Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 61 to 71 of 71
  1. - Top - End - #61
    Titan in the Playground
     
    MikelaC1's Avatar

    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Gender
    Female

    Default Re: Why haven't humans domesticated hyenas, lions, or banded mongeese?

    Quote Originally Posted by Blackhawk748 View Post
    they naturally did what we wanted them to do anyway
    Wait, you have cats that do what you want them to do?
    Everything happens for a reason. But sometimes the reason is that you are stupid and make bad decisions.

    Twitter: It's a small weapon, aimed indiscriminately at a viewership/readership that has mastered the art of over-reactive hyperventilation at the speed of light.


    Thanks to Ridai for the custom avatar

  2. - Top - End - #62
    Titan in the Playground
     
    Grey_Wolf_c's Avatar

    Join Date
    Aug 2007

    Default Re: Why haven't humans domesticated hyenas, lions, or banded mongeese?

    Quote Originally Posted by MikelaC1 View Post
    Wait, you have cats that do what you want them to do?
    I do. Admittedly, I don't expect much of them, but they come when I call, they use the sandbox, and both attack and cease to attack whatever pests/toys/furniture I indicate. As rewards, they get cuddles when they request them, good food and warm spots in the sun. It's a partnership.

    Grey Wolf
    Last edited by Grey_Wolf_c; 2017-06-29 at 10:11 AM.
    My Motto:
    Forum Motto:
    There is a world of imagination
    Deep in the corners of your mind
    Where reality is an intruder
    And myth and legend thrive
    Quote Originally Posted by The Giant & Yendor View Post
    GIANT IN THE PLAYGROUND: On a saner forum,
    there wouldn't have been such speculation.
    Interested in MitD? Join us in MitD's thread.
    Scientia est similis fluminis te capere non possunt in perpetuum
    (Knowledge, like a river, cannot be constrained forever)

  3. - Top - End - #63
    Troll in the Playground
     
    AMFV's Avatar

    Join Date
    Jul 2011

    Default Re: Why haven't humans domesticated hyenas, lions, or banded mongeese?

    Quote Originally Posted by MikelaC1 View Post
    Wait, you have cats that do what you want them to do?
    Good ones will kill mice. We just had to get rid of a bad one for that very reason.
    My Avatar is Glimtwizzle, a Gnomish Fighter/Illusionist by Cuthalion.

    Sorry for any typos just forearm my wrist and am using voice to text on my phone.

  4. - Top - End - #64
    Ogre in the Playground
     
    GreataxeFighterGuy

    Join Date
    Mar 2008

    Default Re: Why haven't humans domesticated hyenas, lions, or banded mongeese?

    Quote Originally Posted by Honest Tiefling View Post
    There is also the issue that I think wolves are far less likely to prey on human children then lions, through I am not 100% sure of that fact. This explains why I don't think many would want a lion around...
    OTOH, unusual for such a large carnivore, cheetahs are apparently very easy to tame, and are good around children from what I've read. There seem to have been several attempts to domesticate them, going back to the ancient Egyptians, but the attempts have always failed because they are simply hard to breed in captivity.

  5. - Top - End - #65
    Firbolg in the Playground
     
    Blackhawk748's Avatar

    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Tharggy, on Tellene
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Why haven't humans domesticated hyenas, lions, or banded mongeese?

    Quote Originally Posted by MikelaC1 View Post
    Wait, you have cats that do what you want them to do?
    If by "do what you want" means eat rats in the barn, then yes.
    Quote Originally Posted by Guigarci View Post
    "Mr. Aochev, tear down this wall!" Ro'n Ad-Ri'Gan, Bard
    Scottish Samurai done by Professor Gnoll, My Spell, My Weapon, Im a God

    My Post Apocalyptic Alternate Timeline setting: Amerhikan Wasteland

  6. - Top - End - #66
    Ogre in the Playground
     
    Grytorm's Avatar

    Join Date
    Jun 2010

    Default Re: Why haven't humans domesticated hyenas, lions, or banded mongeese?

