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  1. - Top - End - #1
    Ogre in the Playground
     
    Planetar

    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Perth, West Australia
    Gender
    Male

    Default Kingmaker in the Forgotten Realms [OOC thread]

    Character Name Player Name Race and Class Link to Character Sheet
    Korlann Zehk BluesEclipse Skarn Monk 3 Link
    Dergosh the Loud Mercurion 2 Half-Orc Cleric of Gruumsh 3 Link
    Three of Three almondsAndRain Warforged Artificer 3 Link
    "Armsmaster" Kuros bcool999 Obah-Blessed Silverbrow Human Fighter 3 Link
    Akara jdizzlean Half-Fey Illumian Warmage 3 Link
    Ruk Zombulian Desert Dragonwrought Kobold Trickster Spellthief 2/Sha'ir 1 Link


    For reference, the IC thread can be found here.

    For further reference, almondsAndRain's campaign blog and notes can be found here.

    Welcome to the Kingmaker in the Forgotten Realms OOC thread! Feel free to post more or less whatever you like, whenever you like about the campaign in this thread.



    Each hex represents an area roughly 12 miles across. Hexes that are shaded are regions you haven’t explored yet. The map will be updated over time to track the regions explored and with the odd text note as appropriate.

    As you explore the Greenbelt, your characters are expected to keep track of what you find in order to keep Emmerock informed of the strong and weak points of defense and determine possible sites for roads, towns, and other fortifications. (This aspect doesn’t have to be RPed out, though if your characters do want to talk about these issues they certainly can.)

    You can certainly travel through these dark-shaded areas (or anywhere else). You don’t have to explore an area before venturing into it.

    How Overland Travelling Works
    Spoiler
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    As said, each hex represents an area roughly 12 miles across. Usually you’ll be travelling from at least one hex to another depending on where you want to go. When you're exploring, you're generally going to be within one hex.

    For the purposes of overland travel, the default is that you can cross 2 hexes in a full day’s travel, regardless of whether the party’s on horseback or not, regardless of the terrain. While horses help you move faster and maybe have more carrying capacity, because you’re in trackless wilderness you still have to be careful so the poor old horse doesn’t stick its leg in a hole and wind up ready for the glue factory. Think of it as similar to why despite an Enlarge Person spell your movement rate doesn’t change ;)

    When you travel from one place to another, your group gets to pick a travel pace for the day: fast, normal, or slow. Each has benefits and drawbacks as follows:

    FAST:
    o The party gains 1.5 days on the route. (i.e. you cross 3 hexes)
    o The party can’t forage for food at all on the way.
    o The party takes -4 penalty on all checks to perceive dangers and on navigation checks.
    o Hostile creatures get +4 on checks to detect or track the party.

    NORMAL:
    o The party gains 1 day on the route. (i.e. they cross 2 hexes)
    o The party can forage for food on the way, but at a -4 penalty.

    SLOW:
    o The party gain 0.5 days on the route. (i.e. they cross 1 hex)
    o The party can forage for food normally.
    o The party gets +4 to all checks to perceive dangers and on navigation checks.
    o Hostile creatures get -4 on checks to detect or track the party

    As for foraging and navigation and how they work:

    Foraging:
    At the end of a day of travel, everyone rolls a Survival check against the Resources DC of the hex:
    5: Coastal or urban areas
    10: Forests or hilly regions
    15: Grasslands, swamps, open sea, and underwater
    20: Arctic tundras, mountains, or the underdark
    25: Deserts, and most planar locations

    If a character fails their check, the player marks off one use of their rations. If the players have no food, they can survive (3 days + their Con mod) travel days without food, or twice that if they decide to spread their food thin. After that time runs out, they start taking starvation.

    If at least one player succeeds on their foraging roll, all players obtain water and can refill their waterskins. If a player has no water or are starving, they become fatigued (-2 STR, DEX, can’t run or charge.) and start taking nonlethal damage. They remain fatigued until they find water, no matter how much they rest.

    Navigation:
    Each day, whoever has the best perception check, or someone with a good navigation ability (i.e. survival), makes a navigation roll. This is against the Navigation DC of the terrain they’re passing through on that day, which is checked in secret. Failing a navigation roll means the party is off target from its destination, i.e. got lost at some point, whether in a totally wrong direction or just a few degrees off course (which can still mean you're miles off course).

    Of course, you might be able to realize you're lost before the navigator passes a roll.

    - If there is a major landmark, like a river, that your character is aware of, you might run into it and realize you’re going the wrong direction.
    - If your days spent travelling exceed the planned days of the route, you’ll certainly figure out you’re lost. For example, if you're expecting to reach a location in three days given the pace you set but the journey stretches into four for no reason, you would immediately deduce that you're off target if not outright lost.

    Once you know you’re lost, you have three options:

    - Pick a direction and travel that way until you hit a landmark (river, edge of forest, etc)
    - Find high ground and try to locate a landmark you can orient yourself by
    - Backtrack until you hit a landmark you know.
    No matter what option you choose, it’s treated as a new journey.

    In summary: every day spent travelling, you all roll a forage check and at the end of the day your navigator rolls a navigation check. This determines whether you’re on course for the destination you're going to and whether you get fed that day.

    Wait, what about wandering monsters and other encounters?
    Encounters may well occur even if you're totally on course. Your choice of route to the destination – and there are always more ways than one to get somewhere – may affect the frequency, and depending on where you want to go and how fast, you might choose to accept the risks of such a journey. And of course the pace you move at will have an effect on your capacity to meet those encounters as they arise (if they are combat encounters at all.)



    How Exploring Works
    Spoiler
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    Or, how the meat of your charter actually works. There’s a difference between just travelling through a hex and exploring it for the purposes of the charter, which chiefly relates to the amount of time you spend in the hex. Travelling through as opposed to exploring an area also has implications for sites or landmarks you might or might not find as you go through; if you’re exploring an area the odds of you coming across some long-forgotten ruin or site obviously heavily increase.

    The time it takes you to explore a hex depends on your party’s overall movement speed.

    Exploring time (Time to fully explore 1 hex)

    Party Speed Plains Forest or Hills Mountains or Swamp
    15 feet 3 days 4 days 5 days
    20 feet 2 days 3 days 4 days
    30 feet 1 days 2 days 3 days
    40 feet 1 days 1 days 2 days
    50 feet 1 days 1 days 1 days

    So in theory if you were feeling brave you could split the party and explore more than 1 hex at a time depending on the movement speeds of the people you send out to each hex.

    That said, exploring does amount to overland travel within the rules, i.e. it may still draw down encounters, it may still cost you food, and you might become lost. You can still pick your pace at the start of the day - fast, normal, or slow, but the time isn't expressed in hexes crossed, it's just the number of days you progress towards the required period to fully explore the hex:
    - Slow pace means you've done 0.5 days' worth of exploration on that day.
    - Normal pace means you've done 1 day's worth of exploration on that day.
    - Fast pace means you've done 1.5 days' worth of exploration on that day.

    For example, if the table indicates that it'll take your party 3 days to fully explore a hex, then using a fast pace for two days you could finish it in those two, but your navigation checks would be at -4, you wouldn't be foraging for food any of the time, and any monsters in the region would have a better chance (+4) at detecting or tracking you.

    Getting lost (ie a failed Navigation check) doesn't mean you have to restart the exploration. The time spent exploring after you got lost is wasted, and you have to find your way back to where you strayed off course before exploration can start again. This may be greater or lesser depending on how many times the Navigation check is failed before you realise you're off course. The only upside to it is that, because you were exploring when you went off course, you've made enough notes of your position that getting back to where you went off course is at the minimum Navigation DC; even if you've mapped the wrong area, it at least helps a lot to get you back to where you were.

    Here’s the effects that fully exploring one hex has:

    (1) It nets you XP on completion – 25 XP each, to be exact. That’s irrespective of anything else that happens inside the hex.

    (2) The DCs for navigating and foraging for food in the hex drops to the minimum if you travel through that hex again – for someone like Kuros with a Survival check at +9, it becomes pretty much automatic success. Once fully explored, you are fully familiar with the landmarks in the region and with any number of water sources and food sources.

    (3) The wandering monster chance drops to a minimum since you become pretty familiar with the creatures that haunt the region and how to avoid them. It doesn't remove it entirely - you may always run into someone or something out there, it's still the wilderness even if you know how to wrestle it better.

    (4) The hex is potentially claimable for your kingdom. But more about that much later.



    Current House Rules:

    (1) Charging isn’t a full round action. It’s a standard action which can be performed before or after a move action, i.e. you move up to your distance allowance and make a single melee attack. This allows you to “skirmish” in that you could charge in, strike, and then shift backward up to your movement distance, albeit you still take an attack of opportunity when you move out of a threatened square. This allows you to at least shift out of the way of an inconvenient rock or something during your charge. (For charge-dependent stuff such as Tome of Battle allows, we just figure it out as we go.)


    (2) Movement diagonally is just 5 feet of movement, not 7.5 feet, no Pythagoras needed.


    (3) Most monsters act on the same initiative count rather than independent initiative scores for each one on the field. This has pros and cons which I see as follows: on one hand, it does mean you are always fighting a coordinated opponent that acts as one, but on the other hand it’ll invariably mean you have the advantage of acting before and after all your opposition does.


    (4) The SRD item creation feats are condensed down to three feats:

    • Create Expendable Magic Item: replaces Brew Potion and Scribe Scroll, available from level 1
    • Create Charged Magic Item: replaces Create Staff, Create Wand etc., available from level 3
    • Create Permanent Magic Item: replaces Forge Ring, Create Rod, Craft Magic Arms and Armor, Create Wondrous Item, available from level 5.



    (5) My Casterless Magic Item Creation homebrew is in effect alongside the normal Magic Item creation rules. Link to the rules can also be found in my sig.


    (6) Training off proficiency penalties for Exotic Weapons: It costs you 20 days of downtime, again at a cost of 200 gp, to knock 2 off in the nonproficiency penalty for using an exotic weapon. Again the days of downtime don't have to be spent all at once, but you have to spend at least 5 days in a block. The 200 gp also doesn't have to be paid all at once or upfront, but must be paid before you can take the benefit of the decreased nonproficiency penalty for using such a weapon. Thus, to fully take off the -4 for using a harpoon, it would take you 40 days of downtime and a total of 400 gp, paid off in a maximum of 8 weeks since you have to spend at least 5 days at a stretch training and drilling with the weapon. In the case of weapons specifically adapted for your race or class -- some exotic monk weapons for monks, or for example the elven shortblade for elves -- the time and gold costs are halved, though you still must spend at least 5 days in a block in days of downtime. Training off a nonproficiency in this manner does not mean you gain Exotic Weapon Proficiency in that weapon as a feat or otherwise can use your proficiency as qualifying for a PrC that needs it; these are simply workarounds to stop you sucking with an interesting weapon you carry.


    (7) Certain creatures of Large size or above may have the quality of Multipart Monstrosity:
    Multipart Monstrosity: [Monster] has one or more body parts, each of which has its own pool of hit points. When a creature makes a melee or ranged attack against [[monster]], that creature may choose to target a specific body part by suffering disadvantage on the attack roll. When a body part suffers damage, [[monster]] suffers the same amount of damage. Conditions and effects inflicted on the body part apply to the whole creature unless the body part is immune to such conditions. When a body part is reduced to 0 hit points, that body part is destroyed. If [[monster]] receives any healing, it may choose to heal one of its body parts by the same amount provided that body part has not been destroyed.

    The body part has all of the traits and statistics of [[monster]] except where noted.

    Certain traits, statistics, and actions are keyed to certain body parts. If a body part is destroyed, [[creature]] no longer has access to those traits, statistics, or actions.

    "Disadvantage on the attack roll" is drawn from 5E, and means this: when you roll your attack roll, you roll 2d20 instead of 1, and without exception use the lower result as the foundation for your attack roll otherwise.

    (8) The I Know A Guy houserule is in effect.


    (9) Characters may resort to Inspiration as follows:

    Spoiler
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    Inspiring Better Roleplaying: Inspiration for D&D 3.5/Pathfinder

    This homebrew is a knockoff of two things:
    (1) 5th edition’s Inspiration rules
    (2) The Angry DM’s hack on 5th edition’s Inspiration rules for stories with Character Arcs.

    People do things better when they’re inspired. Inspiration radiates from doing things that are deeply important to us, or seem deeply important to us, and inspiration motivates us to do things better. Conversely, our flaws and shortcomings, deeply held, operate to affect us to make things worse. And as the adventure goes on, as we confront our shortcomings more and more, we learn to overcome them, especially at moments of high crisis in the story. It gets easier for us to act on our inspirations, on those things that are most important to us.


    In game terms, players pick 5 personal characteristics, one from each of the following categories: two Personality Quirks, an Ideal, a Bond, and a Shortcoming (most players have already chosen these characteristics.)

    How Inspiration works:
    If you have Inspiration, you can spend it at any time to take an Inspired Action to do something -- provided that action somehow ties into one of your character’s personal characteristics. That Inspired Action then gives you a bonus on that action.

    For example, if your Ideal is “I will do anything to save a person in danger,” and you want to swing across a ravine on a vine to rescue someone who is about fall into the ravine and hanging by one hand, that fits. You can claim an Inspired Action.

    When a character tries to do pretty much anything in the game, when they think it aligns with one of their traits, they can claim an Inspired Action. They can say “hey, this aligns with me on a deeply personal level because of my Ideal, Quirk, Bond, or Shortcoming, give me a bonus.” And they get advantage on the die roll. Or impose disadvantage on a saving throw. (Advantage and disadvantage means: instead of rolling one die, roll two, and pick the higher number if you have advantage, or pick the lower number if you have disadvantage.)

    Or players might get some other bonus depending on the situation if a die roll isn’t involved, which the DM adjudicates. The DM might permit the ability to spend a Hit Die to heal right in the middle of battle. Or add some value to the item the character Appraises, irrespective of the skill check. Whatever. If you claim an Inspired Action, if the DM agrees it ties in to your character at a deeply personal level, you get a bonus on the action. The closest analogue is Eberron's system of Action Points, though it need not be restricted to that system.

    The Inspiration is then considered expended and gone.


    How to regain Inspiration
    When they don’t have Inspiration, the character is at a low point. They are not as driven. They’ve lost some sense of control over themselves and the world. Big actions and big decisions take their toll, mentally and emotionally. And that’s when they are prone to give in to their flaws. Or suffer setbacks from their personality traits.

    Whenever they want to, a character can claim a Setback when they feel one of their traits – especially their Shortcoming – might cause them problems.

    Either way, the Setback might be a disadvantage on a die roll or grant advantage on an opponent’s saving throw, or it might impose some other penalty depending on the DM’s adjudication. For example, if your character spends an entire night drinking, he might be exhausted the next day from the hangover.

    Claiming a Setback gives your character Inspiration. Because giving in to our shortcomings and weaknesses and bad habits is, in some sense, a coping mechanism that enables us to take control again.

    Note here that the easiest way to claim Setbacks is via Shortcomings, but it’s not the only way. Quirks, Bonds, and Ideals can all be used to claim Setbacks. A character’s Ideal might well get them into trouble. In Civil War, Steve Rogers’ ideals – when he sees a situation headed south, he can’t ignore it – directly push him into fistfights with the other Avengers and eventually make him an outlaw. Conversely, Tony Stark’s ideals – that superpowered people need to be put in check – wind up getting him into fistfights with a man he had called his friend … as well as indirectly getting one of his other close friends paralysed from the waist down.

    When you want to claim a Setback, simply ask the DM. For example: “I’m easily distracted by shiny objects, so I’m distracted by the giant pile of treasure. Can I claim a Setback and take disadvantage on my saving throw against the dragon’s fire breath?” Or: “This guy wants to help us, but I distrust all strangers. I’m going to be rude and accusatory of him. Can I Claim a Setback for that?” And then the DM might have the stranger refuse to help or get offended or start a fight. Whatever.

    After you claim a Setback, you get Inspiration again. You can use the Inspiration to take an Inspired Action. And so the cycle begins again.


    Alternate ways Inspiration is regained
    Claiming a Setback is the only way to regain Inspiration – bar two. The first way to regain Inspiration is to accomplish a major victory. That is, when characters complete a major milestone in an adventure – once that happens, they gain Inspiration if they didn’t already have it.

    The other way is for a character to overcome their Shortcoming permanently. When you get down to it, a character who has overcome their Shortcoming is really in control of themselves. They know who they are, and they can impose their will on the world. They shouldn’t be subject to the whims of Inspiration. They should never have to claim a Setback. In short, they are just ALWAYS Inspired. Once a character has Overcome their Shortcoming, they regain Inspiration after every short rest of about an hour or so, and certainly after every long rest.

    So, how does a player Overcome their Shortcoming? I mean, if players are in control of how they play, why don’t they just say, “okay, I’ve given up the booze, give me Permanent Inspiration!” Yeah. It isn’t that easy. If they had that level of self-mastery, they wouldn’t HAVE a flaw, would they?

    This mechanic only comes into play at a particular place in the story. Usually, it shows up in the gearing up for the third act -- the place where the story starts making some climax-like noises. In a long-running campaign, it’d come a few sessions or adventures from the last adventure.

    Once it’s time for characters to start “mastering themselves,” the DM takes their shortcomings and writes them into the heart of an adventure, or at least a story arc inside an adventure. The DM has to make the player confront the shortcoming head-on in some sort of significant way. Or create a major loss as a result of the shortcoming. Either way, it has to be something that makes the character wake up.

    Whatever happens, whether it’s a crushing defeat and loss that forces the character to turn their life around or whether it’s a heroic moment where they leave the shortcoming behind and do what has to be done, it’ll be resolved when all is said and done. The character’s choices control whether it is a positive transformative experience or a negative transformative experience, whether they become a shining beacon of hope and optimism or a grim and brooding person making up for a lesson they learned too late, but the transformation happens.

    The story structure – the GM – decides when it’s time to transform. The player decides – by reacting to what actually happens – how that transformation happens.



    A few bits and pieces about my GMing style:
    (1) I cutscene, with people's consent.

    (2) I tend to supply applicable information from Knowledge rolls without prompting and maybe speculate on the source of knowledge (for example, a sorcerer knows an obscure little sentence in Draconic because he saw it in a book his master forced him to read one summer) as part of the update. You can of course always ask for a Knowledge check, but hopefully this might reduce the need for the whole “Hey! That, um, thing that looks entirely like a hobgoblin and which is at CR for us, does my guy know it’s a hobgoblin?” process that can sometimes crop up. Again, if any problems with this please let me know.

  2. - Top - End - #2
    Ogre in the Playground
     
    Planetar

    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Perth, West Australia
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Kingmaker in the Forgotten Realms [OOC thread]

    Some extra presents for your characters!

    First, you all get a free regional feat. Regional feats are a Forgotten Realms specific feat that basically says “To make yourself slightly more interesting, here’s something for having your character come from Land X.” A full list of regional feats can be found, uh, on that site that shall not be named.

    In addition, if you wish and it fits your character, you can also take a free trait from the list below. These are specific to Kingmaker and arise out of Pathfinder -- I’ve adapted them to the setting – and they may or may not be of interest.

    Spoiler: The traits
    Show

    Bastard (limited to human characters):
    Spoiler
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    One of your parents was a member of one of the great families of Emmerock, perhaps even of the line of Esbolder himself. Yet you have no substantive proof of your nobility, and you’velearned that claiming nobility without evidence makes you as good as a liar. While you might own a piece of jewellery, a scrap of once-rich fabric, or an aged confession of love, none of this directly supports your claim. Thus, you’ve lived your life in the shadow of nobility, knowing that you deserve the comforts and esteem of the elite, even though the contempt of fate brings you nothing but their scorn. Whether a recent attempt to prove your heritage has brought down the wrath of a noble family’s henchmen or you merely seek to prove the worth of the blood in your veins, you’ve joined an expedition into the Stolen Lands, hoping to make a name all your own.

    Benefit: You take a –1 penalty on all Charisma-based skill checks made when dealing with members of Emmeryn nobility but gain a +1 trait bonus on Will saves as a result of your stubbornness and individuality. (The penalty aspect of this trait is removed if you ever manage to establish yourself as a true noble.)


    Brigand:
    Spoiler
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    You hail from Thuntar or the more lawless reaches of Emmerock. Life has been hard for you. Perhaps your parents and siblings were crooks and
    con artists, or maybe your rough, lonely life lead you to fall in with thieves and worse. You know how to ambush travelers, bully traders, avoid the law, and camp where no one might find you. Recently, you’ve run into some trouble, either with the law or with other bandits, and you’re looking to get away to somewhere no one would ever think to look for you. An expedition into the rugged wilderness seems like a perfect way to lie low until the trouble blows over.

    Benefit: You begin the campaign with an extra 100 gp in ill-gotten gains. You also gain a +1 trait bonus on Bluff, Diplomacy, Intimidate, and Sense Motive checks when dealing with brigands, thieves, bandits, and
    their ilk.


    High Emmeryn:
    Spoiler
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    You were raised in High Emmerock, a land of misty shores and harsh hill lands, of snowy vistas and violet-hued mountains. You are descended from an able and intelligent people, and you have grand ambitions, a mind alert for opportunity, and the tenacity to fight for your goals no matter the challenge. You care for little more than achieving your aspirations and opportunities to win wealthy and grandeur, for which few costs prove too great. You see yourself as a citizen of Emmerock through and through. The call for champions willing to help take back your country’s rightful holdings in the Stolen Lands has inflamed your dreams of profit and possibilities, so you have joined an expedition to quest south.

    Benefit: Your agile mind grants you a +1 trait bonus on all Will saves made to resist mind-affecting effects.


    Noble Born:
    Spoiler
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    You claim a tangential but legitimate connection to one of the Lords of the Lances' noble families. If you aren’t human, you were likely adopted by one of Emmerock’s nobles or were instead a favored servant or even a childhood friend of a noble scion. Whatever the cause, you’ve had a comfortable life, but one far from the dignity and decadence your distant cousins know. Although you are associated with an esteemed name, your immediate family is hardly well to do, and you’ve found your name to be more of a burden to you than a boon in many social situations. You’ve recently decided to test yourself, to see if you can face the world without the aegis of a name you have little real claim or care for. An expedition into the storied Stolen Lands seems like just the test to see if you really are worth the title “noble.” Choose one of the following noble families
    and associated benefits.

    Margan: Your family’s long association with the gold dwarves of the Icerime Peaks has left its mark. You ignore the movement penalty for the first 5 feet of rocky difficult terrain you move through per round. This applies only to terrain made difficult by rocks or ruins. In addition, you gain a +2 trait bonus on Appraise checks to assess the value of natural stones or metals. Your family motto is “Strong as the Mountains.”

    Brethok: Your family’s history of trading between Themasulter and the inland pervades your blood. As a deft merchant of the region, you gain a bonus language: Dwarven, Elven, Hallit, Gnome, Giant, Halfling, Skald, or Sylvan. Your family motto is “Success through Grace.”

    Marounal: Your family has made a living off the coasts of the Lake of Steam since before Emmerock existed. You gain a +1 trait bonus on Swim checks, and Swim is always treated as a class skill for you. Your family motto is “The Waters, Our Fields.”

    Phondipar: Your family has long a deep respect for the wilderness and is superstitious about the creatures that dwell therein. You gain a +2 trait bonus on all Diplomacy checks made to deal with fey creatures and a +1 trait bonus on Will saves made against their spells and supernatural abilities. Your family motto is “Endurance Overcomes All.”

    Teldoak: Your family has a reputation for avoiding conflicts. You gain a +1 trait bonus on your Initiative. In addition, choose Acrobatics, Diplomacy, or Stealth—you gain a +1 trait bonus on this skill. Your family motto is
    “High Above.”

    Sandras: Your family is well known for their political agility and scheming natures. You deal +2 damage when attacking a flat-footed opponent while wielding a light or one-handed weapon. Your family motto is “Ours is the Right.”


    Pioneer:
    Spoiler
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    You have long lived along the southern border of Low Emmerock, in the shadow of wilderness known as the Stolen Lands. Life has been hard, but through hunting, trapping, trading, and coaxing crops from the freezing earth, you’ve learned how to survive on the rugged frontier. With the wilderness ever at your door, you’ve also learned much about its denizens and the wild creatures that lurk in that unwholesome land. Your family might even claim holdings in the Stolen Lands, with elders telling stories of being driven from or robbed of a lost ancestral homestead, fertile farmlands, bountiful orchards, or a hidden mining claim. Whether because of your personal expertise and familiarity with the borderlands or in order to reclaim your family’s land, you’ve joined the expedition into the Stolen Lands.

    Benefit: You begin play with a horse. Also, choose one of the following skills: Climb, Handle Animal, Knowledge (nature), Perception, Ride, Survival, or Swim—you gain a +1 trait bonus on this skill.


    Low Emmryn:
    Spoiler
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    You were raised in the south of Emmerock, a land of dense forests and rolling plains, of crystalline rivers and endless sapphire skies. You come from hearty stock and were raised with simple sensibilities of hard work winning well-deserved gains, the importance of charity and compassion, and the value of personal and familial honor. Yours is the country of the plainsman loyalists and the heroes who refused to bend before the armies of Nothlan the Usurper. You care little for matters of politics and nobles or of deception and schemes. As you are thoroughly Emmeryn, the call for champions willing to expand your land’s influence into the Stolen Lands has inflamed your sense of patriotism and honor, and so you have joined an expedition to quest southward.

    Benefit: Your hardy nature grants you a +1 trait bonus on all Fortitude saves.


    Sword Scion:
    Spoiler
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    You have lived all your life in and around
    the city of Dunbridges, growing up on tales of Emmerock the Goblinbane and the exploits of your home city’s heroic and legendary Hammers of Helm. Perhaps one of your family members was a Hammer of Helm, you have a contact among their members, or you have dreamed since childhood of joining. Regardless, you idolize the heroes, styles, and philosophies of the and have sought to mimic their vaunted art. Before you can petition to join their ranks, however, you feel that you must test your mettle. Joining an expedition into the Stolen Lands seems like a perfect way to improve your skills and begin a legend comparable to that of Emmerock the Goblinbane.

    Benefit: You begin play with a longsword or rapier and gain a +1 trait bonus on all attacks and combat maneuvers made with such weapons.


    Some context: the background and history of Emmerock

    The Origin of Emmerock:
    Spoiler
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    High Emmerock is, as its name suggests, a region of high, grassy meadows suited for grazing livestock. One of the more prosperous Border Kingdoms, it is unusually verdant. (A property born of magical causes, some locals believe. That belief has persisted, it should be noted, down many centuries.) As a result, it has always provided ample grazing, and so has teemed with wild beasts.

    After the dragons that ruled it perished battling each other, the lesser beasts they fed upon flourished. Giants moved in to rule and defend this gigantic "food pen" against goblins, orcs, and other predators.

    Under their husbandry, the edible grazing animals grew even more numerous. Some three centuries ago, Calishim adventurers came exploring. Finding wild horses of superb quality in the high meadows, the humans set about exterminating the giants.

    From that time on, the Sward (as those first Calishim explorers called the meadows) has served certain Calishim horse-dealers as a secret breeding ground. Both to camouflage their best stock and to use every inch of grazing land, the breeders hunted down as many predators as they could and put in their place horned cattle, sheep, and goats. These swiftly multiplied, and their increasing numbers led to a proliferation of rustlers, monsters -- and mercenary guards hired by the distant Calishim stock-owners to deal with both sorts of raiders.


    Middle history of Emmerock:
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    The loyalty of such hirelings in turn became a problem. After several minor defiances, there came outright rebellion -- the leader of the Unsleeping Eye Guardians, the warrior Ithkyl Halgart, decided to declare the Sward his own kingdom.

    Halgart, an experienced and well-prepared warrior who employed pitfall traps, retreats into the nearby woods (and, some say, mysterious magical aid) to advantage, won a series of bitter battles with forces sent by Calishim satraps who disagreed with the notion of paying for beasts that they considered their own. The armies came in earnest for three seasons and were followed by sporadic expeditions of hired mages and renowned adventuring bands in the decade that followed -- but Halgart prevailed.

    His end came after seventeen summers of ruling his realm from a cave stronghold (today a monster-haunted labyrinth of chambers and natural caverns known as "the Ghostways"). A rapacious blue dragon descended on the realm, dining at will on the Sward's best horseflesh.

    The Lord of the Sward rode out to do battle with it and was torn limb from limb for his troubles. The wyrm died under repeated volleys of fire arrows at the hands of Halgart's men and was cooked and eaten at the Lord's funeral feast.

    After the Lord's death, the watching Calishim expected the fledgling realm to fall apart in the inevitable struggle for the throne among Halgart's underlings. But a warrior named Maeradyn swiftly and ruthlessly took power, and the Sward survived.

    So the Calishim watched and waited for the new Lord's rule to fail. When it continued on, they sent more hired armies to smash Maeradyn's troops. The fast-riding Swardar met them with deadly arrow-volleys, striking swiftly and racing on before the larger, better-equipped Calishim forces could strike camp and respond. Whenever the Swardar were brought to bay, giants appeared out of thin air, as if by magic, to pounce on the Calishim forces. Soon the satraps grew tired of throwing away money on armed hosts whose few survivors brought back only news of futility. They abandoned their efforts to reconquer the Sward.

    Over the years that followed, a succession of fiercely independent local rulers kept the realm strong. They used the money gained from the sale of their famous horses and lesser livestock to carefully build, equip, and train an elite force of mounted crossbowmen and lancers to guard the herds and horse-meadows.

    Priests of Helm were encouraged to settle in the realm and guard its borders, as were adventurers who wanted a safe haven to dwell in -- provided they agreed to submit to the worship and instruction of the Helmite clergy. The famous Company of Sun Knights adventuring band did so, retiring to the Sward at the end of a long and colorful career to found the now equally famous Sunbright Lances of the realm.

    The Lances are heavily armored men of great height and strength. Their massed charge can smash aside and trample most foes, and their almost fanatical commanders train the Lances in fighting in swamps, rainstorms, thick forest, blizzards, and mud while both mounted and afoot. They become adept at shedding armor while in battle or on the move if need be and in anticipating and reacting to enemy tricks. After a century of such training and victory after victory in battle against various ambitious neighbors, the Lances are widely feared in the Border realms. Very few folk dare to trifle with the laws and peace of High Emmerock.


    Most recent history (the Emmerock Dynasty):
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    The present name of the realm comes from one of its most famous kings -- Emmerock the Goblinbane, who hunted orcs, goblins, and their kin as some men hunt stags in the forest, until the enraged goblins mustered an army from their usually-feuding tribes (who dwelt in the land that today is Thuntar) and invaded the Sward. They chased Swardar patrols who 'fled' into the deep ravine at the heart of the realm, leading the goblin army into a waiting trap. There, with the Lake in the Cleft glimmering before them, the goblins died in their thousands, beset from all sides by the rolled rocks, hurled lances, and fired arrows of the Swardar.

    A day after the goblin army was eradicated, the Swardar charged down into the goblin lands to the southwest. Goblin warrens were surrounded, haycarts set ablaze and pushed into the tunnels, and the goblins were smoked out to their deaths in the face of withering arrow-volleys. When all of the goblinkin had been hunted down, the King declared that the Sward would henceforth be known as High Emmerock and the goblin lands as Low Emmerock.

    Emmerock then sired three sons, all as hard-driving and ambitious as their sire. Almost thirty summers later, the eldest murdered him for the crown -- and was executed by the shocked younger brothers, who then promptly went to war with each other over who should rule the realm. The son known as Esbolder prevailed, proclaiming himself King and banishing his younger brother, Nothlan, to everlasting exile.

    Nothlan went straight to Calimshan and offered certain horse-breeding families there a chance to own part of the fabled Land of Horses again if they'd back him in a bid to regain the throne. They did.

    Nothlan's forces landed in Low Emmerock only to find the Emmeran armies waiting for them. The struggle that followed ravaged both armies and went on until a harsh winter forced the survivors to stop fighting and scrabble to survive.

    At some time during the dark, chilly depths of that cold season, Nothlan vanished. Some say he was murdered by his brother (or an adventuring band hired by the King), others that he simply froze to death and was devoured by wolves before his body could be found and identified. Still other folk whispered that he blundered through a magical portal into "another place," never to return. Minstrels sing of the day when a son of Nothlan, "the rightful king of all Emmerock," will come "striding out of nowhere" to reclaim his realm. A few folk insist Nothlan sickened of the whole affair and went away to take up a life of devotion to a peaceful god or study at Candlekeep.

    Whatever Nothlan's true fate, spring found his army reduced to handfuls of scattered, fleeing warriors and Low Emmerock a lawless, ravaged land. The surviving warriors of High Emmerock were unable to hold it. All their attention was needed to defend the original meadowland realm against wave after wave of opportunistic invaders.

    It was then that the Company of Sun Knights, who'd been landholders in the realm for more than a decade but spent most of their time off adventuring, came to home to stay. Under their competent leadership, High Emmerock survived, but its forces were never able to retake their former sister realm (which is today the land of Thuntar). The best they could manage was holding this or that small piece of it for scattered days or months at a time.

    The last King of the Emmerock dynasty, Belder the Sly, perished in 1344 of a bloating plague while wenching in the port cities of the Lake of Steam. With his death, High Emmerock slid peacefully under the rule of a council of seven warrior lords (the descendants of the Sun Knights). Their policies ensured that Emmerans would stop trying to regain Low Emmerock and instead concentrate on improving their homeland.

    They succeeded. Today, High Emmerock is a well-ordered, heavily-policed land that resembles nothing so much as a huge farm in which stock is reared, lands are carefully irrigated and trimmed, and patrols are frequent and vigilant. The towers of the Lords of the Lances ring the land (visitors seeking accommodation or trade are advised to go to the markets, taverns, shops, and inns that cluster about each tower), and its interior consists of rolling, open grasslands still known as the Sward.


    A map of Emmerock
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    One or two notables out of this map:

    - You’re starting a few days west of Dunbridges, in the southeastern corner of the map.

    - We have Low and High Emmerock, obviously. The genteel explanation for the difference is altitude: High Emmerock is mostly around the mountain ranges that take up the northern reaches of the kingdom, Low Emmerock is mostly made up of plainslands in the south. The more cultural difference between High and Low is purpose and independence; the feeling in High Emmerock is that Helm or some other power is watching over the kingdom for a force of order in the land. In Low Emmerock it's more sanguine and more of a sense of free giving of loyalty but retaining an independent streak.

    - The Sward is out west of the main cluster of towns of Emmerock. It’s essentially the bread basket of not only Emmerock, but several other nations around it, being mainly fields as far as the eye can see and guarded pretty well by Emmerock’s forces.

    - Xin Jubei is a Shou enclave, based on an island in the Lake of Steam. Precisely why the Shou from Kara-Tur chose to make their home and main Western market on a small island is not clear, but Far Eastern influences do exist in Emmerock as a result for those who are interested (or want them).


    About The Lance Lords of Emmerock
    Spoiler
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    That is, the seven principal lords and rulers of Emmerock:

    - Haldimar Brethok (a noble, dashing, gallant LG male Mulan human Ftr16), Lord of the Blue Falcon, who dwells in Falconkeep in northwesternmost High Emmerock.

    - Azlurla Marounal (a quiet, grim, darkly beautiful CG female Calishim human Ftr14/Wiz6), Lord of the Wavewatch, who lives in Wavewatch Tower on a peak (Nightwind Pinnacle) overlooking the village of Nightwind and the Lake of Steam beyond, in northern High Emmerock. She set aside warfare to learn magic under the tutelage of the Water Witch over a decade ago.

    - Gorramator Margan (a mighty-thewed, rustic, and gruff LN male Chultan human Ftr17 who is determined his land will never be unprepared to deal with invaders), Lord of Oldstones, of Oldstones Hall in rocky, northeasternmost High Emmerock.

    - Lastos Teldoak (a fat, food-loving, lazy-seeming but shrewd LN male Durpari human Ftr10 who delights in parties, spectacles, and fun -- but uses them to shrewdly sum up the characters of those around him -- and who delights in learning covertly the dreams and future plans of all residents of the realm), Lord of Eagles, who dwells in palatial Reddunsar Manor (known for its shady, wooded gardens of falling streams and pools) atop the Eaglesroost, a wooded ridge in High Emmerock.

    - Soarara "Longtresses" Phondipar (a sharp-tongued but fun-loving, slim, acrobatic, golden-haired NG female Chondathan human Ftr15 who stands almost seven feet tall and is said to have storm giant blood in her ancestry), Lord of the Vale, who dwells in Silverstream Hall in Boldo's Vale at the southeastern edge of the realm. Boldo was the most crude and boisterous of the Kings of the Sward and is fondly remembered in jests and legends.

    - Jethtarina Aldinuth, Hammer of Helm (soft-spoken, calm in any situation, and a woman who never forgets the slightest detail of events, messages, or faces; an outwardly colorless but inwardly passionate and pranksome LN female Damaran human Clr16: a "Bulwark of Helm"), Lord of the Tower of Vigil (Helmite monastery) atop Harethtoe Tor on the southern edge of High Emmerock.

    - Belotar Sandras (a saturnine, sarcastic fashion plate always immersed in the gossip and politics of Calimshan, the Lake of Steam, and the Tashalar; a CN male Mulan human Ftr12), Lord of the Crag, master of Dragonmount Crag Castle in westernmost High Emmerock, and current Regent of the Dragonmount Throne.

    - Of these seven houses, the houses of Phondipar, Aldinuth, and Teldoak are most sympathetic to Low Emmerock ideals of independence from the crown. House Aldinuth was most behind the effort to send adventuring parties out to tame, explore, and survey the lands south of Emmerock in an effort to expand the kingdom’s holdings.

    This information is available via Knowledge (local) rolls if your characters have them, but this is all available for your context to help with immersing your characters in the local situation (if not divining the motives behind some people’s actions.

  3. - Top - End - #3
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    Default Re: Kingmaker in the Forgotten Realms [OOC thread]

    I'm fine with all of the house rules, especially the fourth one.
    I do have one question regarding it, though. Artificers normally get Craft Wondrous Item at level three and Craft Wand at level six. This would mean that I get Create Charged Magic Item at six, where I would normally qualify for it at three, and Create Permanent Magic Item at three, where I would normally qualify for it at five. Should I switch them so that I get Create Charged Magic Item at three and Create Permanent Magic Item at six, to get them at the times I normally would?

    I'm fine with your DMing style too.

    Regarding the regional feats, are you willing to overlook the racial requirements? I don't think Warforged qualify for any.

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    Default Re: Kingmaker in the Forgotten Realms [OOC thread]

    Quote Originally Posted by almondsAndRain View Post
    I'm fine with all of the house rules, especially the fourth one.
    I do have one question regarding it, though. Artificers normally get Craft Wondrous Item at level three and Craft Wand at level six. This would mean that I get Create Charged Magic Item at six, where I would normally qualify for it at three, and Create Permanent Magic Item at three, where I would normally qualify for it at five. Should I switch them so that I get Create Charged Magic Item at three and Create Permanent Magic Item at six, to get them at the times I normally would?
    I must've had that the wrong way around. Yep, let's go with that - even if it might be a while before we get there anyway. :)

    Quote Originally Posted by almondsAndRain View Post
    Regarding the regional feats, are you willing to overlook the racial requirements? I don't think Warforged qualify for any.
    How about for Warforged we expand the racial requirement out to the race and region of the one who created you? "In Thine Own Image" and all that, i.e. your creator's mindset influences you and allows you to qualify for a regional feat that way?

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    Default Re: Kingmaker in the Forgotten Realms [OOC thread]

    Sounds good to me. So is the first house rule essentially Spring Attack, except that you are subject to an AoO from the person you've attacked?

    And Dergosh will need you to explain the concept of shifting backwards in combat, that doesn't sound right to him...

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    Default Re: Kingmaker in the Forgotten Realms [OOC thread]

    Quote Originally Posted by Mercurion 2 View Post
    Sounds good to me. So is the first house rule essentially Spring Attack, except that you are subject to an AoO from the person you've attacked?
    Sorta: say you've got a full round of actions and Gobspit the Unlucky happens to be about 15 feet from you and is currently in melee with Three of Three. You can use a move action to position yourself opposite Three and then use your standard action to charge and make a single attack, picking up the flank condition as a bonus. Normal circumstances you couldn't do it because the full round charge would require you to go in a straight line. I think 3.0 called it a 'partial charge' or similar. Or, as you're suggesting, move back from someone you're in melee with (and draw an AoO) and then charge in on them. Or vice versa. Also, Spring Attack requires you to move 5 feet before and after the actual attack, whilst this charging rule doesn't necessarily require that.

    And Dergosh will need you to explain the concept of shifting backwards in combat, that doesn't sound right to him...
    Okay, uh, Dergosh. Dergosh? No, down here. Yes, it's me again, that funny talky man who won't shut up. See, walking backward in combat, you can think of it like mirrors. No, mirrors. Mirrors. No? Okay, think about your reflection in a lake. Reflection. No? Okay, the other Dergosh in the lake. No, not that time you went swimming, the other Dergosh who's in the lake looking back at you. Doing exactly what you're doing, that's right. No, I don't know why he doesn't pick the same side of his nose as you do.
    sigh


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    Default Re: Kingmaker in the Forgotten Realms [OOC thread]

    I'm here! I am also cool with the house rules. Though I warn that that link may be scrubbed by a mod. That site is apparently in violation of copyright or some such so links to it are against forum rules.
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    Default Re: Kingmaker in the Forgotten Realms [OOC thread]

    Quote Originally Posted by bcool999 View Post
    I'm here! I am also cool with the house rules. Though I warn that that link may be scrubbed by a mod. That site is apparently in violation of copyright or some such so links to it are against forum rules.
    Noted and erased. All I guess we can say is that if you have the right tools you can do almost anything.

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    Default Re: Kingmaker in the Forgotten Realms [OOC thread]

    Quote Originally Posted by Saintheart View Post
    How about for Warforged we expand the racial requirement out to the race and region of the one who created you? "In Thine Own Image" and all that, i.e. your creator's mindset influences you and allows you to qualify for a regional feat that way?
    Works for me. Her creator was an elderly elf, so I figure he's from the Forest of Lethyr.
    Can Three have the Fleet of Foot regional feat? Moving fast fits with her fluff. I'd have to make some minor changes to her equipment, to account for not being able to keep the extra movement speed in medium armor.
    Barring that, I'll take Luck of Heroes.

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    Default Re: Kingmaker in the Forgotten Realms [OOC thread]

    Updated character sheet and stat block to reflect regular traits, bonus trait, bonus feat, and spell selection

    Character Sheet: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1JU...SdR40eWnAc6PdJ
    Stat Block: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1Xr...uLLFygEl8R1_pk
    Last edited by Mercurion 2; 2018-05-05 at 01:43 PM.

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    Default Re: Kingmaker in the Forgotten Realms [OOC thread]

    I'm liking the looks of this
    Would it be alright to pick up the Magic in the Blood regional feat? I have a racial SLA but Kobold isn't on that list.
    Quote Originally Posted by Deeds View Post
    Caster backstories require a reason as to why they can cast spells. Wizards study hard to learn spells. Sorcerers often learn of their powers and then hone them through traveling. Clerics use piety to find the gift of spells through the gods or their ideals. Druids shun deodorant until a riding dog appears and they learn Entangle.
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    Zom, my imaginary hat is off to you. *Horns? *What horns? *It's just an unusual hairstyle.
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    There are certain advantages to a game being as badly written as 3.5.

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    Default Re: Kingmaker in the Forgotten Realms [OOC thread]

    Quote Originally Posted by almondsAndRain View Post
    Works for me. Her creator was an elderly elf, so I figure he's from the Forest of Lethyr.
    Can Three have the Fleet of Foot regional feat? Moving fast fits with her fluff. I'd have to make some minor changes to her equipment, to account for not being able to keep the extra movement speed in medium armor.
    Barring that, I'll take Luck of Heroes.
    Fleet of Foot is fine, as are adjustments to the character sheet.

    Quote Originally Posted by Zombulian View Post
    I'm liking the looks of this
    Would it be alright to pick up the Magic in the Blood regional feat? I have a racial SLA but Kobold isn't on that list.
    I don't see much of an issue with that - he's Dragonwrought for a start, i.e. you've already paid a feat to be almost-dragon as it is, no harm in raising your SLAs to 3 times per day.

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    Default Re: Kingmaker in the Forgotten Realms [OOC thread]

    Quote Originally Posted by Saintheart View Post
    Fleet of Foot is fine, as are adjustments to the character sheet.
    Thanks! The character sheet has been updated. My hide armor was replaced with leather armor and five gold pieces. The gold pieces were spent on a crowbar, shovel, and sledge.

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    Default Re: Kingmaker in the Forgotten Realms [OOC thread]

    I'm fine with all of the house rules (already considering ways my combat style can benefit from the charge changes), as well as the 'cutscening' that you mentioned.

    Regarding the regional feat and the trait selection, I have two questions.

    1) Would it be possible for me to take the Mercantile Background feat? (PGtF) I'm aware that the regions listed don't necessarily match up to the areas my background has me from, but it fits my backstory so well... (If not, I'll need to know whether I can waive racial requirements on any regional feats at all, since none of the regional feats have Skarn as a race.)

    2) Among the traits you listed from the AP, Sword Scion would (again) fit my background perfectly... if it weren't for the issue of being based on swords. Would I be able to take that trait and have the bonus applied to spines instead, given that the Spinemeld Warriors fill much the same role in Skarn culture as groups like the Hammers of Helm (presumably) are in Emmerock? (I'd be just ignoring the free weapon that comes with the trait.)
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    Default Re: Kingmaker in the Forgotten Realms [OOC thread]

    Quote Originally Posted by BluesEclipse View Post
    I'm fine with all of the house rules (already considering ways my combat style can benefit from the charge changes), as well as the 'cutscening' that you mentioned.

    Regarding the regional feat and the trait selection, I have two questions.

    1) Would it be possible for me to take the Mercantile Background feat? (PGtF) I'm aware that the regions listed don't necessarily match up to the areas my background has me from, but it fits my backstory so well... (If not, I'll need to know whether I can waive racial requirements on any regional feats at all, since none of the regional feats have Skarn as a race.)

    2) Among the traits you listed from the AP, Sword Scion would (again) fit my background perfectly... if it weren't for the issue of being based on swords. Would I be able to take that trait and have the bonus applied to spines instead, given that the Spinemeld Warriors fill much the same role in Skarn culture as groups like the Hammers of Helm (presumably) are in Emmerock? (I'd be just ignoring the free weapon that comes with the trait.)
    Since Skarn aren't a designed-for race in Faerun as such, I think we have to make some allowances along those lines. Human is about as close as one gets in appearance to Skarn, so I think we can allow you to read 'human' as applying to 'Skarn' as well.

    On the other hand, there's a certain inconsistency between Mercantile Background and Sword Scion in that Mercantile Background is really more intended for those people coming from big metropolises like Waterdeep or Baldur's Gate, and Sword Scion suggests that you've spent pretty much your whole life around Dunbridges. (The Border Kingdoms are sort-of back-country regions in Faerun.)

    That said, "Shou Expatriate" is included as a valid race for Mercantile Background, and I've included a Shou enclave in the Border Kingdoms, which I guess is pretty serendipitous. So one way we could write this is that your family has close associations with the Shou, i.e. Skarn Spinemeld Warriors have a long tradition of protecting the Enclave on its island because your particular Skarn clan/family came west with the Shou when they immigrated here from Kara-Tur and Shou cultural practices harmonise well with the way the Skarn behave and see the world. This allows you to pick up really eastern influences into your character if you want them, and plays nicely into your whole unarmed monk background.

    So let's refluff the Sword Scion into a Spinemeld Scion trait as suggested, you've spent most of your life in the Shou enclave and in the coastal areas of the Lake of Steam, and your family is closely associated with a trading family amongst the Shou on the island. As said, you then get a +1 trait bonus for your spines and combat maneuvers made with such weapons. And ditch the starting weapon :) That then gives you both the trait and the regional feat.

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    Default Re: Kingmaker in the Forgotten Realms [OOC thread]

    Sounds good - I can change the background to have Thessaris Valenti (the Skarn monastery that Korlann spent eight years studying at) on the same island as Xin Jubei, which would also account for the heirtage. Leshinnik Dalthor (the Skarn enclave that Korlann's family is from) is positioned in such a way that there could easily be an overland trade route that Korlann's father uses to run goods between the Lake of Steam (and its surrounding cities) and the Sea of Fallen Stars (and its surrounding cities) - using the Winding River for access to the latter, and shipping goods overland from the southern end of the river to Torsh (with a short run through the narrow part of the Chondalwood involved), then down the road to Innarlith at the eastern end of the Lake of Steam (and from there by water to Xin Jubei and to the lakeside towns as well). The Skarn presence at Xin Jubei would have been enough reason for him to work to set up such a route, as a means of helping the Skarn communities connect with one another as well.
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    Default Re: Kingmaker in the Forgotten Realms [OOC thread]

    Quote Originally Posted by BluesEclipse View Post
    Sounds good - I can change the background to have Thessaris Valenti (the Skarn monastery that Korlann spent eight years studying at) on the same island as Xin Jubei, which would also account for the heirtage. Leshinnik Dalthor (the Skarn enclave that Korlann's family is from) is positioned in such a way that there could easily be an overland trade route that Korlann's father uses to run goods between the Lake of Steam (and its surrounding cities) and the Sea of Fallen Stars (and its surrounding cities) - using the Winding River for access to the latter, and shipping goods overland from the southern end of the river to Torsh (with a short run through the narrow part of the Chondalwood involved), then down the road to Innarlith at the eastern end of the Lake of Steam (and from there by water to Xin Jubei and to the lakeside towns as well). The Skarn presence at Xin Jubei would have been enough reason for him to work to set up such a route, as a means of helping the Skarn communities connect with one another as well.
    All right, we'll go with that.

    One final sweetener - I notice there's a couple of people with Knowledge (local), but I also don't think it hurts to give a free untyped +2 to Knowledge (Local) to your character seeing as he's from the area and has connections with the trading families from hereabouts. Ruk and Gakan both have superior Knowledge (Local) modifiers anyway, but you can have that as a sort of a third backup if the subject comes up. :)

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    Default Re: Kingmaker in the Forgotten Realms [OOC thread]

    Noted - I assume I'll have to shuffle skill ranks around a bit in order to actually get a rank in the skill before I can benefit from that (since Knowledge checks are trained only)?
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    Default Re: Kingmaker in the Forgotten Realms [OOC thread]

    Quote Originally Posted by BluesEclipse View Post
    Noted - I assume I'll have to shuffle skill ranks around a bit in order to actually get a rank in the skill before I can benefit from that (since Knowledge checks are trained only)?
    That's probably a fair control since the others had to spend skill points to access it. But even one rank in it is enough to trigger the +2.

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    Default Re: Kingmaker in the Forgotten Realms [OOC thread]

    Got it. I'll drop 2 points from Concentration (since I really only need it as a Kensai prereq), and pick up the 1 rank in K: Local.
    Zio Avatar by acelegna

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    Default Re: Kingmaker in the Forgotten Realms [OOC thread]

    I am planning to take the Tireless Feat (from Vassa vague details in backstory on how that happened, but character is unaware from where he hails).

    Also taking the Pioneer trait, but what kind of horse is granted by it? Is it a Light or Heavy horse (Just gonna use it as a pack animal anyway)?
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    Default Re: Kingmaker in the Forgotten Realms [OOC thread]

    Quote Originally Posted by bcool999 View Post
    I am planning to take the Tireless Feat (from Vassa vague details in backstory on how that happened, but character is unaware from where he hails).

    Also taking the Pioneer trait, but what kind of horse is granted by it? Is it a Light or Heavy horse (Just gonna use it as a pack animal anyway)?
    Your choice of horse. No problems with the feat choice!

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    Default Re: Kingmaker in the Forgotten Realms [OOC thread]

    Also, for everyone, one other request - seeing as I use MapTool for combat updates, can you all send me suitable images for your tokens? I find it works best if I get close head portraits, so when you've got a minute...

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    Default Re: Kingmaker in the Forgotten Realms [OOC thread]

    Well... I kinda based my character off of Asura from Asura's wrath (Minus the rage), so here is a headshot of Asura.

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    Default Re: Kingmaker in the Forgotten Realms [OOC thread]



    Id crop it down for you, but Im on my phone.

    Edit: Also, Im tagging onto the list of people with non supported races, and absolutely no idea about the political geography of the realms.

    Also Im now sufficiently bored of looking at them that I might just not bother.
    Last edited by kjelfalconer; 2018-05-06 at 06:10 AM.

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    Default Re: Kingmaker in the Forgotten Realms [OOC thread]

    Quote Originally Posted by kjelfalconer View Post
    Edit: Also, Im tagging onto the list of people with non supported races, and absolutely no idea about the political geography of the realms.

    Also Im now sufficiently bored of looking at them that I might just not bother.
    Well, if it might assist, we can treat you as qualifying for human regional feats. One that popped out at me given your status as an agent for one of the Lance Lords, was Street Smart: You know how to keep informed, ask questions, and interact with the underworld without raising suspicions. You gain a +2 bonus on Gather Information, Intimidate, and Sense Motive checks. Another alternative that seemed sufficiently Catfolk-ish was Swift and Silent, i.e. You can move up to your normal speed while using the Hide or Move Silently skill at no penalty.

    Easiest way of avoiding the overall political geography of the Realms is to probably have your character come from Emmerock itself, born and lived here much of his life. The area's removed enough from the 'big' areas of the Realms that you won't have to go and familiarise yourself intimately with the overall situation. In terms of external influences, it's probably enough to know that Calimshan is an Arabic pastiche and has some influence out here, but the place is still essentially its own independent realm with an empty throne and seven major noble houses jockeying for position in management of that kingdom in classic feudal style.

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    OrcBarbarianGuy

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    Default Re: Kingmaker in the Forgotten Realms [OOC thread]

    Quote Originally Posted by Saintheart View Post
    Also, for everyone, one other request - seeing as I use MapTool for combat updates, can you all send me suitable images for your tokens? I find it works best if I get close head portraits, so when you've got a minute...
    You should be able to take mine off the character sheet, but if you'd like me to send it separately just let me know.

    "Ho! Look like you get Dergosh's good side."

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    Default Re: Kingmaker in the Forgotten Realms [OOC thread]

    Fair enough. Street smart would probably work. It at least fits him mechanically.

    As for location, sure? I mean, it doesn't make a huge amount of difference to me; my lack of realms knowledge isn't due to lack of exposure. I played Neverwinter for two years, and Ive played plenty of realms games before.

    It's just the setting has all the personality of damp cardboard. Which isnt to say i don't enjoy games in the realms. Its just when I do, it's purely the dm (and often I have to be reminded that the game is, technically, in the realms)

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    Default Re: Kingmaker in the Forgotten Realms [OOC thread]

    Quote Originally Posted by kjelfalconer View Post
    Fair enough. Street smart would probably work. It at least fits him mechanically.

    As for location, sure? I mean, it doesn't make a huge amount of difference to me; my lack of realms knowledge isn't due to lack of exposure. I played Neverwinter for two years, and Ive played plenty of realms games before.

    It's just the setting has all the personality of damp cardboard. Which isnt to say i don't enjoy games in the realms. Its just when I do, it's purely the dm (and often I have to be reminded that the game is, technically, in the realms)
    Soooooo you're saying if you enjoy the game it's entirely my fault?

    Cool, I can go with that!

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    OrcBarbarianGuy

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    Default Re: Kingmaker in the Forgotten Realms [OOC thread]

    Saintheart,

    What is your preference on formatting of text in the IC thread? Specifically, do you have a position on whether we should quote previous parts of messages in our responses?

    For instance, if Dergosh is responding to Three, and then Korlann, do you care one way or the other if I embed the other characters' quotes within my response? I ask as I've played with a few DM's who wanted it done specific ways.

    Thanks,
    Merc

    P.S. Please don't say different colored text for each character, please please please. :)

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