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  1. - Top - End - #181
    Firbolg in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Tom View Post
    Wait, did you just say"bear in mind"?
    Purely by accident.

    We have a tie between 77A and 771C.

    77A - 50
    771C - 60

    So we're going to step out of character and ask them to give Flavia a hand!

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    You step forward to the edge of the stage. You let a moment pass, so that all eyes are on you, and a hush falls over the audience.

    "Good people! 'Tis I, Frederick, that addresses you for a moment. I take this opportunity to step out of the play so that I might make an important announcement…"

    "I would like to thank the woman who made this play possible. Flavia, come out here and accept a round of applause!"
    There are some hidden stat changes , but nothing to put on the character sheet

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    It is unseemly for a woman to come onstage, so Flavia blushes as she steps next to you and accepts the applause of the audience.

    "Flavia has been doing such hard work, and I did not want it to go unrecognized. Here's to you, Flavia!"

    The shepherds really seem to appreciate your acknowledgement of one of their own, and you see more smiles among them as they settle in to watch the rest of the play.

    "Now then," you say. "Let us continue." You and Flavia exit. As you leave, with a grin still frozen on her face, Flavia hisses to you, "Thank you. Never do that again. That was the most terrifying…but thank you."

    "Don't mention it," you say.
    And now, on with the show!

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    The scenes that follow are thankfully less eventful, and before long, it is time for the musical interlude that marks the middle of the play.

    A consort of rustic fiddlers take the stage, and the audience stands, milling around and stretching their legs.

    As you enjoy the music, Flavia dashes over to you, breathlessly.

    "The Duke commands your presence before him at once," she says.

    Father is waving you over, sternly. "You. Now."

    You dismount the pavilion and slowly, uncertainly, approach Father's bed.
    Father wants to speak to us...? Will he see through our disguise?

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    Father's arms are crossed, and his face holds an expression of poorly concealed contempt.

    "This play is a strikingly poor attempt at entertainment," he sniffs. "Amateurish. Insulting. Painful to anyone capable of soul or sense. However, you seem to be one of the only performers capable of any shred of acting."

    "Thank you, Your Grace."

    "How do you account for this travesty of a play? What possible excuse can you offer? I have half a mind to have everyone else arrested and whipped for their insult to me."


    Vote 78:

    78A: "Ah, Your Grace, you are discerning and wise. You have perceived our clever parody."

    78B: "We offer no excuses for our play. Perhaps you just do not perceive the aesthetic unity that makes it such a work of art."

    78C: "I apologize most humbly for our failings."


    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    "Enough of this," Father says. "There was one thing more. Ah, yes. Yes. One member of your troupe is worthy of special plaudits. That wonderful bear. Remarkable, remarkable."

    Father gestures to the sleeping bear. "I really believed that was a real bear for a moment. You must introduce me to this fine actor."

    The bear snores loudly.

    Vote 79:
    79A) "Perhaps after the play. He is taking a well-deserved rest, and we don't want to disturb him. Actors need their sleep."

    79B) "He's rather intimidated by your nobility. I fear that he is too meek to seek to claim your acquaintance."

    79C) "Certainly, Your Grace. Bear, this is the Duke. Duke, this is bear."


    He doesn't seem to be seeing through our disguise fortunately, but now we have to navigate the rather treacherous waters of this interview. Let me know what you want to do and we will press on when Monday, 13 May 2019, 5 PM EDT rolls around!

    Hope to see you then!

    Respectfully,

    Brian P.
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid."

    -Valery Legasov in Chernobyl

  2. - Top - End - #182
    Dwarf in the Playground
     
    BardGuy

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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    No stat change? That's practically a win in my book.

    Can I be cheeky and go for a conditional answer?
    78A playing on his desire for obeisance and praise.
    Then 79B if that works, and 79C if it doesn't.

  3. - Top - End - #183
    Orc in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    78A, 79C
    It will be good for Father to be introduced to his loyal subject, the wild bear that was kicked betwixt the legs.
    EXPLOSIVE RUNES
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  4. - Top - End - #184
    Firbolg in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    We'll do 78A and 79C. We've got one vote for each, and I guess the conditional answer is a half point?

    So .. action!

    "Ah, Your Grace, you are discerning and wise. You have perceived our clever parody."

    SKILL TEST: WIT: FAIL.
    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    "Parody?"

    "Yes, Your Grace. What seems low quality is in fact simply satire. Naturally a man as shrewd as you has understood that. Well observed. Well observed indeed."

    Father slams his fist on the bed and glares at you.

    "Nonsense!" he says. "What precisely are you satirizing?"

    "Oh, various social norms and so forth," you begin.

    "Well, stop it," Father barks. "It is not working. Tell your fellow actors that I am aesthetically offended, and further attempts at parody will be forcibly halted. Parody indeed."
    MERRIMENT: 80 [+4]
    FURY : 63 [+4]

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    "Enough of this," Father says. "There was one thing more. Ah, yes. Yes. One member of your troupe is worthy of special plaudits. That wonderful bear. Remarkable, remarkable."

    Father gestures to the sleeping bear. "I really believed that was a real bear for a moment. You must introduce me to this fine actor."

    "Certainly, Your Grace. Bear, this is the Duke. Duke, this is bear."

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    The bear continues to sleep.

    The Duke smiles. "Bear, I hereby grant you a purse of silver and a jug of wine to be given to you every Michaelmas eve."

    The Duke looks at the bear expectantly. When no response is forthcoming, he says, "I admire his commitment to the role. Some actors—not all, mind you!—do a fine job staying in character. Others…less so. We shall leave it at that. Be off with you now. Bear, I will allow you to remain near me."
    He will, will he? How does that work having a sleeping bear next to his bed...?

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    Finally, after several more emotional scenes with Morgan, a battle, a shipwreck, an exile, and several marriages, the play draws towards a close. It is time for the final scene to begin.

    In this scene, you have been found guilty of treason, and you are saying your last words before being executed. It is an intensely political scene, in which you speak out about whether the king has ruled well or not.

    Before going onstage, you take a moment to consider the general tenor of the play's progress to this point…
    Summary time!

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    This play is hard to classify. It seems to combine scenes of comedy and tragedy in nearly equal measure, and the crowd often seems confused about whether to weep or laugh. Could this be a tragicomedy?

    You peek at the audience from offstage as the penultimate scene concludes.

    The shepherds and shepherdesses in the audience seem relaxed, and some joke openly with Father's guards. Some fetch Father refreshments and otherwise curry his favor as he watches.

    You turn to glance at Father.

    Father looks unhappy with the play so far. While he is not as angry as he could be, he is clearly not enjoying himself.
    So we haven't distinctly classified this as a play or a tragedy, the shepherds like it , and father is upset. Not utterly furious, but not happy either.

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    As you step onstage for your final scene, your eyes are drawn to something flitting through the air. It's the fairy outlaw Piccolita, who hovers for a moment, and then settles down in the crook of a nearby oak tree. She hangs her bow on a twig and lies back against the tree. She gives you a nasty look and makes a rude gesture at you.

    Vote 80:

    80A) I return the gesture angrily.

    80B) I ignore her.

    80C) I sarcastically bow to her and blow her a kiss, artfully making it look like part of my entrance.


    After we respond to Piccolita, we press onward!

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    You take a deep breath, clear your head, and launch into the final scene. The scene is complex and takes all of your focus.

    Your character, Hyacinth, is hauled before the king and forced to answer to various crimes before you receive your punishment.

    Morgan, in character as Alexis, speaks fervently on your behalf, begging for your release, but the king will not be moved, and he summons the captain of the guard.

    This is the one scene that Prenzie is in, and he steps forward.

    "Bring forth the prisoner," Prenzie says, flatly. That's the whole of Prenzie's role, and giving you a look that you know means, "I really should be playing the lead," He steps back as you are brought forth.

    The Maroon Knight, playing a lord in this scene, offers you an encouraging nod.
    So, final scene: Go!

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    You are brought to the front of the stage, in chains, while the player king reads your list of offenses.

    "You are guilty of treason," the player king says, coldly.

    "We have received information that you have treated a bear most cruelly within my protected forest. Can you deny this?"

    "Cruelly? No, not at all!"

    "My foresters say otherwise. Let it be recorded. In addition, you have committed acts of piracy and pillage throughout my land. What can you possibly say in your defense, in these last moments before I pronounce your punishment?"

    You step before the player king and look around for a long moment, letting the suspense build. There are several ways you can play this speech, and each would give a very different flavor to the scene.

    You could give the speech as written, which is meant to create sympathy for those of noble blood, championing Father—which would make this play end the way the Maroon Knight would want, you suppose.

    Or you could modify it, making it a savage political critique of Father, which would incite the commoners against him. You look up and see Morgan. Yes, ${morgan_he} would want that.

    Another option—one Prenzie would probably like—would be to make fun of everyone, offering a satire of Father, but also of the shepherds. You'd have to be careful not to offend everyone too much, though.

    Your eyes stray to the tree where Piccolita lolls. Or, you could throw caution completely to the wind, and give a speech in which you admonish Father and praise the Faerie Queene….
    Captain Piccolita IS watching this. Why? Why is she here?


    Vote 81:
    81A) I use the speech to support Father.

    81B) I use the speech to incite the crowd against Father.

    81C) I mock everyone.

    81D) I use the speech to admonish Father and praise the Faerie Queene.


    And after we've made this final speech, the end...

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    The player king slams his fist into his hand. "We have heard quite enough of you! I sentence you to death! Executioner, do your duty!"

    The executioner forces you to kneel and raises an axe.

    Vote 82: Now it is the final moment in the play. What should it be?

    82A) "No, good executioner. Allow me. I will do it myself. As I lived, so shall I die—cutting my own head off with an axe!"


    82B) "Proceed, executioner. I do not fear a little blood. And take my clothes when you are done. They will fetch a fine price."

    82C) "Thus ever are traitors o'erwhelmed by their own treason. Goodbye."

    82D) I say nothing, but make my execution grim and tragic, hoping to make the audience weep.


    And that will be the last act of the play! Good luck!
    See you Wednesday , 15 May 2019, 5 PM EDT!

    Incidentally 14 May is my birthday. Yay.

    Respectfully,

    Brian P.
    Last edited by pendell; 2019-05-13 at 04:17 PM.
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid."

    -Valery Legasov in Chernobyl

  5. - Top - End - #185
    Dwarf in the Playground
     
    BardGuy

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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    Happy Birthday! (Here at least)

    Let's go for comedy, comedy and comedy :80C, 81C and 82A

  6. - Top - End - #186
    Orc in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    80C,81C,82C, see?
    EXPLOSIVE RUNES
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    EXPLOSIVE RUNES

  7. - Top - End - #187
    Firbolg in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    80C, 81C,

    82 roll off
    82a - 5
    82c - 38

    So it's a straight
    80C, 81C, 82C.

    ACTION!

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    You bow deeply, with a magnificent flourish and an extravagant kiss blown in Piccolita's direction. You maintain a deeply mocking expression on your face; the crowd assumes that this is simply your character's attitude, but Piccolita knows that was meant for her.
    ARTISTRY: 61 [+4]

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    You take a deep breath, clear your head, and launch into the final scene. The scene is complex and takes all of your focus.

    Your character, Hyacinth, is hauled before the king and forced to answer to various crimes before you receive your punishment.

    Morgan, in character as Alexis, speaks fervently on your behalf, begging for your release, but the king will not be moved, and he summons the captain of the guard.

    This is the one scene that Prenzie is in, and he steps forward.

    "Bring forth the prisoner," Prenzie says, flatly. That's the whole of Prenzie's role, and giving you a look that you know means, "I really should be playing the lead," he steps back as you are brought forth.

    The Maroon Knight, playing a lord in this scene, offers you an encouraging nod.

    You are brought to the front of the stage, in chains, while the player king reads your list of offenses.

    "You are guilty of treason," the player king says, coldly.

    "We have received information that you have treated a bear most cruelly within my protected forest. Can you deny this?"

    "Cruelly? No, not at all!"

    "My foresters say otherwise. Let it be recorded. In addition, you have committed acts of piracy and pillage throughout my land. What can you possibly say in your defense, in these last moments before I pronounce your punishment?"

    You step before the player king and look around for a long moment, letting the suspense build. There are several ways you can play this speech, and each would give a very different flavor to the scene.

    You could give the speech as written, which is meant to create sympathy for those of noble blood, championing Father—which would make this play end the way the Maroon Knight would want, you suppose.

    Or you could modify it, making it a savage political critique of Father, which would incite the commoners against him. You look up and see Morgan. Yes, he would want that.

    Another option—one Prenzie would probably like—would be to make fun of everyone, offering a satire of Father, but also of the shepherds. You'd have to be careful not to offend everyone too much, though.

    Your eyes stray to the tree where Piccolita lolls. Or, you could throw caution completely to the wind, and give a speech in which you admonish Father and praise the Faerie Queene….
    81C - we mock everyone.

    SKILL START:
    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    You step forward and grin at the crowd. "Well, it seems that I am guilty of treason. Too bad. On the other hand, mayhap it is good that I am soon to be executed."

    You pause for full effect. "When I die, I will go to a place where there is no more stink. That will be my heaven."

    You wave your hand in front of your nose. "Oh, how the commoners offend my nose. They smell of sheep and dung. And sheep dung. Truly, stepping foot in a common village is nose-boggling."

    The shepherds and shepherdesses look at each other in surprise, but Father's guards are smiling.

    "But even more, I shall not miss the smell of the nobility, who pretend they do not sweat, but reek like other men and women, and so cover it up with cloves and nutmegs, which mingle with their own scent only to suggest a sweet sweat pie."

    "What is the meaning of this?!" Father cries. "I smell lovely!"

    This makes the crowd laugh, but it is a slightly mean-spirited laugh. Maybe you'd better finish this speech.

    "My friends," you say. "We are united in this world of foul odors. And so I go eagerly to my execution. Farewell."
    FURY: 64[+1]
    NOBILITY: 81 [+2]

    Deviating from the script requires more artistry than simply following it; in this case we did well enough to achieve a partial, whereas other lines might have met with total success.

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    The player king slams his fist into his hand. "We have heard quite enough of you! I sentence you to death! Executioner, do your duty!"

    The executioner forces you to kneel and raises an axe.
    82C) "Thus ever are traitors o'erwhelmed by their own treason. Goodbye."

    We're not going to cut off our own head with an axe? Ah well...

    SKILL TEST: ARTISTRY + MERRIMENT: FAIL
    You don't need a very high artistry to pull off this line but you do need merriment to be below a certain threshold to pull of tragedy convincingly. And our stat is way too high for that to work.

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    The audience is hushed by your noble sentiment, and some begin to weep as the executioner heaves his axe up.

    That's when you think of another good noble sentiment, so you hold your arm up to halt the axe.

    "Wait, executioner. I have another one. Ah, me, that such a worthy life is cut down in its prime, like unto a flower that has been…cut down in its prime. Wait a moment. I have to work on that one."

    You get up and pace around for a bit. "Like an octopus, clinging to…no, let's just go back to the first one. Thus ever…what was it?"

    "That ends our play!" Flavia says, covering your mouth and stepping in front of you. "Thank you all for attending!"

    And...?

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    Father laughs scornfully, and then begins to hoot and boo, directing his soldiers to boo as well.

    Milling around after the play, you listen to people's reviews.

    The Most Lamentable Pirate's Tragedy, or All Is Not Gold that Glisters is typically a tragedy, but everyone agrees that what they just witnessed was clearly being played as a comedy.

    At least, it was intended as a comedy. The performance goes down in history as the single worst comedy anybody has ever seen. You hear the words "agonizing" and "torture" more than once as you listen in on people's reviews of the play.
    ACHIEVEMENT UNLOCKED: Sweet Comedy : You performed in a comedy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    And so the evening's entertainment comes to a conclusion as the day ends. The moon is high and bright, and the evening is chilly and a bit windy.

    At length, you yawn and stretch, realizing just how tired you are. You slip behind the stage and change back into your scholar disguise.

    Small forest creatures chirp and warble in the darkness, calling to each other, and for a moment, it strikes you just how far away you are from your home. You brush aside these thoughts and consider whether you have enough energy left for dinner, or whether you just need to fall asleep, when you hear a commotion from the clearing.

    "It's a sneak attack!" shouts one of Father's guards. "The fairy outlaws have surrounded the clearing! Defend the Duke! Defend the Duke!"

    EXEUNT
    As Haley would say: SNEAK ATTACK! BI- FEMALE DOG!

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer


    What must be the Faerie Queene's entire fairy outlaw band has surrounded the clearing, shouting rousing battle cries and denouncements of the Duke. Most of them fly in formation, but some ride butterflies wearing armor; some ride in chariots pulled by bees.

    The Duke's loyal guards stand vigilantly, attempting to keep the fairies from approaching their lord. Some call out scornfully to the fairies or shout the duchy's motto proudly.


    Vote 83: By the way, what is the motto of the duchy?

    83A) "Sans Droit!" (Without right!)

    83B) "Where the Bee Sucks, There Suck I!"

    83C) "Honorificabilitudinitatibus!" (Made up word)

    83D) "Couple-a-gorge!" (cut the throat!)

    83E) Don't be ridiculous. It's none of those.


    If you vote for E, please contribute a suggestion as well. Make it good!

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    As the Duke's guards shout their defiance, one particularly flamboyant fairy catches your eye. He wears a bright green floppy hat adorned with a peacock feather as large as him and sports a black beard curled in a tight spiral. Seated proudly on his saddled attack bat, he swoops menacingly back and forth across the battlefield.

    "Surrender!" he cries.

    "Who are you, that you dare to come into my presence in such a bold and insistent manner?" Father asks. Father's guards form a ring around the bed.

    "I am General Flickertoes, commander of the armies of her Most Magical and August Majesty, the Faerie Queene. You have entered into her wood, and she has commanded that you be seized and taken prisoner until such time as you beg for mercy at her feet." He brandishes his lance, which seems to be made from a sharpened river reed.

    "Never!" Father gnashes his teeth. "I defy you utterly! I will have the Faerie Queene dragged before me in chains!"

    "Bold words indeed! Attack!"
    Things are getting serious.

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    And so, what later came to be known as The Battle of the Bed begins.

    Father's guards, in formation, attempt to fight an orderly battle, but they are not used to fighting in three dimensions: the fairy outlaws throw missiles at them from the treetops, or dive upon them on a winged steed and try to knock their helmets off.

    If it were during the day, the battle would still be chaotic; as it is, in the dimness of the clearing, it is difficult to determine exactly what is going on. Standards are lifted and waved in defiance, sparkling spells sizzle through the air, and shouts supporting the Duke and the Faerie Queene ring out amidst the noise of the combat.
    There is a note here that the shepherds will either support the Duke, or defect to the Queen, depending on our choices in the last act.

    We don't know what those are yet, but I'll present the choice anyway, plus one extra.

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    The noise, the dust, and the overall chaos is overwhelming. Screams, the clash of steel, and calls for help fill your ears as you prepare to play your role in The Battle of the Bed.

    Vote 84: Who do you support?

    84A) I will defend the duchy by fighting to protect Father.

    84B) I refuse to take sides in this battle. Instead I will help the noncombatant shepherds find somewhere to hide.

    84C) I will fight on the side of the Faerie Queene's outlaws.

    84D) [out of character]: I want to defer to next voting period to see what the shepherds do first.


    So we're down to the final battle. What do you want to do? If you want to defer , we'll see what side the shepherds take and that will be the final vote, since the story has a major branch depending on which choice we take. There's something interesting down each path. I would also counsel you to consider just what your character will be able to do in a battle and, if you don't think the skill set is a match, it's probably better to choose the noncombatant path than cause the side you support to fail .. unless that is, that is your intent .

    See you Friday, 17 May, 2019, 5PM EDT!

    Respectfully,

    Brian P.
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid."

    -Valery Legasov in Chernobyl

  8. - Top - End - #188
    Dwarf in the Playground
     
    BardGuy

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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    Well, merriment's only our second highest stat. So that's something.
    So let's go:
    83E- "Cause Toujours!" - literally "reason forever" but in reality an ironically contemptuous French phrase with no perfect single English translation: "whatever" perhaps comes closest.
    Then 84C- Boldly sitting on the fence till the splinters hurt.

    (I am enjoying myself.)
    Last edited by Mister Tom; 2019-05-16 at 03:03 AM. Reason: Clarification

  9. - Top - End - #189
    Firbolg in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    Wait a minute. I'm confused. You voted 84C , which is to side with the fairy queen , but you stated that you wanted to sit on the fence, which would imply 84B (refuse to take sides). Unconfuse a somewhat tired and befuddled referee?

    If I don't hear from you, I'm going to assume you meant 84b, since your words seem to be a clearer statement of your intent than the letter/number combination.

    Respectfully,

    Brian P.
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid."

    -Valery Legasov in Chernobyl

  10. - Top - End - #190
    Dwarf in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    You're right, I can't read. 84 B it is...sorry about that

  11. - Top - End - #191
    Orc in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    83e - don't step on the grass!

    84c
    EXPLOSIVE RUNES
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    PICTURE OF A CAT
    EXPLOSIVE RUNES

  12. - Top - End - #192
    Dwarf in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    Quote Originally Posted by Korith View Post
    83e - don't step on the grass!

    84c
    Because you want the fey to win? Or because you want them to lose? :-)

  13. - Top - End - #193
    Orc in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Tom View Post
    Because you want the fey to win? Or because you want them to lose? :-)
    Yes. There's always room for more EXPLOSIVE RUNES
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  14. - Top - End - #194
    Firbolg in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    We have a tie two ways.

    First 83 -- either 'Cause Toujours!' or 'Don't step on the grass!'

    83 - cause - 53
    83 - grass - 1

    So our motto will be 'Cause Toujours!'

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    Ah, yes. Cause Toujours!! That's right. A bold and valiant motto indeed, it has adorned your family's escutcheon for centuries.

    And for our next step, are we holding back, or are we joining the Queen?

    hold back - 56
    queen - 46

    So, first the challenge!

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    As the Duke's guards shout their defiance, one particularly flamboyant fairy catches your eye. He wears a bright green floppy hat adorned with a peacock feather as large as him and sports a black beard curled in a tight spiral. Seated proudly on his saddled attack bat, he swoops menacingly back and forth across the battlefield.

    "Surrender!" he cries.

    "Who are you, that you dare to come into my presence in such a bold and insistent manner?" Father asks. Father's guards form a ring around the bed.

    "I am General Flickertoes, commander of the armies of her Most Magical and August Majesty, the Faerie Queene. You have entered into her wood, and she has commanded that you be seized and taken prisoner until such time as you beg for mercy at her feet." He brandishes his lance, which seems to be made from a sharpened river reed.

    "Never!" Father gnashes his teeth. "I defy you utterly! I will have the Faerie Queene dragged before me in chains!"

    "Bold words indeed! Attack!"
    The battle begins!

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    And so, what later came to be known as The Battle of the Bed begins.

    Father's guards, in formation, attempt to fight an orderly battle, but they are not used to fighting in three dimensions: the fairy outlaws throw missiles at them from the treetops, or dive upon them on a winged steed and try to knock their helmets off.

    If it were during the day, the battle would still be chaotic; as it is, in the dimness of the clearing, it is difficult to determine exactly what is going on. Standards are lifted and waved in defiance, sparkling spells sizzle through the air, and shouts supporting the Duke and the Faerie Queene ring out amidst the noise of the combat.

    As Father's guards and the fairy outlaws clash in desperate struggle, the shepherds look back and forth between the two armies. The sturdier shepherds grasp their crooks and grimly rally to their Duke, while the noncombatants back away. "Down with the rebels!" they cry.
    Your words have had an effect. The outcome of the play was that either the shepherds would join the Queen, split the difference, or rally to the Duke. While our play irritated father our words before the play and actions in the middle reconciled them to him, and now every man who can fight has joined Father to battle against the fairies. At the moment, the humans have the upper hand.

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    The noise, the dust, and the overall chaos is overwhelming. Screams, the clash of steel, and calls for help fill your ears as you prepare to play your role in The Battle of the Bed.
    I refuse to take sides in this battle. Instead I will help the noncombatant shepherds find somewhere to hide.

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    You see Prenzie gathering the shepherd children to bring them to safety as the attack begins, but they are difficult to control. Some are running heedlessly towards the fairies, attracted by the animals they ride and their sparkling lights. Some are quite close to the Duke's guards, who swing their swords without noticing the children near them. Others hide under the refreshments, perilously close to the sleeping bear.

    "Oh, good," Prenzie says, seeing you. "Any ideas? I'm stumped. Every time I get one to safety, two others wander away."

    Vote 85:

    85A) I enchant them all to follow me, so I can get them into hiding.

    85B) I start telling them a story and walk away. They'll follow me to hear the end of the story.

    85C) I convince some of Father's guards to each grab a child and move them far away from the clearing.


    So let's see if we can get these kids to safety .. on Monday, 20 May 2019, 5 PM EDT ! See you then!

    Respectfully,

    Brian P.
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid."

    -Valery Legasov in Chernobyl

  15. - Top - End - #195
    Dwarf in the Playground
     
    BardGuy

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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    Quote Originally Posted by pendell View Post

    Ah, yes. Cause Toujours!! That's right. A bold and valiant motto indeed, it has adorned your family's escutcheon for centuries.
    .
    I guess its meaning's changed a bit since then

    85B. I like our artistry chances best.
    Last edited by Mister Tom; 2019-05-18 at 01:34 AM.

  16. - Top - End - #196
    Firbolg in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    All right , we tell them a story!

    SKILL TEST: ARTISTRY: TOTAL SUCCESS
    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    You walk into the midst of the battlefield and begin to weave a tale.

    "Listen, children, and I shall sing you the tale of the mighty forest ranger, Fiona Hawk, and how she slew six dragons with a single arrow!"

    The children immediately perk up at the simple, catchy tune. The Lay of Fiona Hawk has nearly a hundred verses, and you launch into the first one. The children shout the chorus in unison with glee.

    The soldiers and fairies, too, you note with pleasure, start singing along as they fight, and although the battle continues in full force, you hope, in some small measure, to have reduced the ferocity of the warriors, and thus tempered the destruction.

    Verse after verse, you back slowly away from the battle, luring the children along with you. Prenzie dances and claps along, and helps to hide the children behind the stage as you all arrive there.
    NOBILITY: 68

    This is actually an INCREASE , so there must have been a major drop from the play, which I had not noticed. But it was a success.

    REPUTATION: PRENZIE: 55 [+5]


    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    Suddenly, Constable Growly runs by in his bear disguise, heedless of the battle going on around him. "We've spotted her—Robin—here in the woods," he roars as he bounds by.

    You know what that means. Your snowy twin. As Constable Growly departs, you think you hear a familiar-sounding shout deep in the woods. You run towards the sound, trying to locate it.

    After a few moments, you emerge from a thicket of linden trees to see Morgan backing away from your fairy twin. Your snowy duplicate holds a blade that looks made of ice and advances menacingly on Morgan.

    "Please, Robin," Morgan cries, hands up protectively. "I…I loved…I love you."

    "I thought you loved Frederick," says your snowy twin. "You betrayed me, both in love, and as a spy. I despise you like the worm you are."

    "I…do not know!" Morgan says, slowly drawing his own sword. He parries your snow twin's thrust awkwardly and stumbles.

    Your snow twin looks up and sees you watching. She winks at you, smiles mischievously, and then turns back to Morgan. "I could forgive you," she says. "But on the other hand I do not remember you saying you were sorry. In any case, I think it would be more fun to slay you than forgive you. I do not think I have ever slain anyone before. Probably everyone will assume you fell in the battle—if anyone misses you at all, that is."

    Morgan drops his guard in dismay. "Why are you…"

    "Why am I so cruel, you would ask? It's because I am made of snow and ice. Cold-hearted."

    "You are not. Not the Robin I know."

    "Let's find out." And your snowy twin swiftly lunges at Morgan with her ice blade.

    Vote 86:


    86A: I step out from the thicket and shout, "Stop! Do not do this!"

    86B : I pick up a stone and throw it expertly at the icy blade, knocking it from her hand.

    86C: I call upon the forest itself to protect Morgan from the blow.



    Can Morgan's life be saved? Let's find out ... on Wednesday, 22 May, 2019, 5 PM EDT !

    Respectfully,

    Brian P.
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid."

    -Valery Legasov in Chernobyl

  17. - Top - End - #197
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    Success? What am I doing???

    This time maybe we're close enough to the forest for 86C to work.

  18. - Top - End - #198
    Orc in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    86A is my vote. Time for a climactic confrontation.
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  19. - Top - End - #199
    Firbolg in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    We have one vote for 86C and one vote for 86A.

    86C - 80
    86A - 3

    So we're going to try to use enchantment to stop the attack.

    I call upon the forest itself to protect Morgan from the blow.

    Barely understanding how you are able to do so, you call upon the power of the forest.

    A low-hanging branch suddenly snaps forward, pushing aside the point of the ice blade, so that it misses Morgan.

    "Enough of that," you say, stepping out of the thicket. Your snow twin smiles sweetly at you, and then throws the ice blade at you. But the branch is too swift: it knocks the blade out of the air, and it smashes against a stone into a thousand splinters.

    "Frederick!" Morgan says, startled by your sudden arrival.

    "Of course, you show up just when I am having fun," your twin says. "I was not going to hurt him. I was just going to tease him a bit. He deserves much worse than that."
    ENCHANTMENT: 41 [+6].

    Note that this was not a skill test. Instead, any choice we made would have strengthened the relevant stat.

    At any rate, we seem to have saved Morgan's life, at least for the moment.

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    You take a step closer to your twin. "What do you want here?"

    "What kind of a welcome is that for a close relation?"

    "You are not my close relation."

    She ponders for a moment.

    "You sculpted me with magic," your twin points out. "You put some sort of morality in me. Before, I was content to hang about in my pond. But now I want all sorts of things. Like to point a sword at Morgan."

    Morgan looks at you, bewildered. "Frederick, what is she talking about? What is going on here?"

    You turn to Morgan. "This is not Robin. It is a trick."

    "It is no trick," your snow twin says, wide-eyed. "I am Robin. Who else would I be?"

    Morgan looks deeply unhappy. "Frederick, you do not know Robin like I do. Of course this is Robin. She is just not in her right mind, because somehow she found out what I did. Did you tell her?"

    "No!" you say.

    "Yes!" your twin says.

    Morgan rubs his head.

    "Morgan, you have to believe me. This is a malevolent fairy duplicate of Robin!" But Morgan just looks back and forth between you both.

    "Well, you have broken my sword, and you have me outnumbered. I am in your power. Am I a prisoner? What are you going to do with me?"

    It's a good question. The battle is still raging, and you have daring feats yet to perform back in the clearing. You take a deep breath.

    Vote 87:

    87A) "Let us tie her up and leave her helpless until the battle is over."

    87B) "Morgan, take your sword and kill her. That is the only way to end this."

    87C) "We will have to set her free. We have no right to imprison or kill her."

    87D) "Give me your sword. I will kill her myself."



    After you've made your decision, we'll see whether it works out or not. We've already tried to sculpt some morality into her once. While we were able to improve her a little, it was only a very little indeed.

    Have your votes in and we will attempt to deal with our doppleganger on Friday, 24 May 2019, 5PM EDT!

    Respectfully,

    Brian P.
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid."

    -Valery Legasov in Chernobyl

  20. - Top - End - #200
    Orc in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    it's 87d for me
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  21. - Top - End - #201
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    BardGuy

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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    Not very bright, is he? This supposed love of my life has Just spent 2 whole hours of bad acting directly opposite me while I was dressed as a woman but still the penny hasn't dropped as to who I actually am. Frankly We should just reveal ourselves to the silly sod and then dump him for someone brighter, like constable Growly or a clump of tree fungus but oh no, that would mean slipping off the tracks. Well, Cause Toujours as we say. Let's go for 87A. It's clearly not denouement o'clock anyway, so we may as well take the points for being stupidly heroic.

  22. - Top - End - #202
    Firbolg in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    We have a tie between 87d - kill her ourselves -- or 87a -- simply tie her up.

    Let's see what random.org thinks.

    87d - 1
    87a - 2

    So it's 87A - "Let us tie her up and leave her helpless until the battle is over."

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    "Oh," Morgan says, dazed. "But how can we tie up Lady Robin like that? She—and the Duke—will be furious, and…"

    "Morgan, get hold of yourself. This is the right thing to do."

    Morgan removes his sash, and you use it to bind your snow twin tightly to a tree.

    Your snow twin looks livid. "I will not forget you manhandling me in this way. And you, Morgan. Have you not harmed me enough?"

    Morgan goes ashen and turns away as you check and recheck the knots. You nod to Morgan, and together you walk away.

    Morgan is silent, and it is difficult to break that silence.

    "We did the right thing," you say.

    "Maybe. I know not. I…listen, Frederick, I have some thinking to do. I will find you later. Be careful."

    And Morgan turns quickly away from you and runs off into the night, deep into the woods.
    What a wuss. It's not like we carved her into bits and pieces, and she is not nice.

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    After Morgan departs, you find yourself back in the clearing, where silver moonbeams light the swirling chaos of the battle. A group of the Duke's guards attempt to use a comically oversized butterfly net to capture a squad of fairy outlaws, while the fairies in turn set a series of tripwires across the clearing designed to snare the feet of unwary humans. An elite squad of fairy bombardiers launch beehives and hornet's nests from crude slingshots, and swarms of angry winged insects pursue the Duke's guards ruthlessly.

    You can see Father with a map of the clearing spread out on his bed. He is moving wooden carvings around the map, representing the various forces in the melee, clearly trying to explain some fine point of tactics to Doctor Nostrum.

    In the distance, far from the bed, you see a golden glow emanating from the edge of the wood and hear a tinkling laugh—the Faerie Queene herself must have come to direct the battle.

    As you consider the battle, you see Constable Growly bound past again, looking back and forth. He lifts his bear head up. "Have you seen Flavia? Where is she?"

    "I have not seen her," you say. "I hope she is safe."

    "I'm going to check her house," Growly says, looking concerned, and lopes away.


    Vote 88: What should you do?

    88A) I can be neutral no longer. Father needs help conducting his battle! I'll offer my services at once.

    88B) The time for neutrality has passed. I'll approach the Faerie Queene and join with the fairy forces!

    88C) I'll continue to remain neutral in this battle and follow Constable Growly.


    Let us decide and it will obviously greatly impact the story from this point on. Good luck, and let us determine our future course ... on Monday, 27 May 2019, 5 PM EDT!

    Respectfully,

    Brian P.
    Last edited by pendell; 2019-05-26 at 02:17 PM.
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid."

    -Valery Legasov in Chernobyl

  23. - Top - End - #203
    Dwarf in the Playground
     
    BardGuy

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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    Random.org clearly not impressed with either of our choices...

    88A. Cowardly perhaps, but Daddy has the shepherds and waiting to see who's winning before entering the fray has been a noble tradition for centuries. Maybe this proves useful leverage on the marriage front...

  24. - Top - End - #204
    Orc in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    88B. Let us not forget that Father sought to marry us off. It is time for his comeuppance.
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  25. - Top - End - #205
    Firbolg in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    Oh-kay, one vote for 88A and one vote for 88B.

    88a - 17
    88b- 62

    So we're joining the Fairy Queen. Long live her majesty!

    The time for neutrality has passed. I'll approach the Faerie Queene and join with the fairy forces!


    It's time to join with the fairies! You run towards the golden glow at the edge of the woods to offer your services.
    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    Running past guards locked in mortal combat with fairy skirmishers, you dash across the clearing towards where you heard the laughter of the Faerie Queene. You were not mistaken. There she sits, on a palanquin drawn by one hundred peacocks, shining in the night with a radiant golden glow. She is surrounded by dozens of her most important and minuscule fairy advisors, who hover on hummingbirds around her.

    She holds up her hand to halt her palanquin as she sees you. "Ah…I know you," she says. "Dear Frederick, was it? You are welcome here. And you are needed. I am about to strike the final blow at the Duke, and you come at a most timely hour."

    She turns her face to you, and you are struck once again by the awesome power of her presence. You take a step towards her, trying to maintain some semblance of control.

    "I am weaving a spell," she says and holds out her hand to you. "Please, share my palanquin. These cushions are most soft, and there are honey wine and tea cakes to refresh us while we perform our magic."

    You take her hand, and with surprising strength, she helps you up onto her palanquin. You make yourself comfortable beside her.

    A lithe fairy with a gossamer gown holds up a tray, bearing a miniature wineglass and a plate piled with cakes the size of your pinky nail.

    Vote 89

    89A) "No, thank you," you say. "I have heard that it is best not to eat fairy food. Tell me of this spell you weave."

    89B) "No wine for me. I need to keep my head clear. I will just have the cakes, thank you."

    89C) "Everything looks delicious. I will have both wine and cake, please."



    How much to say ? Consider any stories you have heard of fairy food. It will indeed boost your enchantment stats and bind you more closely to the fairy world but that may not be all it does. If you intend to go all the way with the fairies, it's probably best to eat the food. But if you have any attachment to the human world, it's probably best to refuse even if it does cause you to fail any future skill tests involving enchantment.

    Respectfully,

    Brian P.
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid."

    -Valery Legasov in Chernobyl

  26. - Top - End - #206
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    BardGuy

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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    If we're away with the fairies we should go the whole 89C.
    Last edited by Mister Tom; 2019-05-28 at 12:51 PM.

  27. - Top - End - #207
    Orc in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    Yes, let's 89C. This should be fun. Maybe we'll shrink.
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  28. - Top - End - #208
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    89C
    Even more so if it says "Eat me" on it.
    Awesome avatar (Kothar, paladin of Tlacua) by Linkele!

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    I pirate.
    Yarr!

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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    89C
    Love me some good references.
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  30. - Top - End - #210
    Firbolg in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    All right, we're gonna chug the lot! Don't say I didn't warn you!

    "Everything looks delicious. I will have both wine and cake, please."

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    The fairy server offers you the food and drink, which you find surprisingly filling in spite of how small a portion it is.

    The cakes are warm and sweet, and you feel your body fill with fairy magic. You feel full of energy and life and power. A sense of well-being comes over you, and you have to struggle for a moment to remember who you are. It's pleasant and unnerving at the same time.

    The wine, on the other hand, immediately fills you with a sharp clarity of purpose—you love the Faerie Queene. Looking at her as you drink, you realize how much you need her, how much she means to you, and you feel the magic of the forest as you have never felt it before.
    ENCHANTMENT: 58 [+17]
    NOBILITY: 58 [-10]
    MERRIMENT: 74 [-6]

    The reason both your nobility and merriment scores dropped is, in order to gain magical power, you have lost a part of yourself and you will never, ever get it back.

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    "Now then," the Faerie Queene says. "I intend to weave a deep enchantment to force all of the Duke's loyal allies to set down their arms."

    The Faerie Queene pauses to pick up a hand mirror and regard herself closely. "After all," she says. "I am most worthy of fealty. It would be a favor to all. It would be horrifying for them not to have the opportunity to serve me."

    The Faerie Queene's advisors nod vigorously and applaud. She silences them with one hand. "But in order to weave this magic, I need your help. Only someone as clever and talented as you can possibly hope to wield magic such as this. And I shall guide you."

    "What do you want me to do?" you ask.

    "Take my hands, and close your eyes. I will show you."

    As you obey, you take a few breaths, waiting for something to happen. "Now, reach out with your mind, and try to see the battlefield."

    "I see it!" you say. And you do. Your mind receives a dim picture of the battle. You see the fighting and hear the shouting, faintly, but with increasing clarity as you focus.

    You see the Maroon Knight, armor scored by vicious gashes, but still fighting atop Father's bed. You see Doctor Nostrum, trying in vain to hold on to his bag of medicine, as Piccolita and a group of other fairies flies away with it. You see Prenzie running into the shepherd village, and Morgan wandering the outskirts of the forest, looking melancholy.

    "Good. Now, focus on the Duke."
    Here we go. Into Father's mind.

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    You locate Father, waving his map around. "I have him."

    "Now," murmurs the Faerie Queene, with her thrillingly soft voice. "We are going to enter his mind, and strike at him from within. Come."

    As you and the Faerie Queene hold each other's hands, you mentally push through what feels like a layer of cobwebs, and then you are in Father's mind. You are disoriented, as a thousand foreign thoughts strike you at once, and you feel sick for a few moments. Then, your head clears.

    You are in Father's throne room, a room dominated by a silver throne on a dais, with a pair of jeweled ceremonial axes hanging on the wall.

    Light dance music echoes through the throne room, which is adorned with tattered silk ribbons and ghostly courtiers, stepping lightly, bowing, and performing graceful leaps in dance moves that were popular forty years ago.

    The Faerie Queene motions towards the silver throne. "This throne represents the Duke's sense of command and confidence." She considers you carefully. "We must decide swiftly on our plan of attack. We will have little time to work."

    "What do I do?" you ask.

    "The most effective, but the most difficult approach, would be to simply oppose your will to his and attempt to shatter the throne. But his will is formidable, and this path is not easily walked. Or you might also try to flood his mind with joyful thoughts, which would distract him from battle to a certain extent." She wrinkles her nose a bit. "Although we are here to conquer, not amuse, the Duke. But I leave it to your judgment."

    Vote 90:

    90A) I oppose my will to Father's, attempting to shatter the throne and thus force Father's command to waver.

    90B) I flood Father's mind with joyful thoughts to distract him from the battle.

    90C) The Faerie Queene is making this too complicated. I grab one of the ceremonial axes from behind the throne and smash the throne with it.


    Consider which strategy is most effective in this magical plane; it will probably require a secondary skill test in addition to your enchantment stat. Consider your course carefully and also the Faerie Queene's advice. This isn't her first time in magical battle after all.

    Good luck! We will complete our spell on Friday, 31 May, 2019, 5 PM EDT!

    Respectfully,

    Brian P.
    Last edited by pendell; 2019-05-29 at 05:00 PM.
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid."

    -Valery Legasov in Chernobyl

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