    Quote Originally Posted by AMFV View Post
    Good ones will kill mice. We just had to get rid of a bad one for that very reason.
    So, was it breeding mice or something? Trying to domesticate them?

  7. - Top - End - #67
    Troll in the Playground
     
    AMFV's Avatar

    Join Date
    Jul 2011

    Default Re: Why haven't humans domesticated hyenas, lions, or banded mongeese?

    Quote Originally Posted by Grytorm View Post
    So, was it breeding mice or something? Trying to domesticate them?
    Mostly not killing them, and also contracting mites and refusing to eat non-expensive food. To be fair breeding or domesticating would probably be worse, although theoretically domesticating could result in mice that don't spread disease or destroy food.
    My Avatar is Glimtwizzle, a Gnomish Fighter/Illusionist by Cuthalion.

    Sorry for any typos just forearm my wrist and am using voice to text on my phone.

  8. - Top - End - #68
    Ogre in the Playground
     
    Grytorm's Avatar

    Join Date
    Jun 2010

    Default Re: Why haven't humans domesticated hyenas, lions, or banded mongeese?

    I mean, it depends on whether the mice were molded to the needs of humans or the needs of cats.

  9. - Top - End - #69
    Barbarian in the Playground
     
    NinjaGirl

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Birmingham, UK
    Gender
    Female

    Default Re: Why haven't humans domesticated hyenas, lions, or banded mongeese?

    Quote Originally Posted by Metahuman1 View Post
    The question I'd be mildly interested in is, why don't we try doing it now? Several of these species are heavily endangered, this might be a way to help keep them from going completely to extinction.
    I guess the problem is that once you've domesticated, you've got yourself a subspecies that's sufficiently far from the original that you haven't actually conserved the original, and maybe it doesn't fill that ecological niche anymore. Like if the red junglefowl (gallus gallus) ever went extinct*, the world's broiler and battery chickens (g. g. domesticus) wouldn't be a substitute. Like, the basic species would go on, yes. But it would look different, and behave differently, and live somewhere else, at which point you're not actually conserving much. Maybe the game breeds, bred for more wild-type characteristics and reintroduced to the wild, would do better. (But then you're stuck with the problem that a lot of extinction is due to habitat loss so... where are you reintroducing them to?) Ditto interbreeding with the domestic cat (felis silvestris catus) is considered a threat to European wildcat (f. s. silvestris) conservation, not a means to it.

    *Unlikely, it's down as 'least concern', but just picking an example

    Quote Originally Posted by MikelaC1 View Post
    Wait, you have cats that do what you want them to do?
    Well, even the most stroppy cat is sufficiently domesticated to live with humans. I mean, we see them, ever; if they weren't socialising with us to some degree, they'd be nocturnal and successfully hiding from us. They communicate with us via noises, since we lack most of the bits for cat body language and spraying/rubbing pheromones on stuff. Some of them, depending on tameness, will even cling to us when they're hurt or vulnerable, even though we're (usually) the local top predators and going near one of them in a weakened state is a really stupid thing for a wild animal to do.
    Last edited by Juggling Goth; 2017-07-01 at 02:49 AM.

  10. - Top - End - #70
    Ogre in the Playground
     
    GreataxeFighterGuy

    Join Date
    Mar 2008

    Default Re: Why haven't humans domesticated hyenas, lions, or banded mongeese?

    Quote Originally Posted by MikelaC1 View Post
    Wait, you have cats that do what you want them to do?
    Our cats listen better than our dog. Not that that's saying much; they're all too spoiled.

