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  1. - Top - End - #1
    Ogre in the Playground
     
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    Default Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

    Unlimited Blade Works
    The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass


    (Image Copyright Ufotable)


    "I am the bone of my sword.
    Steel is my body, and fire is my blood.
    I have created over a thousand blades.
    Unaware of loss. Nor aware of gain.
    Withstood pain to create weapons, waiting for one's arrival.
    I have no regrets.This is the only path.
    My whole life was - Unlimited Blade Works."
    -Fate/Stay Night


    When it comes to being a Warrior/Caster gish, there are indeed a plethora of options in D&D 5e.

    The Eldritch Knight is a pretty competitive gish class on its own (though they generally focus their magic on enhancing their martial capabilities).
    Bladesingers are like power rangers. They go mighty' morphin', and when they do, they easily pwn the "monster of the week". Even when they're not mighty' morphin', they can actually cast good and be overall boss.
    The Bladelock is also quite nice with a Fighter dip, and thatís one class I like using as well.
    But here I will like to write a guide about how to create the Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass build, as well as explain why itís so good and entertaining (and what weak points to stay aware of).

    Built right (and itís hard to build it wrong), the Paladin/Sorc can become an invaluable asset to any party, being able to fill basically any party role. The Paladin/Sorc is widely recognized as one of the strongest, if not the strongest, multiclass build out there in D&D 5e.

    One sneak peek at what Paladin/Sorcs can do: Quickened Spell. This Metamagic option makes Paladin/Sorcs different from Bladelocks in how they can act as both a frontline warrior and a versatile caster in the same turn - attacking with your weapon as an action, and casting a spell as a bonus action. Basically, two characters in one. Thereís no way this is weak.

    Eldritch Knights can technically do something similar, but only with cantrips, till they get to epic-tier - and even then, Quickened Paladin/Sorc is better when it comes to slashing and casting in the same turn. A single turn is all the Paladin/Sorc gish needs to completely turn the tides of the battle, and lead the team to a glorious victory.

    But of course, this guide isnít just about Quickened Spell. While thatís certainly a nice asset, itís only the tip of the iceberg, the cherry on top of the ice cream. The various Metamagic options make the Paladin/Sorc amazing at a lot of roles indeed - be it to buff, or to debuff, or to control, Paladin/Sorcsíve got them, and they also do it better than most others. If you go 6 or more levels in Paladin, you can also be an amazing tank. In this guide, we will take a look at what makes the Paladin/Sorc such an interesting, entertaining, powerful, and overall fun-to-play character build.

    ...Just, before that.

    ďPaladin/SorcĒ is too long as a name. Just like Warlocks using Pact of the Blade are called Bladelocks, we need an abbreviation.

    Now, to abbreviate this, some people use the term ďPaladorcĒ, but this term may be confused with Half-Orc Paladins (Iíve actually mistakenly believed so for a very long time... And what makes it even more confusing is the fact that Half-Orc Paladins are a pretty common, as well as strong, choice). This guide originally used an original term to refer to them, but since many people commented that itíll be better to use a term thatís more easy to immediately link to Paladin/Sorcs, here I will call this multiclass build Sorcadin.

    Now, I hear thereís some debate over which is the better name, Paladorcs or Sorcadins, but I really donít want this thread to become a 30-page long argument about ďhow to abbreviate ĎPaladin/SorcereríĒ (because the Giantip Forums has an eerie tendency to give birth to those sorts of threads...). Thus, please do not make arguments about how to call the gish build in this thread.

    As for why thereís a big fat anime reference sitting on top of this guide, hell I have no idea. It probably has nothing to do with how I recently finished watching the Ufotable Fate/UBW anime. I mean, real honest, it has nothing to do with that. IíM SERIOUS!!!

    Though unintended, Emiyaís way of fighting (using various methods of attack to adjust to the enemyís weaknesses, and has great nova damage if required, but generally requires a lot of mana) is sorta similar to Sorcadins. Not to mention, his theme is basically a Paladin (Guardian of Mankind) and Sorcerer (Magus = born caster)... But thatís coincidence.
    Too bad Sorcadins donít use archery.


    Color Scheme:
    • This is freaking amazing! It provides many options, or will do one thing extremely well.
    • This is really good, but not quite phenomenal.
    • This is good. It will regularly be useful, though it won't provide many tactical choices.
    • Bad. It will be extremely rare that it's useful at all.
    • Occasionally very useful, but limited in scope or applicability.

    Shamelessly copied from EvilAnagramís guides, every single word and phrase. Thanks for the permission, EvilAnagram~
    Apart from that, several crucial points that are an absolute must in the build, no reasons asked, and several options that are so attractive you should think twice before not choosing them, are written in Gold.


    Table of Contents:
    1. I am the bone of my sword: Why Be a Sorcadin? The Pros and Cons
    2. Steel is my body, and fire is my blood: Races and Stats
    3. I have created over a thousand blades: Possible Party Roles of a Sorcadin
    4. Unaware of loss, nor aware of gain: Ratios of Paladin and Sorcerer Levels
    5. Withstood pain to create weapons: Whatís Your Weapon of Choice?
    6. Waiting for one's arrival: Feats and More Multiclassing
    7. I have no regrets. This is the only path: Choosing Your Spells
    8. My whole life was - Unlimited Blade Works: Sample Builds

    And here I come, Dungeon Master -
    Do you have enough Deadly encounters in stock?


    Special thanks to all the people who have proofread this guide prior to officially creating this thread, and all the other people who have gave me ideas and helped me, or gave me permission to use their formats. However, due to a miss on my side - namely deleting all the private messages after copy-pasting them into a file - I have lost the data of the entire list of the people who have read it for me, and I must apologize for that.

    Corran and Citan deserve special credit for reading the guide multiple times and editing many mistakes and improving the quality, but there are a lot of other proofreaders as well. Again, thanks to them all.

    Also thanks to all the people who commented/gave constructive criticism in this thread!
    Last edited by Gastronomie; 2016-10-22 at 09:17 AM.
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    ^ Fantastic avatar made by Professor Gnoll. Yaya Tokaz, from the manga "Kukul and Nagi". ^
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    Only on a DnD forum would discussing the methods for jamming a T-Rex into a 10x10x10 box be a thing.
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    Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

  2. - Top - End - #2
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    Default Re: Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

    I am the bone of my sword
    Why Be a Sorcadin? The Pros and Cons


    Pro Number 1: Insane Nova Damage. (Image by Ufotable)

    The Sorcadin is a wonderful gish build thatís good at pretty much almost anything, but to make its characteristics easier to read and understand, letís break it up into several parts.

    Pros:
    1. Insane Nova Damage
    2. Versatility via High-Level Spells
    3. Strong Both Martially and Magically
    4. Fills in Any Party Role


    Neutral:
    1. Arenít Sorcadins squishy?
    2. Donít they get Extra Attack late?


    Cons:
    1. Running Out of Resources
    2. Doesnít Work at Low Levels
    3. Lower Stats (Point-Buy only)


    Letís delve further:
    Spoiler: Pros
    Show
    Pro 1: Insane Nova Damage
    If you like slamming in mass damage into your enemies once in a a while, Paladin is always a good class choice.

    If you like slamming in mass damage into your enemies with eerie frequence, Sorcadins are the class for you.

    For those who donít know, ďNovaĒ refers to when a character chunks out a massive amount of damage in one round, often involving using up a lot of resources. Often considered the antonym of ďDPRĒ, or ďDamage Per RoundĒ, which (though its name is self-explanatory) refers to the average damage a character inflicts each round.

    Pure Paladins are already considered the big bosses of Nova damage in 5e. This is because of the Divine Smite ability, which is also the key mechanic in the Sorcadin build, but Sorcadins make it go even further by smiting using the more high-level Sorcerer Spell Slots as high-grade fuel. The synergy of a Paladin multiclassing with Caster is something of a miracle or phenomenon, but Sorcerers are generally the best choice if youíre gonna go many levels into Caster, due to Metamagic.

    Spells like Hold Person make Sorcadins even more hilarious to use. Auto-Crit makes Smite damage so devastating that the Sorcadin can basically incapacitate a high-CR boss in one or two rounds on his own.

    For instance, letís take a look at what happens if the Sorcadin uses Hold Person as a bonus action, and proceeds to make two critical attacks (Extra Attack), expending two level 4 spell slots on it for the Smites (maximum damage). This is something the Sorcadin will be able to do from level 11 or higher (if you go Paladin 6/ Sorcerer 5).

    Assuming his STR is 16 and the weapon is a Longsword, the original damage is 1d8+3+5d8 per hit, but with critical this becomes 12d8+3=57 damage per hit.

    Two hits (sorta guaranteed with the enemy paralyzed), and thatís 114 damage, more than enough to swipe the floor with your enemies (or at least whatís left of them). I mean, not that you will want to pull this off often - high-level Smites should be reserved for special bosses you really wanna kill quickly - but the fact you have such a devastating trick up your sleeve is very relaxing, not to mention amusing.

    Of course, you donít necessarily need to do such a resource-consuming combo to show that your Nova damage is boss, though - whatís given above is just an example of what Sorcadins can do when the dire need arises (or when you roll crit from the start). Simply put, you can Smite more frequently and more effectively than Pure Paladins, because you have more spell slots. Thatís already quite strong enough an ability. Sorta ironic that those who multiclassed from Paladin can smite better than pure Paladins, but who cares, thatís exactly why weíre here.

    If required, you can do other interesting stuff like use Quickened Spell on Fireball, and after most of the mobs have been cleared, proceed to clean up the leftovers using your normal action attack(s). Because thatís another way of showing how simply awesome you are. Other classes canít do that.

    Pro 2: Versatility via High-Level Spells
    Spells are like a toolkit. You can blast, you can buff, you can debuff, you can fly, you can basically do everything you want using spell slots.

    Sorcadins have the almighty spells like Bless from being a Paladin, but you also get other goodies like aforementioned Fireball and Hold Person. Apart from those, letís see... Mirror Image, Suggestion, Hypnotic Pattern, Wall of Fire, Greater Invisibility, Polymorph... At higher levels, Animate Objects is a complete nosebleeder, Hold Monster allows you to incinerate anything with that aforementioned 116-damage combo, Mass Suggestion can solve a session or completely alter an campaign on its own, and Reverse Gravity makes you feel like a superhero, which in fact you already are.

    And guess what. The best part of it is that you can cast all of these using a Bonus Action with Quickened Spell.


    ^ How you feel like when you use Quickened Spell. ^
    (Image Copyright Disney/Lucasfilm Ltd. & TM.)

    Pro 3: Strong Both Martially and Magically
    So, Casters are versatile. Itís just like how roses are red and violets are blue.

    Iím a big fan of Casters for this reason.

    But at the very same time, Iím not a fan of them.

    The hell is wrong with you Gastronomie!? Youíre contradicting yourself! Well, my point is that while I like having a massive arsenal of possible I WIN buttons stored in my suitcase, I donít like the idea of standing in the backrow, never taking damage, munching on a sandwich and shooting magical shotguns while the frontliners hack away at the goblins. This may sound like Iím masochist or bloodthirsty or perhaps even insane, but I personally prefer it when Iím taking damage on the frontlines as well. Feels more... Alive. More dangerous. Thrilling. ...Wait, what am I, Kenpachi or something?


    WHY YES I AM.

    Anyhow, back on topic: Sorcadins are awesome in how they can be both frontline warriors and versatile casters. Two jobs are better than one. And unlike how Bladelocks need to think which job to do (hack-slash or spellcast) during a particular turn, being a Sorcadin, you donít need to ever think You can just used Quickened Spell to do both jobs in the same turn, because youíre just way too boss to consider choosing between options. The hell with action economy, you donít need to care about that stuff.

    If youíre my type of player who wants to be versatile and almighty but still wants to feel how your sharp blade slices through flesh and bone and hacks off the heads of the kobolds, and proceed to bathe in the blood of both yourself and your mutilated enemies, Sorcadins are the class for you. (And if you want to be a reliable tank, going Paladin 6 or more is recommended.)

    Even if you arenít my type, the Sorcadin is guaranteed to be enjoyable to play, since you always have something powerful you can do, be it slice or be it cast. And oh boy do you feel amazing.

    Pro 4: Fills in Any Party Role

    ^ Being a Paladin, you excel at protecting your allies from certain death. ^
    (Image by Ufotable)

    Iíve already talked about this a bit in 2., but letís explain about this even deeper. (This will also be delved into in the upcoming section, ďPossible Party Roles of a SorcadinĒ.)

    First off, Paladins are healers, with the ever-useful Lay On Hands ability, as well as good healing spells like Cure Wounds. My advice is that you should always have at least one healing spell prepared. Another advice, this given mainly to beginners, is to not heal during fights, unless itís to wake up someone with 0 HP. This is sorta similar as in Pokemon, or any other game which is a mix of combat and adventuring - better to attack or buff during fights, and save the healing for after the battle is over, in order to not waste your turns.

    Apart from that, this is MaxWilsonís idea, but if you happen to go all the way up to Paladin 9 (this becomes a more Paladin-centered build, sorta similar in mechanics to an Eldritch Knight) thereís also a really interesting combination of Aura of Vitality + Extended Spell. Takes some out-of-combat time, but heals a whooping total of 40d6=140 HP for just a level 3 slot and 1 Sorcery point. Amazing synergy here. The problem here is that you get only a very limited number of Metamagic options, though.

    Thatís for the healing. But Sorcadins can also buff.

    As aforementioned, Sorcadins have access to Bless, arguably one of the strongest low-level spells in the entire game. This can also be upcast to suit your party needs. HOWEVER, you are actually probably better to leave Bless to your other party members, like a Lore Bard or Cleric. Why? Because you have even better things to concentrate on. Letís look into those in the ďChoosing Your SpellsĒ section, later on in the guide.

    To avoid losing your concentration on Bless easily, take the War Caster feat (or Resilient (CON) for some cases) as soon as possible.

    Just, be aware that if youíre gonna take it using Variant Human, your first level automatically needs to be Sorcerer (Paladin level 1 doesnít have spellcasting, so you canít choose War Caster), meaning that it might get a bit difficult for you to gain Heavy Armor proficiency. Not a problem with DEX builds, but could get in the way of certain STR builds, so make sure not to forget it.
    NOTE: Itís generally the better choice to start Paladin for the WIS saves.

    You could also get proficiency in CON saves in one way or another as you level up. Most likely Resilient. It isn't a "requirement" (due to the upcoming ability), especially if you have War Caster, but still strong.

    Apart from Bless, once you hit Paladin level 6 or higher, Aura of Protection kicks in, which basically reads ďEVERYONE QUICK HUDDLE AROUND THE PALADINĒ (and also boosts your concentration saves). Too much huddling together and the enemy might actually make good use of that by casting Fireball or some other AoE* effect, but in general this ability is handy and useful, occasionally saving both your neck and the friends of your necks from certain doom. Not to mention, this ability is persistent, and doesnít use up resources, unlike a majority of the Sorcadinís abilities**. This is rare, invaluable, precious, and absolutely adorable.
    *AoE = Area of Effect.
    **Using Up Resources: Weíll talk more about this characteristic of Sorcadins in ďConsĒ.

    Spells like Invisibility can also help your teammates, depending on your party build, but arenít absolutely necessary (especially with the Sorcererís limited number of spells). Assassins will spoil their pants with this spell, though, so itís a nice idea to give it to them.


    ^ The totally unrequired gif of an Assassin spoiling his pants. ^
    (Image by Ufotable)

    Twinning Haste, Greater Invisibility or Polymorph is another way of showing how well Metamagic works. Be careful not to ever drop concentration for that Haste, though.

    Sorcadins can also control, debuffing enemies and/or moving them around into positions beneficial for your team. You have access to spells like Command (which can be upcast), Thunderous Smite, Wrathful Smite, Hold Person, Web (combine with Careful Spell and itís an absolutely amazing combo), Hypnotic Pattern, Wall of Fire, and so on.

    Yes, I know. So many options! One of the most difficult parts of creating a Sorcadin is to determine which spells and Metamagic abilities to take, when thereís so many amazing options to choose from.

    Spoiler: Neutrals
    Show
    Neutral 1: Arenít Sorcadins squishy?
    This is a question that may pop up in the minds of certain readers. Sorcerers have a pretty scrawny Hit Die of d6, meaning that every level the Sorcadin takes in Sorcerer, he loses 2 HP (well, eh, all power comes with a cost anyways). This may seem like a pretty nasty problem for frontline warriors, and indeed, if you keep the Sorcadin as it is, they lag behind Pure Paladins in terms of tankiness. However, there are several ways to get around this, and I donít believe itís enough of something that can be classified in ďConsĒ - and so, here it is, in the ďNeutralĒ box.

    Letís divide the solutions into ďIncreasing ACĒ, ďIncreasing HPĒ, and ďOther MethodsĒ.

    Increasing AC
    The most straightforward answer is to use the Shield spell. You could call this more than a spell - itís a part of the Sorcadinís core abilities.

    ďShieldĒ is something Eldritch Knights also have, and the very reason why theyíre considered to be the most tanky of all the Fighters;+5 AC one round at the cost of a level 1 slot is just way too juicy to ignore. If youíre trying to optimize your Sorcadin, there is really no excuse to not taking this spell.


    The Archer supports this statement. It doesnít work all the time though... (Image Copyright Ufotable)

    If youíre going for a STR build, get Plate Armor as soon as possible. If youíre going DEX, use Mage Armor or the Draconic Resilience ability of Draconic Sorcerers to get maximum AC (Studded Leather Armor is another good option if your DM allows you to buy or earn it). Both Plate and Studded Leather are either too expensive or rare to gain at early levels, but buffing AC is great, so be sure to pick them up sooner or later.

    If youíre gonna go DEX-based Sorcadin, do keep in mind that since light armor consults your DEX, and you likely wouldnít be maxing out your DEX until youíre really high-level (unless you rolled godly with stat-rolling), your AC will probably be still lower than that of a STR-based build. In fact, thereís some chance you will want to pump CHA instead of maxing out DEX, so either way, your AC may be 1 or 2 points lower than that of a STR build.

    Going Sword and Board (Longsword/Rapier and Shield) is another way to increase your AC. If you have Longsword+Shield+Plate, for instance, your normal AC will be 20, and when you get hit by an opponentís strong attack, you can use the Shield spell for AC 25. ďEqual to the TarrasqueĒ sums up how high an AC this is in 5e. (However, if both of your hands are full with separate weapons, and your DM is fussy about rules, you may not be able to cast spells with Material or Somatic components. War Caster solves this problem to some extent, and together with improving your concentration, itís a mandatory Feat for Sword-and-Board Sorcadins that you should get as fast as possible.)

    The Shield of Faith spell increases your AC by 2, but sadly requires concentration. Itís not a bad spell; in fact itís good... Itís just that there are better options, and there are many attractive contestants who want to be concentrated upon.

    Finally, the Defense Fighting Style is actually a pretty reasonable option for you, if not the best option - you can take it via Paladin 2. It does rob you of Dueling, which is pretty good for Sword and Board builds too, but while obviously strong and still a good option, Dueling is not as effective as it is for other builds, mainly due to how youíre gonna be Green-Flame Blading or Booming Blading for a pretty long part of your career (both of which allow you to attack only once - the +2 damage bonus to each attack is stronger if you have Extra Attack).


    ^ Wearing good armor helps a lot. Be aware of how donning armor in D&D generally takes more time than in this gif. ^
    (Image by Ufotable)

    Increasing HP
    Draconic Sorcerer (close to Gold for DEX builds, due to Draconic Resilience) is one good option for those who want a Sorcadin with a more blasty feel (increasing the damage of Fireball and other AoE spells is marvelous, and also makes the most out of this ability), but itís not just about that. It also increases your HP by 1 per Sorcerer level, meaning that you donít lose as much HP from going Sorcerer as you would have if you chose other Origin options.

    The Abyssal Tiefling (UA) race not only boosts your CON and CHA (both important stats for you), but also gives you one extra HP per two levels. Itís not really a very respectable amount, though, so just consider it an extra bonus. Might save your skin occasionally.

    Thereís also Feats such as Durable or Tough, but, ehhh... Most of the time, Iíd honesty just use my ASIs to increase my CON, if I wanted more HP. That way I can be better at concentrating too. And as mentioned later in the Cons of this class (no pun intended), ASIs and Feats are hard to come across, especially for multiclass builds such as this one. One should use them wisely.

    If you have high CHA, the Inspiring Leader Feat does become pretty good, though. Healing a good lot of HP per short rest (technically not healing, but rather giving out temporary HP, but pretty much the same thing) for everyone in the party is quite a nice ability, and makes you more tankier than CON +2.

    If youíre going to multiclass Warlock for 2 or more levels, Fiendish Vigor can work as a pretty nice option to give you Temporary HP. It gives you 8 temporary HP in-between every single battle (thereís no limit to the number of times you can cast False Life, so immediately after a fight is over, you can keep on re-using it till you roll a 4 with the 1d4). Dark Oneís Blessing (Fiend Pact) also gives you temporary HP whenever you kill someone.

    (Multiclassing into Warlock delays your Caster levels, so itís obviously not for everyone. However, the spells gained at even a 1 or 2-level dip are pretty powerful (Armor of Agathys etc.), and itís arguably worth it, depending on what your build goal or role is.)

    The simplest answer is to really just heal yourself with Lay On Hands or Cure Wounds (or Aura of Vitality if youíve gone deep in Paladin). Expect to do this every now and then.

    Other Methods
    First letís talk about racial and class abilities.

    Certain races give us not only CON bonuses, but also neat abilities that increase your tankiness. Apart from the aforementioned Abyssal Tiefling, Half-Orc is great. It boosts your two main stats, has darkvision, makes you extra aggressive with critical hits, gives you proficiency with a skill youíre gonna be super excellent at, and allows you to recover from fainting once per day. Everything in this package is wonderful for a Sorcadin, and itís no wonder that the sample character shown in the first page of ďPaladinĒ in the PHB is a Half-Orc. Actually, Half-Orcs make better Sorcadins than Paladins, since the ďRelentless EnduranceĒ emergency button is more important to someone with lower HP.

    Goliaths are another race well-suited for Sorcadins. Apart from having the same stat bonuses as Half-Orcs, they can reduce the damage you take by 1d12+CON per short rest, which is basically the same thing as being able to heal your HP by 10-ish per short rest by just using a Reaction. That said, this ďStoneís EnduranceĒ ability might compete with the Shield spell for your defensive reaction, so make sure to decide wisely - which to use, at what moment. Ending a short rest without using this ability will make you regret it.


    ^ Your average Goliath, activating Stoneís Endurance. ^
    (Image by Ufotable)

    Taking a look at the Sorcerer options, the Shadow Origin (aka the Emo Origin) gives you two ways to make yourself tankier. For one, Strength of the Grave is basically the same ability as Undead Fortitude, which in other words means itís pretty damn neat (general rule of combat: when an ability the enemy uses is annoying for you, that probably means itís strong). But what makes Emo Sorcerers really Mary Sue powerful is the Eyes of the Dark ability, which I feel is honestly too offhand in terms of Sorcery Points. Not only does it give you Darkvision, itís basically the infamous Darkness + Devilís Sight combo, except in a level 1 ability and with a cost thatís astonishingly lighter than a level 2 spell slot. Shadow Sorcerers will have to choose between Bless and Darkness (among many others) for their spell concentration, but if they choose Darkness and target their weapon, they will have advantage on all their attacks, and also impose disadvantage on all attacks meant for them. Together with the Shield spell, this thing is now unstoppable.

    Iíve used Shadow Sorcerer Sorcadins several times, and one thingís now certain: If a player wants to use Shadow Sorcerer in my games, I will make the cost of Eyes of the Dark 2 Sorcery Points, instead of 1. Itís obviously too much as it is.

    Now, letís move on to the Spells that boost your tankiness (besides Darkness).

    Blur is a good option depending on the circumstances, bestowing disadvantage on all attacks aimed at you. The fact itís a concentration spell is really tragic, because otherwise it would have been amazing beyond belief, but thatís how all strong 5e spells work...

    ...Hmm?

    No, let me re-phrase that. Thatís how almost all strong 5e spells work.

    Take a look at Mirror Image, or the ďMisprint of 5eĒ, which for some reason or another does not require concentration (you can use it together with other strong spells!!). Casting it before combat is most ideal, but not all DMs permit that, and even if he did, you donít really see every single combat coming beforehand. You should remember that it also serves as an emergency button when youíre getting low on HP.

    Oh, and though this also requires concentration, Greater Invisibility can be also used to gain an effect similar to Darkness + Devilís Sight. You can also Twin it to make your party love you. Imagine whatíd happen if both the Sorcadin [b]and[B] the Assassin are invisible... (Works even better with DEX builds, having Stealth, and GWM builds, which always want to have advantage on their attacks)

    Finally, moving on to Feats. Heavy Armor Master is pretty nice an ability, but do be aware that ASIs and Feats are precious for Sorcadins, so you should think twice before taking it (unless itís taken at level 1 using Variant Human).

    And... I think thatís about it for now. Will update if I think up more, if other people suggest good ideas to add.

    Neutral 2: Donít they get Extra Attack late?
    Yes, true, if you go Sorcerer for several levels before going Paladin 5, Sorcadins may get Extra Attack at a higher level. Or, builds going Paladin 2 or 3 never get Extra Attack unless they go Favored Soul. And without getting Extra Attack, the Sorcadinís DPR will be lower than the average Pure Paladin. Right?

    Well, the truth is that this is half-right and half-wrong.

    Iím not going to say that Sorcadins can get constantly better DPR than a Pure Paladin. However, I am going to point out that the Booming Blade and Green-Flame Blade cantrips (SCAG) are wonderful additions to the Sorcadinís arsenal, and most definitely make up enough for not having Extra Attack for several levels.


    BUUMINGU BUREIDO!!! (Image Copyright Ufotable)

    For instance, a STR 18 Paladin with Longsword (one hand) + Dueling + Extra Attack inflicts 2d8+12 damage per turn, dividing 1d8+6 among two targets. The average DPR is 21.

    A STR 16, CHA 16 Sorcadin of level 5 or higher but no Extra Attack (with one-hand Longsword and no* Dueling) inflicts 2d8+3 damage to one target, and 1d8+3 damage to another target. These sum up to be 3d8+6, its average DPR being 19.5. The difference is only 1.5 points per round - even with a lower STR score (Sorcadins have less ASIs/Feats than pure builds due to the multiclassing), the Sorcadin can damage just as well as the Paladin.
    *NOTE - if you add the damage from Dueling, GFB actually damages more than Extra Attack, but here I didnít give the Sorcadin Dueling because itís actually more optimal to give him Defense.

    If thereís no two enemies standing next to each other, Booming Blade is just 2d8+3 damage (average 12), so yeah, true, the DPR of Sorcadins lags behind Pure Paladins. But it also makes this guy a nice sentinel (without even taking the Sentinel feat). Zapping the enemy with 2d8 extra damage is fun.

    Speaking of Booming Blade, this particular cantrip and War Caster make a glorious combination, making picking up Booming Blade a must for this build, even if you already have Extra Attack.

    Remember how War Caster lets you attack someone with a cantrip when they leave melee range? The basic idea is that when somebody stupid turns his back on you, you attack him with Booming Blade to troll him, and also potentially kill him on the spot. At levels 5 to 10 this inflicts 2d8+STR damage with just that, but it doesnít end there - since the enemy moved (that was the whole trigger of the opportunity attack anyway), the enemy takes an extra 2d8 thunder damage, for a total of 4d8+STRmod damage for just moving out of your reach. And it gets even upgraded at higher levels, to a maximum of 8d8. Oh god, look, just look at his face as he writhes in agony and falls dead crisping on the floor. Hilarious.

    And if you really need to damage someone badly, weíve already covered how Sorcadins excel at it using Divine Smite. We do that better than Pure Paladins anyway.

    Finally, to make the damage of the SCAG cantrips better than Extra Attack, you can take the Draconic Bloodline Sorcerous Origin and choose Fire (by RAW, Blue Dragons correspond to Lightning, and Booming Blade is Thunder, so the two donít mesh together. I think this is really stupid and ridiculous, so I let Blue Dragons add damage to Thunder spells in my game, but not all DMs in the world are like that). From Sorcerer level 6 and higher, Elemental Affinity increases your Green-Flame Blade damage even more.

    All in all, it can be concluded that ďlagging behind in average DPRĒ isnít that much of a problem for Sorcadins. Either you can catch up with Extra Attackís damage (GFB), or while you do inflict less damage, you can shine much brighter in other ways to make up for it (BB).

    Spoiler: Cons
    Show
    Now, as much as I hate to admit it, being a multiclass build, and an especially specialized one at that, the Sorcadin build does have its weak points. Since I donít want to deceive people into thinking the Sorcadin has no weaknesses, let me explain them - and also give advice on how to solve those problems, or try to protect the Sorcadin by arguing itís actually a weakness many classes share.

    Con 1: Running Out of Resources

    The Blond guy conveniently doesnít run out of abilities. Sadly, you do. (Image by Ufotable)

    Letís take a look at the core abilities of the Sorcadin.

    Paladin Abilities
    Lay On Hands (Expended, Recharges on a Long Rest)
    Divine Smite (Spell Slots Expended, Recharges on a Long Rest)
    Spell Slots (Expended, Recharges on a Long Rest)
    Aura of Protection (Always There)

    Sorcerer Abilities
    Font of Magic (Sorcery Points/Spell Slots Expended, Recharges on a Long Rest)
    Metamagic (Sorcery Points Expended, Recharges on a Long Rest)
    Spell Slots (Expended, Recharges on a Long Rest)

    ...And you realize a certain tendency...


    "ARGGGHHHHHHH FUUUUUUUUUUU"
    ^ What youíre like after youíve used up all your resources ^
    (Image by Ufotable)

    Yes, exactly. Almost all the abilities of the Sorcadin are expended every time you use them. And once theyíre gone, you need to wait till a long rest to recover them. Doesnít matter if a dragon comes pursuing you after what you thought will be the final fight for the day. Once everything is gone, you will need to fight without any resources!

    The only ability you have left after youíve used up everything is Aura of Protection. That, and either the SCAG Blade Cantrips or Extra Attack. EVERYONE HUDDLE AROUND ME!! I CANíT DO ANYTHING ELSE TO HELP YOU GUYS!!

    That said, itís not like this is unique to the Sorcadin. Both pure Paladins and pure Sorcerers suffer from the exact same problem, as do many other classes. Itís just that the Sorcadin has a lot more options on how to spend these resources, which makes it even more of a perplexing problem in terms of resource management. Since thereís so many options, all of them being so strong and fascinating, itís surprisingly easy to get mesmerized and use up too many resources, resulting in you having not enough left when you really need it.

    How shall I use these spell slots? To smite, or to blast, or to heal, or to protect, or to buff, or to debuff? So many choices. And all of them so strong and fascinating (yes, I know, this is my second time saying this, but thatís because itís all true and I want to emphasize greatly on it). Making the most out of a Sorcadin requires real-life WIS of the player.

    The difficult part is that if you try to economize too much and end the day without using most of your abilities, thatís basically a waste of all your badass abilities.

    Then, is the fact that you need to use your resources carefully a ďweaknessĒ of the Sorcadin?

    No. No, it really isnít.

    First-off, combat-wise, the whole system of D&D is a resource-management game. Itís how D&D classes work in general. Itís not just Sorcadins - every class is like that, at least to some extent.

    Second, Sorcadins strictly have more resources than pure Paladins. Since most pure Paladins can live their adventuring day without dying from resource depletion, you probably wouldnít have problems either.

    Anyhow, what makes this multiclass a bit difficult to use for beginners is rather the fact that Sorcadins donít have a back-up option, or a way to restore their lost resources. Classes like Battle Masters, Monks and Warlocks can easily recover mid-day, even after using too much resources, by taking a short rest - so even if you make a mistake, you can get back from the loss. While Sorcadins can convert Spell Slots into Sorcery Points, and vice versa, the truth is that Sorcadins use both of these resources quite a lot, so itís sorta uncertain whether it properly works as a ďback-up optionĒ.

    Before the session, you should probably ask your DM ďhow many encounters to expect per dayĒ. Some DMs might not answer (they obviously have the right to do that), but some DMs will, in which case you can set up your plans more wisely, using resources in the most effective ways possible at the just right moment. As a general rule, a small number of encounters means the Sorcadin shines better, though this applies for many, many classes indeed (ALL the casters, excluding Druid and Warlock, belong in here).

    Con 2: Doesnít Work at Low Levels

    ^ If you think you can do this sort of badass maneuver at low levels, youíre wrong. ^
    (Image by Ufotable)

    This is something that can be said for most complex Multiclass builds, but I suppose Iíd still list it here in ďConsĒ.

    From Level 6 and higher, I think itís safe to say that Sorcadins can work fine. Paladin 2/Sorcerer 4 does enough of what the build is supposed to do, though itís admittedly of a smaller scale than originally intended.

    With a very limited amount of Sorcery Points and slots, you will frequently find yourself running out of resources (as already mentioned in Con 1). Using Quickened Spell will require a lot of thought at these low levels - ďis this truly the right way to use it, when you can economize the Sorcery Point resources by just waiting another turn?Ē

    So, it might be harder to capture the distinctive ďalmighty feelĒ that the Sorcadin is intended to give you.

    My personal opinion is that most casters, regardless of Sorcadin or not, would have more of this ďsense of superiorityĒ at higher levels and be overall lackluster at low levels - but this is just my personal opinion (and Citan, who proofread this guide, has pointed that out. Thanks Citan!). However, the fact remains that at least in the Sorcadinís case, you will be working much, much better at higher levels.

    On the bright side, you have a lot of upcoming goodies to look forward to.

    On the duller side, if your campaigns are constantly low-level and the players reset their levels to 1 whenever a short campaign is finished, you might never be able to bathe in the ultimate glory that high-level Sorcadins can feel.

    But donít worry. You can always just bide your time and wait, starting Paladin, going all the way to level 6 or 7. And when the right time comes, suddenly scream ďI DISCOVERED MY ANCESTOR WAS A DRAGONĒ or ďI BECAME EMO WITH DARKNESS POWERSĒ and start multiclassing Sorcerer. Thatís one way of doing it, and a smart one too, given how amazing the Paladin Auras are.

    If you want to go with a Caster-heavy build, going Paladin 2 / Sorcerer X helps you a lot with this problem, since youíre not so many levels late in Caster progression.

    Or, you could simply jump into a game that starts at a higher level. If you see a campaign like ďaccepting players, starts at level 12Ē, that is the perfect timing to create a Sorcadin and shove your way into the player list.

    Con 3: Lower Stats (Point-Buy only)

    If only I had 2 more STR... (Image by Ufotable)

    Since you get less chances to take ASI/Feat due to multiclassing, Sorcadins are prone to getting stats lower than their pure-class counterparts.

    Iíll say it again: This applies to all multiclass builds. It is not unique to the Sorcadin. END OF THE STORY!!

    ...No, actually, it isnít the end of the story. Sadly, but admittedly, this problem is more troublesome for Sorcadins than it is for, say, a Fighter/Rogue or a Sorcerer/Warlock.

    This is for two reasons.

    1. Sorcadins are MAD.
    ďMADĒ is an abbreviation of ďMultiple Ability score DependentĒ, meaning that a character requires high scores in multiple stats to work as good as it should. In the Paladinís case, STR, CON, and CHA are the stats used often, so you want all three to be pretty high... The problem being that itís really difficult to boost up all of these, with so little chances to get the Ability Score Improvements. Even if youíre going to make a DEX build, you need 13 STR to multiclass in or out of Paladin (perhaps some really generous DMs might say yes to changing the multiclass requirement to 13 DEX, 13 CHA, but donít count on it), so it gets even more MAD.

    Now, keep in mind that there is some argument over exactly how MAD Sorcadins are. The Hightened Spell Metamagic ability can make your spells devastating even with a low CHA, for instance, so you have a lot of options to get around this problem. However, my personal opinion is that to make the most out of Sorcadins you would probably want high numbers in all of your main three stats. Especially given how Aura of Protection is so amazing...

    And well, even when you get a chance to take an ASI/Feat, your first (or even if not first, definitely your second) chance should be almost mandatorily used for...

    2. Sorcadins need either War Caster or Resilient (CON) to work
    ...This.

    First, for S&B Sorcadins (be it Longsword or Rapier), the War Caster Feat is beyond good. It is amazing, and mandatory..

    There are three reasons for a S&B build to take War Caster. The first is that it improves your concentration. The second is the combination with Booming Blade (explained in ďNeural 2Ē). And the third is that it allows you builds to use spells with Somatic components (this does not stand for Great Weapon Master builds though, which is one reason why GWM characters should choose Resilient over this).

    For GWM builds, War Caster is not mandatory, but Resilient (CON) certainly is. You can already cast Somatic and Material spells from the start (the creators of this game have confirmed this ruling, and most DMs abide by them), so War Caster is not as attractive, and whatís more frightening is rather the stuff like the drow with their poisoned crossbows, and other monsters that come target your CON for their dangerous abilities, especially those which bestow advantage on your attacks and severely debuff GWM builds (sure, you can take an action to use Lay on Hands and neutralize drow poison, but it does waste an action). While Resilient (CON) works on these, War Caster doesnít. This is a very valid reason to take Resilient (CON) over War Caster.

    These sorts of Feats that are mandatory for a particular build to work are called Feat Taxes, and while strong if taken, will slow down your ASI progression, which winds you up with lower ability scores.

    Be it Bless, or Darkness, or Hold Person, or Haste, without advantage on concentration, you can easily drop the save, resulting in you wasting not only an action, but also an invaluable spell slot. You never want to drop concentration.

    Spoiler: Should you take BOTH War Caster and Resilient (CON)?
    Show
    My answer is, itís a good option, but not necessarily the best option either. Itís better for 2/18 builds than it is for 6/14 builds.

    The issue here is that, if you go Paladin 6 or higher, Aura of Protection already boosts your concentration save, so together with your CON, by default you have a +6-ish bonus on your concentration saves (on top of advantage via War Caster). Even if youíre doing the DC 10 save with just War Caster and Aura and with no Resilient, the percentage of failing the save is already only about 4% (assuming you have 16 CON and 16 CHA), and even with a stat of 14 in either, about 6%.

    Letís see the possible merits of going both War Caster and Resilient (CON).

    Even if you get higher damage at higher levels with just +6 and War Caster - for instance, 30 damage from the CR 13 Storm Giantís Greatsword (DC 15) - you can keep concentration for about 80% of the time. Meanwhile, if you take 54 damage from the Storm Giantís Lightning Strike ability (DC 27), Resilient (CON) could sorta help you at times (with a +6 and advantage, the percentage of success is obviously 0%, while for +11 and advantage, you can succeed about 44% of the time). Not like it comes up very often. (BTW, with a simple +11 and no advantage, your chances of succeeding are 25%.)

    However, all the above is based on the assumption you have Aura of Protection. If you donít, it will be a lot better option for you.

    Whether you want proficiency in CON saves is up to you. If you want it, you should probably take Resilient. Technically, there are two other ways to get them, but neither are really recommended:

    The first way is to start first level Sorcerer. The second way is to start first level Fighter (you lag behind in Sorcadin levels, but get an extra fighting style, a self-healing option, and heavy armor proficiency). However, both do not get proficiency in WIS saves, so itís a trade-off, and one that could potentially end up being fatal. A lot of nasty effects target WIS for their saves...

    These sum up to the following conclusion:
    ďSorcadins are MAD, and at the same time, they get less ASIs and Feats compared to pure-class builds, and also suffer from Feat Tax, namely either War Caster or Resilient (CON). This makes it rather difficult for them to get high ability scores, and thus they may not be able to make the most out of their abilities.Ē

    Due to this, Sorcadins are one of the classes that work better with stat-rolling than 27 point-buy.

    However, this doesnít necessarily mean that they donít work good in point-buy, of course. Sure, having 16 STR, you might not hit as accurately as a pure Paladin with 18 STR, but the difference pops up only 5% of the time. And sure, having 16 CHA, the saving throws for your spells might be easier than those of the pure Sorcerer with 18 CHA, but again, the difference pops up only 5% of the time. What does this mean? The difference in Ability Scores isnít as harmful as one may assume.

    Also, if youíre going STR and you optimize your choice of Race, itís not difficult at all to start with a score of 16 in all 3 important ability scores (STR, CON, and CHA) - the best you can hope for in point-buy - or at least get there with your next ASI (while also getting an 18 somewhere). Even if you go DEX, you can get something like DEX 16, CON 14, CHA 16 from level 1 using Half-Elf. Thus it can be said that the problem of being MAD is not as perplexing as it may seem.

    Now, looking at all three ďConsĒ of the Sorcadin, we can say that while the Sorcadin cannot escape from the unavoidable weaknesses that all casters and multiclass builds in general must face, none of them are fatal or specifically unique to this build, and that they donít really serve as reasons why you can say this build is a bad option at all.

    Sorcadins remain awesome.
    Last edited by Gastronomie; 2016-10-22 at 09:19 AM.
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    Spoiler: Quotes
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    Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

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    Default Re: Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

    Steel is my body, and fire is my blood
    Races and Stats


    Choose Your Character! (Image by Ufotable)

    The first thing to keep in mind that Sorcadin ďArchetypesĒ are not necessarily just about the Oaths and Origins, but also about their weapon of choice. In fact you could say that the ratings of your Oath and Origin have a lot to do with your combat style! The first question here is - are you going to go STR, or will you go DEX?

    There are the following options for Sorcadins:

    STR-Based Builds
    1. Sword-and-Board
    2. Great Weapon Master
    3. Polearm Master*
    4. Two-Weapon Fighting

    *This rating assumes you are an Oathbreaker 7 or higher, with Aura of Hate. However, it is worth noting that Improved Divine Smite also works wonders with PAM, meaning you probably will want Oathbreaker 11. The thing is... if youíre going that far, going Pure Oathbreaker might be a pretty strong option as well, given how Supernatural Resistance and Dread Lord are so powerful abilities.

    DEX-Based Builds
    1. Sword-and-Board*
    2. Two-Weapon Fighting

    *Sky Blue or even Gold if itís stat-rolling and you were lucky, or if your DM rules that the STR 13 requirement for Paladin multiclassing can be ignored. Blue if itís point-buy and youíre going Half-Elf. It gets just a bit lower for other races, depending on your playstyle - this will be explained in ďRace Evaluation (DEX)Ē.

    In this guide, we will focus on STR S&B, GWM, and DEX S&B as the three core builds of Sorcadins (think of these as the ďsub-classesĒ of the Paladin/Sorcerer). We will delve further into these three builds in the next part of this guide (ďWeapon of ChoiceĒ), but please wait a moment before we get there.

    Here, letís first talk about whether to go STR or DEX, depending on your situation (stat-roll or point-buy).

    After that, weíll take a look at what ability scores are good for each type of build (STR or DEX).

    And finally, this section will be concluded with a summary of which Races are good for STR and DEX builds each.

    Spoiler: To DEX, or not to DEX
    Show
    STR is, in all honesty, not a very good ability score on its own. What makes pumping STR a good idea is not the mechanical nature of the STR score itself, but the Feat options such as Great Weapon Master and Polearm Master that require high STR, as well as how the STR-based armor (Plate etc.) gives you high AC even without maximizing your STR score.

    The only STR skill available is Athletics, which can come in handy if you want to grapple... But otherwise most of its uses can be substituted by Acrobatics. Forget about STR saving throws, because such things donít really exist (well, technically they do, but pretty much they donít).

    All in all, it can be said that STR is normally a stat you take because you want to use the associated weapons. Greatsword damages better than DEX weapons and has the GWM feat to back it up. Glaives and Halberds are the weapon of choice for a towering sentinel. If youíre going Sword-and-Board, under normal circumstances, going DEX for the rapier is generally better than going STR and picking up a Longsword.

    Then why is that the STR build is rated higher in here? That has to do with the multiclass nature of Paladins. Itís really tragic and honestly sucks, but we have to deal with it nonetheless.

    In order to discuss more about that matter, letís next think about the pros and cons of going DEX:

    Pros
    1. Better DEX saves (Duck out of a Dragonís Breath. Compare with how STR saves are extremely uncommon)
    2. Better Initiative (Self-explanatory.)
    3. Stealth (One of the best skills, as well as one of the rare ones that mean something during combat.)

    Cons
    1. Lower AC (Plate needs only 15 STR for 18 AC. Leather has only 17 AC maximum, even with 20 DEX, and will actually be lower during gameplay, since your DEX will be around 16 to 18 for most of your career. Studded Leather or Mage Armor make stuff a bit better.)
    2. Gets even more MAD (The worst part, and the reason why most people simply go STR. Will explain in more detail below...)


    So now we can see that while DEX has some cons, it still has a lot of benefits compared to STR. Then shall we go DEX? The answer to that question is very simple.

    If you rolled good with Point-Buy, feel free to go DEX all the way. It will work nuts.

    Otherwise, itís possible, but not as strong. However, it is decent, and not as bad as it seems on paper.

    Of course, the problem lies in how multiclassing in or out of Paladin requires 13 STR. In point-buy, buying a STR of 13 already costs 5 points, leaving you with only 22 left. But you want a 16-start in DEX (it boosts both your attacks and your AC, as well as initiative), costing 9 points, so thatís that. You have only 13 points left to spend on CON, INT, WIS, and CHA. But you want high CON and CHA...

    This will mean that if you wish to optimize a DEX Sorcadin in point-buy, your INT and WIS will most likely become 8 (or 9), and stay like that for the rest of your career. INT is fine. WIS is... Itís a bit of a pain, but not like itís fatal. If your first level is in Paladin, you have proficiency with WIS saving throws, and remember, youíll have Aura of Protection and Bless, so you can sorta get around deadly WIS-save effects. But you will need to leave Perception to your friends.

    Anyhow, letís crunch up some Half-Elves with 27-point-buy score for DEX Sorcadins:

    CON-Based
    Original Stats: 13-15-15-8-8-12
    With Bonuses: 13-16-16-8-8-14

    CHA-Based
    Original Stats: 13-15-13-8-9-14
    With Bonuses: 13-16-14-8-9-16

    ...Hmm?

    I think youíve come to realize: If you ignore INT and WIS, these stats arenít really that bad. At leat not the disaster youíd been expecting. Theyíre actually good enough to do what theyíre meant to do.

    (It should be noted, though, that only Half-Elves can be truly optimized DEX Sorcadins in terms of stats).

    The main problem about DEX Sorcadins will not be low starting stats, but rather the fact that they need some investment in DEX to be powerful - something that can come at the cost of lower CHA (less ASI boosts), meaning less benefits from Aura of Protection, and your spellcasting will not be nearly as good as in the case with Longsword builds (assuming your Longsword build invests in CHA mor than STR - which I believe is the generally better option).

    Sure, you can go high CHA, but doing that lowers your DEX, meaning you will suffer from worse Initiative, less Stealthiness, and lower AC (light armor and Draconic Resilience look at your DEX for their good AC). You should invest at least 18 in DEX, possibly 20 as well.

    However, since you are a Half-Elf and not Variant Human, you get only 4 ASIs throughout your entire career (Paladin 4, Sorcerer 4, Sorcerer 8, and Sorcerer 12) - possibly less if you Multiclass or anything. Two of them are already mandatory for their usage, namely War Caster and DEX +2, meaning you have only 2 free ASI/Feat slots. Longsword builds have a bit more wide options.

    The benefits of DEX Sorcadin, like improved initiative, better DEX saves and Stealth will be very useful and powerful. However, it requires careful thought to be built as good as it can be.

    All in all, you can say that while DEX Sorcadin can be powerful, in achieving that, your options are overall very narrowed down.

    Spoiler: Ability Score Evaluation
    Show
    Ability Scores (STR Build)
    • Strength: UNLIMITED POWER!!!! That said, for Longsword builds, 16 is enough for a large part of your career, and you might actually want to pump CHA before this, though this depends largely on the type of build. Greatsword builds should try to get this to 20 as soon as possible (with the exceptions of Resilient, which is more important. Blade Mastery (UA) is also arguably better than STR +2 due to giving you advantage on opportunity attacks and giving you an extra +1 AC option (though it does use up your reaction).
    • Dexterity: Itís a common save, but remember, you have Aura of Protection. Point-Buyers can assign a 10 or even an 8 to this and call it a day. Bah, Stealth is for cowards - I will clink-clank-cling my way into the battlefields with my impenetrable heavy armor of bloodstained glory.
    • Constitution: The fact your hit points generally get lower than normal Paladins makes this a pretty important ability score, but given your lack of ASIs, I feel 16 is the right place to end this.
    • Intelligence: You donít need to know the answer to one plus one. You do know by instinct that Paladin + Sorcerer = Win, though.
    • Wisdom: Aura of Protection, as well as Paladin proficiency, protects you from WIS saves well enough. Your dazzling sexiness beats the knowledge of wise sages.
    • Charisma: Youíve been born to be hot. Blazing hot. In fact you actually have the ability to churn your hotness into a gigantic ball of fire, and hurl it into an enemy horde, incinerating them on the spot. For Longsword builds, this stat is generally more important to you than Strength.


    Ability Scores (DEX Build)
    • Strength: More of a wretched curse that you wish never existed than something you call an ability score. The fact you need 13 in this is nothing but a pain.
    • Dexterity: Probably overall the best stat in this edition. Itís your attacking stat, it directly connects to your AC, it gives you better initiative, it saves you from dragon breaths, and it even allows you to be stealthy. Starting with anything lower than 16 is unthinkable, and after you get War Caster, your next ASI should be used to pump this to 18. Next you can pump Charisma to 18, or alternatively, pump this to 20. This depends on your build, as well as personal preference.
    • Constitution: Since DEX builds are prone to getting AC lower than that of STR builds, having too low CON may make you a bit too squishy. However, CHA is very important for you as well due to spellcasting and Aura of Protection. Due to the point-buy nature of DEX builds, you may be forced to go with CON 14 for your entire career.
    • Intelligence: Youíre already so awesome that you donít even need to be smart.
    • Wisdom: Too bad point-buyers need to dump this, since WIS saves and Perception checks are common. At least you have Aura of Protection for the saves, though. Probably shouldnít bother with Perception if your WIS score is 8, and just leave it to your friends.
    • Charisma: STR builds feature sexy, muscular men, but DEX builds let you create sexy, slender men, or perhaps even that particular super-powerful bishoujo character you wanted to use all this time. IT IS TIME.

    Spoiler: Race Evaluation
    Show
    The first question is - are you using Point Buy, or are you using Stat-Rolls?

    If itís the latter, choose whatever race you want, it honestly doesnít matter much. If youíre Point-Buying, though, race matters quite a lot.

    The main problem Point-Buyers must face is the fact that you can only buy stats of up to 15, when you actually need a 16 to get a +3 bonus. This means that in order to start off your character with a stat of 16 or more, you need to first assign a 14 or 15 to that score, and proceed to pump it up with your Racial Bonus.

    Getting a score of 16 at first level is important in how you either (a) donít need to pump it up anymore using later ASIs, or (b) can more easily pump it up to 18 or even 20 later-on. Thus, you would want to increase at least two, and preferably all three of the ďstats that are important for your buildĒ (either STR, CON, CHA, or DEX, CON, CHA).

    For STR builds, the difference between the races that can boost only two and those who can boots three is evident till the Sorcadin gains enough levels to get to his second ASI, which is when both become equally good (will be explained later).

    Now, before race evaluation, let me explain the abbreviations:
    SCAG: The Supplement ďSword Coast Adventurerís GuideĒ.
    EE: Elemental Evil. The free PDF is up on the WotC (Wizard of the Coast) website.
    UA: Unearthed Arcana. Free PDFs are up on the WotC (Wizard of the Coast) website.

    An now that thatís over, letís move on to take a look at the STR-friendly races and the DEX-friendly races.

    NOTE: A lot of guides look through every single published (or introduced-by-UA) race, but here I will not do that, and instead only evaluate the options that are actually worth choosing. See, thereís not much meaning in explaining how Dwarves make terrible DEX Paladins.

    Spoiler: Race Evaluation (STR Build)
    Show
    Race Evaluation (STR Build)
    If youíre gonna go STR, my advice is to buy the stats to be 15-8-15-8-8-15. Itís really eccentric, but thatís how direly you need the three main stats, and how useless the other three stats are for you. I think weíve already covered why low DEX and WIS arenít a problem in the ďAbility Score EvaluationĒ section written above.

    If youíre gonna choose a race which boosts all three main stats, that becomes 16-8-16-8-8-16 or something similar, and oh look at how beautiful it looks. You are a Deoxys.


    ^ You are a Deoxys. ^
    (Image Copyright Nintendo)

    If youíre gonna choose a race which has +2 STR and +1 CON/CHA, with racial bonus, youíll be something like 17-8-16-8-8-15 (this is taking the Half-Orc and Goliath as an example). Your first ASI/Feat will most likely be used for War Caster, but when the second one comes around the corner, use it for +1 STR and +1 CHA, giving you 18 STR, 16 CON, 16 CHA, which is totally beyond awesome, and also gets you on the same line as a Half-Elf or Variant Human which has +1 to all three major scores. If itís +2 CHA and +1 CON or something (as in Abyssal Tieflings), just switch stuff around and youíll get similar results.

    Races that give +1/+1 like the Warforged are somewhat inferior in this regard (you canít go 18-16-16 with just one ASI), which is really a shame since the Warforged has such an amazing racial ability (AC+1). Weíve placed him in the Blue rating. Sorry, Alphonse...


    ^ Poor Alphonse is sad that he didnít get Sky Blue. Cheer up, Alphonse - we still love you, and youíre still a very good option! ^
    (Image Copyright Hiromu Arakawa)

    With that in mind, letís look at the races (within each color, the order in which the races are listed is sorta random. Thus, the order in which they are listed has nothing to do with their power ranking within the specific color or anything).

    Amazing
    • Half-Elf: I think I just said above something about how an option that increases all three of the ďimportant statsĒ is really, really good. Half-Elves, on top of that, allow you to choose an extra two skills, adding you extra versatility. Arguably one of the best races this edition, and game design-wise itís actually a shame this option exists, because it over-outshines so many other races that would have been chosen a lot more if not for this particular race. Itís honestly badly designed, and in fact you can even say it classifies as one of the benefits of playing a CHA-based class - but that characteristic also makes it an admittedly awesome option for Sorcadins.
      Fey Ancestry is an often overlooked but still powerful ability that comes up every now and then. It shines most when the party caster doesnít have to hesitate using Hypnotic Pattern on your area, because you get advantage on the save (since you have proficiency in the save, as well as Aura of Protection, and possibly Bless, itís really rare for you to be affected). At low levels, the fact you donít get unconscious from the party casterís Sleep spell is also damn nice.
      If you have the SCAG, you can forego your two skill proficiencies to instead gain the bonus of a particular elf race. A moving speed of 35 ft, an extra Cantrip (you should most likely choose Booming Blade since it doesnít have to do with your spellcasting modifier - High Elf Cantrips look at INT), and Drow Magic are especially interesting options for a STR Sorcadin.
      If you know your campaign is going to end before you get your second ASI (which is when Half-Orcs, Goliaths and such catch up to 18-16-16), Half-Elves and the Variant Human with three +1s become hands down Gold. Itís also worth mentioning that with Half-Elf and the three-bonus Variant Human, pumping CHA before STR becomes viable. Whether to take that choice depends on your playstyle, build mechanics, and personal preference.
    • Variant Human (@Boost to all 3 stats): Everybody knows Variant Humans are boss, but what makes this option truly wonderful for Sorcadins is that you can choose a Feat that increases the one important stat you couldnít pump with the racial bonus, which pretty much allows you to buff all three important stats and also gain a neat extra bonus. How awesome is that? Letís look at the candidates:
      Off the top of my head, you can get Resilient (CON) to get better at not only WIS saves, but also CON saves (and concentration), or you can go Heavy Armor Master to become even more tanky. Actor and Durable also apply from the PHB, while UA gives us Gourmand and Master of Disguise.
      Actor and Master of Disguise will be more about role-playing than combat, but depending on what sort of person you want to portray your character as, they can be really fitting, as well as extremely useful in certain campaigns. Gourmand basically makes you a character who came jumping out of the Dungeon Meshi manga and sorta defines what sort of character youíll be (as well as most likely his background profession), but as a DM I love it when imaginative adventurers cook their own meals and explain their monstrous recipes in great detail (Iíve bumped into a particular player who does that really well, and indeed, his character has Gourmand). It also increases the healing capacities of the entire team, and will make your party love you. Durable allows you to heal maximum HP every time you use up a Sorcerer Hit Die, and generally makes you better at resting... But nothing really interesting here.
      Just like Half-Elves, if youíre certain youíre not gonna get your second ASI, this race choice becomes Gold. And Variant Humans can also get facial plastic surgery (plus to CHA) before going to the training gym (plus to STR), while Half-Orcs and Goliaths and their lot always need to do it the other way around.
    • Variant Human (@GWM or PAM builds): Though this option doesnít give you pluses in three ability scores, Variant Human serves as the savior of GWM and PAM builds, allowing them easier access to their core feats. Leave CON to be 15, and later boost it using Resilient (CON) to make the best GWM or PAM Sorcadin build possible.
      To be honest, given how itís so strong, this is almost mandatory for GWM builds. This build is always 2 STR ahead of the other options, assuming all races try to eventually get CON 16 and CHA 16 (which they should), meaning itís the most optimized race option for GWM and PAM builds by far.


    Pretty Damn Good
    • Variant Human (Otherwise): Buff two stats of your choice, and get a Skill and a Feat? Sure, why not. The really annoying problem here is that if you start Paladin, you canít choose War Caster, which is what you actually want the most - and starting Sorcerer just for first-level War Caster is honestly not a very good choice, due to the devastating lack of Heavy Armor proficiency. Of course youíre not gonna waste an upcoming ASI for Heavily Armored, are you?
      Now, if youíre gonna take Variant Human for a Sorcadin, I really, and I mean really do suggest you take a Feat that also boosts a stat that means something to you, but itís not like taking the other options will be fatal or anything, theyíre still pretty damn good.
      Alert really helps by taking care of the weaknesses of this build, which are your pretty bad initiative bonus and your absolutely abysmal Passive Perception score that makes others think youíve probably been just poking your nose all this time - itís really synergetic in that sense, covering up all your weaknesses. You definitely count as an Inspiring Leader, since youíre both really manly and sexy, and on top of that youíre also a f***ing Legendary Pokťmon. Apart from that, youíre also pretty damn Lucky to become one of the most awesome builds in the worldís greatest roleplaying game©.

      ^ You are a f***ing Legendary Pokťmon. ^
      (Image Copyright Nintendo)
      Mage Slayer, Martial Adept, and Mounted Combatant make pretty interesting choices, probably focusing more on character personality/background, or a certain ďthemeĒ or ďfeelĒ, but still pretty useful under the right circumstances. These are not really over-the-top amazing, but still definitely good choices. Especially Mounted Combatant - theyíre pretty rare to see in actual games, and you canít just pull it off 100% of the time, but advantage on all your attacks is no joke.
      And finally, Blade Mastery (UA) gives you +1 to hit and +1 AC using a reaction, not to mention advantage on opportunity attacks, which is arguably better than +2 STR, depending on your build.
    • Half-Orc: Copy-Pasting from ďNeutral 1Ē: It boosts your two main stats, has darkvision, makes you extra aggressive with critical hits, gives you proficiency with a skill youíre gonna be super excellent at, and allows you to recover from fainting once per day. Everything in this package is wonderful for a Sorcadin, and itís no wonder that the sample character shown in the first page of ďPaladinĒ in the PHB is a Half-Orc. Actually, Half-Orcs make better Sorcadins than Paladins, since the ďRelentless EnduranceĒ emergency button is more important to someone with lower HP. (Copy-Paste ends here) I donít have much to add here, because the above passage is so well written. I wonder who wrote it.
      However, do note that for Longsword builds, getting 18 STR is not as important as getting 18 CHA, meaning that these bonuses are not ideal. And as mentioned above, Greatsword builds can benefit more from Variant Human due to how they get GWM earlier, and as a result, are always 2 STR ahead of the other races (this stands even if you have a +2 instead of +1 STR boost).
      Overall this is not the ďbestĒ option, but still a very powerful one if youíre interested.
    • Dragonborn: Any race that has +2 to either your STR or CHA and also gives a +1 to STR, CON, or CHA automatically becomes Blue or higher for STR Sorcadins. While not as synergetic as Half-Orc or Goliath, Dragonborn is still a decent choice.
      Dragonborn have resistance to one energy type of your choice (Fire will probably be your best option, due to how often it comes up, but depending on the nature of the campaign the other colors could be better), which can occasionally save your neck - ironically, it works best if youíre fighting a Dragon of the same color as you. The Breath Weapon is honestly not that important, but better than having nothing. All in all, not bad, and can especially be thematically cool for Draconic Sorcerer builds.
    • Duergar (SCAG): I have mixed feelings about this guy. On the bright side (I know, Duergar hate bright places, but still), he has Superior Darkvision and Duergar Magic, the former allowing you to cast spells at range in dark places (you canít target people you canít see), and the latter giving you two extra spells (Enlarge is honestly useless given Concentration issues, but free Invisibility is nice), both of which are goddamn useful for you. However, his racial bonuses are STR +1, CON +2, which makes this a meh choice for Greatsword builds (not that anything besides V-Human is truly optimized for them in the first place, but still). And Sunlight Sensitivity is a really, really, badly designed feature. Not badly designed because itís a weakness for you, itís badly designed because it makes your DM worry whether itís okay to make you fight in daylight or not. Certain DMs, like me, hate punishing players for their thematic decisions - in which case we need to either (i) keep you in dark places most of the time, or (ii) homebrew the Sunlight Sensitivity into something less penalizing. I prefer the second option, but anyhow, the thing I wanna say is that choosing Duergar (or Drow) forces the DM to make hard decisions. Together with the fact that Duergar are generally depicted as hard-working but grim and tyrannical fellow, you should ask your DM in advance before using one, as well as question how he will (or will not) work around the Sunlight Sensitivity problem.
    • Goliath (EE): Again, Copy-Pasting from ďNeutral 1Ē: Apart from having the same stat bonuses as Half-Orcs, [Goliaths] can reduce the damage you take by 1d12+CON per short rest, which is basically the same thing as being able to heal your HP by 10-ish per short rest by just using a Reaction. That said, this ďStoneís EnduranceĒ ability might compete with the Shield spell for your defensive reaction, so make sure to decide wisely - which to use, at what moment. Ending a short rest without using this ability will make you regret it. (Copy-Paste ends here) I donít have much to add here, because again, the above passage is so well written. Geez, I really wonder who in the world wrote it.
      However, as in the case with Half-Ors, do note that for Longsword builds, getting 18 STR is not as important as getting 18 CHA, meaning that these bonuses are not ideal. And as mentioned above, Greatsword builds can benefit more from Variant Human due to how they get GWM earlier, and as a result, are always 2 STR ahead of the other races (this stands even if you have a +2 instead of +1 STR boost).
      Overall this is not the ďbestĒ option, but still a very powerful one if youíre interested.
    • Abyssal Tiefling (UA): This guy is interesting in how his racial spells change every day. Iíd love to make him a Wild Magic Sorcerer just to emphasize the random and chaotic feel - itís admittedly not the most optimized option available, but itíll be fun.
      Almost all of the spells you get from the random spell list are pretty strong, with some candidates like Cure Wounds, Tashaís Hideous Laughter and Mirror Image being especially awesome, but the fact they change around every day makes it difficult to rely upon them constantly. You also canít get the same spell two days in a row, so if you get Mirror Image on a particular day, you canít have it tomorrow. Sadface. (Looking at it the other way, you donít get a bad or semi-inferior option two days in a row either.)
      Abyssal Fortitude isnít that much of a bonus. That said, it is a bonus, so itís good, and you should thankfully take it. Youíre a frontline fighter, so you need that HP, and it might just save your skin.
    • Warforged (UA, Eberron): Being an Eberron class, not all campaigns will allow Alphonse to join as an adventurer. You should consult your DM before using this race, including the possibility to re-fluff it to become something else that fits into the campaign setting.
      +1 STR and +1 CON is good,but not ideal for the reasons already explained. That said, the Composite Plating racial ability that gives you a +1 AC bonus is beyond amazing for Sorcadins, or any melee character really, and itís still a very good race option. Living Construct is useful for certain special situations in how you donít need food or drink, but unlike Alphonse you can eat an apple pie if you wish. However, just like Alphonse, you are fully aware of your surroundings even when you ďsleepĒ (or just stop moving at midnight) - perhaps creative DMs might have you look at or overhear some plot clues during this ďinactive periodĒ, like you hear a group of people talking about an important plot device or something - that way you can feel special about being a Warforged. The part about not getting diseased is honestly not that important for you, since you already have that as a level 3 Paladin ability.


    Decent
    • Mountain Dwarf: The only race that gives you +2 to two ability scores. Sadly, itís not really something to be overly excited over in point-buy, where the maximum you can buy is 15 anyways, meaning itís impossible for you to get 18 STR at your starting level. For other melee classes this is a good option, but for Sorcadins itís meh - the only advantage this race has to the Sky Blue ones is how it gives you 10 WIS instead of 8, or how you can possibly later take a Feat that also boosts one of your main stats, but the former is unrequired for reasons already mentioned, and if you want the latter, you should just go Variant Human. The armor and weapon proficiencies are really useless because you already have it from being a Paladin, and the tools and skill bonuses are... Not really bad to have, but not really useful either, being either too situational or related to a dump stat.
    • Standard Human: +1 to everything does belong in the ď+3 to all important statsĒ box, but sadly, if you want just that, Sky Blue Variant Human is strictly better, meaning there is not a single reason to take this race. Having the 8s in your DEX, INT and WIS turn into 9s will not even result in a bonus in your DEX or WIS save. Do not take this race. The only reason it belongs in ďDecentĒ is because there are even worse options, and the fact still remains that taking this race will give you absolutely no benefits.
    • Earth Genasi (EE): +1 STR and +2 CON is not bad, but still meh for the reasons already explained in Duergar. Earth Walk is situational but occasionally useful, especially for creative DMs (creative DMs generally like using various sorts of difficult terrain), while Merge With Stone is pretty good - Pass Without Trace is a very versatile spell. Depending on the nature of a campaign, a particular situation, or your party composition (to be more precise, if your party includes an Assassin), this ability can skyrocket to Sky Blue, in which case this race also becomes upgraded to Blue. This raceís power heavily relies on whether youíll be able to find and determine the right timing to activate the Merge With Stone ability.

    Spoiler: Race Evaluation (DEX Build)
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    Race Evaluation (DEX Build)
    The first thing to put in mind is that even DEX builds are required to have 13 STR, no matter how useless it may be. While this may make it seem like itís a good idea to boost your STR using racial bonuses, you should actually refrain from this.

    This is because buying lower stats requires less points than when youíre buying higher stats. For instance, if you wanted 16 STR and 14 CON (for a STR build), Half-Orcs (STR +2, CON +1) require you to buy one ď14Ē and one ď13Ē, which add up to 7+5=12 points. If you went Earth Genasi (STR +1, CON +2), you need to buy one ď15Ē and one ď12Ē, which add up to 9+4=13 points. The difference may be just one point, but this will eventually start to affect your characterís power level. Do keep this sort of calculation in mind, and just focus on your three core stats.

    Due to the sheer MADness of the DEX Sorcadin, the ideal choice of race is something that can boost all your DEX, CON and CHA, preferably one of them being a +2 (hint: Half-Elves), and because of the horrendously heavy Point-Buy tax, this is more important for you than it is for STR builds.

    In fact, you can even say that if youíre going to optimize DEX Sorcadin in point-buy, you need to be an Half-Elf. It sounds ridiculous, it certainly is ridiculous, and it honestly sucks as a fact, but itís true. If youíre angry about it, try to think it this way - Bladesingers are restricted to Elves for no real reason besides fluff. And Battleragers are also restricted to Dwarves for no real reason besides fluff! Thereís no real problem with there being a class restricted to Half-Elves, right?

    ...Right...?

    Well, let me first explain. This is because itís generally a really good idea as a DEX Sorcadin to get a 16 in all of DEX and CHA, and if possible, CON as well. Half-Elves and Standard Humans are the only races that can achieve this with just one ASI. All the other races require 2 or more ASIs to get to these ability scores, which pretty much means the same thing as that the races except Half-Elves and Standard Humans have an ASI tax.

    Then, are Standard Humans good? Yeah, theyíre good. But then again, there is absolutely no reason to choose it over Half-Elf, since two skills are better than zero, and also, Fey Ancestry is a thing. The only real ďmeritĒ Standard Humans have compared to Half-Elves is how they have 9 INT and 9 WIS... except oh wait, that doesnít really count as a merit since itís an uneven number. BYE STANDARD HUMAN!!

    Let's get honest - itís really, really difficult to create a strong non-Half Elf DEX Sorcadin build with 27-point buy.


    ^ Itís not like being a Half-Elf is a bad thing or anything. I mean, if you think youíre born between these two, Half-Elves suddenly start to become really appealing. ^

    Now, what we must keep in mind is that even Half-Elves cannot get 16-16-16 from first level. There are two ways to go with Half-Elves:

    CON
    Original Stats: 13-15-15-8-8-12
    With Bonuses: 13-16-16-8-8-14

    CHA
    Original Stats: 13-15-13-8-9-14
    With Bonuses: 13-16-14-8-9-16

    Either works, but I think CHA is more important.

    Either way, your first ASI will be spent on War Caster, while your second one will probably be used for +2 DEX due to AC issues.

    But what if you want to use a different race, like a +2/+1 one?

    The answer is actually that there isnít a +2/+1 race worth taking for DEX builds. But anyways, letís build a sample DEX Sorcadin with a Lightfoot Halfling (DEX +2, CHA +1) to see how youíll be buying things for a +2/+1 race (to see why theyíre not that attractive). Thereíll be roughly two options:

    Option 1 (CHA-Heavy)
    Original Stats: 13-14-13-8-8-15
    With Bonuses: 13-16-13-8-8-16
    After one ASI: 13-18-13-8-8-16 or 13-16-14-8-8-16

    Option 2 (CON Semi-Heavy)
    Original Stats: 13-14-15-8-8-13
    With Bonuses: 13-16-15-8-8-14
    After one ASI: 13-16-15-8-8-16 or 13-16-16-8-8-14

    Option 1 is when you buy a 15 for the stat for which you already have a +1 racial bonus.
    Option 2 is when you buy a 15 for the stat for which you donít have a +1 racial bonus.

    Either way, you need 2 ASIs to get to 16-16-16.

    Of course, itís a very much possible choice to stop CON at 14 and improve your other stats (DEX increases your AC, DEX saves, and initiative, making you overall better at not taking damage, while CHA increases your saving throw bonus with Aura of Protection, this including concentration saves).

    Now, I mentioned in the STR builds column that you should get a race that improves at least two of your main stats at +2/+1, but this does always stand for DEX builds. Races that go +1 DEX/+1 CON or CHA, or those who go +2 DEX/+0 (this includes races such as Feral Tieflings where the +1 bonus goes to somewhere thatís not DEX, CON or CHA) are actually not so bad. Letís look at them, using Changeling and Feral Tieflings as examples:

    Changelings (DEX +1, CHA +1)
    Original Stats: 13-15-14-8-9-13
    With Bonuses: 13-16-14-8-9-14

    Feral Tieflings (DEX +2, INT +1)
    Original Stats: 13-14-14-9-8-14
    With Bonuses: 13-16-14-10-8-14

    ...Which means that the number of ASIs you need is actually not different from a +2/+1 race. The only way in which the +2/+1 races is superior is that itís possible for them to get a half-feat (a feat that also gives you a +1 bonus) like Resilient (CON) to get an extra bonus on top of their ASI, but certain races have enough racial bonuses to make up for that and make it a pretty good option.

    Now letís move on to race evaluation with that in mind.

    Amazing
    • Half-Elf: For reasons mentioned, this is the number-one option for any 27-point-buy DEX Sorcadin by far. Everything else is a secondary option, which really sucks, but itís also a fact.
      Apart from its wonderful stat bonuses that verge on being downright overpowered, Fey Ancestry gives you nice extra benefits that can occasionally save your neck. As explained in STR builds, it shines most when the party caster doesnít have to hesitate using Hypnotic Pattern on your area, because you get advantage on the save (since you have proficiency in the save, as well as Aura of Protection, and possibly Bless, itís really rare for you to be affected). At low levels, the fact you donít get unconscious from the party casterís Sleep spell is also damn nice.
      If you have the SCAG, you can forego your two skill proficiencies to instead gain the bonus of a particular elf race. A moving speed of 35 ft, an extra Cantrip (you should most likely choose Booming Blade since it doesnít have to do with your spellcasting modifier - High Elf Cantrips look at INT), and Drow Magic are good options for both STR and DEX Sorcadins, but apart from that, the Wood Elfís Mask of the Wild can become an amazing option for DEX builds due to how it greatly increases your stealthiness, something unique to DEX Sorcadins.


    Different Options
    (These can differentiate themselves from Half-Elves)
    • Changeling (UA): This is a rare case where the racial ability is so strong that it stands as a valid contestant as a DEX Sorcadin race. Itís originally an Eberron race, but with DM approval you can easily change it to a simple Doppelganger for most campaigns.
      Always being able to polymorph into anyone youíve seen is an amazing ability that can be hilarious in many RP situations - or even combat situations if you do the right research and role-playing. You can prove an invaluable asset to any team, unless the only type of campaign your table plays is Hack and Slash against a bunch of mindless minions. Using illusion spells whenever necessary to cover up your lies is a good idea, so make sure to take Minor Illusion. Friends is another godly option, and depending on how your DM rules the wording of the spell in a way that is beneficial for you (if he thinks that the target of Friends gets angry at the person who you were polymorphed as), you can get several enemies into trouble at the same time. Lucky for you, Sorcerers get 4 cantrips from level 1, so you donít need to worry about cantrip-choosing like Bards, Druids or Warlocks. This race is absolutely terrifying in any city campaign. Itís also a solid choice for Assassin multiclass builds.
    • Winged Feral Tiefling (SCAG): +2 DEX +1 INT is not that bad for reasons explained above. Being able to fly around and having Fire Resistance makes this a solid option that can differentiate itself from Half-Elves.
    • Aarakocra (EE): Youíre restricted to Light Armor, but DEX +2 is good, and +1 WIS makes it possible for you to have 10 WIS, making you slightly wiser than most other Sorcadins - despite the unignorable fact you have the head of a gigantic bird. But what truly makes this race amazing is the flying speed of 50 ft. Be faster than any other guy in the party (except maybe a high-level Monk), and be also able to fly around. The fact youíre mostly Melee is sorta anti-synergetic though.


    Not Bad
    • Air Genasi (EE): DEX +1 CON +2 is alright. Being able to cast Levitate once per long rest is not particularly powerful, but not weak either - with a failed save, you can suspend an enemy melee character into the air while your concentration lasts, making it a poor manís Banishment.
    • Beasthide Shifter (UA): Eberron race. DEX +1 CON +1 is nothing truly interesting, but the AC +1 (not that you constantly have it) is certainly nice.


    Not Bad, but Better Options (Half-Elves) Exist
    • Drow: These guys have the same Sunlight Sensitivity problem as the one explained in Duergar (in ďRace Evaluation (STR build)Ē), so you should talk over with your DM in advance about how he will handle this problem. However, the drow also have access to Faerie Fire, a truly wonderful spell, so if your DM is willing to permit it, itís not a bad option.
      That said, now again, the SCAG variant Half-Elf also has access to those Drow spells and...
    • Variant Human: The fact you canít go 8-15-15-8-8-15 is really painful, but still not a bad choice (not a good one either, given the existence of Half-Elves). Some candidates for the Feat include Medium Armor Master (good AC while being stealthy is a large benefit for you), Lucky (always worth it), and Blade Mastery (+1 to hit, advantage on opportunity attacks and +1 AC using a reaction - whatís not to love?).
      Just do remember that you have an ASI tax, meaning that most of the time, Half-Elves can actually do the job better if the need arises.
    • Standard Human: Reasons why this is strictly inferior have already been explained.
    • Lightfoot Halfling: Protect yourself from natural 1s and be extra stealthy. Itís one of the ways to be good at ambushing - just do remember that Half-Elves can also do that by choosing the Wood Elf ability variant.
    Last edited by Gastronomie; 2016-10-22 at 09:20 AM.
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    Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

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    Default Re: Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

    I have created over a thousand blades
    Possible Party Roles of a Sorcadin


    The correct way to create difficult terrain.
    (Image Copyright Ufotable)

    Anyone who has played D&D and other games of the genre for some time have probably heard of the terms such as the ďTankĒ, ďStrikerĒ, ďBlasterĒ, ďHealerĒ, ďBufferĒ, ďDebufferĒ, ďField ControllerĒ, and ďParty FaceĒ. But since I suppose not all people have heard of them, I will explain: these are some examples of the Party Roles that the respective player characters represent and fill.

    For instance, a Barbarian makes a wonderful ďTankĒ (frontline warrior that acts as a damage sponge and protects the backrow while dealing good amounts of melee damage). Meanwhile, a Life Cleric can be a good ďHealerĒ (the meaning is the same as the normal English term), saving the group from getting on too-low HP.

    It is possible for a particular character to have several party roles at once. For instance, Bards make excellent Buffers with Bardic Inspiration, but at the same time they can also use spells like Vicious Mockery and Hypnotic Pattern to Debuff, Cure Wounds to heal, and the Expertise ability to be an ideal Party Face. If he took spells like Conjure Animals with Magical Secrets he can also be an amazing Controller. However, in exchange for their amazing versatility, Bards are generally the worst class when it comes to dealing direct damage.

    It is crucial for an adventuring party to have at least a certain level of balance with these party roles. For instance, if no one is a Tank, the party will easily get crippled by monsters with high DPR (damage-per-round), since no one can protect the backrow 3 Wizards and 2 Sorcerers. If no one in the party can heal, they may suffer from a lot more fatalities than the average party, since if someone drops to 0 HP, thereís no way to bring him back except praying to the gods that he does not fail his Death Saves (now, if I[ happened to DM a party where thereís no healers, I will probably try to compensate for their decisions by giving them more Healing Potions than normal, but not all DMs do that). If no one can neither buff nor debuff, the party has no methods to defeat stronger enemies, such as boss monsters.

    One reason the Sorcadin is so powerful is that it has a lot of possible Roles it can fill. It can be a good tank if it wants. It can deal good magical damage if it wants. It can buff, it can debuff, it can heal, it can control, and it can even become a party face with its high CHA.

    It is possible for a Sorcadin to be good at all of them, and also be amazing at some of them. However, sadly, it is not possible for the Sorcadin to be amazing at all of these at once.

    This is where the problem of very limited Metamagic and Sorcerer Spell options comes in. While I do not believe pure Sorcerers are underpowered like many say, it certainly is an undeniable fact that Sorcerers get the least spells known of all full Casters, and that they also get only 2 to 4 Metamagic Options, making the things a particular Sorcerer can do somewhat limited. While Sorcerers can be good at filling any Caster role they want, itís impossible for one Sorcerer to be the best at everything. Each Sorcerer needs to focus on several concepts - party roles - to become truly effective.

    This applies to Sorcadins too. Most of your roles become truly applicable by utilizing the ever-amazing Metamagic, but it frankly is not possible to take all the Metamagic options and all the Sorcerer spells. IT IS IMPOSSIBLE FOR YOU TO FILL ALL OF THE PARTY ROLES LISTED BELOW, AND YOU MUST CHOOSE WHAT YOUR BUILD WILL BE GOOD AT. Focusing on particular jobs will make you better at them, and also better as an optimized build. This especially stands for the lower levels, where you get only two Metamagic options and a very small number of spells known - as you level up, you may become able to fill more and more roles, and eventually get good at most, or possibly even all of them, depending on your build.

    So, now that thatís all explained, letís take a look at the party roles that a Sorcadin can possibly fill. Here I also listed the abilities and options that will help you fill that role, and to make things easier for beginners, I also talked a bit about the other classes that fill the same role. This way, if youíre jumping into a party where several other players have already decided their classes, it becomes easier for you to choose your options in a way that improves the overall balance of the party. Itís not like having three Buffers in the party will be bad, but if thereís no Debuffer yet, you might as well become one (not that that sort of situation will come up often...).

    Here I will list the Tank, Healer, Buffer, Debuffer, Field Controller, and Party Face as possible roles of the Sorcadin.

    Spoiler: Tank
    Show
    Tank
    What is a Tank?
    A tank is a frontline warrior that is good at defense (and most of the time, offense as well). Tanks are crucial for the party in how they act as ďdamage spongesĒ, or ďmeat shieldsĒ (whichever you want to call them) that take on the melee attacks of the enemy monsters and protect the Wizards and other full Casters in your party that have very low HP.

    The job of tanks is to keep the enemies near you and not allow them to reach the backrow. This is done by engaging in melee range with the enemies; if an enemy attempts to go out of your melee range, it will result in an opportunity attack, and this means that generally, once you and your enemies are locked in melee, your enemies will try not to turn their backs on you.

    If there is no tank in the party, the enemies will come straight for the backrow casters and immediately tear them all to shreds, resulting in a way-too-easy TPK. Your entire body is a shield that protects your friends from this brutal fate.

    Tanks should have high AC and HP, and if possible, certain resources that bolster their defenses even more. Having good damage-inflicting capabilities also helps, because the faster you kill your enemies, the less damage you take.

    How to be a Tank
    Obviously, having good AC and HP help a lot. Spells like Mirror Image, the Defense fighting style, and other various options listed in the ďNeutral 1Ē section of ďPros and ConsĒ also count as abilities that make you a better tank. For DEX builds, going Draconic Sorcerer or obtaining studded leather armor helps.

    If you focus on the part about locking your enemies into melee range, Oath of the Crown has a powerful level 3 Channel Divinity ability, Champion Challenge, which stops the enemies around you from going far away from you. This way, even if you use up your reaction with spells like Shield, you can make sure your enemies will not go for your partyís backrow.
    Champion Challenge works especially if your defensive capabilities are high. If youíre not very good at defending, or if your HP is already pretty low when you use it, it may actually result in you getting knocked out.

    Careful Spell + Web allows you to lock down all the enemies in a semi-large area, and also debuff at the same time. This helps when it comes to protecting the backrow - which is, as already explained, the role you want to play as a Tank.

    Booming Blade + War Caster is a combination all S&B Sorcadins should get, but the reason itís so good is because it makes your enemies think twice... or thrice... before turning their backs on you. Again, this makes you a good tank.

    Another thing to note is that if youíre affected by a detrimental condition (poisoned, charmed, paralyzed, restrained etc.) your abilities are a tank are severely weakened, or at times, nullified. If youíre poisoned or restrained, disadvantage on opportunity attacks can be enough to make your opponents think they can leave you alone and head for the backrow casters. If youíre paralyzed... Well, they might still attack you alright, but chances are, youíd be knocked out in the process.

    This means that going Paladin 6 for Aura of Protection is near-mandatory if you want to create a tanky Sorcadin build. Paladin 6 gives you not only Aura of Protection, but also boosts your Lay on Hands, allows you to make Extra Attacks for when Green-Flame Blade does not work (no two enemies standing next to each other - increasing DPR is a good thing for tank builds), and on top of that gives you the Aid spell, which can heal and increase your (and your friendsí) maximum HP at the same time. Not to mention, every level in Paladin gives you 2 extra HP compared to when you go Sorcerer, and you also get d10 Hit Die instead of d6 Hit Die when it comes to healing from short rests. All in all, it makes you really solid as a Tank.

    If your DM constantly pits you against Casters and other enemies that use magic to come damage you, Ancients Paladin 7 can be good as well for increasing your tankiness, having resistance to damage from spells.

    Paladin 9 also helps you be a tank, especially with the level 3 spell Aura of Vitality. Personally I feel 6/14 is the best option for normal tank Sorcadins, but Paladin 9 also opens up other options for certain builds, so if you have something nasty in mind, itís worth it. (One example is an Oathbreaker with Animate Dead for empowered undead minions.)

    Other Tanky Characters
    Now, unlike how itís possible in other class roles to have an ďoverdoseĒ (for instance, having 6 party faces is really redundant - itís better to have a smart guy or a wise guy instead of 6 celebrities), there can be any number of tanks in your party and you can call it a day, so long as there is a Caster or two who does his/her job right. However, if there are already a good number of Tanks in your party, itís possible to consider going 2/18 over 6/14 (especially if thereís not many Casters) to buff them. On the other hand, always having friends to buff with Aura of Protection is alluring indeed as well...

    As a general rule, the d10 and d12 classes make good tanks (the reason you can be a tank without that much HP is the amazing versatility and defensive capabilities of spells). This means thereís the Barbarian, Fighter, Paladin, and Ranger. Some Fighters and Rangers utilize archery, meaning they will stay in mid-range rather than stand on the frontlines, though.

    Looking at the unique ones:

    The Bear Totem Barbarian is the ultimate tank in the current system of 5e. They get not only the best HP of all classes - they also have the super-powerful Rage ability, that gives them resistance to almost all damage.

    Eldritch Knights (a sub-class of Fighter) also make especially powerful tanks, because just like you, they get to use spells like Shield and Mirror Image to buff their defensiveness.

    Moon Druids can use Wildshape to acquire gigantic loads of a temporary HP-esque something, making them good tanks as well.

    And while they do not have as much core HP, Bladelock builds (Fighter 1 / Blade Warlock X) are also good tanks, since they can use eldritch invocations like Fiendish Vigor and spells like Armor of Agathys, as well as abilities like Dark Oneís Blessing, to boost their tankiness. Bladelocks are a rather unique tank build in how they utilize temporary HP to tank, but theyíre sure good at it.

    Spoiler: Healer
    Show
    Healer
    What is a Healer?
    A healer is, by definition, a character who heals people. Again obviously, having a healer will be beneficial for the party in how it will quite diminish the fatality rates of the characters.

    Now, have one Healer in the party, and most people donít have to be afraid of dying, but thereís still the risk of having the Healer drop to 0 HP first, in which case the situation suddenly turns quite dire. Have two Healers in the party and it becomes much, much better. Three may be an overdose if youíre heavily investing for it, but lucky for you, Paladins get it by default (Lay on Hands) and having another option (Cure Wounds) isnít that taxing either, so thereís not much reason for you to not fancy being one yourself.

    Healing should not be done during combat - at least, ideally. Itís better to first kill off all the enemies and then start the healing, because otherwise you lose combat turns and makes the combat drag on longer (which can result in actually taking more damage). However, if a friend has dropped to 0 HP, it will be a good choice to heal him back so he can get awake and take actions too, improving the number of actions your party can take per round.

    Since healing is done mainly as an action to help dying friends, abilities like the Fighterís Second Wind or spells like Armor of Agathys are usually not regarded as the abilities/spells of a ďHealerĒ, even if they are ďhealingĒ abilities.

    How to be a Healer
    You donít need to try to be a Healer, because, as already mentioned, you are a Healer by default. The Lay on Hands ability of Paladins will heal at least 10 HP per long rest - this should be used for healing conditions or diseases, or bringing back people from 0 HP - but apart from that, you should also take Cure Wounds as a Paladin spell.

    If youíre going Paladin 6, Aid becomes another good healing option, while you can heal 30 HP per long rest with Lay on Hands (yay!)

    And going Paladin 9 gives you the Aura of Vitality spell, and oh boy is this gorgeous. You get to heal 20d6=70 HP average with a level 3 slot (compare this to how a level 3 Cure Wounds can heal only about 3d8+5 =18.5 HP).
    If you want, you can also use the Extended Spell Metamagic option to double the healing to 40d6=140. However, you get only a very small number fo Metamagic options, so you might want to think twice before doing so. Itís a really fun combo though...

    Polymorph is a unique Healing spell in its own way. It gives a gigantic load of temporary HP-esque something to a friend by bundling him into the bulky costume of a T-Rex. You could use it on a frontline friend whoís getting low on HP but still wants to tank.

    Other Healer Characters
    Life Clerics heal better than any other class, but you donít need that much healing to be a Healer. Having Cure Wounds or Healing Word is enough to classify yourself one.

    Looking at full casters, Bards and Druids have both Cure Wounds and Healing Word, while the spell list of Clerics is obviously packed with healing spells, among many others.
    Looking at half-casters, Pure Paladins have Lay on Hands and Cure Wounds (as well as Aid and Aura of Vitality at higher levels), while Rangers have Goodbery and Cure Wounds.

    Barbarians, Fighters, Monks, Rogues, Sorcerers, Warlocks, and Wizards do not have methods of healing their friends, with the exception of Favored Soul Sorcerers and Theurgy Wizards, both new and only half-official options from UA.

    Overall you can see that five of the twelve classes can be Healers, while the other seven cannot. Approximately half of the classes can be healers.

    Spoiler: Buffer
    Show
    Buffer
    What is a Buffer?
    A Buffer is a character who empowers his allies (or himself if he wants), normally through the usage of Buffing Spells. Some of the best Buffing Spells are Bless, Haste, Greater Invisibility and Polymorph (all of which you get). Itís something of a shame that Sorcerers donít get True Polymorph nor Foresight (that would have been amazing for 2/18 builds!), but eh, youíd have to deal with it.

    Buff spells are usually used on frontline warriors to bolster their attacks and/or defenses, making it easier for them to smash their enemies apart. Even something as simple as ď+1d4 to hitĒ or ďadvantage on attacksĒ can make a difficult fight become really easy.

    Without a Buffer, your party may run into situations where a particular enemy is so strong itís difficult to take him down, unless you expend a lot of resources in the process. While itís not required for a party to be good, it does make your party better. A lot better.

    Buffing gets especially good if your party includes a lot of guys that especially benefit from being buffed, like the Rogue whoís declaring he will marry Greater Invisibility, or the Barbarian who gets so happy he forgets the reason for his rage every time heís targeted by Haste.

    And remember: since you have Metamagic, your buffing is better than normal. You can do this job better than a Bard or a Wizard - not as versatile, but much more straightforwardly effective.

    How to be a Buffer
    A majority of the powerful buffing spells can target only 1 creature, and at the same time, require concentration. This means that while youíre buffing someone, you cannot use other concentration spells (doing so will end the buff), and also that you cannot buff several friends at once, unless itís a special spell like Bless. But if given the opportunity, youíd obviously want to buff multiple allies instead of just one, right?

    Here, Metamagic kicks in to save the day.

    Consider the Twinned Spell Metamagic option to be mandatory if you want to be a good Buffer as a Sorcadin. This Metamagic option does not have a lot of synergetic spells at low Sorcerer levels (Suggestion and Phantasmal Force come up to mind, but thatís pretty much it), but once you get to the level 3 and 4 spells, aforementioned Haste, Greater Invisibility and Polymorph come jumping into your Spells Ready list. Twinning these spells is truly an amazing trick up your sleeve, and something only Sorcerers can do.

    However, be aware that Twinned Spell is the most costly Metamagic option, requiring a number of sorcery points equal to the level of the spell you Twin. Overuse will result in using up all your Sorcery Points, so use it with caution.

    Twinned Spell also works with certain devastating damage spells like Disintegrate or Finger of Death. Again, it does cost some load of Sorcery Points, though.

    Due to using up a lot of Sorcery Points, and due to how the best buffing spells require some investment in Sorcerer levels to be gained access, Paladin 2/ Sorcerer X is a good option for you if youíve decided that Buffing is your thing. You want those good Buffing spells as soon as possible. After youíve got to Sorcerer 8, you can perhaps go back to Paladin if you want, but since Sorcery Points (and slots) increase lots with Sorcerer levels, you just might as well stay with going Sorcerer all the way from there. Either works.

    Other Buffer Characters
    Bards, Sorcerers and Wizards are the classes that are especially good at buffing (and supporting in general).
    Bards have Bardic Inspiration as means of buffing besides spells.
    Sorcerers have Metamagic, and again, they can Twin.
    Wizards can choose their spells from a vast repository, and apart from that, they can also use a lot of situational buffing rituals such as Water Breathing, making them good at buffing in their own special way.

    If your party does not have enough characters that can buff (including, if you look at the spell lists of the aforementioned characters and realize they donít have many buffing spells), you can become a great Buffer and save the day. The tanks and strikers in your party will all fall in love with you.

    Spoiler: Debuffer
    Show
    Debuffer
    What is a Debuffer?
    The answer is simple: Itís the opposite of a buffer. But at the same time, you can say theyíre similar in nature - they share the same goal, but they use different methods to achieve it.

    While a Buffer empowers his allies to gain tactical advantage, a Debuffer instead weakens his enemies to gain tactical advantage. Spells like Suggestion and Polymorph (used to turn someone into an octopus) can target only 1 enemy unless you use Twinned Spell, while others like Hold Person and Hold Monster can be upcast to designate more targets. Web, Fear, Hypnotic Pattern, Reverse Gravity and their lot can affect everyone in a large area - this including your friends.

    Much like Buff spells, most Debuffs spell require concentration, and thus you cannot cast multiple of them at once.

    Debuff spells can save the necks of you and your friends in countless dire situations. Be it to paralyze the enemy Caster, or be it to hypnotize the entire horde of orcs, debuff spells are always nice to have, and can turn the tide of an encounter on its own.

    Now, the greatest way to debuff an enemy is to kill him. So on first glance, damaging enemies might seem better than debuffing them. And this is right if the enemies are all Goblins, Kobolds or other enemies that will die soon either way - but if the enemies are tanky or anything, debuffing them first is the right thing to do. Itís better to spend 4 or 5 turns killing an once powerful, now severely weakened monster than spend 3 turns killing a super-powerful monster on his murderous rampage.

    How to be a Debuffer
    After reading the Buff section, using Twinned spell together with Debuff spells might seem like a nice idea on first glance. However, I personally think that is not the case here. Letís compare the characteristics of Buff and Debuff spells:

    • Saving Throws
      Buff spells are generally not resisted - they automatically succeed. However, a majority of the Debuff spells require a saving throw for its effects to take place successfully. This means that there is the danger that if your enemy (or enemies) all succeed on the save, your spell slot and turn may be wasted for nothing. Thus, youíd want have some way or another to make sure the enemies fail the saves as much as possible. One method is to pump your CHA. The other is a Metamagic option which we will talk more about shortly.
    • Number of Targets
      Most Buff spells can designate only 1 target, but have powerful effects - thus Twinned Spell has amazing synergy with them in general. However, many good Debuff spells can designate multiple targets, or alternatively, have an ďarea of effectĒ that allows it to affect multiple enemies at the same time, even without help from Twinned Spell.
    • Can (Due to bad positioning) Debuff Friends Too
      While Buff spells donít have the danger of buffing enemies on accident, the AoE debuff spells can, if misplaced, debuff your friends as well. Perhaps your friend Barbarian will get entangled in your Web, or your Fighter comrade might go into a coma with your Hypnotic Pattern. Of course you should generally refrain from this sort of play, but if you may occasionally find yourself in situations where this is required to win, or gain tactical advantage. And thatís not very surprising or rare either - your partyís tanks will always be in melee range of your enemies anyways! But there happens to be a wonderful Metamagic option for those sorts of needs.


    The two Metamagic options that work together most wonderfully with Debuff spells are Heightened Spell and Careful Spell. The former bestows disadvantage on the saving throw of one target of your debuff spell (it seems they were smart enough to not say all the targets), while the latter allows you and your friends to automatically succeed on the saving throws of your debuff spells. What does this make possible?

    Perhaps you can bestow disadvantage on the saving throw of an especially powerful enemy monster, causing him to get Banished into another plane of existence until youíve cleaned up all his minions. Or, perhaps he might never come back in the first place, if heís a native of another plane... (and natives of other planes tend to be formidable enemies, donít they?)

    Perhaps you can, as already mentioned in the ďTankĒ section, use Careful Spell + Web on an area where you and your friends are fighting a bunch of enemies. Restraining all your enemies while you and your friend freely move around is sure fun.

    Heightened Spell requires 3 Sorcery Points to use and is rather pricey, but in contrast, Careful Spell is very economical - requiring only 1 Sorcery Point to use. Both are powerful choices, but Iíd generally advice you first get Careful and then get Heightened later. If you get Heightened at Sorcerer level 3, youíll realize that using it will be a bit too costly at the level (once you hit level 10 for your third Metamagic, feel free to take it - itís good for you, now that youíve got a lot more Sorcery Points, as well as Spell Slots you can convert with Font of Magic). Careful makes you more tactically flexible, even from low levels.

    Other Debuffer Characters
    Again, Bards, Sorcerers and Wizards. Warlocks also have a certain number of debuff spells for when they need it.

    Spoiler: Field Controller
    Show
    Field Controller
    What is a Field Controller?
    A Field Controller is someone who manipulates the battlefield to ensure the party always has tactical advantage over your enemies. This is especially important if your DM uses Flanking rules, but even without them, this is an important job.

    How to be a Field Controller
    Field Control may be done through creating walls of stone or fire, or it may be done through making a particular area covered with thick mist or sticky spiderwebs, or it may be done through summoning a bunch of forks and knives and having them create the frontlines (respectively Wall of Stone, Wall of Fire, Web, Fog Cloud, Animate Objects).

    Other spells, like Fear, force movement.

    However, what makes you different from the other classes that are good at this job as well is that, being a formidable frontline warrior as well as a Caster, you also have the option to act as Field Control yourself. Your mere presence can become Field Control, by utilizing opportunity attacks (especially BB + War Caster) and such, and thereís also the Paladin abilities like Champion Challenge or Dreadful Aspect.

    As with Debuff spells, many Field Control spells require saving throws and require concentration.

    Other Field Controller Characters
    This is getting repetitive, but Bards, Sorcerers, and Wizards.
    But apart from that, Druids are also amazing at minionmancy and field control in general.

    Some Field Control spells can synergize. For instance, if thereís a necromancer in the party, you can cast Stinking Cloud on the area where the zombies are walking around, because Stinking Cloud does not affect monsters that are immune to poison.


    Spoiler: Party Face
    Show
    Party Face
    What is a Party Face?
    A Party Face is someone who is good at getting through role-play situations. Of course, a lot of this will depend on the creativity and IRL wits of the player (thatís more important than the actual abilities of the character), but apart from that it should still be noted that there are many ways to make your Sorcadin better at being a party face.

    How to be a Party Face
    Party Faces should have high CHA, and proficiency with skills such as Persuasion, Deception, and Intimidation. Having access to Illusion and Enchantment spells also helps.

    Now, you happen to already have high CHA, and you can also get easy access to illusion and enchantment spells. Apart from Minor Illusion (aka the strongest cantrip ever), Phantasmal Force and Suggestion are examples of good spells that are useful both in-combat and out-of-combat.

    Being a Half-Elf or a Variant Human can help with getting proficiency in more skills (two with Half-Elf, one with Variant Human). You can customize your background to meet your party needs, and since your INT and WIS will be very low, chances are you will be focusing on:

    • STR Build: Atheletics and CHA skills
    • DEX Build: Acrobatics, Stealth (possibly Sleight of Hand) and CHA skills


    So, itís more like, you are going to be a party face by default.

    Other Party Face Characters
    Almost all of the Casters that use CHA (Bards, Sorcerers and Warlocks) will be good at being a party face - especially Bards. A good number of Rogues - especially Swashbucklers - also have high CHA, and bolster their abilities as a Party Face with Expertise.
    Last edited by Gastronomie; 2016-10-22 at 09:32 AM.
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    Spoiler: Quotes
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    Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

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    Default Re: Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

    Unaware of loss, nor aware of gain
    Ratios of Paladin and Sorcerer Levels


    Some builds are better at melee than others.
    (Image Copyright Ufotable)

    There are many possible Sorcadin builds, each with a particular focus, and depending on what exactly you want to focus upon, your ideal choice of Paladin and Sorcerer level ratios will change.

    For instance, if you want to be a good tank, going Paladin 6 is mandatory, while other builds which want to focus more on buffing yourself and friends will probably want to go Paladin 2 or 3 and take more Sorcerer levels, for more Sorcery Points and high-level Spell Slots.

    Here we will look at the various possible ratios of Paladin and Sorcerer, and evaluate the pros, cons and aptitudes of each ratio.

    Spoiler: Paladin 2/ Sorcerer 18
    Show
    Paladin 2/ Sorcerer 18
    Pros
    • Gets Sorcerer spells fastest of all Sorcadin builds (4 levels earlier than 6/14)
    • Most Spell Slots of all Sorcadin builds
    • Most Sorcery Points of all Sorcadin builds
    • Gets four Metamagic Options at level 19 (Sorcerer level 17)
    • Only Sorcadin build to gain access to Level 18 Sorcerous Origin abilities at level 20
    • Gains access to Level 9 spells at high levels (the main thing being Wish)

    Cons
    • Does not get Aura of Protection. Worse Saving Throws
    • Does not get Extra Attack, unless you go Favored Soul. Without Extra Attack, your DPR will be low in situations where GFB does not work right
    • Just a bit lower HP due to less Paladin Levels
    • Does not get the Oath abilities such as Channel Divinity

    Aptitudes
    While the lack of Aura of Protection and having less HP (as well as less healing via Lay on Hands) makes you mediocre as a tank, you are the most capable God Caster of all the Sorcadin builds.

    For those who wish to utilize Buffing spells with Twinned Spell, this will be a solid choice, with lots of sorcery points and earlier access to the spells such as Haste, Greater Invisibility and Polymorph.

    Spoiler: Paladin 3/ Sorcerer 17
    Show
    Paladin 3/ Sorcerer 17
    Pros
    • Gets good Sorcerer spells at pretty early levels
    • More Spell Slots than other Sorcadin builds
    • More Sorcery Points than other Sorcadin builds
    • Gets four Metamagic Options at level 20 (Sorcerer level 17)
    • Gains access to Level 9 spells at high levels (the main thing being Wish)

    Cons
    • Does not get Aura of Protection. Worse Saving Throws
    • Does not get Extra Attack, unless you go Favored Soul. Without Extra Attack, your DPR will be low in situations where GFB does not work right
    • Just a bit lower HP due to less Paladin Levels

    Aptitudes
    This build is similar to the 2/18 build, the differences being that:
    • This build gets Channel Divinity
    • This build gets Sorcerer spells 1 level late
    • This build does not get the Level 18 Sorcerous Origin ability at Level 20


    So, the only reason to take this over 2/18 is to get Channel Divinity.

    If you are going with this build, the main candidate for your Oath will be Oathbreaker (yes, I know - an Oathbreaker is someone who broke his Oath, not an Oath in itself - but just friggin ignore that for now!!!).
    Oathbreakerís Dreadful Aspect is a powerful control ability that will remain useful for your entire career. Control Undead is situational, but when it comes up, itís truly amazing, if not broken. Itís like Dominate Monster, except it doesnít require concentration and requires only one save per day.

    The Crown Oath also has good Channel Divinity options if you look at just their effects, but Champion Challenge is an ability designed for tanks, meaning itís not your main thing. Devotion and Ancients are mediocre choices, and Vengeance is not that good either, since their Channel Divinities are either not that synergetic with Caster-focused builds (Devotion and Vengeance are better with melee-focused builds), or simply really meh (Ancients). Unless youíre going Oathbreaker 3, itís probably better to go 2/18 and advance in Sorcerer 1 level earlier.

    Spoiler: Paladin 6/ Sorcerer 14
    Show
    Paladin 6/ Sorcerer 14
    Pros
    • Gets Aura of Protection. Amazing at saving throws
    • Gets Level 2 Paladin spells such as Aid and Find Steed
    • Gets to heal more from Lay on Hands, and also gets a bit more HP than Caster-focused builds
    • Gets Extra Attack, meaning more reliable DPR even when GFB doesnít work

    Cons
    • Gets Sorcerer spells pretty late. Four levels late than a 2/18 build, for instance - not something to be ignored
    • Does not get your fourth Metamagic option
    • Cannot get level 8 or 9 spells (aka Wish)

    Aptitudes
    The builds from this one and below can benefit from the amazing Aura of Protection ability (Paladin 6), making them wonderful tanks - one of the most ďconstantly reliableĒ builds in 5e.

    The fact you donít get level 8 and 9 spells is IMO not as devastating as one may assume - itís not like you can use them all day long anyways. Whatís definitely more detrimental is how this build suffers from delayed Caster Level progression.

    It will take a lot of levels before you can become a good Caster. If your campaign starts at a low level, for instance, you might feel always frustrated until you get to the higher levels, because until then, youíre not that different from a normal Paladin.

    This build is focused on being a tank. Once he gets over level 12, he can also be a pretty versatile caster. But he will come online rather slow.

    For campaigns which will spend more time at higher levels, this build is really solid and nice.

    I personally believe that for 6/14 builds, gimmicks such as Careful Web really come to life. You can jump into the enemy frontlines without fear of getting knocked out early, and to make you even better at your job, youíd want to debuff your enemies and control the battlefield.

    Spoiler: Paladin 7/ Sorcerer 13
    Show
    Paladin 7/ Sorcerer 13
    Pros
    • Gains the level 7 ability of your Paladin Oath

    Cons
    • Does not gain the level 14 ability of your Sorcerous Origin
    • Gets delayed 1 level in Sorcerer Level Progression compared to 6/14 builds

    Aptitudes
    The only reason to go 7/13 over 6/14 is to take the level 7 Paladin Oath ability. However, the abilities for Devotion, Vengeance and Crown are not that powerful (at least not powerful enough to justify going 7/13), leaving only Ancients and Oathbreakers. (However, Oathbreakers are only for when youíre going to focus a lot on Extra Attack, and if youíre going mainly GFB/BB, itís not that good an ability.)

    For those going Ancients, there is no reason to go 6/14.

    However, if youíre going 7/13, do keep in mind that 9/11 is another pretty solid choice.

    Spoiler: Paladin 9/ Sorcerer 11
    Show
    Paladin 9/ Sorcerer 11
    Pros
    • Gets access to level 3 Paladin spells

    Cons
    • Gets spells of only up to level 6
    • Even more of a delay in Caster level progression

    Aptitudes
    The big thing about level 3 Paladin spells is Aura of Vitality (heal 70 HP), but in addition to that, Oathbreakers also get Animate Dead.

    Oathbreakers can benefit from 9/11, since Animate Dead can be upcast to summon forth a powerful undead army that gets bolstered with Aura of Hate.

    9/11 is also strong for other builds, but IMO it works best with Oathbreakers.

    Spoiler: Paladin 11/ Sorcerer 9
    Show
    Paladin 11/ Sorcerer 9
    Pros
    • Gets Improved Divine Smite (and Aura of Courage)
    • Best tank of all Sorcadins (at least, among the ones listed in here)

    Cons
    • You donít get your third Metamagic option
    • Gets spells of only up to level 5
    • Lot of a delay in Caster level progression

    Aptitudes
    This build is for when you really want to be good at melee combat. Or, rather... At this point, youíre more of a ďPaladin who happened to realize that youíve already taken most of your goodies in Paladin levels, and decided to get into Sorcerer laterĒ.

    But IMO, the Paladin abilities generally tend to start out strong and slowly get weaker in comparison (not that theyíre really weak - just situational, or at least not as strong as Aura of Protection etc.). With the exception of the Oathbreaker, who keeps on getting super-powerful abilities till his highest level, IMO almost all Paladins with optimization in their minds should think about going Sorcerer later.

    This build is similar to 9/11, but gets better damage via Improved Divine Smite. Due to the nature of IDS, itís best to take Polearm Master and gain extra 3d8 damage per round (otherwise going 9/11 is infinitely better, due to faster Caster level progression, and eventually getting your third Metamagic option).

    This build will be not very different from a ďHalf-CasterĒ type class, in terms of what it can do - it gets only up to level 5 spells. However, itís still very powerful, as well as versatile, because Metamagic. And because you have the spell lists of two classes, Paladins and Sorcerers.

    Your best candidates for 11/9 Oaths are Ancients and Oathbreakers, having good level 7 abilities (Oathbreakers might as well go straight Oathbreaker though).

    Since you get the good Buff spells very, very late, and you donít have many Sorcery Points, you should focus more on Debuffing over Buffing, choosing Twinned and Careful Spell as your Metamagic options.
    Last edited by Gastronomie; 2016-10-22 at 09:35 AM.
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    Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

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    Default Re: Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

    Withstood pain to create weapons
    Whatís Your Weapon of Choice?
    Part 1: Longsword



    Your weapon defines your combat style. (Image by Ufotable)

    As already mentioned in ďRaces and StatsĒ, the build of a Sorcadin is defined by his weapon. You could call these the three ďSub-ClassesĒ of Sorcadins: Longsword, Greatsword, and Rapier. Depending on your weapon, the ratings of certain Oaths and Origins will start to change. I intend to make those points clear by sorting the guide in this way.

    Each explanation of a ďSub-ClassĒ will be divided into the following parts:
    1. Core Concept
    2. Core Abilities
    3. Paladin Oath Evaluation
    4. Sorcerer Origin Evaluation
    5. Level Progression


    Due to the limitation on the number of words per post, I will divide this section into three posts, and talk only about the Longsword in this post.

    NOTE - Technically, damage-wise, you can replace a Longsword with a Battleaxe, Flail, Morningstar, War Pick, Warhammer, or hell, even a Rapier, and likewise, you can replace a Greatsword with a Maul - and you should have multiple weapons in case you fight enemies which are resistant to a certain type of damage - but I anyways named these weapons after the options I considered to be ďdefaultĒ.
    Also, the UA Feat ďBlade MasteryĒ makes using swords generally the better option.



    Longsword Sorcadin
    IMO this is the default option for Sorcadins. Not that itís absolutely superior to the other Sub-Classes, just that itís all-around really, really balanced. You have both great defenses and great offense, not to mention all the versatility via spells and the healing from being a Paladin, and youíll be greatly welcome in virtually any adventuring team.

    Spoiler: Core Concept
    Show
    Core Concept
    Letís first look at the two main strengths of the Longsword Sorcadin, which are ďSuperb DefensesĒ and having ďLess Feat Dependency (Higher CHA)Ē. After that, weíll talk a bit about the ďattack methodĒ of choice, which is either ďExtra AttackĒ or ďGreen-Flame/Booming BladeĒ.

    Superb Defenses
    The main thing about Longsword Sorcadins is their high defense. Your offense capabilities may not match that of a Greatsword build, but youíre more tanky than any other Sorcadin sub-class in terms of both AC and Saving Throws, making you the ultimate All-Rounder.

    First, about AC: As with all Sword and Board builds, having a shield equipped to you for +2 AC is amazing for any melee character. Being tanky is one of the core responsibilities of a frontline warrior, and with your HP being considerably lower than the average Fighter, Sorcadins need an option to reinforce their defenses. The easiest way to get tankier is to hold a shield - and thus, it can be said that S&B and Sorcadins are indeed synergetic from the start.

    With Plate Armor, the Defense Fighting Style, and a Shield, your AC becomes 18+2+1=21. With the Shield spell (+5 AC) that becomes 26, even better than the Tarrasque. At higher levels, with spells like Greater Invisibility, disadvantage on all attacks meant for you makes you a truly terrifying opponent to face (Shadow Sorcs also get the same benefit from Darkness, at the price of possibly hindering your friendsí actions, and Blur also allows this with a level 2 spell). Letís see how effective this is by actually crunching numbers.

    Spoiler: Probabilities of you getting hit
    Show
    With 21 AC:
    • Goblins (CR 1/4) can hit you only 20% of the time.
    • A Red Dragon Wyrmling (CR 4) can hit you only 30% of the time.
    • A Young Red Dragon (CR 10) can hit you only 50% of the time.
    • An Adult Red Dragon (CR 17) can hit you 70% of the time.


    With 21 AC and disadvantage:
    • Goblins (CR 1/4) can hit you only 4% of the time.
    • A Red Dragon Wyrmling (CR 4) can hit you only 9% of the time.
    • A Young Red Dragon (CR 10) can hit you only 25% of the time.
    • An Adult Red Dragon (CR 17) can hit you only 49% of the time.


    With 26 AC:
    • Goblins (CR 1/4) can hit you only 5% of the time (Critical only).
    • A Red Dragon Wyrmling (CR 4) can hit you only 5% of the time (Critical only).
    • A Young Red Dragon (CR 10) can hit you only 25% of the time.
    • An Adult Red Dragon (CR 17) can hit you only 45% of the time.


    With 26 AC and disadvantage:
    • Goblins (CR 1/4) can hit you only 0.25% of the time (Two Criticals in a row only).
    • A Red Dragon Wyrmling (CR 4) can hit you only 0.25% of the time (Two Criticals in a row only).
    • A Young Red Dragon (CR 10) can hit you only 6.25% of the time.
    • An Adult Red Dragon (CR 17) can hit you only 20.25% of the time.

    ...Thatís how difficult it is to hit you.

    (The Blade Mastery feat also increases your AC by 1. It does, however, use up your reaction - which means it cannot be used together with Booming Blade + War Caster, or Shield. These may make it anti-synergetic with builds which focus on locking down enemies.)

    Second, since you donít depend on STR as much as Greatsword builds, the chances open up for you to invest more in CHA (more mentioning of this in the next section, ďLess Feat DependencyĒ). This also reads ďBetter Saving ThrowsĒ, with your ever-so-awesome Aura of Protection (if you go Paladin 6).

    D&D 5e is designed so that the saving throw DCs of the monstersí abilities rise and rise with higher CR, but the saving throw bonuses of the PCs generally donít get upgraded (only the bonuses for the stats youíre investing in and/or have saving throw proficiencies with can grow). While a level 1 Sorcerer and a level 20 Sorcerer will most likely both equally suck at WIS saves, the WIS save DCs of the monsters will rise and rise, from the DC 10 of the CR 2 Gibbering Mouther to the DC 21 of the CR 24 Ancient Red Dragon.

    Most characters are good at only one or two types of saves. Youíre good at them all, and boosting your CHA improves ALL your Saving Throws. Both in terms of AC and saves, your defenses are hell amazing. The only class that has better saving throws than you is the Monk with Diamond Soul, but unlike him, you can bestow your ability to your friends around you as well.

    In addition to aforementioned benefits, Oath of the Ancients level 7 gives you resistance to spell damage, improving your tankiness even further. Oath of the Crown and Oathbreaker give you good battlefield control options as well, with their excellent Channel Divinity powers.

    Less Feat Dependency (Higher CHA)
    For Greatsword builds, GWM is a Feat tax (well, to be fair, itís also one thatís worth taking), and they also need to take Resilient (CON). DEX builds need to not only take War Caster, but also pump up their DEX.

    Compared to these, the only Feat S&Bs have to take is War Caster. Thus you get one more free ASI compared to the other builds. Overall, Longsword Sorcadins have the most options possible, both during character creation and during combat.

    BTW, another thing worth mentioning is that you donít need to necessarily have high STR to make a Longsword build work, unlike how GWMs will invest heavily in there. Longsword Sorcadins should generally value CHA more than STR. It improves not only your spellcasting and Channel Divinity, but also your saves via Aura of Protection (if youíre Draconic Sorcerer, Elemental Affinity] also works better with high CHA). If you went with a Race that gives you +2 STR, you should first pump that 17 STR to 18, but otherwise, it will generally be actually better to first pump your CHA, possibly even to 20, before going on to STR.

    Extra Attack V.S. SCAG Sword Cantrips
    Now, from here, letít move on to the offense issue. Longswordís damage die of 1d8 is okay. Itís not particularly interesting, but not bad either.

    From here is where stuff get interesting, and builds start to differentiate themselves. If youíre interesting in dealing more damage, taking Dueling instead of Defense is a not-bad option, but do keep in mind that at high levels (level 11 and higher), Green-Flame Blade or Booming Blade can be a possibly more damaging option than Extra Attack. This is especially evident with Draconic Bloodline Origin + Green-Flame Blade. On the other hand, if you are an Oathbreaker with Aura of Hate, Extra Attack can be more beneficial for you, and thus Dueling will become a more yummy, synergetic option. At the same time you can also say that Draconic Bloodline and Oathbreaker are sorta anti-synergetic at what they do (only ďsortaĒ, but still).

    ...Stuff like that. Depending on your Oath and Origin, certain options may become stronger or weaker.

    So, it can be said that, one thing to keep in mind when going S&B is - ďWhat is your main attack option? Extra Attack or the SCAG Blade Cantrips?Ē

    Extra Attack has a higher chance of hitting at least once per turn, and rarely ends his turn without doing anything. The SCAG Blade Cantrips are only once per turn with their attacks, so if you miss you might end your turn doing nothing, but depending on the level it has better damage than Extra Attack, and Booming Blade can also be Twinned for a semi-Extra Attack (it does cost a Sorcery Point, and you canít choose the same target for both attacks, though).

    Thereís no ďrightĒ or ďwrongĒ option here. Choose whichever attack option you think is more cool. Your choice of Oath and Origin should be, at least to some extent, based on that decision.

    Spoiler: Core Abilities
    Show
    Core Abilities
    Here I will talk about abilities that are especially useful for the Longsword Sorcadin. However, it should be noted that due to how ďorthodoxĒ and ďsimpleĒ the Longsword build is, there are not many abilities that are especially or uniquely strong for Longsword builds.

    Thus, there is honestly not that much to talk in here. If anything, we will talk about what options are especially strong with S&B - especially the CHA based options.

    Paladin
    • Fighting Style: Take either Dueling (Extra Attack builds) or Defense (SCAG Blade builds). Protection does help your job as a tank, but is mediocre in how it uses up your Reaction. Your Reaction should be used for Booming Blade+War Caster (massive damage), or for the Shield spell.
    • Aura of Protection: Taking this requires 6-level progression in Paladin, delaying your Caster progression by a lot. However, this investment in Paladin is most definitely worth it.
      The label does not lie, because Aura of Protection really protects you and your friends. This ability is insanely powerful for anyone, but it works better for STR S&B than it does for GWM or DEX S&B, because with STR S&B you can invest more heavily in CHA.
      For those who wish to become better Buffers, this can be either delayed or ignored, but I personally think you should get it sooner or later, especially if youíre going to have 20 CHA.


    Sorcerer
    • Metamagic: Do keep in mind that you get only two options, and the options donít increase till Sorcerer level 10. Thus you should choose these wisely. First, Quickened Spell is mandatory, so thatís that. The other main options are Heightened Spell (when you really want to kill someone), Careful Spell (combine with Web or Hypnotic Pattern for amazing effect), and Twinned Spell (While your Sorcerer level is low, use on Booming Blade, Suggestion, and Phantasmal Force. Once itís high, use together with Haste, Greater Invisibility, and Polymorph for maximum lolz. Does require quite a lot of sorcery points when combined with high-level spells though). If youíre going level 9 Paladin, Extended Spell is another good option for the Aura of Vitality combo.
      Careful Spell is
    • Shield: Iím talking about the Level 1 spell.. Itís actually more of a class ability than a spell.

    *NOTE-Some rulings by the creators say Green-Flame Blade cannot be twinned since it must choose two targets. However, as with all rulings, this depends on the DM, so ask beforehand.

    Spoiler: Paladin Oath Evaluation
    Show
    Paladin Oath Evaluation

    Oath of Devotion
    This option is not bad, but not especially good either. Taking a look at what it has:
    • Oath Spells: A mixed bag of situational abilities thatís anyways extremely useful in how theyíre free to take. All the Oath Spells options are good for you, considering how Sorcerers get so little spell selection, and you desperately need versatility .
    • Channel Divinity: Sacred Weapon: It increases your hit bonus and looks at your high CHA! Sadly it also uses an action. If you can activate it before combat itís good, but even in that case this is more of a GWM ability than a S&B one.
    • Channel Divinity: Turn the Unholy: Too situational to be given an actual rating. It is certainly not bad when it can be used, though.
    • Aura of Devotion: Canít be Charmed. Not ďadvantageĒ, you canít be charmed. And sure itís a nice ability, but it also sorta overlaps with racial abilities of an Elf or Half-Elf, and itís also situational. A majority of Charming effects look at WIS, and with proficiency in WIS saves and Aura of Protection, chances are youíre gonna succeed on the save either way. If youíre going Devotion, level 6 is probably enough (unless youíre going level 9 for level 3 spells).
      Also, if youíre using Hypnotic Pattern on your area, you can simply use Careful Spell.


    Oath of the Ancients
    WARNING: This rating specifically refers to when you go 7 levels in Paladin instead of 6. If you plan on going only Paladin 6, DO NOT CHOOSE THIS OATH.
    • Oath Spells: Constantly having Misty Step prepared is good. Speak With Animals is also useful for when you need it in RP situations. Ensnaring Strike is not something you will be constantly using, but itís a very good control spell that doesnít use up your action and is great when you need it. ďRestrainedĒ is quite a menacing condition.
    • Channel Divinity: Natureís Wrath: Itís not that itís necessarily bad, itís that Ensnaring Strike is generally the better option. At least this one doesnít require concentration. Itís not bad when it can be pulled off, so better than nothing.
    • Channel Divinity: Turn the Faithless: Same as Turn the Unholy - too situational to be given an actual rating, but certainly not bad when it can be used.
    • Aura of Warding: The selling point of this Oath. Now, sadly, not a good number of the monsters in the MM have spellcasting, and even if they have magical powers, this ability doesnít work on magical damage that doesnít come from spells (like a dragonís breath weapon or a Mind Flayerís Mind Blast). Itís heavily campaign/DM dependent, and not as amazing as it seems in paper.
      However, even with that said, itís still good. Very good, and can save your neck (and the necks of your friends) when needed, especially given how enemy spells tend to deal extremely high damage. Besides, anything that improves your capacities as a tank is a good ability to have.


    Oath of Vengeance
    Clearly this oath is designed to be an offense build, and a good one at that too. Itís a very strong Oath, but not one that synergizes well with S&B Sorcadins, since you want more versatility than extra offense.
    • Oath Spells: This doesnít give you much extra spell options when you compare it to the Sorcerer spell list. What it does is freeing up Sorcerer spell options and allowing you to choose more Sorcerer spells. Thatís a pretty good thing.
    • Channel Divinity: Abjure Enemy: Not bad as means to keep someone from escaping or running towards the backrow casters. Itís easy to forget, but unlike you, most casters are fragile.
    • Channel Divinity: Vow of Enmity: Gets advantage on all attacks against somebody you want to kill first. Itís a Bonus Action, doesnít require concentration, and doesnít allow a save either. Pretty darn nice, especially since spells like Green-Flame Blade will deal 0 damage for the turn if you miss once. Also, getting twice the crits is very fun when combined with Divine Smite.
    • Relentless Avenger: Not bad. Not something worth the extra Paladin level either.


    Oath of the Crown (SCAG)
    This oath is often overlooked, but IMO itís actually one of the, if not the best Oath(s) for a S&B Sorcadin with more than 6 Paladin levels in how itís the best Oath for a tank build.
    However, for builds that donít focus much on tanking, itís a really meh choice. However, considering that most of those who donít focus on tanking will go 2/18 and never take an Oath in the first place, if youíre going to actually choose an Oath, you should consider this to be a powerful option. (3/17 builds are an exception - they should become Oathbreakers - though.)
    • Oath Spells: Blue for builds that go Paladin more than 9 levels due to Spirit Guardians, Black for builds that go only 6 or 7. Not a bad list, but not as good as the other ones.
    • Channel Divinity: Champion Challenge: Is it just me, or does this not use up an Action, or even a Bonus Action? I mean, all the other Channel Divinity abilities state ďAs an action...Ē or ďAs a bonus action...Ē but this one doesnít. In which case this is Sky Blue as an ability that protects all your backrow friends. And remember how you have amazing AC? Feel free to take on the entire frontline by yourself.
      Gets really meh if youíre not a Tank, but since youíve chosen this Oath, I suppose youíre gonna be one.
      Careful Spell is very synergetic with this ability - get all the enemies around you, and proceed to drop an AoE on the entire area around you. Drop a Web (normally Blue, but Sky Blue for you) or Hypnotic Pattern on the entire area (including yourself) without fear of failing the save.
    • Channel Divinity: Turn the Tide: A situational version of Mass Healing Word is better than it seems on first glance. The way itís written is the same as many healing spells, so pretty sure you can include yourself in the targets you heal as well (you should ask your DM beforehand about those rulings at your table though).
      However, having the targets need to hear your voice is a really painful restriction in how it canít restore the consciousness of friends with 0 HP. The fact Champion Challenge is so good also makes using this something of a last resort, but itís not a bad last resort when you need it.
    • Divine Allegiance: Using up your reaction is generally something you want to keep away from, and the 5 feet radius makes it even worse. Could be worth using if the friend next to you is going to faint, in which case this is a good use of your reaction, but generally, I would stop at Paladin 6.


    Oathbreaker (DMG)
    This Oath (or rather, the state of ďBreaking an OathĒ) specifically requires DM permission in how many associated characters will be evil. Some DMs may also allow this to be re-fluffed to be some sort of a really Dark Hero-ish or Fanatic Cultist-ish ďOathĒ, depending on the setting (in a particular game Iím joining, my character - who derives her Paladin powers from the Goddess of Death - is scheduled to become an ďOathbreakerĒ when she hits Paladin level 3). Whatever the case, itís part of player manners to be cooperative to the team, so do keep that in mind, even when playing an Evil character.
    Anyhow, the reason this Oath is Blue is because a lot of its abilities (all of them very strong!) rely on CHA. S&B Builds can get higher CHA than GWM builds, so itís obvious that this Oath is a really good option for S&B Sorcadins in general.
    Whether to go Oathbreaker 7 or not is up to you. It does increase your damage by 3 or 4 per turn (double that with Extra Attack), but youíll lag behind another level in spellcasting, and it also robs you of the level 14 Sorcerer ability (if youíll actually ever get there, that is). If you want your build to go Extra Attack - like for instance, if you picked up a Flame Tongue or something during Paladin progression - you should probably go to Oathbreaker 7 since you want to be good at Extra Attacks, but otherwise, itís not a requirement at all. Both the stuff you gain and the stuff you lose are quite heavy.
    • Oathbreaker Spells: Every class needs something to balance itself out, and in the Oathbreakerís case that appeared in its Spell List. The spells in here are not necessarily bad, but not the sort of stuff you will be using frequently either. Very situational and overall meh.
    • Channel Divinity: Control Undead: Itís situational, but also as broken as hell when it goes off. Sky Blue in the right campaign.
    • Channel Divinity: Dreadful Aspect: The selling point of Oathbreakers in Sorcadin builds. The super-superb part of this ability is that the targets canít re-attempt saves unless they get over 30 feet away from the Oathbreaker - there is no other way to escape the Frightened condition bestowed by this ability. But if youíve already locked the targets into melee range, the targets must risk being hit by opportunity attacks to get over 30 feet away from you. And when thatís triggered, you use War Caster+Booming Blade to zap them to a crisp. Combine with Tunnel Fighter to do this to everybody. This combination is absolutely devastating.
      If you want to troll the hell out of your enemies, combine with Wall of Fire - encircle your enemies with the wall, and they are forced to fight you while theyíre constantly afraid of you. Either that, or they nee to jump through a burning wall. Sounds fun? Itís fun. Iíve done it before.
    • Aura of Hate: Your good CHA score now boosts not only your spellcasting and saves, but also your weapon damage. Way to go, I mean, like, thereís now nothing you canít do with your dazzling sexiness. For readsons mentioned, it isnít for everybody, especially since it doesnít synergize well with GFB and BB, but if you need it itíll be good. If your party includes a Necromancer, this ability becomes awesome beyond belief.
      This ability can become detrimental for you if you face Fiends or Undead, but by RAW Divine Smite somehow still works with Oathbreakers (I really think they should change the damage type to Necrotic and change the preferred targets to other monster-types for Oathbreakers, but anyways), so you can Smite them harder to kill them first before they kill you (and donít forget that powerful undead can become best friends with Control Undead). That, or you can utilize your high CHA and spellcasting capabilities to simply slink back into the backrow and fling Fireballs until your evil friends have all been extinguished from the battlefield.

    Spoiler: Sorcerer Origin Evaluation
    Show
    Sorcerer Origin Evaluation

    Draconic Bloodline
    Gives you extra tanking and improves your damage. Itís a really solid choice.
    • Draconic Ancestor: Extremely campaign-dependent but can be useful in certain situations.
    • Draconic Resilience: Your job is to be a tank. This ability makes you a better tank. The part about not needing Mage Armor, you can really just skip over, because your DEX is going to be either 8 or 10.
    • Elemental Affinity: And now hereís whatís really amazing. The obvious choice is Fire, improving the damage of Green-Flame Blade as well as amazing AoE spells such as Fireball.
      There has been some rulings that this ability can work only once per spell, so like for instance, it improves the damage of only one of the rays created by Scorching Ray, and so on. By the same logic, if youíre to abide by these rulings, you need to choose which to buff, Green-Flame Bladeís ďmain slashĒ or the ďleaping fireĒ. However, there is a lot of fan debate over whether this ruling is to be followed or not. When it comes to ruling interpretation, the power level goes like Sage Advice/Twitter Rulings < Official Printed Material <<<<< DM judgment, so ask your DM beforehand about how he will rule this.
    • Dragon Wings: So like, you can fly. Isnít that fascinating? Do keep in mind that you can never gain this benefit if you go Paladin 7 or higher, though.
    • Draconic Presence: So, it costs as much Sorcery Points as creating a level 3 spell slot, requires concentration, and unlike Web etc., enemies that fail it once never have to repeat it. It looks bad. And you wouldnít always want to use it either - most of the time, if you have that many Sorcery Points youíll probably rather do something else with them, and you will almost always be concentrating on something thatís much better.
      However, the area is massive (60 feet radius), making it an amazing field control option. Used right and with the right DM, it can also possibly end an encounter on its own (instead of attacking, you can simply make an Intimidation check - perhaps with advantage - to make all the enemies cower before you and deprave them of fighting will).
      In exchange for not working together with Heightened Spell, enemy Casters cannot use Counterspell on it, since itís a class ability and not a Spell. And the whole point of this ability is not whether you will always want to use it - whatís important is that this ability gives you an extra option. Thatís whatís important here.


    Wild Magic
    In terms of how entertaining it is as a class, Wild Magic Sorcerer is Sky Blue. Sadly, that isnít really the main purpose of this guide.
    The powers of this class largely depend on how often your DM is willing to activate Tides of Chaos. Depending on the DM, this can become possibly upgraded to Blue, but in general it has little to synergize with S&B and is overall a mediocre option in terms of optimization. However, it is better than most people assume on first glance.
    This option and Oath of the Ancients mesh together rather uniquely and humorously. Even if you Fireball yourself, you will be able to mitigate the damage. That said, this sort of thing rarely happens, so itís not like itís a really big deal. It will be fun when it goes off though.
    • Wild Magic Surge: Entertainment, which at times come with a price. Itís really fun and a good class, but not exactly the sort you look for in optimization.
    • Tides of Chaos: Advantage on anything, once per short rest! Which is good for both offense and defense, and also recharges whenever the DM ďfeels like itĒ. This is largely dependent on the DM, but with the right DM, can be abused to hell.
    • Bend Luck: Itís like Bardic Inspiration, except you donít need to give it beforehand. 1d4 might not seem like a large amount, but itís very versatile in both boosting your friends and weakening your enemies. Works especially well with save-or-suck spells. Be careful how it expends 2 Sorcery Points and uses up your reaction - only save it for when you really need it.
    • Controlled Chaos: Avoid turning into a potted plant by accident. Thatís pretty nice.
    • Spell Bombardment: And this is a level 18 ability because...? No, really, this is a level 3 ability or something. At least it works with GFB and BB.


    Storm Sorcery (SCAG)
    This is a wonderful Sorcerous Origin option that is both thematic and powerful. Sadly, it doesnít synergize well with Sorcadins, at least unless youíre going 2/18 and your campaign starts at level 20 or something, in which case this might become pretty good. Wind Soul is an amazing ability, but itís for level 18, and until you get that, this option is overall lackluster for Sorcadins..
    • Wind Speaker: Great, so now you can speak with that raging Elemental thatís coming after the party to kill you! Better than nothing, but this ability will be important once in every, like, several hundred sessions (unless your DM is a good, creative DM who knows his job well, and specifically creates moments where this ability can be useful).
    • Tempestuous Magic: Your spells are generally going to be cast using Bonus Actions, and even if itís cast with an Action, you donít need to run away from your opponents.
    • Heart of the Storm: This ability is more important for Sorcadins than it is for pure Sorcerers in how youíre on the frontlines, and having a lot of enemies within 10 feet of you is a good thing, not a bad thing. Sadly, there are not many spells that deal Thunder or Lightning damage, and even when there are, dealing damage using spells is the least of your priorities.
    • Storm Guide: This is one of those abilities that can become Sky Blue with the right situations but is otherwise too, and I mean too situational to be considered an actual class ability. If your campaign is going to be about a bunch of adventuring pirates, your party needs a guy with this ability, but it doesnít necessarily have to be you, given how almost nothing this Origin offers is beneficial for a Sorcadin.
    • Stormís Fury: Itís like you have an unlimited supply of Hellish Rebuke, except with a less resisted damage type. Which is good. It also uses up your reaction, and thus robs you of opportunity-Booming-Blading and Shielding. Which is meh. Overall not bad, I mean, itís still useful, but not something to get really excited over either.
    • Wind Soul: This is an amazing ability, and itís an utter shame almost everything that came before it is not that good for Sorcadins. Immunity to a particular type of damage is something most characters never get in their entire adventuring careers, and you get two of them for starters. Then you can also fly around at a whooping speed of 60ft per turn, or alternatively, allow your entire party to fly around freely. Neither flying option requires concentration. A truly hilarious ability that benefits your entire party and will make everyone love you.
      Again, too bad that everything that came before it is not that synergetic with Sorcadins.


    Favored Soul (UA), Paladin 6 or higher builds
    Itís a running joke how WotC introduced a Sorcerer Origin with an expanded spell list in the exact same guide in which they specifically stated that the spell list of the Sorcerer is heavily restricted on purpose. However, despite how itís a powerful Sorcerer Origin, itís not that much of an option for tank-heavy Sorcadins.
    This is, for one, because the level 1 and 6 abilities of the Favored Soul are complete wastes for Sorcadins.
    And for another, a majority of the spells you can get from the Cleric Domains are already in the Paladin spell list.
    If youíre going to go Favored Soul, the reason for that should be because you really want a particular spell on your list, or because you think having more selection of Sorcerer spells is more important than the level 1 and 6 abilities of the Sorcerer Origins. Itís difficult to justify, and probably not optimized, but who knows? Maybe you could find an insane combo or something.
    • Chosen of the Gods: Read this as ďbit more spell versatilityĒ. Not that it makes you as versatile as you hope. Letís look at the Domain candidates.
      • Knowledge prominently gives us Command, Suggestion, Arcane Eye and Scrying. Not bad, but more of out-of-combat stuff than in-combat. Having Suggestion constantly ready gives us the freedom to take 1 extra Sorcerer spell. Not bad. Not the sort of stuff you expect from being a ďChosen of the GodsĒ either.
      • Life has honestly not much to give us, which is not a surprise, since all the important spells are already on the Paladin list, and we donít need that many Paladin spells to make a strong Sorcadin.
      • Light is not bad, freeing up Sorcerer spell selection with Fireball and Wall of Fire. It also has Faerie Fire and Scrying, which are good spells.
      • Nature is a bag of situational spells that is not really that bad, but not the sort of stuff you would trade the level 1 and 6 abilities of the other Origins for.
      • Tempest has nothing special about it.
      • Trickery is an actually pretty good list, and is probably the best choice, since it has Mirror Image, Dispel Magic, Polymorph and Dominate Person, allowing you to choose a lot more Sorcerer spells.
      • War has spells like Spiritual Weapon, Magic Weapon, Spirit Guardians, and Hold Monster, so itís an okay choice.
      • Death (DMG) is honestly bad.
      • Arcana (SCAG) is likewise meh.
    • Bonus Proficiencies: Itís not really a ďbonusĒ proficiency when you already have it.
    • Extra Attack: Itís not really an ďextraĒ attack when you already have it.
    • Divine Wings: Same as the Draconic Bloodline ability.


    Favored Soul (Trickery Domain) (UA), Paladin 2 or 3 builds
    I divided the ďFavored SoulĒ section into ďif you went Paladin 6 or higherĒ or ďif you did notĒ, because that difference immensely affects the rating of this Origin.
    For 2/18 and 3/17 builds, Favored Soul is pretty darn good. Getting the Extra Attack option is nice, and the extra spells solves the major problem with Sorcerers of getting very little spells known.
    This rating assumes you went with the Trickery Domain, which has, as already mentioned in the above rating of Paladin-heavy builds, many useful spells. Otherwise this becomes not so appealing,

    • Chosen of the Gods (Trickery): The Trickery Domain is amazing - as already mentioned, you get Mirror Image, Dispel Magic, Polymorph and Dominate Person for free. Thatís quite a smexy bonus. I personally believe all Sorcerous Origins should have expanded spell lists, since itís really that important for Sorcerers.
    • Bonus Proficiencies: Itís not really a ďbonusĒ proficiency when you already have it.
    • Extra Attack: Improves your DPR. Even at higher levels, Green-Flame Blade does not always work at maximum effectiveness (having no two enemies near each other etc.), so you should get it.
    • Divine Wings: Same as the Draconic Bloodline ability.
    • Chosen of the Gods: Some healing that comes whenever you use Mirror Image or Polymorph (or any of the other Trickery spells). Thatís cool. Thatís pretty damn cool. The amount itself is not large, but itís nonetheless a good bonus to have.


    Shadow (UA)
    Also known as the Emo Sorcerer. The ďQuirksĒ list included in the UA article is really fascinating, and IMO a list that should be added to any new supplements WotC publishes, but thatís not really relevant to this guide. What is relevant to this guide is that Shadow Sorcerers are a pretty strong - if not overpowered - choice of Origin that can both tank and attack nicely.
    • Eyes of the Dark: At level 1 itís a Darkvision ability. From level 2 it allows you to cast an uber-empowered version of an extremely versatile Level 2 spell at the cost of 1 Sorcery Point, which is honestly nuts. Itís a badly designed ability, so you might want to ask your DM beforehand if itís really okay to use this. My suggestion is to make it cost 2 Sorcery Points, in my games. And even then, itís still strong.
      This ability works most with GWM, but advantage on all your attacks, disadvantage on all your enemiesí attacks, and not getting targeted by enemy spells is so yummy an ability that basically anyone can benefit from it.
    • Strength of the Grave: Emergency button for when youíre going to faint. Which is very useful for a tank like you.
    • Hound of Ill Omen: Spending 3 Sorcery Points as a Bonus Action to summon forth a CR 1 creature that also bestows an enemy disadvantage on the saving throws of your spells. While a bit costly, this is a strictly better version of Heightened Spell. And Heightened Spell was already good...
      What makes this really special is that it pretty much gives you room for 1 more Metamagic option.
    • Shadow Walk: While a bit situational, bonus action teleport of 120 feet is an extremely juicy ability for a frontline martial character who constantly wants to be in melee range of someone in the enemy team. Use this to teleport next to the enemy caster while youíve got Darkness on your weapon, and the enemy becomes blinded, becoming unable to cast Spells that target. Hell amazing, if not broken. IMO this should have a cost, like 1 or 2 Sorcery Points or something.
    • Shadow Form: Spend 3 Sorcery Points as a bonus action to double your HP and get the ability to move through walls. Are you kidding me, boy? This Origin has broken abilities, and broken abilities alone. This should cost 5 Sorcery Points, and as an action. And itíd still be good.

    Spoiler: Level Progression
    Show
    Level Progression

    Since this is a mutliclass build, there are certain levels at which your build may not work as good as it is supposed to. To minimize that problem, Iíve created this section that will hopefully be helpful for those who wish to go Paladin/Sorcerer.

    Those going 2/18 can simply go in that order. First 2 levels Paladin, then Sorcerer all the way. Paladin 3 builds can go that way too, throwing in the third level whenever they feel like it. But 6/14 and builds with more Paladin levels might require some thought. Which is better?

    There are two ways for a 6/14 build to advance - the first to go Pal 2 > Pal 2 / Sorc 6 > Pal 6 / Sorc 6 > Pal 6 / Sorc 14, and the second to go Paladin 6 > Pal 6/ Sorc 14. Either works. 7/13 builds are similar, but go Pal 7 instead of 6.

    If youíre going with the former, be aware that until you get War Caster at Sorcerer 4, unless your DM is willing with component issues (I honestly donít care much as a DM, but some people do), you cannot cast a majority of your spells while holding both a Longsword and a Shield. Itís impossible to get War Caster with V-Human. I personally would wield either a Polearm or a Greatsword till you go level 5, and switch to S&B after getting War Caster, if going this path.

    Simply going Paladin 6 or 7 first is a more straightforward option, and thereís really no way this is weak, because Paladins are known to be top-tier classes at low levels,. Youíll have absolutely no problem with this path, aside from the fact itís mostly a normal Paladin till level 7 or 8 and higher.
    Oathbreakers are especially suited for this progression path, being good Extra Attackers and having an awesome level 7 ability. But really, if in doubt, this might be actually the most safe choice. Especially given how your CHA bonus is going to be good.
    Last edited by Gastronomie; 2016-11-11 at 10:08 PM.
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    Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

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    Default Re: Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

    Whatís Your Weapon of Choice?
    Part 2: Greatsword



    You can never have too much of badass action scenes. (Image by Ufotable)

    Greatsword Sorcadin
    This is the offense build of Sorcadins, with terrifying damage capabilities on top of your magical versatility. In exchange for being able to inflict loads and loads of damage, you will suffer from lower AC and saving throw bonuses compared to a S&B build, so this build requires more careful crafting (beginners should first go S&B - you canít go wrong with them), but if built right, itís hilarious to play.

    I said the S&B build is the ďultimate All-RounderĒ.
    The Greatsword build here is the ďmaster of damageĒ.

    Though you donít get as many attacks, you will have a lot more ways to make GWM hit accurately than the average GWM Fighter, using your spells and the abilities of the Paladin and Sorcerer to their maximum. A large portion of the build should be built to synergize with GWM by improving your attack rolls.

    Spoiler: Core Concept
    Show
    Core Concept
    Great Weapon Master is a truly amazing Feat, and strong enough to build a whole character around. This is one such build.

    +10 damage per hit is boss, but the -5 to attack rolls makes it difficult to use on its own. You need to combine it with something else to be truly effective. Thus we will use various spells and class abilities to improve your attack roll bonus, as well as gain advantage on the attacks, to make sure that you hit accurately as much as possible, and get to make the most out of the Great Weapon Master feat (advantage also increases your chances of landing a critical hit, allowing another attack as a bonus action!).

    To be accurate with your attacks, you will want to prioritize STR more than S&B builds do. Taking the Blade Mastery (UA) Feat could be actually a better idea than an ASI, though, with a +1 attack roll bonus and two extra abilities (+1 AC with a reaction and advantage on opportunity attacks), both of them extremely helpful.

    Spoiler: Going a bit off topic
    Show
    Now, one thing to note: due to the nature of character attack roll bonuses and monster ACs in D&D 5e, Great Weapon Master is generally stronger at higher levels than it is at lower levels. Your attack roll bonus will drastically improve with level progression, but the monster ACs donít rise that much. Granted, this isnít much of a problem, since Sorcadins themselves are better at higher levels. If youíre playing a Sorcadin, chances are youíre playing in a mid-to-high level anyway (READ: If your campaign is starting low-level, best to go S&B instead of GWM).

    For instance, a level 1 Paladin with 16 STR has an attack bonus of +5, so even if he has GWM via Variant Human, he will find it difficult to use it all the time. Even at this level, your enemies have decent AC (for instance, Goblins have 15 AC, when theyíre only CR 1/4), and the risk of -5 to hit is too much.

    When this is a level 20 Paladin/Sorcerer with 20 STR and Blade Mastery, the attack bonus is +12 (in most actual games it gets even better with magical items). Then do your enemies all have 22 AC? Probably not, that sort of AC is reserved for special monsters like the Ancient Red Dragon.

    Now, speaking of the Ancient Red Dragon...

    GWM is designed to be better against hordes. It relies on the enemies having low AC (for the -5/+10) and dying frequently (for the bonus action attack).

    Then does the Paladin/Sorcerer suck against powerful solos/duos?

    NO!!!! Hell no, youíre awesome against solos and duos. This is because Divine Smite gives you insane nova damage and allows you to beat the boss to a pulp without giving him time to react. Even more so if heís a Fiend or Undead. Together with your versatility via spells, once your level is high, youíre set to be effective in any sort of encounter.

    Spoiler: Core Abilities
    Show
    Core Abilities
    It should be noted that unlike the Longsword build, which is meant to be an ďall-rounderĒ, the Greatsword build should revolve around the abilities of GWM, meaning that ďincreasing your attack roll bonusĒ and ďgaining advantageĒ are your top priorities. Now what to go with that?

    Paladin
    • Fighting Style: As with Longsword builds, Defense is a good option for Sorcadins, and especially with how your AC is going to be lower than a Longsword build (despite the fact your HP is the same), you probably will want that +1 AC. Just because youíre going to be an offense-oriented build, doesnít mean you can easily trash your defenses.
      The effectiveness of Great Weapon Fighting, meanwhile, depends on your DMís rulings. Some DMs rule that the re-rolling works on Divine Smite, in which case this ability is Sky Blue. Others rule that the re-rolling works on the original 2d6, in which case this ability is Purple. Sage Advice agrees with the latter, but I honestly donít take Sage Advice that seriously (the whole point of TRPGs is that the DM has final say, and Sage Advice should be specifically for when a DM really doesnít know what to do with a certain ruling), and many DMs still go with the former ruling. Ask your DM beforehand about his thoughts on the ruling of Great Weapon Fighting if youíre going to build a Greatsword character (be it Sorcadin or not - Paladins and Battle Masters all apply, with Divine Smite and Superiority Dice). I personally think that even with the former ruling, itís not like Great Weapon Fighting will ever be a game-breaking choice.
    • Lay on Hands: It can be used to heal in-between fights (you have lower AC than a Longsword build, so you might get hit more often), or you can heal your Poisoned condition (which is fatal for any GWM build due to disadvantage on attack rolls). The fact you rely more on your attacks than a Longsword build means that this ability is extremely important for you. If you get poisoned during the middle of the fight and no one can neutralize your poison, itís actually not a bad idea to use your action to heal yourself. Or, of course, you can still fling Fireballs with no problem though, so thatís another option.
    • Divine Smite: It works when your opponentís AC is high and youíre afraid of using GWM. Also, you will often have advantage, meaning you will roll crit as twice as often. Crit+Smite can severely injure and perhaps even kill boss monsters on its own, so the fact you get advantage often is a major boost to the possibilities of this ability.
    • Extra Attack: If you go 6/14 (or 7/13) with Paladin/Sorcerer progression, the Extra Attack from Paladin 5, which increases the number of GWM -5/+10s you can fling per round, is a must-have.
      However, you can also go with 3/17, using Favored Soul for the Sorcerer Origin, in which case this is unrequired. Losing Aura of Protection is painful, but chances are, your bonus from it will be only +3 or something anyways.
      3/17 is better than 2/18, because Devotion paladins have an amazing Channel Divinity ability.
    • Aura of Protection: Arguably the strongest ability in the entire game, and the reason to go Paladin 6. Even for Greatsword builds, itís good.
    • Improved Divine Smite: This is written here, not because itís a core ability, but actually because itís really not worth it, and I wanted to emphasize it. Extra damage is not something you should consider important either, since you already have enough of it from GWM (BTW, mathematically, if your original damage per hit is higher than a certain level, the ďaverage damage per attack rollĒ becomes lower with using GWM, making using GWM a bad choice). And you want to be good at spellcasting.
      Whatever you do, DO NOT GO PALADIN 11 with GWM builds. And since the Oaths that are good for GWM (Devotion and Vengeance) both have mediocre level 7 abilities, being a GWM build, you should stop Paladin progression at level 6. Any more is a waste, unless your choice is Oath is unoptimized and you are going either Ancients or Oathbreaker (in which case it will be worth it, but itís better to go with S&B).
      If you want the Aura of Vitality + Extended Spell combo, you should go S&B, not GWM.
    • Bless: Level 1 spell. This and GWM work together nuts. However, youíre probably more versatile with your casting than most of the other guys in your team who can use this spell as well, so if possible, you should politely ask the party Cleric to cast it on you, instead of using it yourself. Especially at higher levels, when Greater Invisibility and stuff start to kick in (or if youíre a Shadow Sorcerer - which you should be - this stands for lower levels as well. BTW, interestingly, Bless does not require the Cleric to be able to see you by RAW, unlike many other spells, which means you can be Blessed even while youíre shrouded in darkness... Rather strange).
    • Magic Weapon: Level 2 spell. Bypass resistance to non-magical weapons and gain bonus to hit, all packed in a nice, non-taxing Bonus Action. Upcasting it at level 4 makes the bonus +2, while at level 6 or higher it becomes a +3. However, it also requires concentration and cannot be used on already magical weapons, meaning that at higher levels it might start to taste bland.
      Elemental Weapon does similar stuff, but IMO itís inferior to Magic Weapon in almost all ways, Ďcause it requires at least a level 3 slot to use, uses up your main action, and you donít really need that additional +1d4 magical damage in the first place. If it didnít need concentration it wouldíve been hell amazing,but the creators didnít make it that way.


    Sorcerer
    • Metamagic: Just like in the case with Longsword builds, do keep in mind that you get only two options, and the options donít increase till Sorcerer level 10. Thus you should choose these wisely.
      First, Quickened Spell is mandatory, so thatís that. Then you should go for either Heightened Spell (when you really want to kill someone) or Twinned Spell (use on stuff like Polymorph, Greater Invisibility, Haste, or Booming Blade*). Iíd generally say you get Twinned Spell first - the buff spells are very synergetic indeed with your abilities.
      Since your CHA is going to be lower than a Longsword Paladin (in other words, the DC for your spells is a bit low), Heightened Spell is an ideal option in your case. However, depending on what spells you wish to use, Careful Spell can possibly become Sky Blue as well (spells like Web, Hypnotic Pattern and Stinking Cloud belong here. Emphasis on Web, which Restrains the enemies... Meaning that apart from gluing them in place and bestowing disadvantage on their attack rolls, you gain advantage on attacks against them!)
      *NOTE-Some rulings by the creators say Green-Flame Blade cannot be twinned since it must choose two targets. However, as with all rulings, this depends on the DM, so ask beforehand.
    • Hold Person: Level 2 spell. Targets are limited to Humanoids, meaning it can be a rather campaign-situational spell, but paralyzing enemies with a level 2 slot is an insanely powerful effect - and most campaigns will have a good number of Humanoids to paralyze. Auto-crit means your Smites will work wonders, and more so with Quickened + Extra Attack. Unless your DM has officially stated that you will fight only Oozes for your entire career or something, this should be on your list.
    • Haste: Level 3 spell. This rating of Blue assumes you already are high-level enough to have Aura of Protection (in addition to either Resilient (CON)). Until you get that, this is Red.
      +2 AC, advantage on DEX saves, and getting to take double the action (or one additional attack) is an amazing buff for anyone. Itís even better on yourself, given how youíre a good gish who wants extra turns all the time, and even better when you Twin it to affect some other powerful guy in your party as well.


      ^Kiritsugu the Magus Killer, having his Time Alter ability, agrees that speeding up your time is a powerful strategy indeed.^
      (Image by Ufotable)

      However, Haste also has the weakness of making the target(s) waste a whole turn doing nothing after your concentration is broken.
      This can be taken in two ways. The first way to think of it is that failing the concentration save is devastating, but this is not the real problem, especially since 16 CON + Resilient + Aura of Protection (+3) is enough to surpass a +10 bonus on its own, meaning you will succeed on the save all the time unless the damage is really big.
      The real problem is that AFTER USING HASTE, YOU CANNOT USE OTHER CONCENTRATION SPELLS DURING THE FIGHT.


      "ARGGGHHHHH FUUUUUUUUUU"
      ^ Kiritsugu, after he realizes he canít use other concentration spells for the rest of the fight. ^
      (Image by Ufotable)

      Thus, use Haste with caution and care. Itís a wonderful spell in the right moment, but not all moments are for Haste. Donít be afraid to use it when itís worth it. Donít use it if you think you wanna use other concentration spells later too. And be aware: you have quite a damn lot of effective Concentration spells.
    • Greater Invisibility: Level 4 spell, and an absolute nosebleeder for almost any frontline character. Itís all the benefits of Darkness + Devilís Sight or Eyes of the Dark, except it doesnít hinder your friends, making this the better option (albeit costly). Requires concentration. Is it worth it? Most certainly. If this isnít worth it, nothing really is.
    • Hold Monster: Level 5 spell. So like, you can now target any monster with Hold Person. I really donít think I need to explain why thatís a good thing.

    Spoiler: Paladin Oath Evaluation
    Show
    Paladin Oath Evaluation
    This differs a lot with Longswords and Greatswords.

    Oath of Devotion
    Sacred Weapon synergizes so amazing with GWM. In fact it synergizes so well that it easily makes this option Sky Blue on its own.
    Advantage does not stack. This means that if you want to hit as accurately as possibly, instead of having lots of abilities that give you advantage, you should have both abilities that boost your bonus to hit AND abilities that give you advantage.
    Generally, 5e has a lot of ways to do the latter. Then how about the former? The answer is ďnot manyĒ, since 5e is fundamentally designed so you donít need to crunch together a dozen bonuses each time you make an attack (it seems the recent UA additions are starting to go against that design model though...). Paladin is unique in that sense in how it has both Bless, as well as the Sacred Weapon feature (in a sub-class). You should put this trait to your advantage*.
    NOTE-This is actually a really bad pun, given how the whole point of Sacred Weapon is that it has NOTHING to do with advantage.
    • Oath Spells: A mixed bag of situational abilities thatís anyways extremely useful in how theyíre free to take. All the Oath Spells options are good for you, considering how Sorcerers get so little spell selection, and you desperately need versatility .
    • Channel Divinity: Sacred Weapon: Repeat after me: It increases your bonus to hit. Repeat again, after me: It increases your bonus to hit. One last time, after me: It increases your bonus to hit.
      IT F***ING INCREASES YOUR BONUS TO HIT!!!!!!!!!!!
      Need I say more? This is THE reason to take this Oath.
      Make sure to ask your DM if you can cast it before combat starts, to avoid losing your first turn doing nothing. Personally, I will permit it if itís obvious that the adventurers had a chance to predict the upcoming fight (and also introduce enemies who buff themselves before combat, to make stuff equal). It does depend on the DM though.
    • Channel Divinity: Turn the Unholy: Too situational to be given an actual rating. It is certainly not bad when it can be used, though.
    • Aura of Devotion: Canít be Charmed. Not ďadvantageĒ, you canít be charmed. And sure itís a nice ability, but it also sorta overlaps with racial abilities of an Elf or Half-Elf, and itís also situational. A majority of Charming effects look at WIS, and with proficiency in WIS saves and Aura of Protection, chances are youíre gonna succeed on the save either way. If youíre going Devotion, level 6 is probably enough (unless youíre going level 9 for level 3 spells).


    Oath of the Ancients
    This is a really unique Oath in how it specifically allows you to be an extremely effective Mage Slayer without even taking the Mage Slayer Feat.
    There are two reasons for this - the first obvious one being Aura of Warding, and the second one being Ensnaring Strike, a spell that rarely works on boss monsters with the exception of human Casters (!!), but is devastating if it goes off.
    If your campaign is primarily about hunting evil Archmages and Witches, this becomes Blue. However, other from Ensnaring Strike, this Oath has little to add to GWM builds - and Ensnaring Strike is a situational spell.
    WARNING: This rating specifically refers to when you go 7 levels in Paladin instead of 6. If you plan on going only Paladin 6, DO NOT CHOOSE THIS OATH.
    • Oath Spells: Apart from having Misty Step, the spell Ensnaring Strike (limited to only Ancients Paladins and Rangers) allows you to make a target Restrained (advantage!). Sadly, it doesnít work on most boss monsters (powerful monsters tend to be Large or larger and also have high STR), with the rare exception of that evil necromancer or archmage or whatever, which is indeed a terrible shame given all the benefits of Restraining someone (if the boss monster is that sort of guy who is Medium or smaller and has low STR, this becomes a lot better).
      Using Heightened Spell on Ensnaring Strike is a pretty good option in certain situations. See, due to the restrictions of Metamagic, you canít Quicken and Heighten at the same time on a single spell, meaning that if you want to use your main action for Extra Attack but want to use your bonus action that turn to get attack advantage via spells, the options are very limited indeed. This is one way to do it, since Ensnaring Strike is a Bonus Action spell from the first place, and itís indeed useful when you need it.
    • Channel Divinity: Natureís Wrath: Itís not that itís necessarily bad, itís that Ensnaring Strike is generally the better option, being a bonus action. At least this one doesnít require concentration. Itís not bad when it can be pulled off, so better than nothing.
    • Channel Divinity: Turn the Faithless: Same as Turn the Unholy - too situational to be given an actual rating, but certainly not bad when it can be used.
    • Aura of Warding: The selling point of this Oath. Just like I wrote in the Longsword section, itís situational, but when it works itís so amazing it can win the encounter on its own. Enemy casters tend to have no way to damage you besides spells (or that pathetic ďbludgeon with staffĒ attack that doesnít work on you anyways), and this can really cripple them like hell.


    Oath of Vengeance
    Vow of Enmity is one of the very rare options that give you advantage on attacks with a Bonus Action and without a save. However, advantage does not stack (unless your DM has ruled otherwise), meaning that, say, if youíre a Shadow Sorcerer or something that can easily gain advantage from a different source, this isnít as attractive an option as it should be (even then, itís a nice back-up option though).
    This option is very close to Sky Blue, and if your DM rules that Sacred Weapon can never be cast before combat, or you simply like the idea of a Dark Knight, this becomes Sky Blue. You will probably not regret taking this Oath in a GWM build. If you feel like taking it, feel free to take it.
    • Oath Spells: This doesnít give you much extra spell options when you compare it to the Sorcerer spell list. What it does is freeing up Sorcerer spell options and allowing you to choose more Sorcerer spells. Thatís a pretty good thing.
    • Channel Divinity: Abjure Enemy: Not bad as means to keep someone from escaping or running towards the backrow casters. Itís easy to forget, but unlike you, most casters are fragile.
    • Channel Divinity: Vow of Enmity: Itís a Bonus Action, gives you advantage, and doesnít require a save either. You want advantage. This is good for you. Eat it.
    • Relentless Avenger: Not bad. Not something worth the extra Paladin level either.


    Oath of the Crown (SCAG)
    What was probably the best Oath for S&B Sorcadins becomes what is arguably the worst option for GWM builds. Having not a single offense-oriented ability, Oath of the Crown is pure anti-synergy with GWM, and is to be absolutely avoided for anyone reading this section.
    THIS sort of thing is exactly why I had to do the time-consuming task of dividing the sub-class rating section into three different parts based on the type of weapon youíre using, each with different ratings. Your weapon defines your combat style. Since your combat style is different, the importance of a lot of sub-class abilities change drastically as well.
    See, most of the class guides out there assign only a ďgeneralĒ rating to the class and sub-class abilities. Yeah, well sure, itís helpful, but itís possible to be even more helpful by specifying when itís Blue like you rated, and when itís actually Red.
    Say, if I just said that ďOath of the Crown makes a wonderful SorcadinĒ and ended it there, a lot of people might misunderstand it and start choosing Oath of the Crown even for GWM builds. That is not the sort of incomplete guide I tend to create here. You want to optimize reading this, right?
    Anyhow, letís move on to rate the Oath of the Crown for GWM builds.
    • Oath Spells: Blue for builds that go Paladin more than 9 levels due to Spirit Guardians, Black for builds that go only 6 or 7. Not a bad list, but not as good as the other ones.
    • Channel Divinity: Champion Challenge: Unlike the Longsword Sorcadin, your AC is not as effective, and you should care more about ďswiftly killing all your enemies before they reach the backrowĒ more than ďkeeping the enemies around you and not letting them goĒ. This ability that was Sky Blue for S&B becomes dull Black for GWM.
    • Channel Divinity: Turn the Tide: Itís not bad, itís of course a nice ability to have. Just suits S&B more due to their ďjobĒ.
    • Divine Allegiance: Using up your reaction is generally something you want to keep away from, and the 5 feet radius makes it even worse. Could be worth using if the friend next to you is going to faint, in which case this is a good use of your reaction, but generally, I would stop at Paladin 6, even if you were to take this Oath for some reason.


    Oathbreaker (DMG)
    If youíre going go go Oathbreaker, the best weapon for you is actually not a Greatsword, but a Glaive or Halberd. That way Aura of Hate works most effectively.
    Sadly, there isnít a Polearm section in this guide (at least not yet). If there is one, this will be Sky Blue no-questions-asked in there, but here, it will be kept Black.
    Since you have Extra Attack, Aura of Hate is good to have. Going level 7 is pretty tempting, and probably not a choice you will later regret (unless you actually ever hit level 20 and your Sorcerer 14 ability that you lost was amazing). Do keep in mind that having too much attack damage from the start may actually make using GWM a mathematically bad choice, which may contradict the theme of the build (but even then, having bonus damage is a good thing).
    All in all, the abilities given by the Oathbreaker are generally good and allow you to be a pretty wonderful melee character. The reason why this option is regardless rated as Black is because while the individual abilities are powerful, they do not exactly synergize with GWM, meaning that the Oaths that do (Devotion and Vengeance) are better choices. For this reason, to make it more clear that those two Oaths are superior, this has been rated Black. Itís not that this option is bad - itís just that there are better ones for GWM builds.
    This Oath (or rather, the state of ďBreaking an OathĒ) specifically requires DM permission in how many associated characters will be evil. Whatever the case, itís part of player manners to be cooperative to the team, so do keep that in mind, even when playing an Evil character.
    • Oathbreaker Spells: Every class needs something to balance itself out, and in the Oathbreakerís case that appeared in its Spell List. The spells in here are not necessarily bad, but not the sort of stuff you will be using frequently either. Very situational and overall meh.
    • Channel Divinity: Control Undead: Itís situational, but also as broken as hell when it goes off. Sky Blue in the right campaign.
    • Channel Divinity: Dreadful Aspect: Copy-paste from Longsword: ďThe selling point of Oathbreakers in Sorcadin builds. The super-superb part of this ability is that the targets canít re-attempt saves unless they get over 30 feet away from the Oathbreaker - there is no other way to escape the Frightened condition bestowed by this ability. But if youíve already locked the targets into melee range, the targets must risk being hit by opportunity attacks to get over 30 feet away from you. And when thatís triggered, you use War Caster+Booming Blade to zap them to a crisp. This combination is absolutely devastating.Ē
      Even with GWM builds, this is a nice ability to have, especially since unlike the ďChampion ChallengeĒ of the Oath of the Crown, this ability also includes a defensive option with frightening your enemies.
    • Aura of Hate: Works better with Extra Attack than it does with GFB and BB. Adding your CHA modifier to your damage rolls is good, and if your party includes a Necromancer, this ability becomes awesome beyond belief.
      Copy-paste from Longsword: This ability can become detrimental for you if you face Fiends or Undead, but by RAW Divine Smite somehow still works with Oathbreakers (I really think they should change the damage type to Necrotic and change the preferred targets to other monster-types for Oathbreakers, but anyways), so you can Smite them harder to kill them first before they kill you (and donít forget that powerful undead can become best friends with Control Undead). That, or you can utilize your high CHA and spellcasting capabilities to simply slink back into the backrow and fling Fireballs until your evil friends have all been extinguished from the battlefield.

    Spoiler: Sorcerer Origin Evaluation
    Show
    Sorcerer Origin Evaluation

    Draconic Bloodline
    None of the abilities the Draconic Bloodline offers you are bad. All of them are good. Itís just that they donít necessarily mesh with the concept of GWM.
    • Draconic Ancestor: Extremely campaign-dependent but can be useful in certain situations.
    • Draconic Resilience: Using a melee weapon requires you be in melee range. If youíre in melee range, youíre more likely to be killed. And most importantly, people die if they are killed, meaning that having extra HP is always important for a melee character.
    • Elemental Affinity: You generally donít use Green-Flame Blade, which really downgrades this ability. Fireball remains buffed.
    • Dragon Wings: Being able to fly is even more interesting for GWM builds than it is for S&B builds in how you can now reach flying enemies and engage them in melee, without fearing of the caster losing concentration (S&B builds can go ranged as well via spells without losing their main selling point).


    Wild Magic
    The first thing to say: Wild Magic Sorcerer is actually not a bad choice for GWM builds. The advantage you gain from Tides of Chaos can be really synergetic if combined with GWM. The real problem lies in how Shadow Sorcerers are so overpowered, but if your DM bans UA, you might as well use this for your GWM builds.
    The powers of this class largely depend on how often your DM is willing to activate Tides of Chaos. Depending on the DM, this can become possibly upgraded to Sky Blue.
    Tides of Chaos requires neither an action nor a bonus action, and not even a reaction. If your DM is a willing person and you can pull it off with some frequence, this can become a pretty damn interesting build. You should ask beforehand about his thoughts on this matter.
    • Wild Magic Surge: Entertainment, which at times come with a price. Itís really fun and a good class, but not exactly the sort you look for in optimization. Since a lot of the effects harm the guys around you, make sure to always be in close range of your enemies.
    • Tides of Chaos: Advantage on anything, once per short rest! And it recharges whenever the DM ďfeels like itĒ. This is largely dependent on the DM, but with the right DM, can be abused to hell. Use it on your attack rolls for maximum effect, or alternatively, save yourself from a save-or-suck.
    • Bend Luck: Copy-paste from Longswords: ďItís like Bardic Inspiration, except you donít need to give it beforehand. 1d4 might not seem like a large amount, but itís very versatile in both boosting your friends and weakening your enemies. Works especially well with save-or-suck spells. Be careful how it expends 2 Sorcery Points and uses up your reaction - only save it for when you really need it.Ē
    • Controlled Chaos: Avoid turning into a potted plant by accident. Thatís pretty nice.


    Storm Sorcery (SCAG)
    Everything I wrote for Longswords builds in here also stands for Greatswords: ďThis is a wonderful Sorcerous Origin option that is both thematic and powerful. Sadly, it doesnít synergize well with Sorcadins.Ē
    To add, GWM builds should try to maximize their attack accuracy as much as possible. The Storm Sorcerer has nothing to add in that sense, which is actually a negative thing rather than a neutral thing, and in that sense, even the often name-called (if not underrated) Wild Magic is better. The Storm Origin is good for pure Sorcerers, but deserves Purple for GWM Sorcadins.
    Below is all copy-paste from Longswords, since I didnít feel the need to change anything.
    • Wind Speaker: Great, so now you can speak with that raging Elemental thatís coming after the party to kill you! Better than nothing, but this ability will be important once in every, like, several hundred sessions (unless your DM is a good, creative DM who knows his job well, and specifically creates moments where this ability can be useful).
    • Tempestuous Magic: Your spells are generally going to be cast using Bonus Actions, and even if itís cast with an Action, you donít need to run away from your opponents.
    • Heart of the Storm: This ability is more important for Sorcadins than it is for pure Sorcerers in how youíre on the frontlines, and having a lot of enemies within 10 feet of you is a good thing, not a bad thing. Sadly, there are not many spells that deal Thunder or Lightning damage, and even when there are, dealing damage using spells is the least of your priorities.
    • Storm Guide: This is one of those abilities that can become Sky Blue with the right situations but is otherwise too, and I mean too situational to be considered an actual class ability. If your campaign is going to be about a bunch of adventuring pirates, your party needs a guy with this ability, but it doesnít necessarily have to be you, given how almost nothing this Origin offers is beneficial for a Sorcadin.
    • Stormís Fury: Itís like you have an unlimited supply of Hellish Rebuke, except with a less resisted damage type. Which is good. It also uses up your reaction, and thus robs you of opportunity-Booming-Blading and Shielding. Which is meh. Overall not bad, I mean, itís still useful, but not something to get really excited over either.


    Favored Soul (UA)
    If you are going Paladin 6, this Origin is a joke. The level 1 and 6 abilities pertaining to proficiency and extra attack are basically worthless for you, since you already have them from another class. Chosen of the Gods frees up some of your Sorcerer spell selection depending on the Domain, but in general they overlap too much with Paladin and are not worth the effort. This is a terrible option for most GWM Sorcadins.
    HOWEVER, if you are going to stop at Paladin 3 and take the rest in Sorcerer, this is pretty much the only Sorcerous Origin available to you - because otherwise you cannot gain Extra Attack. Now, it should be noted that 3/17 itself is a suboptimal option due to lack of Aura of Protection, but anyways, if you really want to go with it... Favored Soul is your Origin, no questions asked.
    • Chosen of the Gods: Read this as ďbit more spell versatilityĒ. Not that it makes you as versatile as you hope. Letís look at the Domain candidates.
      • Knowledge prominently gives us Command, Suggestion, Arcane Eye and Scrying. Not bad, but more of out-of-combat stuff than in-combat. Having Suggestion constantly ready gives us the freedom to take 1 extra Sorcerer spell. Not bad. Not the sort of stuff you expect from being a ďChosen of the GodsĒ either.
      • Life has honestly not much to give us, which is not a surprise, since all the important spells are already on the Paladin list, and we donít need that many Paladin spells to make a strong Sorcadin.
      • Light is not bad, freeing up Sorcerer spell selection with Fireball and Wall of Fire. It also has Faerie Fire and Scrying, which are good spells. Faerie Fire is especially beneficial for Greatsword builds, but in all honesty, youíd rather have someone else in the party cast it.
      • Nature is a bag of situational spells that is not really that bad, but not the sort of stuff you would trade the level 1 and 6 abilities of the other Origins for.
      • Tempest has nothing special about it.
      • Trickery is an actually pretty good list, and is probably the best choice, since it has Mirror Image, Dispel Magic, Polymorph and Dominate Person, allowing you to choose a lot more Sorcerer spells.
      • War has spells like Spiritual Weapon, Magic Weapon, Spirit Guardians, and Hold Monster, so itís an okay choice.
      • Death (DMG) is honestly bad.
      • Arcana (SCAG) is likewise meh.
    • Bonus Proficiencies: Itís not really a ďbonusĒ proficiency when you already have it.
    • Extra Attack: Itís not really an ďextraĒ attack when you already have it from another source. HOWEVER, if youíre going 3/17, this is your only way to get Extra Attack. Keep in mind itís at level 6, not 5, meaning that (together with the fact you will start off with 1 or 2 Paladin levels) you will get Extra Attack several levels late.
    • Divine Wings: Same as the Draconic Bloodline ability.


    Shadow (UA)
    Copy-paste from Longsword: ďAlso known as the Emo Sorcerer. The ďQuirksĒ list included in the UA article is really fascinating, and IMO a list that should be added to any new supplements WotC publishes, but thatís not really relevant to this guide. What is relevant to this guide is that Shadow Sorcerers are a pretty strong - if not overpowered - choice of Origin that can both tank and attack nicely.Ē
    Now, whatís important here is Darkness + Magical Darkvision, easily one of the most overpowered abilities in the game. Advantage on all your attacks, disadvantage on all attacks against you, and not getting targeted by enemy spells and abilities. Everything in this package screams ďWINĒ, and here, Iíll say it honestly and loudly, THIS IS THE SUB-CLASS FOR GWM BUILDS. If you want to optimize a GWM Paladin/Sorcerer build, there is no excuse to not taking this Origin. Itís that strong. Itís also that broken. I honestly wouldnít permit it as it is in my games, and thatís a natural thing, since Unearthed Arcana is supposed to be ďtest-play materialĒ, not ďofficial materialĒ.
    • Eyes of the Dark: At level 1 itís a Darkvision ability. From level 2 it allows you to cast an uber-empowered version of an extremely versatile Level 2 spell at the cost of 1 Sorcery Point, which is honestly nuts. Itís a badly designed ability, so you might want to ask your DM beforehand if itís really okay to use this. My suggestion is to make it cost 2 Sorcery Points, in my games. And even then, itís still strong.
      This ability works with S&B builds as well, but being a GWM build, you can make the most out of it. Youíll be sorta similar to how a Bladelock works (Bladelocks also use Darkness+Devilís Sight - except you actually do it better...)
    • Strength of the Grave: Emergency button for when youíre going to faint. Which is very useful for a tank like you.
    • Hound of Ill Omen: Spending 3 Sorcery Points as a Bonus Action to summon forth a CR 1 creature that also bestows an enemy disadvantage on the saving throws of your spells. While a bit costly, this is a strictly better version of Heightened Spell. And Heightened Spell was already good...
      Even better for GWM builds, since your spell save DC will likely be 1 or 2 points lagging behind that of a S&B build, and you need a way to improve it. This is a wonderful way to improve it.
    • Shadow Walk: While a bit situational, bonus action teleport of 120 feet is an extremely juicy ability for a frontline martial character who constantly wants to be in melee range of someone in the enemy team. Use this to teleport next to the enemy caster while youíve got Darkness on your weapon, and the enemy becomes blinded, becoming unable to cast Spells that target. Hell amazing, if not broken. IMO this should have a cost, like 1 or 2 Sorcery Points or something.

    Spoiler: Level Progression
    Show
    Level Progression

    Now, unlike in the case with S&b, there is actually only one way to effectively progress levels in a GWM Sorcadin build. Itís to:

    Go Paladin 6 or 7, and go Sorc all the way from there
    The reason is fairly simple and easy to understand: You want to get Extra Attack as fast as possible. And if youíve already went Paladin 5, you should keep on going Paladin till you hit either 6 or 7, for Aura of Protection, as well as the level 7 Paladin ability (if itís one worth taking. If not, stop at 6). After that, Sorcerer. This is the only real way to go for a GWM build.
    This means that GWM Sorcadin builds will generally start to get ďrealĒ at around level 9 or higher. Until that, itís not that different from a normal GWM Paladin. Do keep that in mind if joining a low-level campaign.

    HOWEVER, if you are going Paladin 3 / Sorcerer 17, you should go:

    Paladin 1 or 2, proceed to go Sorcerer 1 to 6 > Paladin 3 > Paladin 3 / Sorcerer 17
    You need to start Paladin for the heavy armor and WIS save proficiency. Then go Sorcerer, taking Resilient (CON) and Extra Attack. You can go straight to Sorcerer after the first level, acting as more of a Sorcerer with really high AC till you become level 7, or you can get Divine Smite and the Paladin spells with a level 2 dip and become a gish.
    After that, get your Paladin level to 3 (here you gain access to Oath features like Sacred Weapon and Vow of Enmity), and once thatís done, go Sorcerer all the way.

    3/17 is an overall sub-optimal build in how you donít get the super-powerful Aura of Protection and neither do you get as many Origin features (your Origin features are mainly stuff that you would have gotten from extra Paladin levels anyway), but compared to the 6/14, you do gain these benefits:
    • More higher-level spells: Apart from having 1 more level 5 slot than normal Sorcadins, you get access to Wish (albeit at level 20) and other awesome level 8 and 9 spells. (Sadly, being a Sorcerer, you donít get access to Foresight, the most powerful spell in the world for gish builds. If you want Foresight, go Bladelock, because thatís another pretty good gish option.)
    • More Sorcery Points: Itís honestly not that much, just 3 extra points.
    • One more Metamagic Option: While normal Sorcadins get only 3 options, you get 4. Iíd choose Careful, Heightened, Quickened, and Twinned, but other people may say otherwise. Depending on the campaign, Subtle may be a good choice.


    Notice that all of these benefits are exclusive to higher levels, and that at the same time, at high levels, having bad save bonuses can be lethal. All in all I think 6/14 is better, but if you still want to go 3/17, take a look at the above info for some advice.

    ...That said, if your campaign is going to end before level 12, going Paladin 2 or 3 / Favored Soul X can be the better option. Especially if it starts at level 8 or higher (in which you can gain War Caster and Extra Attack from the start).
    Last edited by Gastronomie; 2016-11-11 at 10:08 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malifice View Post
    Only on a DnD forum would discussing the methods for jamming a T-Rex into a 10x10x10 box be a thing.
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    Default Re: Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

    Whatís Your Weapon of Choice?
    Part 3: Rapier



    "What!? You posted this guide without creating the section for an entire sub-class!?"
    "Yeah!"
    "I can't believe you! F*** off!!"
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    SORRY!!! This area of the guide is still under construction. The reason is simple: I have not used one yet. Well, to be exact I have, but it was in a stat-rolling game, only several sessions (short campaign), and also at a low level (the build was Paladin 2/Sorcerer 6 since the DM declared the game will not advance to level 9 and higher), and thus I donít know if it can be classified something I can call actual experience. I decided that instead of theory-crafting, I should wait till I can get enough experience to talk with more confidence.

    However, even with that limited experience, I can say that going Draconic Sorcerer is almost mandatory. Higher AC and HP plus Elemental Affinity is, just... I mean, itís just too good to pass.

    Apart from 6/14, I am currently thinking of some sort of really weird Paladin 6 / Sorcerer 8 / Rogue 3 / Fighter 3 multiclass (Draconic, Assassin, Battle Master - Oath undecided) that utilizes Stealth with Assassinate and keeps on hurling Divine Smite and Superiority Dice on top of those critical hits. I imagine its nova will be hilarious. He/she will probably suffer from CON 14 and CHA 16, though.
    I may someday use this build and see how it works out.

    I am willing to try out DEX Sorcadins whenever I get the next chance, but if anyone has experience of DEX builds, please do help me with creating this section... or rather, please let me help you create this section.
    Last edited by Gastronomie; 2016-10-22 at 09:39 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malifice View Post
    Only on a DnD forum would discussing the methods for jamming a T-Rex into a 10x10x10 box be a thing.
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    Default Re: Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

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    Feats and More Multiclassing


    Blade Mastery.
    ...Yeah, I think thatís Blade Mastery all right...
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    Feats
    Now, the first thing I must mention here is that ASIs are amazing for Sorcadins. If youíre using a Greatsword, pumping your STR is top priority, and if youíre using a Rapier, youíd want good DEX for all the associated benefits, as well as good CHA. And if your weapon is a Longsword, while you may not need that much STR to be effective, you will want to use those leftover ASIs for pumping CHA, possibly to max.

    Even if you have nothing in particular to do, pumping CHA to improve your Sorcerer Spellcasting DC and Aura of Protection, or taking additional STR to get your GWM attacks to be more accurate, or improving DEX for better AC, Stealth checks, initiative, and DEX saves is probably more important than becoming a bit lucky or getting able to cast rituals. It is generally not a good idea for Sorcadins to take many Feats (unless it comes from being Variant Human, to get +1 to a particular odd ability score - as in the cases with Heavy Armor Master, Gourmand, and the lot. The Feats for Variant Human are already rated in post #3, Part 2 of the guide, ďRaces and StatsĒ, in ďRace Evaluation (STR Build)Ē).

    Thus, I think this part of the guide is honestly close to unneeded. But letís do it anyway, picking up just the important choices.

    Also adding in ASIs to explain how important they are.

    Spoiler: Longsword
    Show
    • War Caster: Mandatory if youíre holding stuff in both hands during combat. Combine with Booming Blade to crisp fleeing foes. And it improves your concentration as well.
    • CHA +2: F*** YEAH. Make your spells harder to resist, prepare more Paladin spells, improve ALL your saving throws, and if you have Elemental Affinity, boost your DPR as well. You should have at least 18, and if possible 20 CHA, by the time you hit level 20 (if you ever do). For you, this is more important than pumping STR.
    • +1 to two stats: This rating assumes that two of your STR, CON and CHA are odd numbers before you took it, and you boosted those odd stats. Thereís no reason not to do this, since having odd ability scores is nothing but a pure waste in 5e mechanics.
    • Inspiring Leader: Iíd say this is generally better than CON +2 for you, because it basically increases your - and your entire partyís - HP by your level + your CHA mod in-between every single short rest (whereas CON +2 does improve your concentration, but in terms of HP, increases it by your level only once per long rest, and itís also limited to yourself). You donít have any abilities related to temporary HP, so no anti-synergy issues (the Bladelock in your party might develop an inferiority complex though).
      This Feat scales quite nicely. Starts off at 4 temporary HP per short rest to everybody, but at level 20, it becomes 25 temporary HP per short rest (perhaps less if your CHA is not maxed out, but still, itís good).
    • Heavy Armor Master: This rating assumes your STR was odd and your CON and CHA were even before you took it (the easiest way to create this situation being taking this at level 1 using Variant Human). Otherwise, do not take this.
      This Feat improves your tankiness, especially useful against low-CR hordes. While it does not scale, it certainly stays good till high levels.
    • Resilient (CON): This rating assumes your CON was odd and your STR and CHA were even before you took it (the easiest way to create this situation being taking this at level 1 using Variant Human). Otherwise, do not take this.
      This Feat and War Caster somewhat overlap in usage, but this also helps you fight Drow and other monsters which have nasty abilities that require CON saves. Getting Poisoned is honestly not that much of an issue for you (you can use Lay on Hands to end it), but getting paralyzed or fainting can be dreadful, not to mention not applicable with Lay on Hands, so this is somewhat good for those situations.
    • Blade Mastery (UA): Apart from +1 bonus to hit (similar to STR +2), this also gives you two extra abilities, which are ď+1 AC as a reactionĒ, and ďadvantage on opportunity attacksĒ. Both of these are good - however, the first ability is not very synergetic with Shield or BB + War Caster, so you may not find yourself using it so much, and if your DM rules that the advantage does not get applied to Booming Blade (by RAW BB does not get advantage - War Caster states that you ďcast a spell at the creature, rather than making an opportunity attack), the second ability may not be as attractive either.
      It all depends on the DM. If your DM rules that advantage gets applied to BB, I think this is better than STR +2, but if your DM rules it does not, and you want stronger attacks, you might as well simply go STR +2.
      I personally think itís okay to give advantage to BB, since it makes more in-game logical sense (how come a master of blade-wielding canít apply his skills to his attacks, just because thereís elemental energy zapping through the blade?), but some DMs who are more strict with RAW may think differently.
    • STR +2: For reasons stated above, Blade Mastery can be better depending on your DM. If you really want more accuracy and damage, feel free to boost your STR, but in all honesty, itís not the most optimized option. DPR isnít your thing, from the start.
    • CON +2: For reasons stated above, Inspiring Leader is better. If you really want more accuracy and damage, feel free to boost your STR, but in all honesty, itís not the most optimized option.

    Spoiler: Greatsword
    Show
    GWM builds require heavy investment in STR, and thus a lot of dedication in ASIs, to be optimized. Thus, sadly, there is not much room for original customization.

    • Great Weapon Master: This isnít really something you need, itís the thing everything in this part of the guide assumes you already have.
    • Resilient (CON): Since the creators of the game declared that you can hold a greatsword in one hand while performing somatic and material components for a spell, War Caster is not mandatory for Greatsword builds. You might as well take this feat that makes you better at CON saves in general, not only concentration saves.
      Monster abilities that paralyze or poison (both fatal for GWM builds) generally use CON saves. Making yourself better against these crippling debuffs is very important for you. War Caster doesnít give you that benefit.
      Starting Variant Human with 15-8-15-8-8-15, +1 STR and +1 CHA, and eventually getting this feat to get 16 STR, CON, and CHA is the easiest way to optimize a GWM Sorcadin.
    • Blade Mastery (UA): +1 to hit and advantage on opportunity attacks make this Feat amazing for GWM builds. +1 AC as a reaction is not something youíll use with much frequence, but having more options is not a bad thing.
      The most important thing is that this Feat allows you to get bonuses to hit on top of your STR and proficiency. You should get STR 20 and this Feat, if possible.
    • STR +2: Unless you have good reason to, take this twice and max out your STR. Increasing your bonus to hit is top priority.
      Notice that adding up GWM, Resilient (CON), Blade Mastery, and two STR ASIs, youíve already used up all possible ASIs/Feat slots you get over the course of your entire career. Taking other options requires you to skip at least one of these, and most of the time, itís not worth it.
    • War Caster: This rating assumes you went Resilient (CON), in which case this Feat becomes not very appealing - especially since you want to max out STR and donít have that many left.

    Spoiler: Rapier
    Show
    (As aforementioned, I have not played this build much, so consider these ratings to be mere assumptions. Will edit later in accordance to personal experience and opinions gathered from people on these forums.)

    • War Caster: Same as Longswords: Mandatory if youíre holding stuff in both hands during combat. Combine with Booming Blade to crisp fleeing foes. And it improves your concentration as well.
    • DEX +2: Improving DEX also means improving your AC, Stealth, initiative, and DEX saves. This is a case where itís almost strictly better than taking Blade Mastery. Your DEX should be minimum 18. 20 is probably a good idea as well.
    • CHA +2: Improve your spellcasting and all your saving throws. Solid choice.



    Because real casters learn Kung-Fu.
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    Multiclassing

    Yeah, youíre already a multiclass build. Iím talking about taking levels in the other ten classes.

    Most of the time, multiclassing will probably result in a reduction of Sorcerer levels. However, when doing so, do keep in mind that Sorcery Points rise together with Sorcerer level, meaning that if you have only a few levels in Sorcerer and go multiclass into a lot of other classes, you cannot use Metamagic as often as a normal Paladin/Sorcerer build. While Quickened and Careful spell are relatively economical, options such as Twinned and Heightened spell may eat through Sorcery Points too quickly to be chosen as Metamagic options in these cases. While multiclass of course has its benefits, it will reduce your resources, and no one can say that it will be ultimately a good idea (of course, no one can say that it will be always be a bad idea though).

    Spoiler: From when to start multiclassing
    Show
    For most builds, Paladin 6 / Sorcerer 6 is a pretty important milestone. You get Aura of Protection, level 3 spells, your level 6 Sorcerous Origin ability, and the spell slot equivalent of a level 9 Caster (four level 1s, three level 2s, three level 3s, three level 4s, and one level 5).

    However, thereís a quite lot of powerful level 4 Sorcerer spells, like Greater Invisibility and Polymorph. Going 6/8 gives you level 4 spells, one ASI/Feat, and the spell slot equivalent of a level 11 Caster (four level 1s, three level 2s, three level 3s, three level 4s, two level 5s, and one level 6). This is another good place to start multiclassing.

    If you start multiclassing into a third class before these levels, you will suffer from having very little Sorcery Points. I advice you do not do this.

    Spoiler: Choices
    Show
    The first thing to note is that the classes that have restrictions pertaining to INT and WIS can never, ever be taken. That means no multiclassing into Cleric, Druid, Monk, Ranger, and Wizard. This leaves Barbarian, Bard, Fighter, Rogue, and Warlock (Rogue is exclusive to DEX builds).

    Spoiler: Longsword
    Show
    For Longsword + Shield builds, youíre honestly better off not multiclassing IMO. You want that Animate Objects (Sorcerer 9), and so do you want a third Metamagic option (Sorcerer 10). Then you feel you want Sorcerer 11 for Mass Suggestion, and Sorcerer 12 for an extra ASI... When you realize, the next level in Sorcerer gives you level 7 spells, and the final level gives you at-will flight, or something just as awesome. Overall I would not recommend it.
    But if you really want to, thatís your choice.

    • Barbarian 1: Being able to tank better than any other class is a good thing, and itís also synergetic with your concept. Sadly, not being able to use, or even concentrate on spells during the duration of Rage and not being able to wear Heavy Armor while you do so is too much of a drawback to be considered ďgoodĒ. Besides, your selling point is versatility, being able to choose the best option for every turn. While raging, if you want to use a spell to help your friends, you need to end the Rage (by using up a Bonus Action).
      Since your DEX will be either 8 or 10, your AC without heavy armor will be beyond terrible.
      If you want to be tanky, just use Greater Invisibility, or Polymorph into a T-Rex, instead of delaying your Caster level progression.
      I think Paladin/Barbarian (no levels in Sorcerer) is a pretty interesting combination (Iíve seen a friend use it and it worked out better than on first glance), for the aforementioned reason that you can use Divine Smite while raging (Reckless Attack for more crits). It does require you to have 13 STR and CHA though, and you still canít wear Heavy Armor. My friend had no problems because it was stat-rolling, but in point-buy, will probably be worse.
    • Bard 1: Gain 5 Bardic Inspiration Dice that can help your friends make attack rolls or saving throws. Good ability to have, but 5 per day is honestly not that much (can be a lesser number if your CHA is lower), and this ability requires Font of Inspiration (the level 5 ability) to be something that can be considered truly powerful. Of the level 1 spells, Healing Word is a good choice.
    • Bard (Lore) 6: So itís Paladin 6 / Sorcerer 8/ Bard 6. I have not played this build before, but since it does seem fun, I want to use it someday.
      You never gain level 5, 6, or 7 spells (while you gain the spell slots of a Level 17 Caster), but you instead gain 9 extra choices of level 3 or lower spells, which can improve your versatility in certain situations. You also get Font of Inspiration, meaning you can buff your friends all day. You will never run out of level 1 to 3 spells to cast due to Font of Magic and Upcasting, and to be honest, a lot of the low-level spells remain powerful even at high levels, so this probably isnít that bad of an option as it might seem on first glance. You also become darn good with Skills.
      Going Lore Bard also allows you to debuff your enemies, and also gives you access to any two level 3 or lower spells of your choice. Some good choices are Conjure Animals (upcast for absolute insanity) and Aura of Vitality.
      No, this is not your most optimized Sorcadin build, itís rather something of its own... But it truly does seem interesting.
    • Fighter 2: Gain an ability that heals you once per short rest, and also another ability that allows you to take an extra action. What it says on the package is pretty good, but sadly, itís not worth taking less Caster levels. And as for Action Surge, you can already do similar stuff with Quickened Spell.
    • Warlock 1 (not Undying Light with Draconic Sorcerer): With a 1 level dip, you do not get the benefits of Eldritch Invocations. What you do get is the Armor of Agathys spell, which is quite amazing when upcast. With a level 5 slot, you gain 25 temporary HP (a level 5 Cure Wounds heals 27.5 HP with 20 CHA, so itís about roughly the same amount) and also get to deal 25 damage to anyone who attacks you. And it does not require concentration either.
      IMO Hex is honestly meh for you except in certain situations, due to the concentration issue.
      Archfey gives you Faerie Fire and a decent control ability. Fiend gives you Command and a nice healing resource that gets re-charged every time you kill somebody. GOO gives you two good low-level utility spells to choose from (Tashaís Hideous Laughter and Dissonant Whispers - but if you take Agathys, you can choose only one of these, since Warlock 1 gets only 2 spells to choose from) as well as limited telepathy. All are good choices.
      You also get to cast 1 more Shield per short rest. That or, one extra smite.
    • Warlock 2 (not Undying Light with Draconic Sorcerer): A lot of people dip Warlock 2 for better Blasting. You are mainly a frontline warrior, but having an alternative attack option is useful for when you donít want to expend a spell slot but the enemies are over 30 feet away from you (this can happen).
      Certain invocations are interesting, but IMO, are not worth the 2 level lag in Sorcerer progression on their own. The only reasons this is not red are because now you get to heal uses of the Shield spell (or a Divine Smite) twice per short rest, because the Fiendish Vigor Eldritch Invocation allows you to heal either 1d4+4 or 8 temporary HP in-between every single battle (8 if your DM rules by RAW that you can re-cast it as many times as you want in-between fights till you roll a 4 with 1d4, and 1d4+4 if your DM rules that you cannot re-cast it till ití s gone), and because the Warlock level 1 spells are pretty decent and add extra options.
    • Warlock 1 (Undying Light @Draconic Sorcerer): I do not allow the Undying Light (UA) warlock patron in my games for two reasons. The first is that itís overpowered. The second is that the idea of commiting your soul to this vague concept of ďpositive energyĒ is not only really hard to understand but also dull and overall not so ďeldritchyĒ, if eldritchy is even a word. Anyhow, I think it doesnít mesh with the core concept of Warlocks, this eerie, creepy guy who makes contracts with these unfathomable beings of great power. So I really hate it.
      But if your DM allows it, youíre an optimizer at heart, and you have a good character idea and/or an explanation as to how this guy gained the powers of this ďUndying Light WarlockĒ, itís a strong choice.
      Apart from the extra use of Shield or Divine Smite per short rest, Draconic Sorcerers get a massive boost from this dip - one that most DMs will frown upon as too excessive power-gaming. The Radiant Soul ability of Undying Light is honestly terribly designed in how it by RAW stacks with the Elemental Affinity of Draconic Sorcerer for just a 1 level dip. It should be a level 6 ability or something, but whoever created this was f***ing stupi... Okay, I mean, not very smart, so itís pretty damn overpowered right now.
      Combined with Elemental Affinity, you have +10 damage to all your GFBs and Fireballs and Walls of Fire, as well as the Firestorm you gain at your last level. Are you really serious? I mean, is there actually any reason to take Great Weapon Master when this exists? I really hope they fix this problem by the time they release this as an official product.
      BTW, the Paladin spell Divine Favor becomes a decent use of a level 1 slot if combined with Radiant Soul (though concentration issues and the fact it works better with Extra Attack than GFB keep it from becoming as effective as one may think). Hellish Rebuke also becomes a pretty interesting option, and itís listed in the Warlock spell list, so you might as well take it.
    • Warlock 2 (Undying Light @Draconic Sorcerer): You gain Eldritch Invocations, like Agonizing and/or Repelling Blast which can boost your Blasting (as a secondary option), or Fiendish Vigor, which makes you tankier.
      BTW, at level 11 to 16, your Eldritch Blasts deal 3d10+15 damage, spread over 3 attacks, while Green-Flame Blade inflicts 3d8+13 to one target and 2d8+5 to another, all in one attack roll. Eldritch Blast is a better damaging option if no two creatures are standing next to each other, and the risk of all three blasts missing is not very high. GFB does more damage, but is rather unreliable unless you have advantage on the attack (if you do, itís amazing).
    • Warlock 3 (Undying Light @Draconic Sorcerer): Comes at the cost of one ASI. You get level 2 slots, which can be used for Mirror Image, Web, Misty Step, and upcasting Hellish Rebuke. If they end up not being used when you take a short rest, convert them into Sorcery Points.
      Pact of the Blade is redundant, so letís go with either Chain or Tome. If your DM rules that Chain allows you to get the Imp or Quasit familiar that gives you Magical Resistance, I advice you take Chain. Otherwise, Tome opens up a lot of versatility options.
    • Warlock 6 (Undying Light @Draconic Sorcerer):
      On first glance, it seems like this build can hurl around Fireballs better than normal Sorcerers. However, since you took 6 levels in Warlock, you lose access to level 5, 6, and 7 spells, and also do not gain level 7, 8, and 9 slots. That plus, you lose 6 points from going 6 less levels in Sorcerer. The lost slots and the lost levels accumulate to be 32 Sorcery Points, and re-converting these to level 3 spell slots (each one being ), thatís 6 of them. Which means that if you take only 2 short rests per adventuring day, pure Sorcadins can fire Fireballs just as frequently.
      What made me mention this as a valid option (not an optimized one, but still) is the Searing Vengeance ability that is amazing for any frontline tank. Basically, when you faint, you regain half your HP and come back to life, while blinding the foes around you as well. This is a perfect example of an ability that shows how Unearthed Arcana is really in ďtest-play modeĒ, and in all honesty itís bad design.
      Is it worth all the spellcasting? Probably not. But you also do gain the Pact abilities (Tome or Chain) as well, so if you want, you could.

    Spoiler: Greatsword
    Show
    • Barbarian: Look at ďLongswordĒ for my rambling. The fact Rage requires you to not wear heavy armor makes this ability pointless for you, especially since your DEX is either 8 or 10 and you will be terrible with Unarmored Defense.
      Reckless Attack (gained at level 2) seems like it could be good, but bestowing advantage on all your enemiesí attacks is too much of a cost unless you also use Rage together with it... And if you try using Rage, your AC will be as bad as that of a pure Caster. Overall meh.
    • Bard: Your CHA is probably only 16, meaning these sorts of multiclassing are as not as effective as they are for Longsword builds.
    • Fighter 3 or 4 (Battle Master): Battle Master increases your attacksí accuracy (very important for a GWM build) and also gives you new interesting options such as Riposte. Superiority Dice are regained on a short rest, so no fear of running out of them.
      Going Fighter 4 gives you an ASI in exchange for 1 Caster level progression and level 6 spells.
      You do lose 3 or 4 Caster levels, but you still get 10 or 11 Sorcerer levels and 13 or 14 Caster levels, so not that bad. If you compare yourself to the Eldritch Knight, you can see that you remain pretty powerful (not that youíre absolutely superior to them, but rather that delayed spellcasting progression isnít that much of a problem, since Eldritch Knights, with worse spellcasting, are still considered good).
    • Warlock 1, 2: Get Armor of Agathys. Have fun. Becomes doubtful if your campaign may reach level 20, since the Shadow Walk ability of Shadow Sorcerer 14 is quite strong.

    Spoiler: Rapier
    Show
    • Barbarian 1: This actually might be a good dip, though I have not testplayed yet so I cannot say for sure. You donít wear heavy armor from the start, so you essentially gain the benefits of Stoneskin as a bonus action (it doesnít cost concentration, but you canít concentrate on or even activate spells while Raging). Bear Totem gives you resistance to almost everything at level 3, but the extra two levels are probably better off used to invest in Sorcerer for more casting high-level spells and more Sorcery Points.
    • Bard: Just like Greatsword builds, your CHA is not maxed out, meaning the benefits of going Bard are somewhat lessened.
    • Fighter 2, 3: On its own, honestly not that much. But they synergize quite a lot with the Assassin. This build is more of an Assassin variant than a Sorcadin variant, though.
    • Rogue 3 (Assassin): I am yet to actually play this, so this rating is only a temporary one, but I think Paladin 6 / Sorcerer 8 / Assassin 3 / Fighter 3 makes a pretty interesting Assassin variant that has good AC, healing, half-casting, and over-the-top nova. Critical Hit + Divine Smite + Superiority Dice add up to be quite a something, you know.
      For instance, Rapier + Sneak Attack + Level 2 Divine Smite + Fighting Maneuver is 2d8+6d6+6d8+2d8 = 6d6 + 10d8 = 21 + 45 = 66 damage average, and together with your DEX bonus, becomes about 70 damage on hit. Using Action Surge you can do three more attacks (they donít benefit from Sneak Attack though), which, assuming DEX 18, do 6d8+12=39 damage without adding anything. But you will probably add superiority dice (2d8, average 9 damage) and Divine Smite (4d8, average 18 damage with a level 1 slot, and average 9 damage higher per extra level), so that will probably amount to be something around 150 damage in a single round. Even more, if you use Sorcery Points to fuel bonus action Green-Flame or Booming Blade.
    • Warlock 1, 2: Reasons to go this way are explained in the Longsword section. Think twice before taking this if you are certain you will go to level 20, though, since getting to fly (the Draconic Sorcerer ability at level 14) is quite good.
    Last edited by Gastronomie; 2016-10-22 at 09:39 AM.
    Spoiler: Avatar
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    Spoiler: Quotes
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    Only on a DnD forum would discussing the methods for jamming a T-Rex into a 10x10x10 box be a thing.
    Extended Signature: Homebrew Stuff
    Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

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    Default Re: Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

    I have no regrets. This is the only path
    Choosing Your Spells Part 1: Sorcerer (Low Levels)


    Megumin casts Fireball!!
    (Image Copyright Natsume Akatsuki)

    Confession: I am generally a very lazy person.

    If I felt that the current, pre-existing guides for Sorcerers can be used straight for evaluation of Sorcadin spells, instead of writing this section, I would have just wrote ďLOOK AT THE OTHER GUIDESĒ and be done with it. Thatís what I did with the core class abilities of Paladins and Sorcerers.

    And indeed I will say that for Paladin spells. There are a lot of good guides about Paladins, them being listed in the 5e guides thread, and you can look at the stuff there for help. The spells that are important for Paladins and the spells that are important for Sorcerers are not that much different.

    However, thatís not how things can go with Sorcerers.

    Though I am generally very lazy, I also know when I should work hard. This is one such case, because sadly, the pre-existing evaluations of spells for Sorcerers cannot be so simply converted into the evaluations of a Sorcadin spell list.

    This does not mean, in any way, that the pre-existing guides suck. Theyíre indeed wonderful at evaluating the spell list of a full Sorcerer, thatís nothing to doubt. But Sorcadins are, as Iíve already told you, a class of its own. Itís a lot different from Sorcerers (while itís probably a bit similar to a Paladin). Thus their selection of spells should be different from pure Sorcerers as well, meaning that the pre-existing Pure Sorcerer guides cannot be simply copy-pasted into this section.

    Another thing: Iíve sorted the spells, not only by spell level, but also by their ďgenreĒ - Iíve divided the spells into 6 sections per level, based on usage (some sections are completely hollow for certain levels, and some spells belong in multiple sections).
    You should have a good balance of these spells - for instance, just because you want to cripple your enemies, having 90% of your spells be spells that ďweaken your enemiesĒ will probably not be as effective as you think, because it goes against the whole Caster premise of versatility. You should always have a dozen options to choose from, so make sure to keep a good balance of these spells (with the exception of Blasting spells - you donít need any of them till you get Fireball).

    Since the evaluation is too long to fit in a single post, Iíve divided this section into two parts.

    NOTE 1: Since this is an optimization guide, I will NOT list all the spells that exist in the Sorcerer spell list. Generally speaking, those who are not mentioned are those who are not worth mentioning. If youíre not sure whether I missed something, please comment so and I will explain my reasons, or simply agree with you and edit this post.
    If multiple people say they want a full rating of all Sorcerer spells, I might feel like doing so, but for now, Iím not doing that task.


    NOTE 2: You should probably leave the situational spells, like Feather Fall and Water Breathing, to your Wizard. Remember that Sorcerers can learn only a limited number of spells.

    Spoiler: Spell Genre
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    Spell Genre
    • Blasting
      Spells like Fireball belong here. Almost all the Blasting spells you take should be AoE. This is because warriors are generally already good enough at severely damaging singular enemies, but bad at severely damaging multiple enemies in a turn, meaning that single-target damaging options will most likely be never used, while AoE options can come up to be useful every now and then.
    • Self Protection
      Shield, Mirror Image and the sort. These spells make up for your bit-low HP and easily turn whatís a futile scrawny kid into an invincible behemoth thatís loads tankier than the average pure Fighter.
    • Buffing Friends (and/or Yourself)
      Spells like Bless and Invisibility belong here. You have the powers required to make the Rogue even better at roguing, or make the Fighter even better at fighting. Thatís obviously extremely beneficial for the entire team. Do be aware that most of these spells require concentration, so you constantly need to make the right decisions of ďhowĒ exactly to buff your team. Do not use them randomly or without much thought.
    • Weaken Enemies
      Some of these spells, like Hold Person, target just one enemy (unless you upcast it). Others, like Hypnotic Pattern, are AoE spells that can cripple multiple enemies at once (use together with Careful Spell for maximum efficiency). Either way, these are awesome. The former is to be used against powerful bosses, while the latter is to be used against hordes, and to adapt to all sorts of situations, you should have both of them if possible. It may be difficult depending on your spell selection - Sorcerers have a very limited number of spells they can memorize - but it is definitely worth the effort.
    • Field Control
      Spells like Web, Stinking Cloud, and Wall of Fire belong in here. What can be said about these spells in general is that Careful Spell becomes Sky-Blue wonderful when paired with them (especially the ones that donít deal damage). Having the enemies wasting their turns coughing and reeling while your entire team (equipped with magical gas masks crafted from Careful Spell) steamrolls them is surely a hilarious moment.
      If your DM uses battle grids for combat, you should always have at least 1, and preferably over 2, Field Control spells. Manipulating the field is a godly ability. If itís theater of mind, itís not as important, but if youíre good at convincing the DM that all the enemy creatures belong in the area of Wall of Fire, it might become just as important again.
    • Out-of-Combat
      Spells like Minor Illusion and Suggestion belong here (though these can actually be used in-combat as well). These spells give you role-play versatility, and if done right, can make you progress within the plot much more efficiently then mindlessly hacking your way through.
      These spells can potentially turn the tides of a combat as well... Most of the time, by using it before combat. For instance, before walking into the banditsí base, you can use Minor Illusion to mimic the voice of a henchmen your team recently captured, proceed to knock on the door, and swing in with your sword the moment the bandits open and greet you. Ambushing is the most easy-to-understand way to use illusions, but thereís a lot more possibilities and technique waiting ot be discovered by you. Imagination is the key.

    Spoiler: Cantrips (Sorcerer)
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    Luckily, being a Sorcerer, you have the right to choose 4 Cantrips - the largest number of starting cantrips for any class. You should use these to increase your utility, both in and out of combat, but there are several things to keep in mind.
    First, since youíre holding a weapon - and weapons generally do more damage than damage cantrips - you should not take the non-GFB/BB damage cantrips unless you have good reason to do so. 1 at best, and most of the time, 0. You can just throw a javelin or shoot a bow if you want.
    As for GFB and BB, most of the time, I advice you take them. If youíre a GWM build without War Caster, you might not need them, though.
    Unless you have zero creativity, consider Minor Illusion to be something of a ďCantrip TaxĒ. It works wonders. Take it.
    Most non-GWM Paladin/Sorcs will start with GFB, BB, and Minor Illusion, leaving only one free space (two spaces if Sorcerer level 4 or higher, and three spaces if Sorcerer level 10 or higher, and so on). What to do with the last slot(s) is up to you - if youíre a human you might need Light, but otherwise, perhaps take Lightning Lure for field control, or Create Bonfire for the Pyrotechnics combo, or make friends, or mend things, or send private messages to your teammates. Depends on campaign, character, playstyle, and personal preference.

    Blasting
    • Booming Blade (SCAG): TAKE THIS. Itís mandatory for S&B builds, and even GWM builds may find situations where itís useful (though this will become Black for GWM builds of level 6 and higher). Twin or use with War Casterís Opportunity Attack for maximum troll laughs.
    • Green-Flame Blade (SCAG): This one canít be Twinned (according to the creators of this game), but works with Elemental Affinity and can damage better than Extra Attack depending on the situation. No reason to not take this for S&B. Becomes Black for GWM builds of level 6 and higher, but even then, not a bad choice or anything, a good thing to have up your sleeve.
    • Fire Bolt: Its damage is worse than GFB or BB (despite being one of the best cantrips in terms of damage), but it can go ranged, with a pretty damn long distance of 120 feet, so itís possibly useful when all the enemies are afraid of your awesome melee capabilities and are attempting to slink back. If youíre a Fire Draconic Sorcerer with Elemental Affinity this becomes Blue. Otherwise, not much TBH.
    • Frostbite (EE): Being a CON save spell means it hardly works on certain enemies, but bestowing disadvantage on the first attack is a petty decent ability, making this a respectable back-up option. Is it worth the cantrip slot? Probably not.
    • Sword Burst (SCAG): Written not to say itís good, but rather written to say itís bad. If you have multiple enemies within melee range, just use Green-Flame Blade. The same can be said for Thunderclap (EE), an inferior version of this spell.


    Self Protection
    • Blade Ward: Not a bad choice as it seems on first glance, since if youíre in a situation where you really want to survive this turn, you can Quicken this to reduce the physical damage you take next turn to half. Sadly, it doesnít work on elemental (and other non-physical) damage, and while not bad, itís not an exceptionally good choice either.


    Buffing Friends (and/or Yourself)
    • Light: If you have darkvision, donít bother. If you donít have darkvision, you need it.
      (I listed this spell here because it pretty much ďnegates a severe de-buff bestowed upon you as a terrain featureĒ.)


    Weaken Enemies
    • Frostbite (EE): Described in ďBlastingĒ. Not bad, but not top-priority either.


    Field Control
    • Booming Blade (SCAG): You could consider this Field Control in its own weird sort of way. Only affects one target but keeps him in place, unless he wants to take that extra damage.
    • Lightning Lure (SCAG): When thereís too much distance between an enemy and you, this clicks in and saves you from that problem. OR, you can actually use it to drag a friend and keep him away from an Area of Effect or help him disengage (itís possible for you to move the target just 5 feet, so that he doesnít take the Xd8 damage).
    • Create Bonfire (EE, Concentration): The damage doesnít matter. What matters is that Quickening this makes Pyrotechnics an AoE version of Blindness. If youíre scheduled to take Pyrotechnics, or if you find yourself in a narrow 5-feet corridor and all the enemies are coming at you from the other side of said corridor, this can be good. Otherwise, eh, donít take this.


    Out-of-Combat
    • Minor Illusion: Your imagination is the only limit to the countless uses of this spell, be it luring enemies into a trap or a different direction, hiding more effectively, scaring enemies away from something you donít wanna have them touch, making them believe youíre a nice guy or someone with great authority, ambushing them, capturing them, etc, etc, etc... Itís not the sort of versatility a Cantrip can have. If multiple characters in the group can use this, they can be combined together to create even more ďbelievableĒ situations.
    • Friends (Conc): Target gets angry at you after the spell ends. Depending on the DMís rulings, if youíre disguised as someone else when you cast this, the target might get angry at the guy who you were disguised as. In which case, this is Sky Blue no-questions-asked for Changeling DEX builds, and Blue for those who have Disguise Kit proficiency. I imagine most DMs will rule that using the Disguise Kit looks at CHA, and being both a Paladin and a Sorcerer, youíre quite an attractive fellow.
    • Mending: CRAZY DIAMOND!!


      DORARARARARARARARARARA!!!
      (Image Copyright Hirohiko Araki)

      Well, that aside, itís a situational but occasionally extremely useful ability. It can greatly help you in certain situations, especially in city campaigns.
    • Message: Depending on the campaign this becomes Blue or possibly even Sky Blue, especially when you want to communicate to your friends without having other people overhear what you wanna tell them.
    • Shape Water (EE): Thereís a whole thread dedicated to this cantrip that makes you want to take it. DM dependent for some rulings, but certainly looks fun.
    • Control Flames (EE): Thematic for certain builds, and can occasionally come in handy when, say, you want to extinguish a fire, or play tricks with stupid or easily believing NPCs. Itís still very situational.
    • Mage Hand: Situational, and not top-priority.
    • Prestidigitation: Minor Illusion is obviously better when it comes to deceiving enemies, but at least this spell lets you clean all that goblin blood off your clothes with a single snap of your fingers.

    Spoiler: Level 1 Sorcerer Spells
    Show
    Most level 1 spells are underpowered (and they should be). Especially, Level 1 Blasting spells. Theyíre generally sub-optimal at best because of their low damage that can be easily surpassed by a well-placed GFB or BB. The AoEsí areas are small and their rider effects, if any, are not that appetizing either.
    But that goes for almost all level 1 spells in general. Since the number of Spells Known you can have are limited, you will probably not have a large number of level 1 spells known at mid-to-high levels. Most of the time you will be using Shield and not much anything else.
    However, I will rate the other options anyway, to give ideas on how to use them.

    Blasting
    • Burning Hands: Starts off nice due to its range (large for a level 1 AoE I guess) but quickly gets bad, especially for Sorcadins which have another good damaging option (simply attacking with your sword doesnít cost you any resources, and if multiple enemies are standing together, GFB can burn two of them at once).
    • Magic Missile: I honestly am not a big fan of this spell from the start, and itís even less so with Sorcadin builds. Being guaranteed to hit is a good thing, but the damage is simply abysmal and itís often better to just attack with your sword. However, if your DM constantly shows the players how much HP the monsters have remaining, this might become better. Another way to utilize this is to use against enemy Casters to make them automatically make three Concentration-maintaining saving throws, most likely ending in a failure. In which case this works sorta like Dispel magic.
      Itís not a really amazing spell, especially for you, but it still does have its uses.
    • Thunderwave: The damage is meh, but it allows you to blast a good number of enemies away. This is something normal attacks cannot do, and having a spell-exclusive rider is a good thing. However, Warlocks can do similar stuff with Repelling Blast, so you might as well leave this job to them and just use your level 1 slots for Shield.
    • Ice Knife (EE): Look, the general rule here that Iím trying to explain here is that you should try to keep away from damaging spells that donít have insanely large areas of effect. They generally arenít worth belonging in Spells Known.
    • Chromatic Orb: Just attack with your frigginí sword you coward, why are you even holding it in your hand in the first place. These sorts of spells that can ďhave their effects be achieved by non-magical meansĒ should be kept away from, especially for a master swordsman like you. Youíre delving into magic to find new possibilities, and getting to deal damage to a singular target is not a new possibility.
      The same can be said for Catapult. I just supposed I should note these here because these sorts of spells are often rated good for Sorcerers in their guides. These spells may be good for Sorcerers, but not for you.


    Self Protection
    • Shield: Become invincible for a round at the laughably low cost of a reaction and one level 1 spell slot. There is no excuse to not taking this spell.
    • Mage Armor: Most characters donít need it (including DEX builds, since most have Draconic Resilience). If youíre a non-Draconic Bloodline DEX build, sure, take it.
    • False Life: Just pointing out you have no reason to take this, since you have Cure Wounds as a spell of the same level.


    Buffing Friends (and/or Yourself)
    • Expeditious Retreat (Concentration): Only affects yourself. Also listed in ďField ControlĒ. According to Zene, works real good with positioning Wild Magic Surges.


    Weaken Enemies
    • Sleep: As often said, itís devastating at low levels, making enemies unconscious without a save, but it quickly starts to suck from around level 5 and higher. This is because the inflation of the enemy monstersí general HP is extremely high-paced, especially at low levels, and the HP limitation of Sleep quickly becomes too small for the monsters to fit into.
      The same can be said for Color Spray.


    Field Control
    • Expeditious Retreat (Concentration): Many spells have a range, and your melee attacks have a limited range as well. This is handy for when you want to move around at double speed as a bonus action. Orcs can do similar stuff.
      Gets better for Wild Magic Sorcerers, since the effectiveness of certain Surges depend on where youíre positioned. Since a contributor to this guide (Zene) who actually used this combination rated it Gold, it might be even better than it seems on paper. Iím not sure if the concentration and Spell Known makes it so effective even at higher levels (Zene played a low-level Sorcadin), but regardless, if youíre a Wild Magic Sorc, it seems you should consider taking this. I cannot say for sure since I have not used it, but nothing beats the comments from those whoíve actually tested the idea.
    • Fog Cloud (Concentration): Everyone in a certain area gets Blinded (wind may move around the cloud). Itís similar to Darkness, except you canít see through it with Devilís Sight or Eyes of the Dark.
      The really weird thing about being Blinded is that when two creatures within darkness or heavy fog are both Blinded, both gain advantage on attack against each other, but at the same time both bestow advantage on attacks against themselves, meaning that both sides will make attack rolls as normal (by RAW, due to advantage/disadvantage not stacking, it does nullify any other advantages and disadvantages, though). Thus this isnít as much of a ďdefensive optionĒ as one may hope.
      Then what is it good for?
      There are two main things here. The first is that opportunity attacks can only be done against targets you can see, meaning that within the area of Fog Cloud, no one can make opportunity attacks (unless they have Blindsight or something). Within the area of Fog Cloud, you, and everyone (including your enemies) can freely move around without caring about opportunity attacks, making the combat situation a lot different than it normally is.
      Combining this with Booming Blade is a pretty damn nice combo. Jump into the fog, hit an enemy, and retreat without provoking OAs. If the enemy wants to move and chase you, he must take the extra damage.
      The second thing is that 99% of target spells cannot target people the Caster cannot see, meaning that using Fog Cloud on an enemy Caster basically renders him useless. HOWEVER, if cast using a level 1 slot, the Caster is free to escape the area of Fog Cloud on his next turn, and no one can stop him from doing that (because he doesnít provoke OAs either). Upcasting can make the radius 40 feet (at level 2), or perhaps larger, in which case the Caster cannot move out of the obscured range, and for a turn, cannot use some of his spells (he can still use attack roll spells and AoE spells. However, some DMs, including I, will rule that he will be confused and that if he wishes to use an AoE spell, he will hurl it in a random direction).
      Or, simply use it when your parts wants to hide.
      Fog Cloud is the only Field Control spell of the ďfield-affecting typeĒ (Wall of Fire, Evardís Black Tentacles etc.) you get at this level, and itís not a bad option to use. However, once you go to higher levels, chances are you will want to swap this out due to the limited number of Spells Known (even if you originally chose it).
      Be aware that this ability completely kills the party Rogue since it makes using Sneak Attack impossible.
    • Thunderwave: Detailed in ďBlastingĒ. Not bad, and can move people around, but not that amazing.


    Out-of-Combat
    • Charm Person: For all your role-playing needs. Itís pretty much limited to outside combat, but you get to be able to make an enemy a friend with just a single WIS save. Wonderful in infiltration and various other situations.
    • Disguise Self: I think getting proficiency in the Disguise Kit is a generally better option (by RAW Disguise Self has a lot of limits on what you can become, and most importantly itíll be difficult to impersonate other people). Either way, combine with Friends for maximum effect.
    • Silent Image (Concentration): Minor Illusionís older brother, which is a good thing. It uses a slot, which is a bad thing. If you want to be that good at illusions, just take Warlock 2 or 3 for the Misty Visions invocation. This isnít what you use Sorcerer Spells Known for.

    Spoiler: Level 2 Sorcerer Spells
    Show
    Ha-ha-ha-ha-ha. Now weíre talking. Level 2 introduces a lot of spells that slowly start to draw out the outline of the Sorcadin build - from the defensive spells like Mirror Image, to the major debuffs like Hold Person, and the field controllers like Web. Suggestion and Phantasmal Force are dazzling both in and out of combat, and are sure to affect your partyís approach to the problems they face.
    The damaging spells are yet to be worth taking, though. We will need to bide our time till level 3 for that.

    Blasting
    • Shatter: Best AoE damage spell for this level. Not that thatís really something to boast about, given how the others really, really suck. Another level and you get Fireball, from which is where the Blasting spells finally get a rating of over Blue... Actually, Fireball suddenly gets it to Sky Blue, but thatís that.
      Looking at the stuff unique to this spell, Shatter one can destroy nonmagical objects within the area as well. Whether thatís a good thing or bad thing depends on the situation, but you might be able to be creative with it.
    • Scorching Ray: As always, simple damage can be replaced by the SCAG cantrips for you. Depending on how your DM rules Elemental Affinity, it might become ďadd CHA modĒ or ďadd CHA mod x3Ē. Creators seem to have intended the former, which sucks hard, but even with the latter, not an ideal option for Sorcadins.
      The reason why Iím posting these here is because I really want to emphasize that being a Sorcadin, you should not take these. Many spells that are good for pure Casters become terribad for gish builds.


    Self Protection
    • Mirror Image: The fact this doesnít require concentration is either a misprint or a result of a troll lurking in the writers of WotC. Itís really damn useful, and you should put it to your advantage.
    • Misty Step: I listed it in here because it can get you out of dire situations and help you slink back into the backrow when you desperately need it, but it also can be used for various other purposes. The fact itís a Bonus Action is what really makes it shine.
    • Blur (Concentration): Pretty good defensive spell for this level. If it didnít require concentration it wouldíve been insanely powerful. But thereís absolutely no way thereís a level 2 spell that buffs your defenses by a ton and doesnít require concentration, right? I mean, if such thing existed it would be really powerful, so you should take it, but...owait.
      (Starts to becomes redundant after you hit Sorcerer 7 and gain Greater Invisibility.)


    Buffing Friends (and/or Yourself)
    • Misty Step: Technically not a buff, but it increases your combat versatility by using for purposes such as ďdisengageĒ and ďdashĒ. Think of it sorta like Cunning Action. For both offensive and defensive purposes, this spell is solid and good.
    • Invisibility (Concentration): Best used on an Assassin (if your party includes one, this becomes Sky Blue). It can also be useful in RP situations, but in combat, itís a bit of a pain how the effect ends so easily. You better use it on someone who isnít wearing heavy armor, meaning that unless youíre a DEX build you should cast it on someone else.
    • Levitate (Concentration): Poor manís Fly. Does allow someone to engage in melee with flying monsters to lock them down with OAs, but generally, the thing to say is ďjust frigginí use FlyĒ.
    • Enlarge/Reduce (Concentration): Basically allows anyone to be good with grappling and also inflicts a bit of extra damage. Itís probably not the best way to use your precious Concentration, though.


    Weaken Enemies
    • Hold Person (Concentration): Quickening and proceeding to Crit-Smite the hell out of the poor humanoid is almost sure to kill the guy on the spot. Even if he doesnít die there, chances are he will die within the round. A truly devastating spell, and while it doesnít work on all enemies, you should still have it due to its hilarious synergy with Divine Smite.
    • Suggestion (Concentration): With a bit of creativity, you can subdue not one, but multiple enemies with this spell, or perhaps even end the encounter with the enemies fleeing and running for their lives. Since this spell heavily relies on DM discretion, you should ask your DM beforehand about his definition of a ďsuggestion that sounds reasonableĒ, and make sure everyone in the party is okay with what you do before using it.
      This spell is also listed in ďOut-of-CombatĒ, since itís extremely versatile.
    • Phantasmal Force (Concentration): Taking one monster out of the fight (be it freeze on the spot or run away for dear life) is easy with this spell, but with the right situation and the right imagination you can make the enemy pretty much kill himself, or even make him go on your side, acting like Dominate Monster. An excellent spell, and even if the enemy is dubious, he must use an action (or several actions if heís unlucky or stupid) to realize the illusion is a fake.
    • Pyrotechnics (EE): Use together with Create Bonfire (perhaps Quickened) for maximum versatility. Used as a Debuff spell, itís like Blindness/Deafness, except it is an AoE (which is a seriously good thing). Do keep in mind that Pyrotechnics can blind the targets for only 1 turn, opposed to how Blindness/Deafness persists till the guy succeeds on his save.
      This spell can also be used as a Field Control spell that resembles Fog Cloud, except without requiring concentration. Itís also extremely thematic for Fire Draconic Sorcerers.
    • Levitate (Concentration): This is rated Purple for when helping friends and for using outside combat, but when used on enemies, itís possible to make this like a really poor manís Banishment, albeit restricted to monsters with only melee attacks, by sending him floating into the air where he can harm nobody. Not that it will come up very often, especially with it requiring concentration, but being able to pepper him with arrows while heís raging and screaming, suspended mid-air, might be a nice thing to have. The problem is that you probably donít have the Spells Known capacity.
    • Maximillian's Earthen Grasp (EE, Concentration): STR saves may be resisted by large foes, but being Restrained is a pretty nasty condition. The fact it requires concentration makes it a mediocre choice at best, optimization-wise, but itís not like itís bad, so if you think itís thematic I guess you can take it.


      ^ Example of someone with this spell being thematic. MY BRAIN TREMBLES!! ^
      (Image Copyright Tappei Nagatsuki)

    • Blindness/Deafness: Itís a debuff that doesnít require concentration (thatís a rare thing), but itís a CON save (commonly resisted, especially by the powerful, burly bosses that you really wanna Blind), the target re-rolls it every turn, and while the Blinded condition is indeed crippling, there are worse. You can Twin it if you want, but if you want to affect multiple enemies at a time, Pyrotechnics is another option.
      It is really thematic for an Evil or Chaotic Neutral character though.


    Field Control
    • Darkness (Concentration): If youíre a Shadow Sorcerer, this becomes Gold - though itís only when you cast it using Eyes of the Dark, and casting it with a level 2 slot is unthinkable. Together with Eyes of the Dark, you can completely lock down an enemy Caster.
      For other people, Darkness is generally a variation of Fog Cloud. This one has a smaller area, but it can be moved around the battlefield (although depending on the target from which the darkness originates, enemies can move it around as well).
    • Web (Concentration): Crowd control is a good thing, and it becomes astonishing when combined with Careful Spell. If you donít have Careful Spell, this becomes a bit less attractive, but if you do, you must take it.
    • Pyrotechnics (EE): Use together with Create Bonfire (perhaps Quickened) for maximum versatility. Used as a Field Control spell, itís like Fog Cloud, except it doesnít require concentration (which is a seriously good thing).
      This spell can also be used as an AoE debuff spell that makes Blindness/Deafness cry his eyes out and go blind. Itís also extremely thematic for Fire Draconic Sorcerers.
    • Cloud of Daggers (Concentration): Requires concentration and is far too easy to avoid. It should be noted, however, that its damage requires no save, meaning itís sorta like Magic Missile in how it inflicts damage no matter what. The image created by this spell is rather nice.


      ^ If youíre a vampire with Time Stop, this spell becomes Gold. ^
      (Image Copyright Hirohiko Araki)


    Out-of-Combat
    • Suggestion (Concentration): Also listed in ďWeaken EnemiesĒ. Used right, this can alter the course of an entire campaign. Be it gaining loads of wealth or accelerating the downfall of the evil aristocrat, this spell has the power to do it on its own. Since this spell heavily relies on DM discretion, you should ask your DM beforehand about his definition of a ďsuggestion that sounds reasonableĒ, and make sure everyone in the party is okay with what you do before using it.
    • Phantasmal Force (Concentration): Use in RP moments with the right set-up and imagination, and you almost automatically get an NPC on your side, or alternatively, force him into getting a mental breakdown. Use Heightened Spell to make sure the enemy doesnít realize heís being tricked.
    • Invisibility (Concentration): Also listed in ďBuffing Friends (and/or Yourself)Ē. You better use it on someone who isnít wearing heavy armor, meaning that unless youíre a DEX build you should cast it on someone else.
    • Alter Self (Concentration): Allowing yourself to breath underwater is really pointless when the rest of your party canít, and the Natural Weapons arenít that attractive either. The way this effect is written I think you can impersonate as other people as well, but Iíd just use the Disguise Kit if I wanted to make such a character.
    • Enhance Ability (Concentration): Advantage on checks. Generally better to just be a Bard and inspire your friends.
    • Knock: Can become Blue depending on the campaign, but regardless of whether the campaign needs it or not, the Wizard does it better. Just politely ask him to prepare it, wait till next morning, and itís job done.
    • Levitate (Concentration): Wanna retrieve that item hanging 50 feet above you? Yeah, well, ask the Wizard. You donít get that many Spells Known.

    Spoiler: Level 3 Sorcerer Spells
    Show
    This is the level where warriors get Extra Attack and their DPR becomes doubled. Meanwhile, Casters get access to the grand collection of these uber-powerful spells that already start making you look godly.
    This is the level at which the classic Fireball finally, comes storming into the battlefield, roasting an entire horde of goblins and calling it a day. This is the level at which you start to fly through the air, hypnotize an entire encounter, get to say ďNOĒ to the enemy caster and waste his turn, and get to do a bunch of other awesome stuff.
    There are not as many broad options as the level 2 spells, though. The real goodies come online at level 4.

    Blasting
    • Fireball: THIS is from where the damaging spells actually get into the level that itís impossible to mimic with just normal attacks and cantrips (which means you now have better versatility). The damage itself is just ďgoodĒ for a character of this level, but Fireballís insanely large area of effect means it can incinerate an entire horde on its own (low-CR monsters like Goblins and Kobolds may die even if they succeed on the save). Thereís almost no excuse to not taking this spell, more so if you have Elemental Affinity.
      HOWEVER, you may also note that having just 1 AoE is not enough in certain cases. Fireball specifically states in the text that any flammable objects within range start to burn, and this means that, say, if youíre fighting in a forest or in a town with a lot of wooden buildings, depending on the judgments of the DM (the pace at which the fire spreads etc.), this spell can potentially kill yourself as well. This does not necessarily mean you need over 2 damaging AoEs - rather, you should take at least 1 ďnon-damaging but crippling AoE with a large areaĒ, like Hypnotic Pattern, and make sure that even if you face a horde in a place where hurling a Fireball may damage the environment too much, you have means of counter-measure.
    • Lightning Bolt: Itís a bit difficult to get over 3 monsters into the area, unlike Fireball (in which case itís actually harder to not get over 3 monsters into the area). The damage is the same, and contrary to popular belief, Lightning damage is just as commonly resisted as Fire damage (though more enemies are immune to Fire). Overall, not worth taking.
    • Melf's Minute Meteors (EE, Concentration): Does same damage as Fireball over the course of two turns, becomes better with three. However, the area is depressingly small (ďany creatures within 5 feet of the pointĒ), and it allows the low-HP enemies to take more turns before theyíre burned to death. Itís not bad, but generally not good enough to belong in your readied list either.
    • Erupting Earth (EE): While magical bludgeoning damage is never resisted, the average damage of this spell is 18.5, whereas Fireball is 28 (14 even if resisted), meaning that the merit gained when used on a monster with fire resistance is only 4.5 - not something that makes this worth taking, especially when its area is considerably smaller than Fireball. The only situation in which you should take this is when all your opponents are immune to fire, but even then, Lightning Bolt exists if you want.
      The part about turning the area into difficult terrain is... Not bad, I guess, and it might be useful in certain situations, but most of the time, not worth throwing this into Spells Known.


    Self Protection
    • Protection from Energy: This is not your job. At least you can Twin it, but really, this is not your job.


    Buffing Friends (and/or Yourself)
    • Fly (Concentration): Not only do you get to move at double the speed, you can also fly over traps, cripple earthbound enemies by raining death from above, get into melee range of flying enemies, and even upcast it to affect multiple friends as well. Always beware of losing concentration and falling to your death.
    • Haste (Concentration): Twin for maximum effect. Be careful when using it, however, since once youíve chosen to cast it, you cannot cast other Concentration spells for the remainder of the fight.
      This blue rating assumes you already have War Caster or Resilient (CON) as well as Aura of Protection by the time youíve took it, and if you do not, this becomes a trap option.
    • Flame Arrows (EE, Concentration): On first glance itís like giving your friend archer Hex. Then you realize it becomes double the Hex when you combine it with Elemental Affinity for an additional 1d6 + CHA mod damage per hit. If your DM permits it and thereís two archers in your party, it becomes quadruple the Hex when you combine it with Twinned Spell (by RAW, Twinned Spell only works on spells that target ďcreaturesĒ, not ďobjectsĒ). Itís normally not worth taking, but if thereís at least two archers in your party, youíre a Fire Draconic Sorcerer, and you have Twinned Spell, itís good. The problem is that you might as well leave someone else in the party to do that job for you, since your concentration is precious indeed.


    Weaken Enemies
    • Hypnotic Pattern (Concentration): Massive range, save-or-suck. If the still-awake enemies waste their turns shaking their friends awake, just smash their heads while they waste their precious actions. Itís a nice option for when your enemies are pretty tough, or when you donít want to burn everything around you. If you took the Careful Spell Metamagic option, this spell becomes mandatory.
    • Counterspell: If multiple characters in your party already have this, you might want to skip this and go for more versatility instead, leaving that job to your friends (unless your DM has a habit of throwing in lots of Casters). Remember that you have a lot of good uses for your reaction, like opportunity Booming Blade or Shield.
      However, this spell can cripple encounters on its own, and every party should have at least 1 or 2 characters who can use it.
    • Fear (Concentration): This spell is quite interesting and powerful. Any creature who fails his WIS save drops whatever weapon he is holding and then proceeds to run away as fast as possible using his action. And he cannot repeat the save until he canít see you anymore. This means that:
      • Monsters who rely on weapons to attack are completely disarmed and rendered powerless (someone in your party can pick up the discarded weapon and put it into his bag or something)
      • The affected monsters waste their actions doing nothing harmful for your team
      • The affected monsters provoke opportunity attacks from you and your friends
      • If the fight is in a place without any ways to hide from you, the target cannot do anything until he hits a wall, and even after he does, he had disadvantage on all his attacks (and in many cases, he can only make futile fist attacks)
      The only downside is that its range is a cone, and that it doesnít work on Constructs and some other big monsters.
      Combine with War Caster + Booming Blade for massive guaranteed damage. If you really want to kill somebody for running away, also use your bonus action that turn for Quickened Spell + Booming Blade, and inflict him twice the damage (this should be done after Fear goes off successfully, since otherwise you might sorta waste the Booming Blade if the enemy succeeds on the WIS save).
      However, be aware that this spell may be anti-synergetic with the fact youíre mostly gonna fight in melee. If your enemies dash away, you cannot catch up to them unless you want to spend your actions Dashing as well. This goes for your friends too. Barbarians, for instance, may get angry at you for using this spell because he has no enemies he can attack near him, and his Rage ended earlier than originally assumed.
    • Dispel Magic: Itís costly, requiring an action and a level 3 slot, but solid and good when you need it. DMs like I often introduce battlefields where the enemies have already set up magical traps (the ground in front of the enemy frontline is the area of Evardís Black Tentacles etc.), so if your DM is one of those people, this becomes Sky Blue.
    • Stinking Cloud (Concentration): The Blue Rating assumes you took the Careful Spell Metamagic option. If you didnít, then this is Purple.
      Bestowing disadvantage on your opponentís attacks is one thing. Getting to waste the actions of your opponents is another. Itís truly hilarious when paired with Careful Spell, the only downside being that CON saves are often resisted by bulky foes.


    Field Control
    • Stinking Cloud (Concentration): Detailed in ďWeaken EnemiesĒ.
    • Sleet Storm: Huge area, lots of debuffs. Can be Careful Spelled, but ehhh.... Iíd just go for Web or Stinking Cloud.


    Out-of-Combat
    • Daylight: One of those spells that are mostly useless, but extremely useful in the right situation (such as when youíre fighting a vampire). Interestingly, Wizards do not have access to this spell,but Druids do, so just leave it to them if you need it.
    • Major Image (Concentration): You can learn only a limited number of spells. If you want to be an illusionist just go Wizard or Warlock. Or use Phantasmal Force.
    Last edited by Gastronomie; 2016-11-11 at 09:59 PM.
    Spoiler: Avatar
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    ^ Fantastic avatar made by Professor Gnoll. Yaya Tokaz, from the manga "Kukul and Nagi". ^
    Spoiler: Quotes
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malifice View Post
    Only on a DnD forum would discussing the methods for jamming a T-Rex into a 10x10x10 box be a thing.
    Extended Signature: Homebrew Stuff
    Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

  11. - Top - End - #11
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    Default Re: Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

    Choosing Your Spells Part 2: Sorcerer (Mid Levels)


    An oath shall be sworn here.
    I shall attain all virtues of all of Heaven;
    I shall have dominion over all evils of all of Hell.
    From the Seventh Heaven, attended to by three great words of power,
    Come forth from the ring of restraint,
    Protector of the holy balance!

    (Image Copyright Ufotable)

    Spoiler: Level 4 Sorcerer Spells
    Show
    Level 4 is where you get various powerful control, buff, and debuff spells like Wall of Fire, Greater Invisibility, Banishment, and Polymorph. Most of the powerful level 4 spells require concentration, and at the same time, are most definitely worth it.
    This is also the level where Twinned Spell starts to get super gravy, with Greater Invisibility and Polymorph, uber-powerful spells that cannot benefit from upcasting like Banishment can.

    Blasting
    • Wall of Fire (Concentration): Crowd control and good damage that also gets bonuses from Elemental Affinity. Cutting the enemy team in half, combining with your party Warlockís Repelling Blast, thereís lots of stuff you can do with this spell. Fire damage is of course often resisted, so be careful not to use this against a group of Devils or anything.
    • Vitriolic Sphere (EE): Itís like a less-resisted Fireball with a bit more damage, except it divides the damage into two turns and does less than half damage on a successful save. Which is better is up to you and the campaign, but most of the time I say Fireball.
    • Blight: If you happen to often fight Plants, this is Sky Blue. Thing is, at least I havenít fought plants with that much frequence. Damaging with spells is the least of your priorities, unless itís an AoE. This has good damage, but itís not what you seek for in level 4 spells.
    • Ice Storm: Worse damage than Fireball. Ew. Pass.
    • Storm Sphere (EE, Concentration): A really interesting spell. A shame itís an unoptimized option, especially for a Bladelock like you whoís going to use your action for a plethora of good techniques.


    Self Protection
    • Greater Invisibility (Concentration): This will be explained more in ďBuffing Friends (and/or Yourself)Ē.
    • Stoneskin (Concentration): On first glance itís good for frontline builds. Then again, This is the same level spell as Greater Invisibility, so why in the world would you ever want to use this?


    Buffing Friends (and/or Yourself)
    • Greater Invisibility (Concentration): Get ready for the lolz. This is a mandatory choice for all GWM builds, and arguably so even for S&B builds. All the merits of the Darkness + Devilís Sight combo, except it doesnít hinder your friends. How awesomesause is that?
      Use together with Twinned Spell to make it double the awesomesause.
    • Polymorph (Concentration): You know Bob the Fighter always wanted to roleplay a T-Rex. Let him turn into a T-Rex. Enjoy.


      ^ Bob the Fighter, currently roleplaying as a T-Rex. ^
      (Copyright Steven Spielberg, Universal Studios)

      Wait, what? Sam the Fighter also wants to roleplay into a T-Rex? Fine, then. Use Twinned Spell.


      ^ Thanks to you, now both Bob and Sam can roleplay a T-Rex at once. ^
      (Copyright Steven Spielberg, Universal Studios)


      Giving 136 temporary HP to the frontline warrior and making his average DPR 53 is a bad joke. Giving 136 temporary HP to two frontline warriors and making both or their average DPR 53 is the worst joke ever. Somehow you have access to this joke, so I advice you use it. Since itís already a bad joke from the start, overusing it wouldnít really make it worse.
      16 CON + War Caster/Resilient + Aura of Protection pretty much guarantees you can keep concentration on this spell for as long as you want.
    • Stoneskin (Concentration): Look, just become invisible instead, because that way, you donít even get hit in the first place.


    Weaken Enemies
    • Banishment (Concentration): So, you see, encounter difficulties are calculated based on the number of enemies on the map. This spell changes the number of enemies on the map. What does that mean? It means this spell is awesome.
      Some enemies are erased off the material plane with this spell, regardless of its CR (be careful of losing concentration in that case, though). Others disappear from the map for a minute, and when they return, they first see their comradesí dead bodies sprawled across the floor, and then they look around and see the entire adventuring party encircling them, all readied for the grand ambush with the ever-so-useful Ready action. Either way it spells death for any opponent, and Charisma saves are uncommon.
      Do note that this spell can be upcast to affect more than 2 targets, without even using Twinned Spell. If anything, you can Heighten this for maximum effect.
    • Polymorph (Concentration): Turn a raging monster into a harmless frog, throw him into a bin, and proceed to let it go flow down a river. Or simply use it in a way similar to Banishment, and kill him at once after the rest of his friends have been cleaned up.
      Of course, this spell can also be used as an amazing buff.
    • Confusion (Concentration): Not that this is bad, but that Hypnotic Pattern is better.
    • Dominate Beast (Concentration): How often do you run into Beasts? And even if you did, this spell allows the target to re-make a save every time he takes damage, making him hardly a trustable ally. Mind-controlling is a good ability, but this one is too limited in its uses.


    Field Control
    • Wall of Fire (Concentration): Set up the map so that your enemies are cut off from each other, or encircle the big bad so he canít get out. Either way it works amazing.
    • Watery Sphere(EE, Concentration): As with many EE spells, full of creativity and potential. Not exactly optimized, but fun.


    Out-of-Combat
    • Dimension Door: Only a range of 500 feet, and you canít take your entire party with you. If you had 30 spells known you mightíve wanted to take it, but you only have 15 at best.

    Spoiler: Level 5 Sorcerer Spells
    Show
    Level 5 introduces a lot of debuffs and control spells, but the main two things to look for in this level are Animate Objects and Hold Monster. Hold Monster is a wonderful upgrade of Hold Person, complete with abusability via Divine Smite Crit (if abusability is even a word), while Animate Objects opens up the door for a completely new option that can damage, defend, and control, all in the same golden package: minionmancy.
    Interestingly enough, there is not a single level 5 Sorcerer spell that directly boosts your defenses or buffs your friends. Not that thatís ever a problem, though, since Greater Invisibility is pretty much the best Sorcerer spell ever in that regard, and you already have it.

    Blasting
    • Cone of Cold: The damage is 36 average, which is no different from a Fireball of the same level (average 35, better with Elemental Affinity), but this spell has a much wider area of effect. Contrary to popular belief, cold damage is more commonly resisted than fire damage, but on the other hand, less creatures are immune to it.
      The real thing here is the insanely large area, so if you often fight bunches and bunches of monsters (too much to fit even in a Fireball), this can be a good choice.
    • Cloudkill (Concentration): Concentration requirement, CON saves and Poison damage make this a somewhat bad choice for this level. The fact it forces damage every turn is interesting, though. Use together with a necromancer in your party for the lolz (zombies donít take poison damage).
    • Immolation (EE, Concentration): The damage is low and it takes several turns to be effective enough. It even requires concentration. The idea is interesting but the numbers are sadly not.


    Self Protection
    N/A

    Buffing Friends (and/or Yourself)
    N/A

    Weaken Enemies
    • Hold Monster (Concentration): This spell was already good for Sorcerers. Itís an absolute boner for you. Combine with Divine Smite for the trollolololz.
      Being a multiclass Caster, you have high-level spell slots for which you donít have actual spells to match (for instance, 6/14 nets you level 8 and 9 slots, while your highest level spell is level 7). Of course these can be converted into Sorcery Points, but another way of using them is to upcast your spells.
      Like Hold Person, Hold Monster can be upcast. And when itís upcast, it allows you to select extra targets. All in all, Iíd say this is near mandatory for you.
    • Dominate Person (Concentration): This rating assumes you have some trick up your sleeve that makes the Humanoid believe youíre not hostile when you first cast him this spell (disguising as a friend etc. ) If you do not have such a trick, this becomes Red as a combat spell.
      Used for combat (combined with some sort of way to assure the Humanoid youíre not hostile), this spell can possibly get a powerful NPC with class levels on your side. If the enemies focus fire on him, chances are heíd eventually break free of the charm, but you force your enemies to waste their actions attacking a friend. Either way itís beneficial for you.
      However, not all DMs introduce a lot of powerful humanoids, so as with all ďSomething PersonĒ spells, this spell is campaign-dependent.
    • Telekinesis (Concentration): Moving around and restraining creatures is interesting. However, Hold Monster exists as a spell of the same level. Itís not that this spell is bad, itís just that thereís a similar option, and you donít have that many Spells Known.


    Field Control
    • Animate Objects (Concentration): If your DM uses flanking rules, this spell becomes pure gold. However, chances are, the moment you start using this spell, your DM will stop using flanking rules.
      Minionmancy is a broken concept in itself, because it goes against the main game premise of controlling just ďone characterĒ. Be it Animate Dead, or Conjure Animals, or Conjure Woodland Beings, or this particular spell, you should always first ask your DM beforehand if youíre okay to use it. This is not a matter of whether itís RAW or not, but rather part of table-talk manners. Minionmancy tends to result in one player rolling the dice a dozen times per round, which can get tedious and slow down the game. And since theyíre overall broken in the first place, itís perfectly reasonable for the DM to perhaps set a limit on the number of monsters you can summon, or create special rules for minionmancy (you cannot animate more than 5 objects with this spell etc.).
      Mechanic-wise, Tiny is the only choice for the objects you animate, but for the aforementioned reasons, you should consult your DM before drawing out ten trinkets from your pockets and animating them at once. The image of having ten knives float around you and stab into enemies with your commands is badass, though. Other ideas include quills, skulls, and spinning tops.


      ^ The right way to animate spinning tops.^
      (Copyright Takara Tomy)

      If you want, you can upcast this spell. Two extra objects per additional spell slot level is not a really ďgiganticĒ deal, but itís still good.
    • Cloudkill (Concentration): Detailed in ďBlastingĒ. As a control spell, this spell may be a bit meh in how it slowly moves around against your will.
    • Wall of Stone (Concentration): The control effect is the strongest you can get (it doesnít harm people for moving, it instead just robs the whole option of moving in the first place), but it requires concentration, and most of the time youíd probably use Wall of Fire instead. This spellís true potential lies in out-of-combat situations.
    • Insect Plague (Concentration): Magical piercing cannot be resisted except by very special foes, but the damage itself is meh. It does serve its job as a battlefield control spell, but if you want something along these lines, other options exist from level 3 and 4, like Stinking Cloud or Wall of Fire.
    • Control Winds (EE, Concentration): This spell is like a representation of the EE spell list. Theyíre really fun and creative, but also really, really underpowered. This should have been a level 3, or even a level 2 spell or something.


    Out-of-Combat
    • Wall of Stone (Concentration): What was rated Black in ďField ControlĒ becomes Blue in Out-of-Combat situations - perhaps even Sky Blue depending on the campaign (War Campaigns and City Campaigns come to mind). This spell allows you to create bridges or huts, or if you have several days of downtime activity, even fortresses. If used right, itís a campaign-changing spell, and the possibilities are endless.
      However, it should be noted that Druids and Wizards - both of them able to change their spell lists every day - also have access to this spell, meaning that if thereís already such a character in your party, you wouldnít need to take it.
    • Dominate Person (Concentration): Itís like Charm Person, except you donít become the guyís friend, you become the guyís master. This spell has hilarious potential in any campaign, but becomes especially godly in city campaigns. However, it competes with other spells for your Spells Known list, and you might as well have other guys in the party do it for you. Also, be aware that the duration is only one minute, which means its uses are not as broad as one may expect (unless you upcast it). In some cases, the level 1 Charm Person - having a duration of 1 hour and not requiring concentration - might be actually the better option.
    • Teleportation Circle: Itís basically the Fly move from Pokemon. Anyone who has played Pokemon knows how useful the Fly move is.


      Teleportation Circle!
      (Image Copyright Nintendo)


      However, do you want to have your most powerful Pokemon learn Fly and use it in battle? Probably not. Thatís what itís like to make a Sorcerer learn Teleportation Circle. Leave the Hidden Machines to the Wizards. They deserve to be the HM slaves!
    • Creation: Yeah, if you want to use a level 5 slot to create a rope or something. I honestly think they should have made it possible to make the created object permanent (albeit at a cost) - this is a 5th level spell - but it seems the creators didnít allow that.
    • Seeming: The effect is basically ďMass Disguise SelfĒ, except they didnít name it that way because itís impossible to disguise over two ďselvesĒ No concentration is a good thing, and you can perhaps infiltrate the enemy ranks with this spell alone, but these sorts of situational spells are meant more for Wizards, not for Sorcerers.

    Spoiler: Level 6 Sorcerer Spells
    Show
    Whereas all the good Level 4 and 5 spells required concentration - ta-da! The level 6 goodies generally do not.
    Here we get good Blasting options for the second time in our career, namely Chain Lightning and Disintegrate. The former is a wonderful finishing move that scales hilariously effectively (synergetic with Sorcadins, given how we always have high-level leftover spell slots), while the latter is of an almost never resisted damage type and can wipe off an enemy (or two enemies, with Twinned Spell) clean off the battlefield.
    This level is also where we get access to Mass Suggestion, one of the most broken spells in the entire game. And here, look. It doesnít even require concentration. Youíd think it was a typo, but looking at the ďAt Higher LevelsĒ column, it seems itís on purpose. Feel free to abuse it as much as you like.
    The Investiture spells are thematically fun, but as options, are honestly not that optimized.

    Blasting
    • Chain Lightning: Deal average 45 (or half of that) damage to up to 4 targets that are standing near each other. Which is a pretty good deal.
      Based on the rulings for GFB, I suppose most DMs will not allow you to Twin this. If he says itís okay... well, have fun.
      One thing to note is that this spell scales like no other - while most damage spells increase only 1d8 or something per level, when upcast, Chain Lightning increases the number of the extra leaping bolts, meaning +10d8 damage per extra spell slot level (albeit if there are that many targets within range). Together with the fact that Sorcadins will always have a really high-level slot that they canít use except for converting into Sorcery Points or Upcasting, this spell has special meaning for you.
    • Disintegrate: Deals average 75 damage of an almost-never resisted damage type, if the enemy fails his saving throw. Sadly, it has no effect if the enemy succeeds on his save, meaning you should think twice before using this spell on a guy with a high DEX score or the Magical Resistance ability. Works better with Heightened and Twinned spell.
    • Sunbeam (Concentration): Blinding and inflicting 27 (or half that) damage average every turn is nice, especially with its damage type being something thatís virtually never resisted, but it uses up concentration. I confess I havenít testplayed this spell before so I donít know how good it will be, but I think youíd probably use your concentration for something else.
      If you have played this spell before in a Sorcadin build, please tell me your experiences.
      (If your campaign is about fighting vampires or drow, this becomes Sky Blue.)
    • Circle of Death: Anger. My heart is filled with anger. And that anger comes from how WotC created a spell with a really badass sounding name and gave it an absolutely abysmal effect. The same damage as Fireball, with a CON save, and itís supposed to be a level 6 spell. At least itís a less resisted damage type and the radius is huge, but even so, I mean... this is terrible. It should have had a rider effect like, say, Ray of Enfeeblement.


    Self Protection
    • Globe of Invulnerability (Concentration): Look at ďBuffing Friends (and/or Yourself).Ē
    • Investiture of Wind (EE, Concentration): This spell probably has the most self-contained synergy of the four Elemental Investiture spells. Itís like the Fly spell, except you bestow disadvantage on ranged weapon attacks - which happen to make up for the majority of the attacks that can actually hit you. Thatís a pretty good set of abilities, isnít it? Whoever created this spell was obviously good at designing high-level spells, and I think this is actually a decent pick for Casters (though it does eat at Concentration).
      However, you are a frontline warrior, meaning you need to engage in melee range of opponents to be truly effective. This spell has self-contained synergy, but sadly, that synergy does not extend to the basic idea of the Sorcadin itself.
    • Investiture of Stone (EE, Concentration): Itís like a Stoneskin with a bit more benefits, except itís also a level 6 spell that requires concentration. Ew. The extra benefits are too situational as well.


    Buffing Friends (and/or Yourself)
    • Globe of Invulnerability (Concentration): You become sorta like a Rakshasa (though as not as good). And it extends that benefit to anyone within a 10 feet radius.
      This is a tricky one. If thereís a friend within 10 feet, this means he also gains the benefits. But unlike Aura of Protection, this affects your enemies as well. What if the enemy boss comes over to sit right next to you? Perhaps the Wizard in the backrow might start calling you names. Do keep in mind that if required, you can always drop concentration at any desired timing - though you will waste that level 6 spell slot of the day.
      Of course, however, if the frontline warriors become invincible from a majority of the attacks of the evil mastermind mage, thatís fun. This spell is campaign-dependent, but if used right in the right situation, it can save everybody around you.
      Becomes a bit less attractive for those who went Oath of the Ancients 7, since they already have overlapping benefits. Also, do keep in mind that this spell is a bit anti-synergy with the Paladin levels in itself, because you can already protect your friends with Aura of Protection, and this spell has the downside of helping your enemies as well.
      If itís just you that you want to protect yourself from spells, better to simply use Greater Invisibility. You canít target people you canít see with your spells, and the enemy Caster has to guess where you are when hurling AoEs. This spell is most meaningful if you can get your friends into the area as well.
      You might want to consider slinking back into the backrow and defending your party Caster as you use this.
    • Investiture of Flame (EE, Concentration): Self only. The fire immunity, cold resistance and Heat Aura are all nice benefits. Having an unlimited supply of magical fire attacks is not bad for a Sorcerer, but meh for Sorcadins which already have other good methods of dealing damage. All in all, the packaging itself is not bad, but if asked whether itís worth your concentration, Iíd say no. Self-Buff sorta hits the capstone with Greater Invisibility.
      ...Of course, unless the campaign is mainly about fighting Red Dragons or something.
      If youíre a Fire Draconic Sorcerer, this spell is thematic and cool. Whether that counts as a reason to take this, you decide. I might take it.
    • Investiture of Ice (EE, Concentration): This Investiture revolves around field control. However, itís mostly too situational to be worth taking.


    Weaken Enemies
    • Mass Suggestion: Itís like suggestion, except it works on up to a dozen targets and doesnít require concentration.
      What?
      Yes, Iím deadly serious, and itís WotC who forgot to be serious this time.
      How to use it in combat is easy - you use it, and at that moment, the combat is already over. Of course it can be used out of combat as well. Either way, this spell is amazing in how itís several spells in one (VERSATILITY dudes!!), meaning it makes a truly wonderful Sorcerer spell.
    • Eyebite (Concentration): Visually awesome, but requires concentration and all of the effects are duplicates of lower-level spells. Generally Iíd pass.


    Field Control
    • Investiture of Ice (EE, Concentration): Also listed in ďBuffing Friends (and/or Yourself)Ē. It makes the ground you difficult terrain, and also halves the speed of enemies with a magical attack. Both of these abilities are geared towards ďnot letting enemies come within melee range of youĒ, and thatís natural, given this spell was meant to be given to backrow Casters, which donít want to be hit. Unfortunately, youíre a frontline warrior who just happens to be so awesome that you can also cast high-level spells, so this spell is somewhat anti-synergetic with your combat style. And it also requires concentration...


    Out-of-Combat
    • Mass Suggestion: This spell has the potential to change the course of a campaign - something Suggestion already had, but this does it even better. Since you have leftover high-level spell slots from multiclassing, itís one option to upcast this spell and keep a certain group of people charmed for ten days, a month, or possibly even an year.
    Last edited by Gastronomie; 2016-11-11 at 09:36 PM.
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    Spoiler: Quotes
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    Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

  12. - Top - End - #12
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    Default Re: Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

    Choosing Your Spells Part 3: Sorcerer (High Levels)


    I cast a spell!
    And itís pretty high-level for sure!!

    (Image Copyright Hiromu Arakawa)

    Spoiler: Level 7 Sorcerer Spells
    Show
    If you went 6/14, this is the farthest you can go with spell levels. Does it have a lot of good options, enough to call it a capstone?
    Most certainly yes.
    The main thing at this level is Reverse Gravity, which is versatile, full of fun possibilities, and overall extremely powerful. Apart from that, you also gain access to pretty good blasting spells like Fire Storm, Finger of Death, Delayed Blast Fireball, and Prismatic Spray. Note that these are not rated Blue or Black because theyíre bad - theyíre only rated so because Reverse Gravity is so strong. The other Blasting spells are pretty powerful too, and depending on your DM, Finger of Death can become a terrifying spell...

    Blasting
    • Reverse Gravity (Concentration): Detailed in ďField ControlĒ. This spell inflicts minimum 10d6, maximum 20d6 damage to all creatures in the massive area without a save, and by strict RAW, this damage cannot be resisted by 99% of your enemies. Of course, thinking logically, most DMs will rule that Demons, Devils and other dudes that have resistance to non-magical bludgeoning that comes from hammers will also probably have resistance against the damage that comes from smacking into the ground, but in the MM it states ďdamage from non-magical weaponsĒ, so...
    • Fire Storm: And you thought Fireballís area was already large. This spellís area is colossal. It basically inflicts average 38.5 (or half of that) damage to every single enemy in the battlefield, which is a grand opening to any encounter. For some weird reason you also have the option to not harm plant life, meaning you can feel free to use it in a forest without fear of eventually immolating yourself.
      If you look at just the damage, a level 7 Fireball does it better with 12d6, average 42 damage, so the main reasons to take this would be the insanely wide area, and how it can be more easily used in forest areas. When it gets this large, it even gets possible to use it out of combat to destroy an enemy base.
    • Finger of Death: Less damage than Disintegrate, but unlike it, you can always deal at least half damage. Like Disintegrate, you can Twin for profit. But the damage part isnít the important part, itís the zombie part that is.
      The zombies created by this spell are permanently under your control, meaning that you can control as many as the DM permits, and by RAW, it seems you donít need a bonus action to control them either (unlike in the case with Animate Dead). If your DM permits you to create a gigantic army of zombies with this spell as downtime activity, and you donít get punished for it, this spellís rating can range from anywhere between Blue to Gold, but most DMs will probably set a limit, or tell the players to not overabuse it.
    • Delayed Blast Fireball (Concentration): A really fun and well-designed spell that works as both AoE and field control in its own weird sort of way.
      If someone in the party is godly at DEX saves (for instance, a level 17 Rogue with 20 DEX has a +11 bonus from the start, and it gets even better when you add Aura of Protection for +3 or +4 - chances are it surpasses your DC of 17 or 18), you might try throwing it far for massive damage (to lessen the risk, perhaps use Inspiration or something for advantage on the save). In which case Extended Spell adds 10d6 to the damage... but sadly, since you went Sorcerer 13 to get this, you cannot go Paladin 9 for Aura of Vitality. Thus, chances are, you donít have Extended Spell.
      Overall itís a good spell, but I still rated it Black in here because itís not that important an option. Itís not that this is weak at all. Itís just that the other level 7 Sorcerer spells are insanely good.
    • Prismatic Spray: Consider this spell mandatory for Wild Mages, not because it has synergy but because itís thematically awesome. Itís not an optimized choice but I like it just for the visuals.


    Self Protection
    • Teleport: More of ďParty ProtectionĒ than ďSelf ProtectionĒ - more like, if you use this spell just on yourself, chances are, your party will not consider you a party member anymore. But itís not really a buffing spell either, so I listed it in here.
      Another note: this rating assumes your party does not have a Wizard. If your party does, just let him be the HM slave.
      Now, so, onto the effects. This spell is like the Fly move from Pokemon, except you can use it in the middle of a fight as an emergency button, and if you have something related to your desired destination, you can go to even places that donít have Pokemon centers (or teleportation circles - thatís how you call them in D&D). As long as your friends huddle around you, you can teleport them as well. If you think a TPK is nearing, call over your friends and use this spell.
      As a DM, Iíd like to someday have the players roll on the ďSimilar AreaĒ in the destination list...


    Buffing Friends (and/or Yourself)
    N/A

    Weaken Enemies
    • Reverse Gravity (Concentration): Monsters with only melee attacks are surprisingly common, even at high levels. Use this spell. Cripple them all. Detailed in ďField ControlĒ.
    • Plane Shift: This rating assumes you use it as a save-or-suck spell. It certainly is save-or-suck, but the target gets two chances to escape, leaving you with a level 7 spell slot expended and nothing happening whatsoever. The risks are too high to consider using this, especially when lower-level spells can also do save-or-suck.


    Field Control
    • Reverse Gravity (Concentration): Visually, awesome. Mechanically? Beyond awesome. This is one example of a well-designed and powerful high-level spell that really gives you the feeling that youíre a man (or woman) of absolute power. The ultimate Field Controll spell. Yeah, I spelled that right.
      The spell starts off by smacking the entire enemy party onto the roof of the citadel, or cavern, or tavern, or whatever place you happen to be fighting within. If itís a low ceiling, not much damage, but if itís a high ceiling, this ďfallĒ alone is enough to turn most minions into ground beef, or at least make them really close to becoming ground beef. Monsters with only melee attacks are completely left to the mercy of your partyís archers and Casters (keep in mind that if there is no ceiling, or the ceiling is extremely high, archers may have disadvantage on the attacks due to attack range issues), so feel free to call them names while theyíre forced to walk around the ceiling and being able to do nothing.
      And when you lose concentration - be it forced or be it on purpose - all creatures in the area fall to the ground, taking 10d6 bludgeoning damage, no save (unless the DM rules that resistance to non-magical weapon attacks can extend to falling damage, this damage cannot be resisted). Even the guys who werenít ground beef before.... Well, now they are. To add, theyíve falled prone, meaning that once theyíve smacked onto the floor, the melee guys in your party can rush in and stab them with advantage all they want (and remember, youíre also one of these melee guys).
      This spell is probably best to use at the start of an encounter, when the enemies and friends are far apart, but if your friends happen to be already in the area, tell them to grab onto something nearby and combine this spell with Careful Spell.
      Now, thinking logically, I think most DMs will rule that the people grabbing onto the things nearby cannot move from that point willingly, unless they want to experience the 100-foot fall and smack onto the roof. In which case this spell can debuff even the guys who succeeded on the save, since most monsters cannot attack without using at least one hand.
      Then again, if the DM rules that one DEX save is enough to completely resist the gravity thereafter for some weird reason, use that to your advantage by using Careful Spell and having your friends march into the area of this spell while declaring ďOH MY GOD I AM PINCHING THE GROUND WITH MY FINGERS, DEX SAVE DONEĒ.
      Either way, this spell is boss. Consider taking this almost mandatory.
    • Delayed Blast Fireball (Concentration): Detailed in ďBlastingĒ. In short, it basically makes everyone flee from the area.


    Out-of-Combat
    • Fire Storm: Itís originally meant to be an AoE blasting spell, but when the area is this large you can burn down entire buildings, depending on how your DM rules destroying architecture. Consult the DM beforehand if you plan to use this spell in this way. If he says yes to this option, how to use that to your advantage, you decide.
    • Teleport: Detailed in ďSelf ProtectionĒ. Go anywhere at any time. It needs to be the same world as the one youíre in, though.
    • Etherealness: Be a good scout, or escape prison. Sadly, Wizards have good scouts via Find Familiar from level 1. This is a level 7 spell. Also, if youíre a character of this level, you honestly probably have some other ways to escape prison (well, to be fair, at least this spell requires no material components, only Verbal and Somatic, so if you happen to be in a situation where your party is in jail, robbed of all armor and weapons and spellbooks, but are somehow not handcuffed nor gagged, you can cast this to slip away. Whether or not you should Know this spell just for that particular situation is a different matter).
    • Plane Shift: If your campaign is about traveling across the multiverse, or if your DM says that you can now go magic-item shopping in the City of Brass or the demonic capital of Zeletar, this becomes Sky Blue. Then again, if your campaign is about traveling across the multiverse, most of the time Iíd assume the DM has given the party ways to travel without using this spell. The idea of a high-level campaign involving epic adventurers traveling across the planes with this spell does seem really interesting, though.

    Spoiler: Level 8 Sorcerer Spells
    Show
    Sorcerers get only six level 8 spell options. Almost all of them are decent. Not many of them are that amazing either.
    Half of the six spells are primarily blasting spells, but as already mentioned, blasting isnít really your thing. Given you have very little room for Spells Known, thereís an actually pretty good possibility that youíre not going to take even a single level 8 spell. TBH I might as well get four extra castings of Shield.

    Blasting
    • Earthquake (Concentration): This rating assumes (1) your DM uses the ďFissureĒ variant, (2) you do not fight often in friendly cities, and (3) your DM is generous with where to place the fissures. If your campaign does not belong in even one of the above, this is a trap. If your campaign is mainly about destroying enemy cities or anything, this becomes better. Really campaign dependent, and when it sucks, it really sucks.
      That said, even at its best, this spell is meh for damaging purposes. The damage is 10d6 to everyone that fails a save in the fissure area, but it becomes 0 damage on a successful save. And it may affect friends too.
    • Sunburst: Okay damage of an almost never resisted damage type, hilariously large area, CON save for half damage, makes people blinded on a failed save. Mixed bag of pros and cons and difficult to rate, but when there are lots of other Sorcerer spell options that you can declare awesome the moment you read it, this really becomes a secondary option on your list. And for the record, Sorcerers donít have enough Spells Known to ever get to the secondary options.
      Gets a lot better if youíre always fighting vampires, but really, how often does that happen?
    • Incendiary Cloud (Concentration): The damage is about the same as a Fireball of the same level, and it deals the same type of damage. However, this spell is different in how it moves around the battlefield (albeit slowly) and inflicts that damage to the people inside at the start of every turn.
      Is it worth a level 8 spell slot and being a Spell Known?
      I would say no, even with draconic riders. The fact you need to move it away 10 feet from you every turn really kills it, because it canít stay in a particular area for too long, and the fact itís only 10 feet per turn also kills it, because enemies can run away with ease, unless you corner them or otherwise use this in the right situation.
      Itís not a bad spell at all. It just isnít worth being level 8. Iíd expect something like ďmove around 30 feet every turn in a direction you wantĒ at this level, because then weíd be talking.
    • Abi-Dalzimís Horrid Wilting: Look, here you can see that WotC is being friendly to beginners by specifically stating this spell is horrid on the very label. I donít know who Abi-Dalzim is, but one thing for sure, he shouldnít have named this spell after himself. Sure, its damage type might be seldom resisted, but 45 damage is honestly not that of a big deal at this level, and if the enemies you are facing are the really tanky ones that you really want to slam that damage into, chances are theyíd succeed on the save with no problem because itís a CON save. 23 damage? As a level 8 spell? Itís a joke, and a very bad one too. There is very little reason to ever cast this spell, and when youíre someone with only 15 Spells Known at maximum, there is no reason to ever take it. Even if your campaign is mainly about fighting Water Elementals and Plants, I would still think twice before taking it.


    Self Protection
    N/A

    Buffing Friends (and/or Yourself)
    N/A

    Weaken Enemies
    • Earthquake (Concentration): As mentioned in ďBlastingĒ, this rating assumes (1) your DM uses the ďFissureĒ variant, (2) you do not fight often in friendly cities, and (3) your DM is generous with where to place the fissures. If your campaign does not belong in even one of the above, this is a trap. If your campaign is mainly about destroying enemy cities or anything, this becomes great. Really campaign dependent, and when it sucks, it really sucks.
    • Power Word Stun: Itís not bad if your DM allows you to look at the remaining HP of enemy monsters before you cast it, and this rating assumes that. But if your DM is not letting you know, this is a trap.
      Also, in all honestly Iíd rather use a Heightened Hold Monster than use this. Stunned might be powerful as a condition, but paralyzing is better.
    • Sunburst[/color]: Blinds all the enemies in a pretty large area. Deos not Requires concentration and allows the targets to re-make the save at the start of every turn, though, and Iím not sure if you really want to use a level 8 spell slot for just this.
    • Dominate Monster (Concentration): Used as means of making the enemy team weaker, this spell is terrible, since it bestows advantage on the target during combat.


    Field Control
    • Incendiary Cloud (Concentration): A cloud of smog that obscures the area, deals decent damage to the people inside, and moves around 10 feet every turn (but only away from you). Sadly, if you want Field Control, there are much better options at this level. And this spell also requires concentration.
    • Dominate Monster (Concentration): This spell is terrible in combat, since it bestows advantage on enemy targets you face, and it re-forces the save every time the target takes damage.


    Out-of-Combat
    • Dominate Monster (Concentration): The spell bestows advantage on enemies while fighting, and re-forces the save every time guy takes damage. Thus this spell is best used for non-combat purposes. Problem is, at this level, most of the time, your friends will have ways to overcome non-combat situations without expending a level 8 slot.

    Spoiler: Level 9 Sorcerer Spells
    Show
    2/18 and 3/17 builds get these. Since thereís no reason to stop Paladin at a level from 4 to 5, all builds that get level 8 spells also eventually get level 9 spells.

    Contrary to how level 8 spells were overall underpowered for their required slot level, level 9 spells are BOSS. They can do anything, and I mean literally anything here, because Wish.

    Wish is near-mandatory. Meteor Swarm is awesome when you use it right, and in the right campaigns, Gate can be a wonderful way to transport an entire army into the battlefield and ensure victory.
    What, Time Stop and Power Word Kill? Umm.... Ehhh...
    ...Um, at least, Time Stop has its uses out-of-combat.

    This section will also try to be helpful to the readers as much as possible by pointing out whatís the best uses for Wish. In fact this section is more about how to use Wish than rating the level 9 spells.

    Blasting
    • Wish: This spell can be anything. ANYTHING you choose, of ANY spell of level 8 or lower. And the Sorcerer classís greatest weakness was its limited spell list... Now that you have this, youíre the master of utility. (This spell also adds to the reason why youíre okay without taking any level 8 spells.)
      Each section will talk about the good candidates for this spell, including insight on how to abuse the hell out of this spell.
      • Tsunami (level 8, concentration): The best use of this spell is to wash away a whole division of the enemy nationís army in a war campaign. It will be an AWESOME sight.
        Generally, Wish should be used not for damage, but for other purposes, and thus this is the only real ďBlastingĒ way to use Wish I will list here.
    • Meteor Swarm: Blasting is one thing, and nuking is another. Clean up all the enemies with 140 damage on a hilarious large area. Beware of Fire resistance, and even more of Fire immunity.
    • Power Word Kill: Itís a spell of great power that kills a level 9 spell slot and a Spell Known for nothing. Itís truly a power word. I know. Hilarious.
      Itís bad, even for normal spellcasters, but as a gish you have the equipment and abilities required to smack out 100+ damage in a single round without using a level 9 slot (Divine Smite + Hold Person etc.), making it even worse.
      The only circumstances in which youíd want to use this is when you want to assassinate someone without leaving any trace of harm, but how often will that come up?


    Self Protection
    • Wish: Some candidates for using Wish as self protection (and god, there are many):
      • Clone (level 8): A near-mandatory use of Wish, since Wish ignores spell components, and now your clone costs you less than a lunch at MacDonaldís. Donít forget to declare to the DM that you will cast this at some time during your downtime activity (because real optimizers use downtime to get ready for the next battle). This spell basically makes you (and your party) immortal. By RAW it seems you can create multiple Clones, so you might as well create one for almost every downtime day. Why I said ďalmostĒ will be detailed below.


        ^ You canít help but smile when you realize you have got a gajillion spare lives in your basement. ^
        (Considering what happened to the Clones of this girl, it might actually be a better idea to put all the clones in different places, though...)
        (Image Copyright Hideaki Anno)
      • Contingency (level 6): Yet another awesome use of Wish, and again, you donít have to buy the material components for it either. Use this during downtime to make sure that ďat the start of your next encounter, Mirror Image/Greater Invisibility/whatever automatically activates upon youĒ or something, and just have fun economizing your limited resources of spell slots per adventuring day. By RAW it is vague whether this spell works with upcast spells, but if your DM rules it does, you can basically say ďSITRUS BERRYĒ, automatically casting a level 5 Cure Wounds every time your HP drop below half. The duration is 10 days, meaning if you cast it once every 10 days of downtime, itís enough to make sure youíre always holding a f***ing Sitrus Berry.


        ^ SITRUS BERRY!!! ^
        (Image Copyright Nintendo)
      • Holy Aura (level 8, concentration): A Cleric-only spell that gives advantage on all saving throws + disadvantage on all attack rolls meant at them to you and all your friends (to be exact, the friends who were close to you when you activated this spell, but itís essentially the same thing, since theyíd be huddled around you at the start of the battle if you declare youíre gonna use this). Even better against Fiends and Undead, which all get blinded with a CON save whenever they hit. To be fair, most Fiends and Undead are good at CON saves, so it might not work as often as you assume, but still, a good bonus.
      • Regenerate (level 7, concentration): A spell can heal 633 HP average on a target. Iím not sure I understand what Iím saying, but at least thatís what it says on the label. The fact it canít spread the heal over multiple targets sorta sucks (and Twinning Wish is really, really costly), but since this doesnít get included in Spells Known, make sure to keep this in mind.


    Buffing Friends (and/or Yourself)
    • Wish: Some candidates for using Wish as buff:
      • Simulacrum (level 7): Not exactly a buff, but something that enhances the power of the entire party, so I supposed itíd belong here. This is the No.1 top priority MANDATORY use of Wish, since Wish ignores spell components, and does not cost you 1500GP per casting. One Sorcadin is one thing; two Sorcadins is another. And the second Sorcadin HAS A NINTH LEVEL SPELL SLOT that can be expended for the other uses of Wish, meaning that you only gain stuff and do not lose ANYTHING by casting Simulacrum. Casting Simulacrum at the start of every adventure is ALWAYS the right thing to do (though it does take 12 hours to do so). Are you joking? No, Iím not joking. Whatís joking is the utter brokenness of this spell.
      • Clone (level 8): Already listed in ďSelf ProtectionĒ, but this spell can be actually used on anyone, including your party friends, or even important NPCs who you donít want to die, such as your patron king or guild merchant. With clones of your entire party stored everywhere, your adventures will feel less like D&D and more like Super Mario Brothers.
      • Holy Aura (level 8, concentration): Already mentioned in ďSelf ProtectionĒ, this spell is like a weird variant of Foresight. Doesnít give advantage on your attacks, doesnít make you immune to ambushes and requires concentration, but can affect multiple friends at the same time, and can blind Fiends and Undead. Under the right circumstances this can be better. (You DO wish you could have learned Foresight, though...)
      • Animal Shapes (level 8, concentration): Hilarious in a war campaign - turn a hundred soldiers into giant elephants (like that scene from Lord of the Rings), or giant scorpions, or Ankylosauruses. Whatever works, and it works like nuts.
      • Mind Blank (level 8): A splendid buff spell that does not require concentration and makes a friend (or yourself) immune to psychic damage, divination, charming, and and mind-reading. Itís situational but solid, and when you need it, youíll love it. The fact you donít even need to prepare it makes this a wonderful asset that you should never forget you have. If anything, Wishís power differs greatly based on how much knowledge you have of the spells in the PHB (and EE), so make sure to remember these stuff.
      • Regenerate (level 7, concentration): Again already listed in ďSelf Protection, itís the best healing spell you can get as a 2/18 or 3/17 Sorcadin. It does take time to regenerate, though, so using this during mid-combat may not work as effective as it seems. Sure, healing 1 HP at the start of every turn means the target will never lose his turn due to being HP 0, but if he takes multiple hits before his turn comes, he might as well just die. Over-reliance can be fatal. If you want massive healing during combat, Heal (level 6) exists - but not really the best use of a level 9 slot.
      • Resurrection (level 7): Under normal circumstances, outclassed by Clone. However, 120 days is long, and if a party member died before 120 days have passed after you obtained Wish, you might as well Wish for this.
        The largest weakness of this spell is that you canít use it on yourself.


    Weaken Enemies
    • Wish: Some candidates for using Wish as de-buff:
      • Maze (level 8): A wonderful spell that banishes a target without a save. Those with low INT scores may spend turns (or even 10 turns no questions asked, if its INT is 9 or lower) just trying to get back. Itís like Banishmentís older brother, and that means itís really good.
      • Feeblemind (level 8): Basically reads ďcripple the enemy Caster and make him mentally handicappedĒ. Use together with Heightened Spell (or Hound of Ill Omen) to ensue victory. This is arguably one of the most morally ambiguous spells out there, but then again, killing is fine, so maybe this is fine too in the D&D universe. It really is a terrible thing to do to a person, though.


    Field Control
    • Wish: Some candidates for using Wish as field control:
      • Antipathy/Sympathy (level 8): Arguably one of the best Field Control spells in the entire game. Requires beforehand research, but doesnít even require concentration and can be cast up to 10 days in advance. Use this to lure all enemies into a single area and then BLASTíEM all the way, or radiate an aura that makes Red Dragons afraid of you. Whatever works. This spell does not work on its own as effectively as when you combine it with other effects, so discuss with party members beforehand about how to make the most out of this spell. Creativity is the key.
        You can cast this on multiple targets at the same time.
      • Forcecage (level 7): Remember how you were bragging about how you donít have Wall of Force? Well, now you do. And itís better.


    Out-of-Combat
    • Wish: Some candidates for using Wish out-of-combat:
      • Glibness (level 8): You donít need mind-controlling spells to hire enemies as minions anymore, because now you can just intimidate or persuade them by your word. This is how you win an election, or create the adventurerís guild you always wanted to rule over.
      • Mordenkainenís Magnificent Mansion (level 7): Leomondís Tiny Hutís really, really, really older brother. For all your cozy resting needs in the middle of a jungle, a desert, or the elemental chaos.
      • Telepathy (level 8): Itís almost the same ability as the average cell phone, and worse of an ability than the average smartphone (no gaming applications), but at least this can allow you to communicate with the Tarrasque. Not that that will allow you to persuade him to go back to his home or anything, but still.
      • Move Earth (level 6, concentration): Allows you to re-create terrain, or make enemy fortresses collapse. Especially useful in war campaigns.
      • Wall of Stone (level 5, concentration): Use every day to gradually build your home fortress. Yes, you have this spell on the Sorcerer spell list, but using it via Wish, it doesnít take up a Spell Known.
      • Control Weather (level 8): Maybe you live in the countryside and the peasants ask you to make it rain. You can make it rain.
        With the right DM, creative players might be able to use this in war campaigns to cripple an enemy army by heavy precipitation, thick fog, and hailstorms. Isnít that everyoneís dream?
    • Gate (Concentration): Call forth minions. This is like an upgraded ďConjure whateverĒ spell with the right set-up done beforehand, and it can even mean ďSummon ArmyĒ in some campaigns, but itís not for everyone. If it seems like a good idea to take this, take this. If not, pass.
    • Time Stop (Concentration): This spell is listed in ďOut-of-CombatĒ because it sucks hard in combat. You canít damage enemies with it, it requires concentration; it sucks, it just sucks, it really, really, sucks. If your DM knows Jojoís Bizarre Adventures he might allow you to throw dozens of knives at the target that stop mid-air and then go stabstabstab into the target the moment the Time Stop ends, or if he knows Puella Magi Madoka Magica he might allow you to do the same with shotguns and missiles and explosives, but either way, using a level 9 spell for just damage is not a very good use either. It doesnít even allow you to walk around and disarm all your enemies. How restrictive is that?
      Even out of combat, itís not like this spell has a lot of uses. But at least it lets you cheat in games of chance, steal items without leaving a trace, and do other stuff that might come in handy in some limited situations.
      Is it worth the Spell Known?
      No. It isnít.
    Last edited by Gastronomie; 2016-11-11 at 09:51 PM.
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    ^ Fantastic avatar made by Professor Gnoll. Yaya Tokaz, from the manga "Kukul and Nagi". ^
    Spoiler: Quotes
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malifice View Post
    Only on a DnD forum would discussing the methods for jamming a T-Rex into a 10x10x10 box be a thing.
    Extended Signature: Homebrew Stuff
    Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

  13. - Top - End - #13
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    Default Re: Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

    My whole life was - Unlimited Blade Works
    Sample Builds


    Show me your moves!
    (Image Copyright Ufotable)

    Now, the first thing I must say is that most characters do not actually get to level 20. Thus I know that just posting level 20 builds will be not very helpful for a majority of the people.

    Here I will post :
    • Level 6 builds meant for 2/X or 3/X Paladins (This is for when you know your campaign is going to end before hitting Level 12, in which going Paladin 6 might slow down your Caster progression a bit too much, and it can be better to go just Paladin 2 or 3)
    • Level 12, 13 and 20 builds meant for 6/14 or 7/13 Paladins (Level 12 is where you get 6/6 and your Paladin/Sorcerer gish starts to get really nasty, while Level 20 is your ďideal way to perfect your characterĒ)


    Spoiler: Level 6
    Show
    Spoiler: Longsword 6 (No Oath, Draconic)
    Show


    DIVINE SMITE!!
    (Image Copyright Ufotable)
    Concept: Longsword + Shield
    Class: Paladin 2/ Sorcerer (Draconic, Gold) 4
    Race: Variant Human
    Final HP: 10+1d10+4d6+3x6+1x4=54
    Final AC: 21 (Plate + Shield + Defense), +5 with the Shield spell (Reaction)
    Start Stats: 16-8-16-8-8-16
    Final Stats: 16-8-16-8-8-16
    Feats: Heavy Armor Master, War Caster
    Fighting Style: Defense
    Spoiler: Spell List
    Show
    Paladin (the ones that you almost constantly prepare)
    Level 1: Command, Bless, Cure Wounds
    (You can also prepare1 extra spell in addition to the above every day)

    Sorcerer
    Cantrips: Booming Blade, Friends, Green-Flame Blade, Lightning Lure, Minor Illusion
    Level 1: Shield
    Level 2: Hold Person, Mirror Image, Suggestion, Web

    Metamagic
    Quickened Spell... Obvious choice for any Sorcadin
    Careful Spell... Use together with Web, and later Hypnotic Pattern

    Spoiler: Build Concept
    Show
    This build assumes your campaign ends before you hit level 12, in which case Aura of Protection becomes a bit lackluster due to the long delay in Caster levels. This build also assumes the campaign either starts at level 6 or higher, or your DM allowed you to ignore somatic and material components using houserules, or perhaps some minor magic item - otherwise you cannot spellcast without War Caster (as an example of a houserule, a particular character I created had a smexy tattoo that acted as her arcane focus, so she didnít need War Caster).

    This is already a pretty darn powerful gish build. With good defenses, good nova, and encounter-changing spells like Hold Person, Suggestion and Web@Careful, this guy is versatile, and without doubt, fun to use. The only problem will be that this guyís DPR lags a bit behind those with extra attacks, but as explained in ďthe NeutralĒ box of ďPros and ConsĒ, itís not that much of a problem. And once you get to level 8 (2/6), you will gain Elemental Affinity and get much better.

    Itís possible to take Twinned or Heightened instead of Careful, and swap out Web for something else. Here I took Web because Web+Careful Spell is a pretty darn powerful combination, and itís one of the very few ways to get good field control at this level.

    However, be aware that using Green-Flame Blade in the area of Web can burn down the squares in which itís used. Then, does this make taking Web a bad idea? No, not at all! Once you use Web, just use Booming Blade, and itís all fine. Also worth noting that BB and Web work together wonderful, since Web forces the target to make a save at the start of every turn as long as the target starts his turn in the area... do you understand what this means?

    Any creature adjacent to you in the area of Web and who failed his DEX save will must a Strength check as an action to escape the Restrained condition. However, even if he succeeds on this check, he remains adjacent to you, also within the area of Web, and on top of that, he has ended his action (meaning no attack or even the disengage action). Thus, he must either turn his back on you and run, provoking an opportunity Booming Blade from War Caster and taking massive damage, or stay in the spot, risking re-making a DEX save at the start of his next turn. This combination forces the enemy to make a difficult decision - and itís also pretty darn cheap, requiring only a level 2 spell slot and 1 Sorcery Point.

    Once you level up, the level 3 spells are almost mandatory at this point, with Draconic Sorcerer and Careful Spell - Fireball[/b] and Hypnotic Pattern[/b].

    Spoiler: Level 12, 13
    Show
    Spoiler: Longsword 12 (Crown, Draconic)
    Show


    Roll Initiative.
    (Image Copyright Ufotable)
    Concept: Longsword + Shield
    Class: Paladin (Crown) 6/ Sorcerer (Draconic, Gold) 6
    Race: Variant Human
    Final HP: 10+5d10+5d6+1x6+3x12=106
    Final AC: 21 (Plate + Shield + Defense), +5 with the Shield spell (Reaction)
    Start Stats: 16-8-16-8-8-16
    Final Stats: 16-8-16-8-8-18
    Feats: Heavy Armor Master, War Caster
    Fighting Style: Defense
    Spoiler: Spell List
    Show
    Paladin (the ones that you almost constantly prepare)
    Level 1: Command*, Compelled Duel*, Bless, Cure Wounds
    Level 2: Warding Bond*, Zone of Truth*, Aid
    *Oath Spells
    (You can also prepare4 extra spells in addition to the above every day)

    Sorcerer
    Cantrips: Booming Blade, Friends, Green-Flame Blade, Lightning Lure, Minor Illusion
    Level 1: Shield
    Level 2: Hold Person, Mirror Image, Suggestion, Web
    Level 3: Fireball, Hypnotic Pattern

    Metamagic
    Quickened Spell... Obvious choice for any Sorcadin
    Careful Spell... Use together with Web andr Hypnotic Pattern

    Spoiler: Build Concept
    Show
    This is sort of like a missing link in-between the level 6 and 20 Crown/Draconic Longsword builds. You get both good spellcasting, good saves, and good DPR.

    A level 11 STR 18 S&B pure Paladin with Dueling, Extra Attack and Improved Divine Smite inflicts 2d8+6 damage per hit, 4d8+12=30 damage average every round. Your Green-Flame Blade without Dueling but with Elemental Affinity (even if itís only once per spell, as ruled by Sage Advice or whatever random blabbering) inflicts 3d8+7 damage to one target and 2d8+4 damage to another, adding up to be 5d8+11=33.5 damage. Though it all depends on only one attack roll, gets weaker against monsters with fire resistance or immunity, and requires 2 monsters to be adjacent to each other, itís quite good. And remember, you donít need to be the king of DPR to be a good Longsword Sorcadin build in the first place.

    Fireball and Hypnotic Pattern continue to be powerful spells even at this level. You have the Caster slots of a level 9 Caster (4-3-3-3-1), so you can gain lots more Sorcery Points (or upcast Command, Aid or Hold Person).

    From here, you should go Sorcerer all the way.

    Spoiler: Longsword 13 (Oathbreaker, Shadow)
    Show


    You do not know the power of the Dark Side...
    (Image Copyright Ufotable)
    Concept: Longsword + Shield
    Class: Paladin (Oathbreaker) 7/ Sorcerer (Shadow) 6
    Race: Variant Human
    Final HP: 10+6d10+5d6+3x13=109
    Final AC: 20 (Plate + Shield), +5 with the Shield spell (Reaction)
    Start Stats: 16-8-16-8-8-16
    Final Stats: 16-8-16-8-8-18
    Feats: Heavy Armor Master, War Caster
    Fighting Style: Dueling
    Spoiler: Spell List
    Show
    Paladin (the ones that you almost constantly prepare)
    Level 1: Hellish Rebuke*, Inflict Wounds*, Command, Bless, Cure Wounds
    Level 2: Crown of Madness*, Darkness*, Aid
    *Oath Spells
    (You can also prepare3 extra spells in addition to the above every day)

    Sorcerer
    Cantrips: Booming Blade, Green-Flame Blade, Lightning Lure, Minor Illusion, Ray of Frost
    Level 1: Shield
    Level 2: Hold Person, Mirror Image, Web
    Level 3: Fireball, Hypnotic Pattern, Conjure Lesser Demon (UA)

    Metamagic
    Quickened Spell... Obvious choice for any Sorcadin
    Careful Spell... Use together with Web and Hypnotic Pattern

    Spoiler: Build Concept
    Show
    This is half an optimized build and half a thematic build, the ultimate Emo Sorcadin. Itís also what a S&B Sorcadin that utilizes Extra Attack more looks like.

    Notice how this build does not have Defense as the Paladin Fighting Style. This is because this build took Dueling instead, to synergize with Extra Attack.

    With STR 16, CHA 16 (Aura of Hate) and Dueling, each of your attacks deal 1d8+3+3+2=1d8+8 damage. Two attacks deals 2d8+16=25 damage average.

    Wait! But, isnít that lower than that of a Green-Flame Blade of the same level? Youíre losing in DPR!!

    Yes, true. GFB + Elemental Affinity does better damage than Extra Attack + Dueling + Aura of Hate. HOWEVER, you will not always have an enemy adjacent to you. If there is only one enemy to damage, GFB + EA can do only 20.5 damage average, meaning youíre better in terms of DPR. Also, you get more chances to slam in Divine Smite.

    To maximize the potential of Aura of Hate, Iíve thrown in a rather unique and extremely thematic spell - Conjure Lesser Demon. This allows you to summon eight Manes or Dretches (forget the Manes, you have zero reason to summon them), which are futile CR 1/4 Demons with AC 11 and HP 18. These creatures are hostile to all non-demons around them, meaning they might attack your friends if you place them in the wrong places. To make Aura of Hate work as good as it can, you should place these near you as much as possible. Of course, being an Oathbreaker, youíre perfectly fine with killing people, so make sure to kill someone at the start of the adventuring day, and draw the circle created from the blood of the innocents when casting this spell. (Due to this nature of the spell, only evil campaigns will allow you to join, but youíll be a hilarious addition to any evil campaign.)

    Rather disgustingly, the Dretchesí attack bonus to hit is only +2, meaning that if 1/3 of their attacks hit youíre lucky - however, they have multiattack, meaning they make 16 attacks per round. Now, due to the nature of minionmancy, you should consult your DM before using or even taking this spell, but if you think of how about 4 or 5 attacks will hit (much more if your friends have some way to make the attack rolls have advantage), dealing +20 or +25 damage from just Aura of Hate, you can say this is a pretty damn interesting spell.

    If the demons start to become more annoying than helpful, you can always end concentration at any timing you wish. Unlike in the case with the other Conjure Demon spells, once your concentration is broken, the Demons summoned by this spell all instantly disappear, making it not as problematic.

    If thereís a necromancer in your party, perhaps your DM may rule that the demons will start attacking the zombies near you. In which case, itís not a good idea to take this spell, so perhaps swap it with something else. Animate Dead is actually better if you can have it... Just, you donít have it. (BTW, for this reason, going Paladin 9 for Animate Dead can become a viable choice at later levels.)

    Apart from that, the BB + War Caster + Careful Spell + Web combo (already mentioned in Longsword 6) has amazing synergy with Dreadful Aspect, so be sure to remember it, and use it. Locking down opponents into fear-mode and not allowing them to escape by making them restrained is pretty devastating. And guess what - the Frightened condition bestows disadvantage on checks, meaning that once your enemies (who have already been affected by Dreadful Aspect) get restrained, chances are they will waste a lot of their turns just trying to succeed on the STR ability check. What awesome synergy is this?

    Spoiler: Level 20
    Show
    Spoiler: Longsword 20 (Crown, Draconic)
    Show

    It shines bright... It is the true embodiment of the sad yet noble dream of all soldiers, past, present, and future, who lie dying on the field of battle...
    Clutched to their hearts with their last breath, holding aloft their dying wish, making certain that their loyalty will not be in vain...
    The Invincible King is about to cry out the true name of the miracle she wields in her hands. That name is...
    ...Excalibur.

    (Image Copyright Ufotable)
    Concept: Longsword + Shield
    Class: Paladin (Crown) 6/ Sorcerer (Draconic, Gold) 14
    Race: Variant Human
    Final HP: 10+5d10+14d6+3x20+1x14=170
    Final AC: 21 (Plate + Shield + Defense), +5 with the Shield spell (Reaction)
    Start Stats: 16-8-16-8-8-16
    Final Stats: 16-8-16-8-8-20
    Feats: Heavy Armor Master, War Caster, Inspiring Leader
    Fighting Style: Defense
    Spoiler: Spell List
    Show
    Paladin (the ones that you almost constantly prepare)
    Level 1: Command*, Compelled Duel*, Bless, Cure Wounds
    Level 2: Warding Bond*, Zone of Truth*, Aid
    *Oath Spells
    (You can also prepare5 extra spells in addition to the above every day)

    Sorcerer
    Cantrips: Booming Blade, Friends, Green-Flame Blade, Lightning Lure, Message, Minor Illusion
    Level 1: Shield
    Level 2: Mirror Image, Web
    Level 3: Fireball, Hypnotic Pattern, Haste
    Level 4: Greater Invisibility, Polymorph, Wall of Fire
    Level 5: Animate Objects, Hold Monster
    Level 6: Mass Suggestion
    Level 7: Reverse Gravity

    Metamagic
    Quickened Spell... Obvious choice for any Sorcadin
    Careful Spell... Use together with spells like Web, Hypnotic Pattern and Reverse Gravity
    Twinned Spell... For buffing multiple friends at once with Haste, Greater Invisibility and Polymorph

    Spoiler: Build Concept
    Show
    The basic premise is to lock down all your enemies. This build does not have the devastating DPR of GWM builds, but makes up for that with amazing defense, field control and better spellcasting, not to mention better saving throws.

    This build is extremely defensive (this does not mean at all that it has weak offense, though). With base AC 21 via Plate, Shield and Defense, on top of Mirror Image, the Shield spell, and possible disadvantage on your attacks due to Greater Invisibility or another +2 AC due to Haste, you are a wonderful tank.

    This build also includes Heavy Armor Master. For one itís a means of getting +1 to STR using Variant Human, but for another, it adds to the tankiness - even if you do take damage from enemy weapons, it will be reduced by 3 every time (monsters with magical weapons are surprisingly rare, even at high levels). The reduction may seem small on first glance, but it will eventually accumulate to be a lot over the adventuring day, and will most definitely save your skin - or at least keep you from using up too much Cure Wounds and Lay on Hands.

    Since using Cure Wounds will lessen your uses of Shield, and Lay on Hands is a limited resource (using it to heal diseases and poison is very important and also economical), you want to take minimum damage. To make this possible, this build has also taken the Inspiring Leader feat, which gives you and your friends 25 temporary HP in-between every single short rest. This and Heavy Armor Master create a nice cushion that helps you not take that much damage. ...And it helps your friends as well.

    To keep your enemies constantly fixed on you and protect your partyís backrow, utilize the Champion Challenge ability of Oath of the Crown. Your enemies will be forced to attack only you, but when they do, you can just use Shield to ward them all off (the effectiveness of Shield has already been explained in the ďLongswordĒ column of this guide), effectively rendering all the enemiesí attacks useless. When you run out of level 1 spell slots, depending on how often you use high-level slots (this is a matter of playstyle), you can perhaps use Font of Magic to re-gain them. Donít bother converting level 2 slots for this usage though, since creating a level 1 spell slot requires 2 Sorcery Points, and itís better to simply keep that level 2 slot (in case youíre not going to use Shield).

    Since the enemies are all fixed in melee range around you, possibly standing together, Green-Flame Blade becomes more effective than under normal circumstances (better chances of there being two enemies within range - of course, unless youíve already killed all of them but one). And since youíre going to use GFB a lot, why not give it a damage boost? Oh, and, if itís gonna be a damage boost, why not base it off your ,maxed-out casting stat? Yeah, I know - my point is that Draconic Sorcerer is a wonderful combination in that regard, with Elemental Affinity adding +5 damage to all your GFB attacks. Lots of interesting synergy here.

    Since a lot of enemies will be encircling you, Careful Spell becomes a pretty good Metamagic choice - better than it is for other builds. Feel free to use spells like Web and Hypnotic Pattern, centered around you. Except oh wait, you donít get affected at all! The lolz. The trollololz. Enjoy as your enemies all get restrained while you and your friends do not.

    Another thing about Careful Spell is that it requires only 1 Sorcery Point to use, and compared to how easily the other Metamagic options can eat through Sorcery Points, you can say itís really, really economical. If you still remember what I said in the first section of this guide, the weakness of Sorcadins is that they canít do anything after theyíve used up resources, but Careful Spell is unlikely to become the reason for that problem. (I still threw Twinned Spell into the Metamagic list here, though, because it works amazing with Greater Invisibility, Polymorph and Haste)

    Bit off-track: Perhaps someone said something about how spells like Fireball are anti-synergetic with Careful Spell, because you still take half damage. Well then, if you really want to minimize the damage, you can use the secret hidden ability of Elemental Affinity to gain fire resistance for 1 hour at the cost of just 1 Sorcery Point. Both Careful Spell and Elemental Affinity cost only 1 Sorcery Point, so use whichever is better in the particular situation. In short, when using Fireball on your area:
    • If youíre not the only guy in the area: Careful Spell
    • If youíre the only guy in the area: Elemental Affinity

    Is the way to go. Either way, you take only half damage - or if you used Elemental Affinity and succeeded on your DEX save, only a quarter of the damage. Technically you can spend 2 Sorcery Points to guarantee you take only 1/4 damage, but honestly, itís probably a bit too high-priced.

    Now, of course, just because you have Shield, doesnít mean youíre invincible from all enemy attacks, especially critical hits. Iíve equipped this build with Heavy Armor Master to mitigate that problem as much as possible, but if you still find yourself a bit too wounded after a fight is over, just use (a possibly upcast version of) Cure Wounds, or Lay on Hands.

    Here I threw in Animate Objects as another way to maintain the frontline and make you better at your job, this spell being considerably good at being a damage sponge. If you have low HP but want to keep on fighting, Polymorph into a T-Rex (or whatever the equivalent of a T-Rex is in your campaign world) with Quickened Spell, and essentially gain 136 temporary HP. Not getting able to cast spells is bad, but the DPR is higher than your normal self, and you get to keep on doing your job to help your friends. If you use Champion Challenge just before activating Polymorph, your enemies will be forced to stay within 30 feet of a T-Rex. Isnít that quite terrifying? (It even synergizes, since T-Rexes need over 2 enemies within attack range for their attacks to all be effective.)

    With a CHA score of 20, you are also a wonderful Caster, your saving throw DC being 19, the highest number possible for a normal character. Web, Hypnotic Pattern, Hold Monster, and Mass Suggestion especially benefit from this. Elemental Affinity also gets yummier from the +5 damage, and especially since you will be using Green-Flame Blade often, you can say this is an important part of this build.

    Your maxed-out CHA boosts not only your Sorcerer spellcasting. It also makes Champion Challenge and Turn the Tide better / harder to resist, and allows you to choose more Paladin spells (most Paladin spells are situational, but this pretty much means that you get to be more adaptable to all sorts of niche situations). And the best part is that with maximum benefits from Aura of Protection, you get +5 to all saving throws.

    The saving throws of this build are like the following:
    • STR: +8
    • DEX: +4
    • CON: +8
    • INT: +4
    • WIS: +10
    • CHA: +16

    Yeah, thatís awesome.

    If you want your CON saves to be better, take Resilient (CON) instead of Heavy Armor Master, and spend those Variant Human +1s on STR and CHA. That way you get the same ability scores as this original build, except with +6 to CON saves instead of a -3 cushion from all physical attacks.

    Generally speaking, if your party has a Bard, you donít need Resilient (CON). If your party does not, it might be pretty good, especially if your DM has a habit of throwing in Beholders, Demiliches and the sort as boss monsters, or he really likes throwing in drow with poisoned crossbows.

    Spoiler: Longsword 20 (Oathbreaker, Shadow)
    Show


    BE PREPARED.
    (Image Copyright Ufotable)
    Concept: Longsword + Shield
    Class: Paladin (Oathbreaker) 9/ Sorcerer (Shadow) 11
    Race: Variant Human
    Final HP: 10+8d10+11d6+3x20=162
    Final AC: 20 (Plate + Shield), +2 with Haste, +5 with the Shield spell (Reaction)
    Start Stats: 16-8-16-8-8-16
    Final Stats: 18-8-16-8-8-20
    Feats: Heavy Armor Master, War Caster
    Fighting Style: Dueling
    Spoiler: Spell List
    Show
    Paladin (the ones that you almost constantly prepare)
    Level 1: Hellish Rebuke*, Inflict Wounds*, Command, Bless, Cure Wounds
    Level 2: Crown of Madness*, Darkness*, Aid
    Level 3: Animate Dead*, Bestow Curse*, Aura of Vitality, Dispel Magic
    *Oath Spells
    (You can also prepare3 extra spells in addition to the above every day)

    Sorcerer
    Cantrips: Booming Blade, Friends, Green-Flame Blade, Lightning Lure, Minor Illusion, Ray of Frost
    Level 1: Shield
    Level 2: Hold Person, Mirror Image, Web
    Level 3: Fireball, Haste, Hypnotic Pattern
    Level 4: Banishment, Greater Invisibility, Polymorph
    Level 5: Hold Monster
    Level 6: Mass Suggestion


    Metamagic
    Quickened Spell... Obvious choice for any Sorcadin
    Careful Spell... Use together with Web and Hypnotic Pattern
    Twinned Spell... Use together with Haste, Greater Invisibility, and Polymorph for the lolz
    (Hound of Ill Omen... Not an actual Metamagic option, but similar in usage. This makes Heightened Spell redundant)
    (If you feel your party lacks healing you can take Extended Spell to maximize Aura of Vitality)

    Spoiler: Build Concept
    Show
    NOTE-This is theorycrafting, and I have not used it yet. However, I do suspect it will be fun to use.

    This is a rather interesting variant of S&B Sorcadins that utilizes Extra Attack more than it does GFB or BB (though they might be Quickened when you really need that extra damage), using Dueling, Aura of Hate, and Haste to maximize the damage. On first glance Oathbreaker 11 seems interesting, but IMO improving your casting and increasing your slots and Sorcery Points is better. The worst part is, with Sorcerer 9, you cannot gain your third Metamagic option. I prefer 9/11.

    ďSince Aura of Hate gives +5 damage to all undead and demons around you, why not throw in Animate Dead?Ē
    ďBut Gastronomie, Sorcerers donít get Animate Dead!Ē
    ďOathbreaker 9 does! Together with Aura of Vitality!Ē


    You may not get the amazing bonuses that Necromancy School Wizards have, but your zombies will still be pretty good. Iíve cut Conjure Lesser Demon from the spell list because of the potential anti-synergy it has with Animate Dead (the Dretches may start attacking the skeletons).

    Whether to summon forth Zombies or Skeletons is something of a problem. Skeletons can attack ranged, so theyíre generally the better option, but Zombies serve as really tough, annoying meat shields (and you like having meat shields near you). Perhaps you should have a good mix of both.

    Now, since you get Aura of Vitality from Paladin 9, I would love to take Extended Spell as a Metamagic Option and allow you to heal 140 HP with a single level 3 spell, but sadly you get only 3 Metamagic Options at this level. You donít need Heightened Spell thanks to the Shadow Sorcererís Hound of Ill Omen ability, but Quickened and Careful are already near-mandatory. I would choose Twinned Spell, which can empower Greater Invisibility and Polymorph, over Extended Spell (which has no other spells it can combo with).

    Banishment is important for this build because it allows you to banish the Fiends that are potentially lethal for you (imagine the terror of a Marilith with an +5 damage bonus to all his attacks!) Since most Fiends have Magic Resistance, donít forget to use together with Hound of Ill Omen.

    Spoiler: Greatsword 20 (Devotion, Shadow)
    Show

    And you call that GREAT WEAPON MASTER.
    (Image Copyright Ufotable)
    Concept: Great Weapon Master
    Class: Paladin (Devotion) 6/ Sorcerer (Shadow) 14
    Race: Variant Human
    Final HP: 10+5d10+14d6+3x20=156
    Final AC: 19 (Plate + Defense), +1 with Blade Mastery (Reaction), +5 with the Shield spell (Reaction)
    Start Stats: 16-8-15-8-8-16
    Final Stats: 20-8-16-8-8-16
    Feats: Great Weapon Master, Resilient (CON), Blade Mastery (UA)
    Spoiler: Spell List
    Show
    Paladin (the ones that you almost constantly prepare)
    Level 1: Protection from Evil and Good*, Sanctuary*, Bless, Command, Cure Wounds
    Level 2: Lesser Restoration*, Zone of Truth*
    *Oath Spells
    (You can also prepare3 extra spells in addition to the above every day)

    Sorcerer
    Cantrips: Booming Blade, Friends, Lightning Lure, Message, Minor Illusion, Shape Water
    Level 1: Shield
    Level 2: Hold Person, Mirror Image
    Level 3: Counterspell, Fireball, Fly, Hypnotic Pattern
    Level 4: Banishment, Greater Invisibility
    Level 5: Hold Monster
    Level 6: Chain Lightning, Mass Suggestion
    Level 7: Reverse Gravity

    Metamagic
    Quickened Spell... Because almost every Action will be Extra Attack
    Careful Spell... Use together with Hypnotic Pattern
    Twinned Spell... To abuse Greater Invisibility, because you use it so often
    (Hound of Ill Omen... Not an actual Metamagic option, but similar in usage. This makes Heightened Spell redundant)

    Spoiler: Build Concept
    Show
    This build is focused on GWM through getting bonuses to hit and gaining advantage.
    At level 17 and higher, your normal attack rolls will have a +12 bonus to hit. Add Sacred Weapon for +3, and the end result is an attack roll of +15. If someone in your party is casting Bless on you (which they should), add extra 1d4. In the below math, Iíd just consider Bless +2 to make math simpler.
    Spoiler: Probabilities of Hitting
    Show
    AC 15
    Normal Attack without GWM (+12): 90%
    Normal Attack with GWM (+7): 65%
    Advantage and GWM (+7 twice): 87.75%
    Sacred Weapon with GWM (+10): 80%
    Sacred + GWM + Adv. (+10 twice): 96%
    Sacred + GWM + Bless + Adv. (+12 twice): 99%

    AC 17
    Normal Attack without GWM (+12): 80%
    Normal Attack with GWM (+7): 55%
    Advantage and GWM (+7 twice): 79.75%
    Sacred Weapon with GWM (+10): 70%
    Sacred + GWM + Adv. (+10 twice): 91%
    Sacred + GWM + Bless + Adv. (+12 twice): 96%

    AC 19
    Normal Attack without GWM (+12): 70%
    Normal Attack with GWM (+7): 45%
    Advantage and GWM (+7 twice): 69.75%
    Sacred Weapon with GWM (+10): 60%
    Sacred + GWM + Adv. (+10 twice): 84%
    Sacred + GWM + Bless + Adv. (+12 twice): 91%

    AC 21
    Normal Attack without GWM (+12): 60%
    Normal Attack with GWM (+7): 35%
    Advantage and GWM (+7 twice): 57.75%
    Sacred Weapon with GWM (+10): 50%
    Sacred + GWM + Adv. (+10 twice): 75%
    Sacred + GWM + Bless + Adv. (+12 twice): 84%

    Taking a look at these numbers, you can say that ď-5 to hitĒ and ďadvantageĒ pretty much cancel each other out. If you put Sacred Weapon or Bless on top of that, the chances of hit become even higher than normal while getting +10 damage per hit.

    Whether Sacred Weapon and Darkness cancel each other or not depends on the rulings of the DM, but even if the DM says they donít work together, all you have to do is use Greater Invisibility. Darkness is always there as a much more ďcheapĒ option, but it can possibly hinder your friends and thus requires caution to use.

    Of course, Darkness is better for when youíre attacking a Caster, though (blinding works amazing on Casters).

    When using GWM builds, make sure to be careful of monsters that have Truesight and Blindsight. Neither Darkness nor Greater Invisibility will work on them, so you need to use spells like Hold Monster to gain advantage on attacks against them. You could say dragons are the worst foes of GWM Sorcadins in that regard, since they have high AC and blindsight on top of the ever-so-annoying Legendary Resistance, but at least you can Smite against boss monsters like them, and the breath weapon becomes a bit better with Aura of Protection.
    Last edited by Gastronomie; 2016-11-11 at 09:29 PM.
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    ^ Fantastic avatar made by Professor Gnoll. Yaya Tokaz, from the manga "Kukul and Nagi". ^
    Spoiler: Quotes
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malifice View Post
    Only on a DnD forum would discussing the methods for jamming a T-Rex into a 10x10x10 box be a thing.
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    Default Re: Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

    Epilogue


    (Image Copyright Ufotable)


    "I am the bone of my sword.
    Steel is my body, and fire is my blood.
    I have created over a thousand blades.
    Unknown to Death.
    Nor known to Life.
    Have withstood pain to create many weapons.
    Yet, those hands will never hold anything.
    So as I pray, -Unlimited Blade Works."
    -Fate/Stay Night



    So, weíve got through everything the Sorcadin has to offer. The Pros and cons (or rather, the things to look out for), whether to go DEX or not, what races are good for them, what good builds exist, evaluation of the spells (though Paladin is left to the other guides since not much is to be added there), and lots of ideas for combos scattered here and there.

    Though this guide still lacks a bit of information about DEX builds (if you have any experience, please do tell me), I think Iíve built something that can help people with no experience multiclassing create the super-powerful and super-fun gish build that is Paladin/Sorcerer. Perhaps itís become a bit too long as a side effect of me trying to explain everything, so a bit sorry on that. I tried color-coding and bolding so that even with skimming over, you can get a good grasp of whatís written in here, but if you feel itís too long I may edit it, or post a shorter version.

    This guide is still far from truly finished. In fact a guide can never hope to become truly finished, in my humble opinion. I have played multiple builds of Paladin/Sorcerer, but the combinations are truly endless, and I have only delved into a tiny part of whatís actually possible. Perhaps the spells I rated to be bad here can become the key parts of amazing combos, or perhaps I rated something to be too high, or perhaps Iím missing something really big. Weíre all human, and we all have our limits. It happens. However, when it happens, it would be really, really helpful if you could point it out - whatís called in English ďconstructive criticismĒ - and help me make this guide even better.

    It would have been impossible for me to create this guide on my own - Iíve already been helped by dozens of other forum members who gave me their ideas, time and effort to proofread, comment, advice, and point out the mistakes they found (again, thanks to all of them!). If you can add to the cooperation, I would really love it. (Apart from pointing out mistakes, you can also post your own combination ideas that you think are interesting and/or good. Thereís probably dozens Iíve missed.)

    If Iíve been able to help anyone who wants to build a Paladin/Sorcerer, or if youíve felt like building a Paladin/Sorcerer after reading this guide, that would be my greatest pleasure.

    I think thatís about it for now. Thank you for reading, and happy gaming.


    Off to battle!
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    Last edited by Gastronomie; 2016-11-11 at 09:28 PM.
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    ^ Fantastic avatar made by Professor Gnoll. Yaya Tokaz, from the manga "Kukul and Nagi". ^
    Spoiler: Quotes
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malifice View Post
    Only on a DnD forum would discussing the methods for jamming a T-Rex into a 10x10x10 box be a thing.
    Extended Signature: Homebrew Stuff
    Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

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    BardGuy

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    Default Re: Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

    Great job with this guide! Lots of information here!

    You suggest starting stats of 16/8/16/8/8/16. This looks to be a variant human, but do you recommend the heavy armor mastery feat or resilient constitution (or something else)?

    I can see the benefits of both.

    Your next feat needs to be warcaster, IMHO, and boosting CHA above STR or DEX is the optimal choice. Do you agree?
    Quote Originally Posted by Rainbownaga View Post
    I swear, 1 handed quarterstaves are 5e's spiked chain.


    BRING BACK ALIGNMENT LANGUAGES!!!

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    Default Re: Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

    I'm just wondering why you rate PAM so low. I find it's generally the best choice for single class paladins, as you get the extra chance to smite. Is it merely because with Advantage, GWM maths out better and that you're ASI/Feat starved anyway?

    Otherwise it's a good and well thought out read.

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    MindFlayer

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    Default Re: Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

    Quote Originally Posted by deathadder99 View Post
    I'm just wondering why you rate PAM so low. I find it's generally the best choice for single class paladins, as you get the extra chance to smite. Is it merely because with Advantage, GWM maths out better and that you're ASI/Feat starved anyway?

    Otherwise it's a good and well thought out read.
    It's because Sorcerer gets Quicken spell which takes up your bonus action. PAM uses your bonus action as well. It's not that PAM is bad, but why whack a mole with the butt end of your stick when you can quicken a Booming Blade/GFB? It just adds more competition for action economy.

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    Default Re: Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

    Haven't read through everything, but Blade Mastery lets you add +1 as a reaction, not bonus action.

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    NecromancerGuy

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    Default Re: Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

    Some much information have to re-red it to absorb it all Just wanted to post GREAT JOB!

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    BarbarianGuy

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    Default Re: Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

    I love this solely because you used so many references to F/SN and FMA.
    Last edited by Mongobear; 2016-10-05 at 03:18 PM.
    I Am A: Neutral Good Half-Orc Fighter/Barbarian (2nd/1st Level)

    Ability Scores:
    Strength-16
    Dexterity-16
    Constitution-17
    Intelligence-17
    Wisdom-16
    Charisma-13

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    MonkGuy

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    Default Re: Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

    No love for a Paladin 6/Champion 4/Sorcerer 10? I would figure the improved critical on the Champion would help for those nova smite bursts.

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    RogueGuy

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    Default Re: Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

    Quote Originally Posted by CaptAl View Post
    It's because Sorcerer gets Quicken spell which takes up your bonus action. PAM uses your bonus action as well. It's not that PAM is bad, but why whack a mole with the butt end of your stick when you can quicken a Booming Blade/GFB? It just adds more competition for action economy.
    Because the latter is another limited resource, of which you have many, as you note in the guide, and the former is something you can do all day? Having multiple options for bonus actions and reactions is how you optimize action economy. It's a feature, not a bug. We can both quicken booming blade; when we're not doing that, I can use my bonus action for an attack to which IDS applies.

    PAM isn't the best choice for all builds, but it's clearly as good a choice as the other options IMO.

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    Default Re: Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

    One question about Ability Scores: If given the choice of Standard Point Buy from the PHB or using the Standard Array (15/14/13/12/10/8) which would you take? I am sort of against having so many stats below 10 doing the triple 15 point buy methods you mention, at least up until Aura of Protection kicks in, which could take anywhere from 6-12 levels depending on how you level up.

    If you were starting a "Birthblade" at 1st level tommorow, would you do your Point Buy array of 15 8 15 8 8 15 (+Racial/Feat mods) or would you use the Standard Array?
    I Am A: Neutral Good Half-Orc Fighter/Barbarian (2nd/1st Level)

    Ability Scores:
    Strength-16
    Dexterity-16
    Constitution-17
    Intelligence-17
    Wisdom-16
    Charisma-13

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    Barbarian in the Playground
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    Default Re: Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

    Quote Originally Posted by deathadder99 View Post
    I'm just wondering why you rate PAM so low. I find it's generally the best choice for single class paladins, as you get the extra chance to smite. Is it merely because with Advantage, GWM maths out better and that you're ASI/Feat starved anyway?

    Otherwise it's a good and well thought out read.
    I would assume it's because your bonus action is spoken for by either a quickened spell or a quickened melee cantrip

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    Default Re: Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

    I'm going to have to read this again to digest it, but thanks for taking the time to write this.

    I'd love to see at least a mention of Paladin 12/sorcerer 8

    Sure it's different but its also absurdly strong
    Last edited by Spiritchaser; 2016-10-05 at 03:33 PM.

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    Default Re: Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

    Quote Originally Posted by Finieous View Post
    Because the latter is another limited resource, of which you have many, as you note in the guide, and the former is something you can do all day? Having multiple options for bonus actions and reactions is how you optimize action economy. It's a feature, not a bug. We can both quicken booming blade; when we're not doing that, I can use my bonus action for an attack to which IDS applies.

    PAM isn't the best choice for all builds, but it's clearly as good a choice as the other options IMO.
    Yes, these were my thoughts. I don't think it's to do with bonus action competition, Quicken is not something you'll do every round, and getting an extra attack in order to hit smites is fantastic. Maaaybe you can get away with saying you have far too much to do with your bonus action, with the Devotion channel divinity and/or if you dip 1 in Lock, then OK. Still, there aren't too many reactions you have access to unless you're an Oathbreaker (in which case PAM is probably superior to GWM), and you'll still be able to use the 1d4.

    My suspicion is that the -5/+10 works out as better damage with all things considered, but I'd like to hear Gastronomie's rationale for the black rating. Perhaps it's also to do with feat starvation. If you rolled godly stats, I can see a build with PAM, GWM, War Caster and Spell Sniper be utterly broken, but you'd never get that in a normal game as you'd need to have at least one or two 18s at character creation.

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    PaladinGuy

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    Default Re: Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

    Great Job! You clearly have been putting a great deal of effort into this for some time.

    I'm afraid you'll have to put me in the "Sorcadin" camp. I am sorry, but "Birthblade" really just doesn't work for me.

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    RogueGuy

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    Default Re: Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

    Quote Originally Posted by Mikey P View Post
    Great Job! You clearly have been putting a great deal of effort into this for some time.

    I'm afraid you'll have to put me in the "Sorcadin" camp. I am sorry, but "Birthblade" really just doesn't work for me.
    Agreed on all counts. As for the name: I'm not sure why it needs one, but "birthblade" sounds like some horrifying implement of medieval midwifery.

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    Default Re: Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

    Excellent guide, loved reading every second of it and was very well written and informative.

    Thoughts on subtle spell for utility?

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    PirateCaptain

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    Default Re: Unlimited Blade Works: The Guide to the Ultimate Paladin/Sorcerer Multiclass

    Awesome guide, and short of nthe devs giving us a genuine Gish class or home brewing something like Swordmage, this is probably as good as we'll get if you want the character most people assume they get with a "gish" (a sort of, "sword in one hand, spells in the other," damage stallion)

    Quote Originally Posted by Finieous View Post
    Agreed on all counts. As for the name: I'm not sure why it needs one, but "birthblade" sounds like some horrifying implement of medieval midwifery.
    Yeah, I had the same response to the name - kinda skeeved me. I do love Paladork though, since playing the class requires a lot more depth than most others (meaning you spend more time looking at books, optimizing math, reading this guide - NERRRRD) and because the Paladin is giving up his awesome "being a knight and rescuing damsels" to "go practice his witchcraft and wizardry - NERRRRD!!!"

    Maybe "Sword-Born" or "Spell-Sworn" would work better?
    Kinda interested into home-brewing this so that it "comes online" faster as a single class. Hmm...

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