powered in D&D 3.5, or whether your changes help or hurt that part of the game balance. I almost think that the kind of player you're looking for -- the kind of player who, even now that D&D 3.5 is years out of date, is still intimately familiar with the D&D 3.5 rules and can intelligently assess whether hundreds of house rules would collectively be an improvement to the old system -- will overwhelmingly tend to be irrationally fond of the old rules and unwilling to consider major changes with an open mind.
    No arguments there.
    You have to be reasonably familiar with a system to evaluate if a proposed fix actually fixes things or does more damage than good.

    As far as coping with the core materials and mine, if you take a leap of faith for a moment and assume that I have a decent idea what I'm doing (you wouldn't believe the amount of feedbacks I got on everything that's hear over the course of time), then this codex is a massive simplification, because it shrinks the amount of classes from hundreds to but 15 (hopefully 16 some day, if I ever get to finish my Binder project, with which I'm stuck right now). And with no PrCs in the equation, a lot of 3e's uncertainties and breaking points just don't exist.



    Quote Originally Posted by Argothair View Post
    Anyone who had an open mind about rules changes has probably migrated to Pathfinder or 4e or 5e by now.
    My early days in D&D go way back to the BECMI boxed sets published back in the 1980's. I can rule with a high level of credibility that, in spirit, 4e is in no way shape or form D&D.

    While I understand the benefits of 5e, it's too simplified to model all the aspects that 3e lets you model.



    Quote Originally Posted by Argothair View Post
    That said, I love-love-love your Strain-Tolerance system for spellcasters, and I plan to adapt it for any campaigns in any system that I run in the future. I think it's an elegant, accurate, flexible, fair system that captures the fun of fantasy spellcasting without hemming players in or letting wizards run amok.
    While I admit that the idea is not originally my own (see the credits section), I regard my rules as a necessary polish.



    Quote Originally Posted by Argothair View Post
    I am potentially a fan of some of your extra combat mechanics, like Overrun and Play Dead and so on, and I would be open to giving your Grapple rules a try in a session with another DM, but the overall level of complexity is higher than I would want -- I want to find ways to give martial characters interesting tactical options during combat without urging players to spend multiple minutes poring over a two-page list of "standard" combat options (in addition to the tricks they learn as part of their class or because of their special items). I think 5e simplifies things too much by reducing all combat mechanics to "roll an opposed STR or DEX check; if you win you get advantage on your next attack," but I think your system has some excess complexity that can and should be trimmed down by 30-40% or so.
    I'm not pro excess-weight.
    I'd appreciate it if you named those 30-40%, so that we could discuss their redundancy.

    Regarding "two-page list of "standard" combat options"... that's why they're spoilered, so you can drill-down to the topic you seek in a click of a button or two (and I try minimizing spoiler-encapsulation as much as possible).



    Quote Originally Posted by Argothair View Post
    Finally, this is kind of nitpicky, but I object to 10*STR pounds as a "Standard Load" of encumbrance, even for heroes. Unless I missed something, 10 STR still represents average strength for an average human (rather than for an average heroic human), and if you have average physical traits, even if you are in good shape and you work outdoors for a living, you're not going to be able to swing a sword, dodge an arrow, or jump over a creek while carrying 100 lbs. on your back.
    Let's take Str 18.
    It means that you regard 180 lbs. (~85 kg) as the high-end of medium weight a human could possibly carry.
    I'm betting Ronnie Coleman can regard that weight as medium weight without any significant difficulty.
    I'm betting Zydrunas Savickas can handle even more than that.

    And let's remember that we're talking about weight that's efficiently distributed all over your person, not this big stone tied to your limbs or encircling your neck.

  19. - Top - End - #49
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    Default Re: 3.5e Overhaul – Fixing ALL 3.5e's problems (P.E.A.C.H)

    There are a lot of changes here I don't understand. For example, what was the problem with the rules on gaze attacks or carrying capacity? I also don't understand why you've nerfed but not removed stupid things like massive damage. There's a lot of stuff like that. For example, your holy word fix involves a bunch of new accounting, but I don't understand why you didn't just ban CL boosters. Nothing good comes of them, and they require you to rewrite substantial portions of the game. Also, what's your solution to non-core material that breaks things?

    Basically, you seem to have moved a lot of stuff around, but I don't really get what you're trying to do. Are people supposed to be as good as Wizards? As good as Rogues? Fighters? How much, how often, and in what ways are people supposed to interact with the various non-combat minigames? What is the setting supposed to look like? How much and what existing content can I use with this?

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    Default Re: 3.5e Overhaul – Fixing ALL 3.5e's problems (P.E.A.C.H)

    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    There are a lot of changes here I don't understand. For example, what was the problem with the rules on gaze attacks or carrying capacity? I also don't understand why you've nerfed but not removed stupid things like massive damage. There's a lot of stuff like that. For example, your holy word fix involves a bunch of new accounting, but I don't understand why you didn't just ban CL boosters. Nothing good comes of them, and they require you to rewrite substantial portions of the game. Also, what's your solution to non-core material that breaks things?

    Basically, you seem to have moved a lot of stuff around, but I don't really get what you're trying to do. Are people supposed to be as good as Wizards? As good as Rogues? Fighters? How much, how often, and in what ways are people supposed to interact with the various non-combat minigames? What is the setting supposed to look like? How much and what existing content can I use with this?
    Hey Brova,

    All are fair and just questions. I'll share my motivations.



    gaze attacks
    In one word: TPK (Total Party Kill).
    I've been there several time. Off the top of my head, I can remember one such case with a Medusa (way back in a BECMI campaign - TPK) and another with a Bodak (3.5e campaign - 2 out of 6 survived. Needless to say, it killed the campaign).
    As a group, all players (and each one individually) can make all the right decisions, and still be destroyed by pure bad luck.
    These kind of things ruin the game.



    carrying capacity
    A simple formula (that makes sense) instead of a table with seemingly arbitrary numbers is always better.



    Massive Damage
    Massive damage makes sense. It's just that they were lazy formulating that rule.
    If it bothers you - remove it altogether.



    Holy Word
    Again - TPK. This time with no saves.



    Not removing CL boosters
    I didn't want to take away elements that let players define their character.
    As long as CL boosting doesn't result in TPK, I'm fine with it.
    I'm not sure what you mean by "they require you to rewrite substantial portions of the game". As long as you deal with stuff like Holy Word, all CL affects are some stats and SR-penetration. Not the best char-op strategy.



    Non-core material that breaks things
    AFAIK, I dealt with them quite nicely:
    1. No PrCs. I designed the codex' classes to not allow power abuse. I hope I did a good job there.
    2. The "Spellcasting Rules" section (entry #4) is designed, among other things, to eliminate the remaining problems.



    Moving stuff around and what I'm trying to do
    1. Simplification of rules and making things more intuitive.
    2. Speeding up gameflow.
    3. Expanding options.
    4. Preventing loopholes and rule-abuse.



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Are people supposed to be as good as Wizards? As good as Rogues? Fighters? How much, how often, and in what ways are people supposed to interact with the various non-combat minigames?
    I must admit that I'm unable to determine what you're asking here.


    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    What is the setting supposed to look like?
    Whatever you want it to look like.
    The aim is to expand options, not limit them.


    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    How much and what existing content can I use with this?
    Whatever you fancy.
    If it doesn't conflict with what's written in the codex - it's legit.

  21. - Top - End - #51
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    Default Re: 3.5e Overhaul – Fixing ALL 3.5e's problems (P.E.A.C.H)

    Quote Originally Posted by nonsi View Post
    gaze attacks
    In one word: TPK (Total Party Kill).
    I've been there several time. Off the top of my head, I can remember one such case with a Medusa (way back in a BECMI campaign - TPK) and another with a Bodak (3.5e campaign - 2 out of 6 survived. Needless to say, it killed the campaign).
    As a group, all players (and each one individually) can make all the right decisions, and still be destroyed by pure bad luck.
    These kind of things ruin the game.
    That's a problem with save or dies, not with gaze attacks. It is better for the game if you rewrite the problematic effect rather than changing something minor.

    carrying capacity
    A simple formula (that makes sense) instead of a table with seemingly arbitrary numbers is always better.
    That may be true, and if you were designing a new game, I would totally be behind that. But you aren't. You're fixing 3.5 and that's a change approximately no one would suggest to something that isn't broken.

    Massive Damage
    Massive damage makes sense. It's just that they were lazy formulating that rule.
    If it bothers you - remove it altogether.
    Massive damage is bad for the game. If you want people to have attack riders, give them attack riders. If you want the Bloodied condition to matter, write things that care about it.

    Not removing CL boosters
    I didn't want to take away elements that let players define their character.
    Caster level doesn't define your character level, except that it makes you higher level than you are. If your character concept is "has a really high caster level", you either doing something cheesy (The Word) or trying to play a higher level character, which is obviously dumb.

    I'm not sure what you mean by "they require you to rewrite substantial portions of the game". As long as you deal with stuff like Holy Word, all CL affects are some stats and SR-penetration. Not the best char-op strategy.
    It depends on the level of cheese and the balance target. Uncapped damage spells (there are a couple) have much the same effect as a holy word, they just require a bigger caster level.

    1. No PrCs. I designed the codex' classes to not allow power abuse. I hope I did a good job there.
    Looking at a couple of classes, it seems like you've lost a lot of versatility. If I'm a Mage, I get some minor new abilities for sticking around to 20 (this is good), but I lose a lot of the distinction Wizards got from random PrCs like Mage of the Arcane Order or a Mindbender dip. I don't think those were particularly broken and they gave high level Wizards a lot of bang for their buck in terms of unique abilities. I think you either need to implement something where there are a lot more options for trading abilities around, or let some PrCs back in.

    2. The "Spellcasting Rules" section (entry #4) is designed, among other things, to eliminate the remaining problems.
    Hmm. My first thought when looking at this is that there's no reason to have more than two spellcasting progressions. Whatever you gain in granularity is lost in extra complexity. By the end of 3.5 there were three different progressions for partial caster, and that's terrible. Cutting it down to full (9/9) and partial (6/9) casters is better and simpler. Just give the Witch's primary circle a straight cost reduction.

    The casting time stuff seems okay. How does that interact with Rapid Spell/arcane spellsurge? Also, in general for metamagic, how do spell level adjustments work? Are they the same, or are they changed somewhat?

    The rules on having minions are a good step with stupid adjudication (unless there's a change to HD/CR somewhere). Measuring hit dice does not get you a meaningful measure of anything. A 20 HD creature could be the CR 6 Grey Render Zombie, the CR 20 Balor, or (almost) the CR 16 Nightwalker. It just doesn't track at all. Measure by CR if you want to get anything meaningful, or go pack to the nonstandard caps 3.5 had.

    I must admit that I'm unable to determine what you're asking here.
    Basically, what balance point are you targeting. Are people supposed to be like Wizards, where they're level appropriate at low levels and pull ahead at high levels, Rogues, where they're level appropriate at all levels, or Fighters where they fall behind starting at 5th-ish.

    Also, what kinds of abilities are people supposed to get in terms of building kingdoms, running businesses, and other not stabbing stuff.

    Whatever you want it to look like.
    The aim is to expand options, not limit them.
    That's not really a helpful answer. Any set of rules necessarily constrains what campaign settings can exist. A world where Shadows works as they do in RAW has one possible campaign setting - a world blanketed in eternal night. Similarly, choices about how non-combat material is supposed to work, what the economy looks like, and ease of planar travel change the campaign setting.

    Whatever you fancy.
    If it doesn't conflict with what's written in the codex - it's legit.
    In that case, I think you need to be a lot more rigorous with bans. AFIAK, ability damage still works totally normally, and that seems out of bounds for a system where you're supposed to have trouble dropping stuff like evard's black tentacles.

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    Default Re: 3.5e Overhaul – Fixing ALL 3.5e's problems (P.E.A.C.H)

    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by nonsi View Post
    gaze attacks
    In one word: TPK (Total Party Kill).
    I've been there several time. Off the top of my head, I can remember one such case with a Medusa (way back in a BECMI campaign - TPK) and another with a Bodak (3.5e campaign - 2 out of 6 survived. Needless to say, it killed the campaign).
    As a group, all players (and each one individually) can make all the right decisions, and still be destroyed by pure bad luck.
    These kind of things ruin the game.
    That's a problem with save or dies, not with gaze attacks. It is better for the game if you rewrite the problematic effect rather than changing something minor.
    No, that's a problem with a specific save-or-die ability that affects every single member of the party each round anew.
    Notice that the rule changes nothing for the Bodak, only for "radiated" gaze attacks.



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by nonsi View Post
    carrying capacity
    A simple formula (that makes sense) instead of a table with seemingly arbitrary numbers is always better.
    That may be true, and if you were designing a new game, I would totally be behind that. But you aren't. You're fixing 3.5 and that's a change approximately no one would suggest to something that isn't broken.
    All rules are suggestions. Don't like it – don't use it.
    If I can save time by not having to go to the tables, that's a good thing in my book. _5_10_15_20-_-30_ – it doesn't get any easier than that


    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by nonsi View Post
    Massive Damage
    Massive damage makes sense. It's just that they were lazy formulating that rule.
    If it bothers you - remove it altogether.
    Massive damage is bad for the game. If you want people to have attack riders, give them attack riders. If you want the Bloodied condition to matter, write things that care about it.
    As I said, all rules are suggestions. At the very least they improve on the existing.
    Don't like it – don't use it.
    Nixing rules is always an option – I'm just offering alternatives to consider before nixing.



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by nonsi View Post
    Not removing CL boosters
    I didn't want to take away elements that let players define their character.
    Caster level doesn't define your character level, except that it makes you higher level than you are. If your character concept is "has a really high caster level", you either doing something cheesy (The Word) or trying to play a higher level character, which is obviously dumb.
    There are many roads to power. CL boosting is just one of them.
    Why would I deny players their vision if I can make it so that their vision doesn't break anything?
    Higher power output comes with decreased versatility.
    I prefer letting players decide where they wish to invest their character resources.
    With my proposed changes, CL boosting is hardly the best choice.



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by nonsi View Post
    I'm not sure what you mean by "they require you to rewrite substantial portions of the game". As long as you deal with stuff like Holy Word, all CL affects are some stats and SR-penetration. Not the best char-op strategy.
    It depends on the level of cheese and the balance target. Uncapped damage spells (there are a couple) have much the same effect as a holy word, they just require a bigger caster level.
    So what, now you'd have me rewrite every uncapped damage spell out there?
    If a specific uncapped damage spell is broken, deal with it specifically, but one or two d6s (or d8s) shouldn't pose a dramatic power shift, or someone's doing something totally wrong – either in character design or during playtime.



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by nonsi View Post
    1. No PrCs. I designed the codex' classes to not allow power abuse. I hope I did a good job there.
    Looking at a couple of classes, it seems like you've lost a lot of versatility. If I'm a Mage, I get some minor new abilities for sticking around to 20 (this is good), but I lose a lot of the distinction Wizards got from random PrCs like Mage of the Arcane Order or a Mindbender dip. I don't think those were particularly broken and they gave high level Wizards a lot of bang for their buck in terms of unique abilities. I think you either need to implement something where there are a lot more options for trading abilities around, or let some PrCs back in.
    I really don't need PrCs – that element of 3.5e is just not required anymore.

    Among the many proposed new feats, there's one called "Bestow Spell-Like Ability".
    Write a spell that gives you telepathy (2nd level at most) and take the feat or find someone that has it. There, you're done.

    Regarding Mage of the Arcane Order – you're talking about Spell-Combination.
    My Mage just doesn't need it (read it and you'll find out). It offers more flexibility than that PrC. Actually, all my spellcasters do.

    As for "they gave high level Wizards a lot of bang for their buck in terms of unique abilities"…
    Did you look at the arcane feats, or the "Spellcasting Feats" spoiler at post #9? Look more closely – the options might surprise you.
    Along with ACFs and the multiclassing rules at post #10, you have a lot to work with.


    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by nonsi View Post
    2. The "Spellcasting Rules" section (entry #4) is designed, among other things, to eliminate the remaining problems.
    Hmm. My first thought when looking at this is that there's no reason to have more than two spellcasting progressions. Whatever you gain in granularity is lost in extra complexity. By the end of 3.5 there were three different progressions for partial caster, and that's terrible. Cutting it down to full (9/9) and partial (6/9) casters is better and simpler. Just give the Witch's primary circle a straight cost reduction.

    The casting time stuff seems okay. How does that interact with Rapid Spell/arcane spellsurge? Also, in general for metamagic, how do spell level adjustments work? Are they the same, or are they changed somewhat?

    The rules on having minions are a good step with stupid adjudication (unless there's a change to HD/CR somewhere). Measuring hit dice does not get you a meaningful measure of anything. A 20 HD creature could be the CR 6 Grey Render Zombie, the CR 20 Balor, or (almost) the CR 16 Nightwalker. It just doesn't track at all. Measure by CR if you want to get anything meaningful, or go pack to the nonstandard caps 3.5 had.
    The whole point behind the Witch is that the primary circle defines her theme, but at the same time she's a dabbler.
    It's all about spell access, not power output.
    Furthermore, diminished spellcasting is required to keep my Spellthief balanced.

    Regarding casting time – it all depends if the spells in question force conditions or not.
    In general, arcane spellsurge seems problematic to me. It presents a false mitigating factor to disguise itself as balanced.

    Regarding metamagic – for all intents and purposes other than strain toll, spells modified by metamagic operate at their normal level. I guess I should state that.
    If you wish to squeeze more out of a spell – use the Heightened Spell option and work from there.

    Regarding summoning – I don't want a spellcaster to be able to summon a creature with CR equal to his CL.
    If a creature has poor CR per HD, then the caster is not compelled to summon it specifically (and sometimes "s**t happens"... and sometimes CR is not the main goal of the summons).
    Also, CR is not an exact science either.



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by nonsi View Post
    I must admit that I'm unable to determine what you're asking here.
    Basically, what balance point are you targeting. Are people supposed to be like Wizards, where they're level appropriate at low levels and pull ahead at high levels, Rogues, where they're level appropriate at all levels, or Fighters where they fall behind starting at 5th-ish.

    Also, what kinds of abilities are people supposed to get in terms of building kingdoms, running businesses, and other not stabbing stuff.
    Oh, I get it.
    The aim is that all classes are equally fun across the day/session/campaign, on average, at equal levels.
    Because the classes have different features, this won't be totally true, but the aim is to get as close as possible.

    If by "people" you mean NPCs, then the thumb rule of "6th level = highest RL human capabilities" persists.
    But I don't see a direct link between building kingdoms, running businesses, and other not stabbing stuff and personal might. One can be a low level aristocrat or a mighty warrior with nothing more than his combat gear and what's in his backpach.
    (or did I misunderstand your question?)



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by nonsi View Post
    Whatever you want it to look like.
    The aim is to expand options, not limit them.
    That's not really a helpful answer. Any set of rules necessarily constrains what campaign settings can exist. A world where Shadows works as they do in RAW has one possible campaign setting - a world blanketed in eternal night. Similarly, choices about how non-combat material is supposed to work, what the economy looks like, and ease of planar travel change the campaign setting.
    I'm failing to see what kind of a campaign world would be impossible/nonviable/unreasonable using my codex.



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by nonsi View Post
    Whatever you fancy.
    If it doesn't conflict with what's written in the codex - it's legit.
    In that case, I think you need to be a lot more rigorous with bans. AFIAK, ability damage still works totally normally, and that seems out of bounds for a system where you're supposed to have trouble dropping stuff like evard's black tentacles.
    The point of ability damage is that it'll hurt. If people can't cope, then tuff titties for them.
    I don't see why this is supposed to be a problem.

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    Default Re: 3.5e Overhaul – Fixing ALL 3.5e's problems (P.E.A.C.H)

    Can you stop posting a paragraph break after every sentence? It makes your posts really annoying to read.

    Quote Originally Posted by nonsi View Post
    All rules are suggestions. Don't like it – don't use it.
    This is a bad argument. Having something be optional doesn't excuse bad design.

    If I can save time by not having to go to the tables, that's a good thing in my book. _5_10_15_20-_-30_ – it doesn't get any easier than that
    Sure. But my point is that you're supposedly trying to fix 3.5, and that additional change doesn't add anything to the game, but does make it different from 3.5. It's probably minor enough to be okay, but it's emblematic of wider issues.

    There are many roads to power. CL boosting is just one of them.
    Except that CL boosting is a power that is literally defined by doing things which are not level appropriate. There's not a reason for it to exist, and blasphemy et al are actually totally fine if it doesn't.

    Higher power output comes with decreased versatility.
    So? Versatility and power are different resources and don't present a reasonable tradeoff.

    So what, now you'd have me rewrite every uncapped damage spell out there?
    Absolutely. If you're going to let people cheese up their caster levels, you can't have uncapped damage spells. It's exactly the same problem as blasphemy.

    Among the many proposed new feats, there's one called "Bestow Spell-Like Ability".
    Feats are not a reasonable solution. You seriously get all of seven feats over your entire career. Most PrCs granted about an ability a level. And you got feats on top of that.

    Did you look at the arcane feats, or the "Spellcasting Feats" spoiler at post #9? Look more closely – the options might surprise you.
    Along with ACFs and the multiclassing rules at post #10, you have a lot to work with.
    I see all of four feats. Also, looking at your feats in general, you seem to have fallen into the trap of making feats for non casters insultingly terrible. You really think someone should have to spend a feat to make whips deal nonlethal or lethal damage at their option.

    The whole point behind the Witch is that the primary circle defines her theme, but at the same time she's a dabbler.
    It's all about spell access, not power output.
    I fail to see how that precludes using the Bard spell progression. If you're really worried, write up each circle with seven levels of spells and let her cast spells that are one level higher in her primary circle.

    Furthermore, diminished spellcasting is required to keep my Spellthief balanced.
    I very much doubt that. And you're allowed to modify the levels of spells on the Spellthief list. Having a spell be a different level for you personally is much better than having four different casting progressions. Note that this does require you to ban anything that allows you to plunder spells from other lists.

    In general, arcane spellsurge seems problematic to me. It presents a false mitigating factor to disguise itself as balanced.
    Then why is it not banned?

    Regarding metamagic – for all intents and purposes other than strain toll, spells modified by metamagic operate at their normal level. I guess I should state that.
    I don't understand what that means. Can I cast Sculpted grease if I can only cast 1st level spells? If so, you need to change that, or Persist Spell wins everything forever. If not, metamagic is probably still too bad to use. I mean, how many builds used metamagic without reduction cheese in 3.5?

    Regarding summoning – I don't want a spellcaster to be able to summon a creature with CR equal to his CL.
    If a creature has poor CR per HD, then the caster is not compelled to summon it specifically (and sometimes "s**t happens"... and sometimes CR is not the main goal of the summons).
    Also, CR is not an exact science either.
    Then make it CR = Level - 2 or something. Tracking hit dice does not work. In core only, the Pit Fiend is CR 20 with 18 HD. Which means that you can summon him at level 18, when he is supposedly twice as powerful as you. Whereas if you're a Necromancer, the 20 HD zombie is CR 6.

    Oh, I get it.
    The aim is that all classes are equally fun across the day/session/campaign, on average, at equal levels.
    Because the classes have different features, this won't be totally true, but the aim is to get as close as possible.
    That's not really helpful. What balance point are classes supposed to be at. Look at the Same Game Test. How effective should a class be when confronted with level appropriate encounters?

    But I don't see a direct link between building kingdoms, running businesses, and other not stabbing stuff and personal might. One can be a low level aristocrat or a mighty warrior with nothing more than his combat gear and what's in his backpach.
    If your job is to kill Dragons, you are the government. That's simply how it works, particularly in a medieval world like D&D.

    The point of ability damage is that it'll hurt. If people can't cope, then tuff titties for them.
    I don't see why this is supposed to be a problem.
    Because it's just as lethal as all the save or dies you've nerfed. ray of stupidity kills any animal, no save. It's a 2nd level spell. If you're going to nerf 7th level spells that do something similar, you need to nerf that too.

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    Default Re: 3.5e Overhaul – Fixing ALL 3.5e's problems (P.E.A.C.H)

    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    This is a bad argument. Having something be optional doesn't excuse bad design.

    some people like some of the designs that you hate; that's why they're optional. some people thing almost everything here is good and are excited to run them

    Sure. But my point is that you're supposedly trying to fix 3.5, and that additional change doesn't add anything to the game, but does make it different from 3.5. It's probably minor enough to be okay, but it's emblematic of wider issues.

    than ignore it and move on, there's no good reason to continue on something you both have opposite opinions about

    Except that CL boosting is a power that is literally defined by doing things which are not level appropriate. There's not a reason for it to exist, and blasphemy et al are actually totally fine if it doesn't.

    So? Versatility and power are different resources and don't present a reasonable tradeoff.

    Absolutely. If you're going to let people cheese up their caster levels, you can't have uncapped damage spells. It's exactly the same problem as blasphemy.

    a complete spell rework is much bigger than what is being done here. this is a general fix of the system itself. if you are looking for something that fixes the spell casting system than i'd recommend this one

    Feats are not a reasonable solution. You seriously get all of seven feats over your entire career. Most PrCs granted about an ability a level. And you got feats on top of that.

    than give feats more often if you really feel that way. you don't have to accept something word for word. that's the power of roleplaying games is all rules are fluid. I'm personally a fan of a feat every odd level, but whatever you like is good.

    I see all of four feats. Also, looking at your feats in general, you seem to have fallen into the trap of making feats for non casters insultingly terrible. You really think someone should have to spend a feat to make whips deal nonlethal or lethal damage at their option.

    that's cause the core classes have been rebuilt to such a degree that feats simply augment them, and don't need to be amazing. read the warrior, it's really good.

    I fail to see how that precludes using the Bard spell progression. If you're really worried, write up each circle with seven levels of spells and let her cast spells that are one level higher in her primary circle.

    having one more table shouldn't be a big deal

    I very much doubt that. And you're allowed to modify the levels of spells on the Spellthief list. Having a spell be a different level for you personally is much better than having four different casting progressions. Note that this does require you to ban anything that allows you to plunder spells from other lists.

    i'm guessing cause that'd be a lot more work, but don't quote me on it

    I don't understand what that means. Can I cast Sculpted grease if I can only cast 1st level spells? If so, you need to change that, or Persist Spell wins everything forever. If not, metamagic is probably still too bad to use. I mean, how many builds used metamagic without reduction cheese in 3.5?

    he means usual as in usual after the increase. it costs more strain based on the new level, but functions as a spell of the original level.

    Then make it CR = Level - 2 or something. Tracking hit dice does not work. In core only, the Pit Fiend is CR 20 with 18 HD. Which means that you can summon him at level 18, when he is supposedly twice as powerful as you. Whereas if you're a Necromancer, the 20 HD zombie is CR 6.

    good point. my personal plan to circumvent this was to use the evolutionist for whatever monsters i used.
    bold is my rebuttal. ignore me if you want, i'm not the creator in any way, but i have some answers i think

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    Default Re: 3.5e Overhaul – Fixing ALL 3.5e's problems (P.E.A.C.H)

    Quote Originally Posted by ArkenBrony View Post
    some people like some of the designs that you hate; that's why they're optional. some people thing almost everything here is good and are excited to run them
    That doesn't make it good design. For example, people are totally excite to play the Factotum, but that class is not functional as written. If your goal is to "fix ALL 3.5e's problems", why are you including something that is not on anyone's top 50 problems, but not (as far as I can see) a solution to wishing for magic items?

    a complete spell rework is much bigger than what is being done here. this is a general fix of the system itself. if you are looking for something that fixes the spell casting system than i'd recommend this one
    How is "no, you can't cheese up your caster level" a complete rework of the spell system? It's less work than nonsi's blasphemy fix, and it fixes more problems.

    than give feats more often if you really feel that way. you don't have to accept something word for word. that's the power of roleplaying games is all rules are fluid. I'm personally a fan of a feat every odd level, but whatever you like is good.
    Oberoni Fallacy. And a weird one at that. If you're changing the system, change it to something that works.

    having one more table shouldn't be a big deal
    It's pointlessly excessive design. There are four separate progressions for casters. Honestly, you probably only need one. Two should be the absolute cap.

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    Default Re: 3.5e Overhaul – Fixing ALL 3.5e's problems (P.E.A.C.H)

    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Can you stop posting a paragraph break after every sentence? It makes your posts really annoying to read.
    Apologies my friend. Coding habit. I'll try to remember that when I reply to you.



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    This is a bad argument. Having something be optional doesn't excuse bad design.
    Assuming we are talking about bad design. I didn't see anything that would indicate that this is the case.


    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Sure. But my point is that you're supposedly trying to fix 3.5, and that additional change doesn't add anything to the game, but does make it different from 3.5. It's probably minor enough to be okay, but it's emblematic of wider issues.
    As ArkenBrony said, let's move on. This isn't getting anywhere.



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Except that CL boosting is a power that is literally defined by doing things which are not level appropriate. There's not a reason for it to exist, and blasphemy et al are actually totally fine if it doesn't.

    So? Versatility and power are different resources and don't present a reasonable tradeoff.

    Absolutely. If you're going to let people cheese up their caster levels, you can't have uncapped damage spells. It's exactly the same problem as blasphemy.
    As was said, a complete spell rework is by far a lot bigger project and I'm far from convinced that it would yield better results.



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Feats are not a reasonable solution. You seriously get all of seven feats over your entire career.
    seven feats ?! Are you sure about that count?
    Do the math.
    - Priest: has more options than any other class in the codex.
    - Mage: gains 4 bonus feats (for a total of 11… or 12 if human), spontaneous casting (spontaneous enough at least) and quite a few powerful features.
    - Druid: doesn't need the extra feats to manage just fine.
    - Witch: probably the most versatile class of them all – and it gets 5 bonus feats.
    - Bard: more powerful and twice as versatile as the official class.
    - Spellthief: ditto.
    .
    .
    .

    Y'know what? Let's play a little game. Describe to me the kind of character you'd wish to roleplay and let's see if I can build it. If I can – case closed. If not, then I have a new challenge to make it viable. Chances are in my favor that I won't be needing to resort to the second option.



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Most PrCs granted about an ability a level. And you got feats on top of that.
    Most of which are stat-augments or negligible SLAs.
    Only the broken PrCs (Dweomerkeeper/Ur-Pries/Plannar Sheppard/Iot7fV/Incantatrix etc) have such features that one of them is paramount... and those are the features that make them broken and I have no desire to include.



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Also, looking at your feats in general, you seem to have fallen into the trap of making feats for non casters insultingly terrible. You really think someone should have to spend a feat to make whips deal nonlethal or lethal damage at their option.
    1. That's why the Warrior still gets those extra 11 feats.
    2. Do you know of any collection of official feats that even comes close to giving whips what I give?
    3. With my crit-substitution rules and those Whip feats I propose, a high-level combatant could do some serious damage with a whip. Just add Vexing Maneuvering and you got yourself one mean tripper-disarmer.



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    I fail to see how that precludes using the Bard spell progression. If you're really worried, write up each circle with seven levels of spells and let her cast spells that are one level higher in her primary circle.
    The Bard's progression doesn't offer 7th SL access, and spellcasting-wise, Witch > Bard. It's supposed to be.



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    I very much doubt that. And you're allowed to modify the levels of spells on the Spellthief list. Having a spell be a different level for you personally is much better than having four different casting progressions. Note that this does require you to ban anything that allows you to plunder spells from other lists.
    That's just more work without any noticeable gain behind it (not beyond "because that's how I'd like it to be" - not that I can recognize).



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Then why is it not banned?
    Because I didn't get to it. I just didn't get to every spell in every game supplement.



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    I don't understand what that means. Can I cast Sculpted grease if I can only cast 1st level spells? If so, you need to change that, or Persist Spell wins everything forever. If not, metamagic is probably still too bad to use. I mean, how many builds used metamagic without reduction cheese in 3.5?
    As was stated - it costs more strain based on the new level, but functions as a spell of the original level - except for what's modified by the metamagic feat.



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Then make it CR = Level - 2 or something. Tracking hit dice does not work. In core only, the Pit Fiend is CR 20 with 18 HD. Which means that you can summon him at level 18, when he is supposedly twice as powerful as you. Whereas if you're a Necromancer, the 20 HD zombie is CR 6.
    Ok, you make a good point here, but [CR = Lv-2] is still too good in my book, because it means you summon a creature of approximately equal power to you.
    I think I'll make it [CR = Lv-4].



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    That's not really helpful. What balance point are classes supposed to be at. Look at the Same Game Test. How effective should a class be when confronted with level appropriate encounters?
    The best answer I can provide is that an un-optimized group should be a bit more powerful and more than a bit more versatile than an un-optimized group of official classes. Now, since my system is a lot less cheesy, the overall level of optimization is lower and under control, so you won't become crazy strong. I remember someone at WotC boards (Sinfire Titan IIRC) describing a character he had once, a Mystic-Ur-Theurge with Str 110. You're not gonna be able to pull off shenanigans like that using my rules.



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    If your job is to kill Dragons, you are the government. That's simply how it works, particularly in a medieval world like D&D.
    That's maybe what you're used to, but that's not mandatory in any way. A child could inherit the thrown and the world's mightiest warrior can live in poverty and seclusion.



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Because it's just as lethal as all the save or dies you've nerfed. ray of stupidity kills any animal, no save. It's a 2nd level spell. If you're going to nerf 7th level spells that do something similar, you need to nerf that too.
    Low-level spells with no save and no limiting factors are indeed problematic.
    I could say that ability damage (as opposed to ability drain) is never lethal, but it won't change the fact that they'll drop and be defeated. I could also set a rule that ability damage never drops you below ability score 1. This will categorically eliminate such spells from being terminal.









    @ArkenBrony: you struck a nerve. I really miss the exchange with Vadskye. His contribution to the codex was crucial.

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    Default Re: 3.5e Overhaul – Fixing ALL 3.5e's problems (P.E.A.C.H)

    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    That doesn't make it good design. For example, people are totally excite to play the Factotum, but that class is not functional as written. If your goal is to "fix ALL 3.5e's problems", why are you including something that is not on anyone's top 50 problems, but not (as far as I can see) a solution to wishing for magic items?
    Do you have any measurement tools to determine the claim of "something that is not on anyone's top 50 problems"?
    What if you're a player in a group run by a wonderful DM whose only vice is that he's obsessed with the smallest details and always goes back to the tables for the exact numbers? Suddenly that one is very much on your top 50 problems. Now, you might say that if the DM is nitpicking, then he's not that wonderful, but not everybody measures things like you do.



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    How is "no, you can't cheese up your caster level" a complete rework of the spell system? It's less work than nonsi's blasphemy fix, and it fixes more problems.
    AFAIK, using my rules, you can't cheese up your character via CL boosting - and at the same time I preserve CL boosting an option for those that envision their character in that manner (as a DM, I'd never use CL boosting strategy for monsters/NPCs using my rules, simply because that 5% modifier is a waste of resources).



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Oberoni Fallacy. And a weird one at that. If you're changing the system, change it to something that works.
    AFAIK, my proposed rules work. E.g. with a total of 6 feats, at 9th level you could be a much better War Weaver than the proposed HoB PrC - without compromising spellcasting progression. If we take my Whip feats for example, they allow almost everything that you can achieve with 10 Lasher (S&F) levels, only improved. Now that I think of it, I could write up my own version of Stunning Snap (I can do just fine w/o Death Spiral).



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    It's pointlessly excessive design. There are four separate progressions for casters. Honestly, you probably only need one. Two should be the absolute cap.
    Why not eliminate bardic music while you're at it (it's also magical, isn't it)?
    Sorry, but you just can't model all character archetypes using only fullcaster progression. I found, after a lot of experimenting, that FullCaster > Witch > Bard > Spellthief is a necessity, not luxury or convenience.
    I'd be thrilled if I could make everything possible using only the base 6 classes. Unfortunately, it just can't be done - and even if I could, the character resources that would have to go into it would make it not worth the effort (think of everything that the Bard gets... now tell me how you'd do it by multiclassing the basic 6). I challenge you to write up any collection of base classes that would be even vaguely balanced vs. one another and still allow equally balanced hybrid character archetypes via multiclassing (I'll save you a lot of time: don't even try).

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    Quote Originally Posted by nonsi View Post
    Assuming we are talking about bad design. I didn't see anything that would indicate that this is the case.
    If you're fixing the system, you should avoid changes to anything that isn't broken.

    As was said, a complete spell rework is by far a lot bigger project and I'm far from convinced that it would yield better results.
    You don't need a complete spell rework. You just need to whitelist spells (by giving people class lists) and/or ban CL shenanigans.

    Y'know what? Let's play a little game. Describe to me the kind of character you'd wish to roleplay and let's see if I can build it. If I can – case closed. If not, then I have a new challenge to make it viable. Chances are in my favor that I won't be needing to resort to the second option.
    Any horde summoner (i.e. Malconvoker). Any horde dominater (i.e. Beguiler). Any horde Necromancer (i.e. Dread Necromancer). Any horde golem maker (i.e. Artificer). Now, moving past concepts you have explicitly banned. Bonded Summoner (share spells with elemental familiar). Fear stacking (i.e. Nightmare Spinner). Green Star Adept style transformative progression. polymorph specialist (i.e. Master Transmogrifist). Telepouncing (i.e. Blade of Orien, Teflammar Shadowlord).

    2. Do you know of any collection of official feats that even comes close to giving whips what I give?
    In a world where casters get to take Sculpt Spell, "do nonlethal or lethal damage" is an insult of a feat. It is totally true that the official rules shaft mundanes, but that doesn't mean you need to.

    The Bard's progression doesn't offer 7th SL access, and spellcasting-wise, Witch > Bard. It's supposed to be.
    Then shift the Witch's spells down more.

    That's just more work without any noticeable gain behind it (not beyond "because that's how I'd like it to be" - not that I can recognize).
    Fixed lists solves 99% of the problems with casters. Notably, it prevents the spells at lower levels stuff that your Mage has going on (seriously, as far as I can tell he gets animate dead as a second level spell).

    As was stated - it costs more strain based on the new level, but functions as a spell of the original level - except for what's modified by the metamagic feat.
    I don't think I get it. Can a Persist a 2nd level spell at 4th or 16th (or whenever casters get 2nd/8th level spells)?

    That's maybe what you're used to, but that's not mandatory in any way. A child could inherit the thrown and the world's mightiest warrior can live in poverty and seclusion.
    The reason medieval governments have legitimacy is protection from force. If you can do that and the government can't, you are the government. Now, you can chose to delegate your power, but the fact remains that you are personally in charge.

    Low-level spells with no save and no limiting factors are indeed problematic.
    I could say that ability damage (as opposed to ability drain) is never lethal, but it won't change the fact that they'll drop and be defeated. I could also set a rule that ability damage never drops you below ability score 1. This will categorically eliminate such spells from being terminal.
    It also makes everything short of Constitution damage, maybe Strength damage, and maybe damage to casting scores irrelevant. Better to just not put it on people's spell lists.

    Do you have any measurement tools to determine the claim of "something that is not on anyone's top 50 problems"?
    I mean, how many people do you think you'd have to ask before "carrying capacity" showed up as a problem?

    AFAIK, using my rules, you can't cheese up your character via CL boosting - and at the same time I preserve CL boosting an option for those that envision their character in that manner (as a DM, I'd never use CL boosting strategy for monsters/NPCs using my rules, simply because that 5% modifier is a waste of resources).
    limited wish -> consumptive field, repeatedly kill small animals, uncapped AoE. Or just wish for a ring of +10k to caster level.

    Why not eliminate bardic music while you're at it (it's also magical, isn't it)?
    Sorry, but you just can't model all character archetypes using only fullcaster progression. I found, after a lot of experimenting, that FullCaster > Witch > Bard > Spellthief is a necessity, not luxury or convenience.
    I'd be thrilled if I could make everything possible using only the base 6 classes. Unfortunately, it just can't be done - and even if I could, the character resources that would have to go into it would make it not worth the effort (think of everything that the Bard gets... now tell me how you'd do it by multiclassing the basic 6). I challenge you to write up any collection of base classes that would be even vaguely balanced vs. one another and still allow equally balanced hybrid character archetypes via multiclassing (I'll save you a lot of time: don't even try).
    What? I suggested that you should have two casting progressions. I didn't say anything about number of classes.
    Last edited by Brova; 2015-09-08 at 06:53 AM.

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    Default Re: 3.5e Overhaul – Fixing ALL 3.5e's problems (P.E.A.C.H)

    I think it is good to make alternate houserules to things that are not necessarily broken in people's eyes, so long as the overall 3.5 fix comes in easily separated packages. I currently can't use much of it because it relies changes to crits and weapon damage that I don't like, with that rippling out to effect other areas.

    I think 4 progressions is fine, and necessary for modelling all kinds of magic users well.

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    Default Re: 3.5e Overhaul – Fixing ALL 3.5e's problems (P.E.A.C.H)

    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by nonsi View Post
    Originally Posted by nonsi
    Assuming we are talking about bad design. I didn't see anything that would indicate that this is the case.
    If you're fixing the system, you should avoid changes to anything that isn't broken.
    Horse + cart was never broken – they still invented cars (and for a good reason).
    Maybe the analogy is a bit of an overkill in the grand scheme of thing, but think of my formula as switching to disk-breaks.



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by nonsi View Post
    As was said, a complete spell rework is by far a lot bigger project and I'm far from convinced that it would yield better results.
    You don't need a complete spell rework. You just need to whitelist spells (by giving people class lists) and/or ban CL shenanigans.
    But I don't want to deal with lists if I can avoid it.
    The only spell list I added was for a Witch ACF, for those that would feel odd about a class w/ multiple spellcasting progression. As much as I like the Witch as it is, its makeup is nonstandard, so I felt I owed the readers an alternative with a more standard solution.



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by nonsi View Post
    Y'know what? Let's play a little game. Describe to me the kind of character you'd wish to roleplay and let's see if I can build it. If I can – case closed. If not, then I have a new challenge to make it viable. Chances are in my favor that I won't be needing to resort to the second option.
    Any horde summoner (i.e. Malconvoker). Any horde dominater (i.e. Beguiler). Any horde Necromancer (i.e. Dread Necromancer). Any horde golem maker (i.e. Artificer). Now, moving past concepts you have explicitly banned. Bonded Summoner (share spells with elemental familiar). Fear stacking (i.e. Nightmare Spinner). Green Star Adept style transformative progression. polymorph specialist (i.e. Master Transmogrifist). Telepouncing (i.e. Blade of Orien, Teflammar Shadowlord).
    Hoards:
    - You can. You'll just have to keep in mind that if you overreach, you lose control on whatever "excess weight" you're carrying (or they vanish – case by case basis).
    - Dominator = Spellthief… Bard… Mage… You don't need specific class features to pull this one off. Also, skills don't carry the same limitation as spells. Whoever you manage to manipulate via Bluff/Diplomacy/Intimidate (Sleight of Hand sometimes) can serve as your pawn. Sometimes manipulation is more powerful/effective than direct domination.

    Sharing spells:
    - Check again on the Witch's "Familiar" feature.
    - Mage: Arcane Webweaving and derivatives

    Fear Stacking:
    - Check out the Intimidation Feats. (or did I misunderstand your intention?)

    Green Star Adept style transformative progression:
    - Here you have a point. Slowly changing into construct is indeed something that I've neglected. Could be nice as a set of feats. If the inspiration falls upon me, I'll cook something up.
    - This could also be partially done via Grafting.

    Polymorph specialist:
    - Druid
    - Witch
    - Mage (transmutist)

    Telepouncing:
    - Soulknife: Breach the Gap
    - Monk: Abundant Step / Boundless Reach



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by nonsi View Post
    2. Do you know of any collection of official feats that even comes close to giving whips what I give?
    In a world where casters get to take Sculpt Spell, "do nonlethal or lethal damage" is an insult of a feat. It is totally true that the official rules shaft mundanes, but that doesn't mean you need to.
    What do you expect from a 1st level feat with no prereqs other than Whip prof.? (which a warrior can take at 1st level w/o feat investment).
    And how exactly does anything that I suggested so far "shaft" mundanes? The options are next to limitless. Nobody forces anything upon you. And again – check out how Whip feats combing with the Crit-Substitution rules.



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by nonsi View Post
    The Bard's progression doesn't offer 7th SL access, and spellcasting-wise, Witch > Bard. It's supposed to be.
    Then shift the Witch's spells down more.
    So again – the proposal is to play with spell lists, just to force the same spell progression.
    Too much work, too little gain (if there is gain at all).



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by nonsi View Post
    That's just more work without any noticeable gain behind it (not beyond "because that's how I'd like it to be" - not that I can recognize).
    Fixed lists solves 99% of the problems with casters. Notably, it prevents the spells at lower levels stuff that your Mage has going on (seriously, as far as I can tell he gets animate dead as a second level spell).
    How did you figure animate dead as a second level spell?! What loophole am I missing here?



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by nonsi View Post
    As was stated - it costs more strain based on the new level, but functions as a spell of the original level - except for what's modified by the metamagic feat.
    I don't think I get it. Can a Persist a 2nd level spell at 4th or 16th (or whenever casters get 2nd/8th level spells)?
    Umm… what?? : baffled: :scratchhead:



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by nonsi View Post
    That's maybe what you're used to, but that's not mandatory in any way. A child could inherit the thrown and the world's mightiest warrior can live in poverty and seclusion.
    The reason medieval governments have legitimacy is protection from force. If you can do that and the government can't, you are the government. Now, you can chose to delegate your power, but the fact remains that you are personally in charge.
    High-level characters are heroes of their gameworld. Most royalty shouldn't even taste 10th level. When one starts posing a threat due to personal might rather than strength of office – that's the time to bring out the cavalry (adventuring parties… assassins) to eliminate the threat.
    Also, Nobility ==> Family ==> Vulnerable Relatives. Either you play in an "ecological gameworld" or in a campaign where you play "Brova with superpowers". If it's the former, then your assumption is not mandatory.



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by nonsi View Post
    Low-level spells with no save and no limiting factors are indeed problematic.
    I could say that ability damage (as opposed to ability drain) is never lethal, but it won't change the fact that they'll drop and be defeated. I could also set a rule that ability damage never drops you below ability score 1. This will categorically eliminate such spells from being terminal.
    It also makes everything short of Constitution damage, maybe Strength damage, and maybe damage to casting scores irrelevant. Better to just not put it on people's spell lists.
    Your call to remove ability damage from the equation in your campaign. I'm not gonna suggest it as a houserule for all.



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by nonsi View Post
    Do you have any measurement tools to determine the claim of "something that is not on anyone's top 50 problems"?
    I mean, how many people do you think you'd have to ask before "carrying capacity" showed up as a problem?
    It did in enough campaigns I took part of – depending on the DM/players/group. Not all, but enough. This is where the YMMV-factor comes into the equation.



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by nonsi View Post
    AFAIK, using my rules, you can't cheese up your character via CL boosting - and at the same time I preserve CL boosting an option for those that envision their character in that manner (as a DM, I'd never use CL boosting strategy for monsters/NPCs using my rules, simply because that 5% modifier is a waste of resources).
    limited wish -> consumptive field, repeatedly kill small animals, uncapped AoE. Or just wish for a ring of +10k to caster level.
    1. Where would you get all those dying small animals to repeatedly kill?
    2. About CL abuse: open the "Redefining Magical Items' Creation" spoiler >> take a look inside the "Banned Magical Items" spoiler. This alone kills a lot of power abuse. And in general, using my rules, throw away everything you ever heard in 3.5e about magical gear. "Redefining Magical Items' Creation" is exactly that. There, no CL boosting via gear anymore.



    Quote Originally Posted by Brova View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by nonsi View Post
    Why not eliminate bardic music while you're at it (it's also magical, isn't it)?
    Sorry, but you just can't model all character archetypes using only fullcaster progression. I found, after a lot of experimenting, that FullCaster > Witch > Bard > Spellthief is a necessity, not luxury or convenience.
    I'd be thrilled if I could make everything possible using only the base 6 classes. Unfortunately, it just can't be done - and even if I could, the character resources that would have to go into it would make it not worth the effort (think of everything that the Bard gets... now tell me how you'd do it by multiclassing the basic 6). I challenge you to write up any collection of base classes that would be even vaguely balanced vs. one another and still allow equally balanced hybrid character archetypes via multiclassing (I'll save you a lot of time: don't even try).
    What? I suggested that you should have two casting progressions. I didn't say anything about number of classes.
    Ok, I got you wrong on that one. But still, thematically speaking and for balance reasons, I need witches to have greater spell access than bards and spellthieves to have lesser access. The results I achieved cover both aspects in a satisfying way. You're welcome to throw those two classes away and suggest new ones instead. If the results are good enough, I may adopt them myself (not making any promises). Until then, I'm sticking with my proposals.

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