  11. - Top - End - #71
    Dwarf in the Playground
     
    tantric's Avatar

    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    near athens, ga

    Default Re: Why haven't humans domesticated hyenas, lions, or banded mongeese?

    some notes:

    you are wrong about minks - this guy has found a way to utterly tame them at the Minkenry. minks are VERY tamable and even affectionate. they can be used to hunt, even kill and retrieve fish. it is commonly thought that aggression is link to coat color black minks are meaner. oh, and unlike ferrets, minks have NO SMELL.

    skunks are long time domesticates. they were kept as pets by native americans then by farmers. today pet skunks come in colors like champagne and lavender.

    ringtails are 'wannabe domesticates'. The ringtail is said to be easily tamed, and can make an affectionate pet and effective mouser. Miners and settlers once kept pet ringtails to keep their cabins free of vermin; hence, the common name of "miner's cat" (though in fact the ringtail is no more a cat than it is civet).[13] The ringtails would move into the miners' and settlers' encampments and become accepted by humans in much the same way that some early domestic cats were theorized to have done. At least one biologist in Oregon[who?] has joked that the ringtail is one of two species the domestic cat and the ringtail that thus "domesticated humans" due to that pattern of behavior.

    flying squirrels are also wannabes. they naturally form intense bonds with their owners, as easy to feed and house.

    ungulates: the common eland has long been domesticated.

    Their milk is comparatively richer in proteins and milkfat than dairy cows, which may be an explanation for the quick growth of eland calves.[25][31] Eland's milk has about triple the fat content and twice the protein of a dairy cow's milk.[41] Its docility and profitable characteristics have made it a target of domestication in Africa and Russia and has also resulted in hunting.[21][32]

    Many people prefer to tame and raise eland rather than cattle due to their numerous benefits. Elands can survive on scarce water, which is a great advantage over domestic cattle. They can also eat coarse grasses, and can even manage to ingest some poisonous plants that can prove fatal for cattle. They are also immune to some diseases to which cattle may succumb.[31]
    fallow deer are true domesticates, despite their near extinction in captivity. this began in 9th century phonecia.

    otters have been domesticated. once world wide, now only in bangladesh. there otter fishing is a tradition, passed down threw family who breed the otters and train them.

    mongoose are peridomesticates - for the most part, they share space with humans while killing rats, snakes and croc eggs, which endured them much to the eqpyians. they are not uncommon pets in india. they have not, however been changed genetically by captive breeding.

    binturongs have long been kept by the oran asli peoples in indonesia. they are also instant pets-
    "Binturongs are affectionate and follow their owners around like dogs," says Stephens. "They love to have their owners feed them bananas and other favorite foods by hand. They will sniff people, and especially their hair, for as long as you'll let them. They'll crawl all over you if you sit still. The female is the boss. You can't keep males and females together or the males will kill the babies."
    Baby females sell for $2,500; males for $1,800 to $2,000. Both males and females are worth more if they're hand raised.
    many new species of rodent have been domesticated in the last 1000. first house mice and norweigen rats, then guinea pigs (which should remain food animals). now golden/syrian hamster, mongolian gerbils, dwarf hamsters - siberian, roborovski's, campbells, persian jirds, chinchillas, egyptian spiny mouse, striped grass mouse, white footed mouse, deer mouse and the weirdly named multimammate mouse. but dammit, no grasshopper mice, the ones that eat scorpion and centipede and howl at the moon like wolves.

    african pygmy hedgehogs are de facto domesticates as they don't exist in the wild (they are a hybrid of two wild species). they also come in happy colors.

    short tailed opossums have cohabited with humans for ages, but are now true domesticates, pets and lab animals. sugar gliders, Australia's flying squirrel are also domesticated.

    cheetahs, despite making excellent pets (they are no danger whatsoever to humans) were never domesticated because they don't breed in captivity. now techniques have been developed for artificial insemination. there are only 15,000 wild cheetahs and 1,400 captives. cheetahs need to be domesticated to survive as a species.

    a program to breed domestic indian elephants is also needed. it has been tried because they live so long and take so long to mature. tame elephants are captured from the wild and become astonishingly useful larborers.

    keep in mind that there are hundreds of species of FW tropical fish that are true domesticated and now some SW fish are being bred. there are also huge coral farms far from the ocean, growing all kinds of inverts.

    and the hundreds of species of parrot that have been captive bred for generations - and finches, i ****ing hate finches.
    Last edited by tantric; 2017-07-01 at 09:30 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •