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  1. - Top - End - #151
    Firbolg in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    65b it is!


    "Perhaps you may some day regain the heart of Robin. After all, love is not love that alters when it alteration finds."

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    "Do you think so?" Morgan asks. "How torn I am between two loves! And how strangely torn you must be, Frederick, to encourage me to love Robin when you yourself may…perhaps…care for me."

    "It is a strange love triangle indeed," you say. "To think that Lady Robin is my romantic rival!"

    "But let me tell you of my motives," Morgan says.

    Morgan shakes his head. "As you know, I fell in love with Robin. I resisted and resisted. I knew it was wrong. I knew I was undermining my mission to work secretly against the Duke. When I helped Robin run away from home, I thought maybe I could free myself of this impossible love. And then I met you, Frederick, and…I should not say this, because you will be insulted, but it is the truth: I fell in love with you because—somehow—you remind me of her, in some strange way."
    Really? Can't imagine why.

    REPUTATION: MORGAN: 63[+1]

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    "So…where do you go from here?" you ask.

    "I know not," Morgan says. "I suppose I will have to return home to Lower Fogsworth. You are…welcome to join me. I hate the thought of Robin thinking that I was treacherous to her, but I do not suppose I will ever see her again. Farewell for now, Frederick."

    Before you can respond, a large bear bounds over to you and Morgan; your instinct is to panic, but before you can do so, the bear stands up and holds out his hands to reassure you.

    Constable Growly removes his bear head and stows it under one arm. "You may not have recognized me in my costume"—here he gestures to his bear outfit, turning around fully so you can admire it—"but I want to assure you that it is indeed me." He takes a good look at Morgan.

    "That's a nice fox disguise there. Well done. Let me recommend going beyond simply the head, though. It's not…wholly convincing yet. But it's an all right start," he says, smugly.

    "Who has a fox disguise? What is he talking about?" Morgan asks.

    "Is there something I can help you with, Constable?" you say, waving aside Morgan's questions.

    "I just wanted to let you know that I've spotted Robin lurking on the edge of the woods, and that I've prepared what I would call a pretty cunning trap for her."

    Morgan looks around uncertainly. "A trap? You will not…hurt her, will you?"

    Growly shakes his head. "Of course not. It's a wholly nonlethal snare."

    "What kind of snare?" you ask.

    "It's a little complicated. Suffice to say that it involves me finding just the right tree to hide behind and then jumping out unexpectedly. So I'd appreciate you keeping a close eye out for her. I expect that when I capture Robin, the Duke will reward me richly. And then—O happy day!—I'll be able to wed the woman I love."

    Here Constable Growly's gaze strays across the clearing to rest on the shepherdess Flavia, who is feverishly directing the construction of a lovely pavilion near the stage.

    "Well, I must be off. If you see Robin, try to guide her over to where I'm hiding. I'll be by those trees over there." He motions vaguely with one paw. "That's where my cunning trap has been laid."
    His ... cunning trap? Do tell. Maybe we won't be the only ones with a merriment score?

    And ... he's working for the Duke so he can get the money to marry Flavia, is he? Maybe we can get him on our side?


    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    Hunting horns blare shrilly as Father's hunters and a troop of his household guards march into the clearing, waving banners as if offering a challenge to anyone who would dare to oppose them.

    Father's men look grim and wary, and most have weapons drawn. Ten of the burliest warriors carry Father's bed; Father lies in the bed, propped up on several fluffy pillows. With every step of the guards who bear him, he winces and curses.

    Doctor Nostrum paces alongside the bed, fussing over Father, replacing a poultice on his head or mixing a healing salve with a comically oversized mortar and pestle.

    You look at Father, sizing up what sort of mood he is in.
    And ...?

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    Father crosses his arms and looks around the clearing with utter contempt.

    "Where is my daughter?" he demands. "Are you keeping her from me? Hand her over to me at once, or I will order my men to burn your hovels to the ground."

    Some of the shepherds start to boo and hiss at Father, and one of them cries, "Down with the Duke!"

    Father becomes angrier still. He orders the bed halted. "Who said that!" he yells. "Who said, 'Down with the Duke'? Guards, find that shepherd and give him a sound lashing! I was promised rustic entertainment, not seditious caterwauling!"

    The guards advance towards the shepherds, and you can see some of the shepherds clutch their staffs and crooks more tightly. The situation is volatile, and you need to do something about it, now, or a bloodbath will follow!
    FATHER'S FURY: 73 [+2].

    Uh-oh.

    We may have ONE chance to prevent a massacre.

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    Well!" you suddenly cry out, and all eyes go to you. "Entertainment! Let's all have some fun!"

    "Fun?" Father says. The guards turn to you, and the shepherds do as well. "What 'fun' are you referring to?" Father asks, doubtfully, sizing you up.

    Vote 66: How should you amuse everyone?

    66A) I'll amuse everyone with physical comedy and ridiculous buffoonery.
    66B) I'll engage him in an intelligent conversation to distract him from his anger.
    66C) Maybe I can manipulate the latent magic of the woods to influence his mood and make him calmer.


    Could this be a chance to actually use our burgeoning merriment score? Maaaybe Have your votes in by Wednesday, 24 APR, 2019 , 5PM EDT and we'll see if we can stop father from murdering everyone.

    Good luck!

    Respectfully,

    Brian P.
    Last edited by pendell; 2019-04-23 at 07:51 AM.
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid."

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  2. - Top - End - #152
    Dwarf in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    Yeah, Growly's clearly got the cheap laughs sewn up.

    So. Either we use our merriment or increase it to even more godlike levels. 66A it is.

  3. - Top - End - #153
    Orc in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    Hey, a quick aside: after this is done, would people be interested in doing another choice of games? I would love to run my favorite, choice of robots.
    Whether loved or hated, all characters die. A minority opinion holds that the righteous ones are really just Put on a Bus until the head writer's son gets back from his coffee break.

    Thank you Honest Tiefling for this Rocking Avatar, Man I like that Tiefling.

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  4. - Top - End - #154
    Firbolg in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    I actually ran it here four years ago. But four years is enough of a cooldown , don't you think? I'd love to be in as a participant.

    Respectfully,

    Brian P.
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid."

    -Valery Legasov in Chernobyl

  5. - Top - End - #155
    Orc in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    Quote Originally Posted by pendell View Post
    I actually ran it here four years ago. But four years is enough of a cooldown , don't you think? I'd love to be in as a participant.

    Respectfully,

    Brian P.
    Oh wow! I think I actually read through that a a year or two back! Oh that was what gave me the idea!






    ...Why do you sign your posts outside of your signature?
    Whether loved or hated, all characters die. A minority opinion holds that the righteous ones are really just Put on a Bus until the head writer's son gets back from his coffee break.

    Thank you Honest Tiefling for this Rocking Avatar, Man I like that Tiefling.

    "Sorry I couldn’t get on yesterday, personal stuff happened. Why are we lynching a boat?"

  6. - Top - End - #156
    Orc in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    66A as well!
    EXPLOSIVE RUNES
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    EXPLOSIVE RUNES

  7. - Top - End - #157
    Firbolg in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    Okay, we're going to amuse everyone with ridiculous comedy. Let the madness begin!

    ACTION!

    SKILL TEST: MERRIMENT: TOTAL SUCCESS
    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    You do a forward roll, fall flat on your face, and then jump up, dust yourself off, and bow deeply before Father.

    You back slowly away from him, and grandly announce: "Now, I shall amuse you with my dexterous feats of—WHOA!" You fall backwards over the banquet table, right into a cream pie.

    This has the possibility to go very poorly indeed, but you gauged Father's mood right: he claps his hands and guffaws at your seeming ineptitude.

    "What nonsense is this!" Father says, his eyes creased with laughter.

    "'Tis I, Frederick the Magnificent Scholar, at your service," you say.

    "At my service?" says the Duke. "What service have you to offer?"

    "Delight and laughter. Behold!" you say, and you spend the next thirty minutes spinning plates, juggling fruit, and telling outrageous stories. You are not especially good at any of those things, but you know how to make it amusing when the plates fall and the fruit drops to the ground.

    The guards laugh and clap as you tell stories and tumble. Father is enjoying himself, clutching at his belly in laughter. Most importantly, he seems to relax considerably.
    NOBILITY: 77 [+2]
    FATHER'S FURY: 59 [-14]

    *Wipes brow* So bloodshed doesn't seem imminent any more. Thank goodness.

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    inally, Flavia approaches the Duke, curtsies, and announces that the play in his honor is about to begin. The shepherds mutter and grumble, but the prospect of a play diverts enough that they make no objection to the Duke entering the clearing and feasting among them.

    Prenzie, the Maroon Knight, and Morgan approach you as everyone is getting settled.

    "That was impressive," says Prenzie. "Nicely done. The Duke didn't have to execute anyone."

    "These shepherds seem malcontent," the Maroon Knight says. "I like not their tone. Your diversion seems to have quieted things down, however."
    We're getting there, but the shepherds still seem to be a bit unhappy. Father isn't totally happy himself at this point, but at least we've calmed things down.

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    renzie looks over at Morgan. "Did you know that you have a fox head?" he asks. "I mention it merely conversationally."

    "I am unaccustomed to being spoken to that way by strange haberdashers," Morgan says stiffly, snorting and pawing at the ground a bit.

    Before you can respond, Flavia rushes over to you, fear in her eyes, her hair streaming behind her.

    "Oh, Frederick! Four of our actors in the play have unfortunately come down with a terrible case of the French disease and cannot go on! Two of them were supposed to play crucial roles."

    "Oh," you say. "That is unfortunate."

    "I need you to play one of the lead characters. Please, I beg you. Otherwise, the play will be ruined." Flavia sorts through a stack of papers, and then hands you your part.

    "But I do not know what play you are doing! Wait a moment!" This is uncannily like a bad dream.

    "It's The Most Lamentable Pirate's Tragedy, or All Is Not Gold that Glisters," she says.

    You do have some familiarity with that play: you read it not long ago. "But…you want me to go on without practice or having the part memorized?"
    The "French Disease"?

    ...

    Whatever. Sounds like we're going to be acting.

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    You'll have to improvise. Just make it sound good. There's no time to argue! Now, we'll need one person to play the other lead role, opposite you, and two people to play smaller roles. Do you know anyone else who can play the other lead role? It's a tragic role, suitable for a subtle actor."

    You look towards Morgan, Prenzie, and the Maroon Knight. "Let me do it," says Morgan. "Let me do this for you."

    "But you have a fox head," Prenzie objects. "That disqualifies you. Let me do it. These bumpkins don't know what good theater is anyway, and we can just make up some silly stuff together."

    "This play is not a 'silly' play," says the Maroon Knight. "It is a dignified tragedy with serious and sad dramatic content. Let me play the role, Frederick. I will bring a certain gravitas to the part."

    "You'd have to take off that helmet," says Prenzie. "Nobody will be able to understand you."

    "I will not take off my helmet," counters the Maroon Knight. "I made a vow."

    Flavia looks at you, desperately.

    Vote 67: You look at them all. "I pick…

    67A) "…Morgan."

    67B) "…Prenz—I mean, that haberdasher there."

    67C) "…the Maroon Knight."


    After we pick our leading man, Flavia continues.

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    "Thank you," Flavia says. "That's everyone. Oh, wait. There's one minor role that still needs filling. A bear comes onstage in the middle and pursues the heroes. I wonder if…"

    Constable Growly pops up behind Flavia. "Did you happen to say you need someone to play a bear? I feel like I can do that." He looks at Flavia adoringly. "Please, Flavia. I can do this. I was born to play this role."

    "Oh, all right," she says, and Constable Growly jumps for joy.

    Flavia hands you and your partner scripts. "Neither of you appear in the first scene, so you have about ten minutes to review the parts. You'll just have to do the best you can. Good luck!"
    EXEUNT.


    Hmm ... it appears that much of the dialog at this point on depends on our partner. So we'll have to stop here and make that selection. While we're waiting, I'll fill you in on

    THE PLAY

    SPECIAL RULES

    The measure of success of the play is FATHER'S FURY. The lower that value is (it is currently 59), the more successful the play is.

    ARTISTRY is the primary stat used in acting skill tests.

    For the play to be a success, you must decide early on whether to play it as a comedy, a tragedy, or a mixture of both. MERRIMENT is the primary stat for comedy. COURAGE , WIT, and CHARM can all be important, depending on your actions and what skill you choose to exercise.

    The play is originally intended to be a tragedy , but it can be played as a comedy as well. You can succeed with any of the three interpretations, but the mixed form is the hardest to pull off. Probably better to pick an interpretation and stick with it as best you can through the play.

    Good luck! See you Friday, 26 APR 2017, 5:30PM as we begin our acting career!

    Respectfully,

    Brian P.
    Last edited by pendell; 2019-04-24 at 04:23 PM.
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid."

    -Valery Legasov in Chernobyl

  8. - Top - End - #158
    Ogre in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    I choose:
    67C: The Maroon Knight!
    And I want to make it a comedy, since the Maroon Knight is a rather silly person, and we might as well put our merriment to use.
    Awesome avatar (Kothar, paladin of Tlacua) by Linkele!

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    Orc in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    Our highest relationship stat is with Morgan, so let us choose 67A.

    Then we'll make it a tragedy so that Morgan can die.
    EXPLOSIVE RUNES
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  10. - Top - End - #160
    Dwarf in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    Our choices have left us primarily suited to unintended comedic Failure, so I choose choose 67B- Prenz- I mean the haberdasher who is after all a professional fool.

  11. - Top - End - #161
    Firbolg in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    So let's see. Looks like we have a three way tie. I'll roll for it!

    67C: The Maroon Knight! 52
    67A: Morgan 70
    67B: Some haberdasher we just met. 23

    So we'll be taking Morgan as our co-star, fox head and all.

    Achievement: A rare courtier
    You chose Morgan as your co-star.

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    "Thank you, thank you!" Morgan says, picking a flea off of his fur. "I will not disappoint you."

    "Well, it's your loss," Prenzie says, shaking his head. "I will do justice to whatever smaller role Flavia chooses to give me."

    "I respect your decision," the Maroon Knight says. "Although I suspect there may be dark fairy magic at work here with his…head. But you know your business best. I will perform a smaller role."
    REPUTATION: MORGAN: 68 [+5]
    REPUTATION: MAROON KNIGHT: 40 [-4]
    REPUTATION: PRENZIE: 46[-5]

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    Thank you," Flavia says. "That's everyone. Oh, wait. There's one minor role that still needs filling. A bear comes onstage in the middle and pursues the heroes. I wonder if…"

    Constable Growly pops up behind Flavia. "Did you happen to say you need someone to play a bear? I feel like I can do that." He looks at Flavia adoringly. "Please, Flavia. I can do this. I was born to play this role."

    "Oh, all right," she says, and Constable Growly jumps for joy.

    Flavia hands you and Morgan scripts. "Neither of you appear in the first scene, so you have about ten minutes to review the parts. You'll just have to do the best you can. Good luck!"

    Exeunt
    And on to our next scene!

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer


    The Duke, his guards and hunters, and the shepherds all take their seats on the benches in front of the stage. They feast and laugh, but most of all, they murmur with excitement for the evening's entertainment.

    It is dark, but the clearing is well-lit with torches, and one of the shepherds pipes a merry tune as everyone waits for the play to begin.

    Behind the stage, however, things are less merry. You are struggling to understand the plot of the play, as Flavia hastily explains it to you for the fourth time.

    "So I play Hyacinth, a young noble from Flanders who was exiled for political reasons, and has returned home from Bohemia to live the life of a pirate, but who is now in disguise as a visiting dignitary," you say. "I understand. And my best friend, Alexis the clothmaker, has betrayed me in my absence, and I return, kill Alexis…and prove my innocence to the kingdom? Is that right?"

    "That's…very close," says Flavia. "Let's get you into costume, and then I want you to study the script some more."

    She holds up the gown of an aristocratic young woman. "This should fit you tolerably well. The Duke donated these old clothes from his household last year, and they'll get the idea across that you are a rich noblewoman."

    "You…want me to play a woman?" You recognize those clothes. That was your gown before it went out of style, and you allowed it to be given away.

    "Yes, I do," she says. "As you well know, it is rather in bad taste for women to act onstage, so all women's roles must be played by young men. I am certain you will do admirably. Do you think you can play a woman persuasively?"

    "I think so," you say. "I will try."
    So we're a woman playing a man playing a woman...? Well, this is definitely going to stretch us.

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    "All right," she says. "Go put them on. And learn your lines swiftly and accurately."

    You step behind a tree and put aside your trusty scholar costume that has been with you through so much since you came to the forest.

    Vote 68: How are you feeling about appearing as a woman again?

    Vote 68A: I am not happy about appearing before Father as a woman, because he may be more likely to figure out who I am.

    Vote 68B: In a way, I regret having to leave the clothes of a man behind.

    Vote 68C: I could not be happier. I feel more like myself.


    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    You put on your costume while studying the script, reading your lines over and over, trying to memorize some of the more difficult speeches, or at least recognize where your cues are. But it's hopeless. There's too much, and you have no time to prepare.
    No problem, we'll just fall on our *** and amuse the heck out of 'em. Who needs lines when you have buffoonery?

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    Morgan, wearing a very small hat on his large fox head, steps over to you.

    "I just want to say thank you for the vote of confidence," he says. "I know I can do a good job playing…" he looks at the script in his hands. "Alexis the clogmaker…no, sorry, clothmaker! Alexis the clothmaker. This script is confusing, is it not?"
    I ... see we're going to have our work cut out for us. He doesn't know his lines and that fox head looks ridiculous. Still, that might be useful from a comedy perspective...

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    Flavia clears her throat for silence, and then steps before the Duke, quill still behind her ear. She curtsies low, and speaks: "Your Grace, we present to you, The Most Lamentable Pirate's Tragedy, or All Is Not Gold that Glisters."

    She then retires backstage, where she gnaws on her fingernails and paces.

    The audience hushes, as three shepherd musicians play a solemn, classically inflected tune, the sounds of the crumhorn, the viola de gamba, and the hautbois announcing the start of the play.

    The shepherd playing the Chorus steps forward, wearing some old and tattered robes. Holding a scroll, he raises his hands majestically and speaks the prologue.

    I am he who all men fear: I am Time.
    And when I speak, I always speak in rhyme.
    I urge you, then, to work your thoughts to sail
    Across the sea so filled with fish and whale.
    We hope to show you, with no fault or blemish,
    The kingdom of the ones they call the Flemish.
    And here we see the court: the king's lamenting.
    They all are lost in tears; there's no dissenting.
    To know why they all weep, we now shall show:
    So be prepared for fear and death and woe.
    Sweet mercy, WHO wrote those lines? Agh.

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    The play begins, and on the stage, the shepherds playing the king and the court are all crying and wringing their hands. The audience, you can see, as you peek out from behind the stage, is beginning to be drawn in, and you are looking forward to your entrance, which will be any moment now.

    If you understood the scene right, you will be entering and pretending that you are a stranger to the Flemish king's court, when in fact, it was your home. There's also some sort of plot about a trial and an execution that you are a little hazy about, but you're sure that will be made clear.


    Vote 69: The only question is, how would it be best to speak your opening line?

    69A) "I am CONTENT, as always when I travel, to meet both common folk as well as lords."

    69B) "I am content, as always when I TRAVEL, to meet both common folk as well as lords."

    69C)"I am content, as always when I travel, to meet both COMMON folk as well as lords."

    69D) "I am content, as always when I travel, to meet both common folk as well as LORDS."


    So what we're doing is stressing to the audience what is most important to us .. is it our contentment? Or love of travel? Are we especially attached to either commons or lords? A lot to pack in to one short sentence. Make it good!

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    You cross the stage and wave elegantly to the player lords and player king.

    Now you are supposed to have a discussion with the king—this is important exposition, in which you make a wager that you can defeat some rebels in the north.

    You begin to argue with the player king while the court looks on in dismay. Now you have a complex speech in which you have to boast about your accomplishments…

    Vote 70:

    70A) …I'll look at the notes I've written on my hand.

    70B) …I'll cough, and Flavia will prompt me.

    70C) …It may be difficult, but I will concentrate and try to recall the line accurately.

    70D) …Oh, forget the script. I'll just make it up.


    So, our first conumdrum. What will we do about the lines we don't remember? Let me know and we'll find out on Monday, 29 Apr, 2019, 5:30PM EDT! . See you then!

    See you then!

    Respectfully,

    Brian P.
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid."

    -Valery Legasov in Chernobyl

  12. - Top - End - #162
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    Hmmm
    68 C
    69 B
    70 D
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  13. - Top - End - #163
    Orc in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    68c
    69d
    70d
    EXPLOSIVE RUNES
    EXPLOSIVE RUNES
    EXPLODED RUNES
    PICTURE OF A CAT
    EXPLOSIVE RUNES

  14. - Top - End - #164
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    68C why not indeed.
    69A I am aiming to make this a comedy...
    70C... by accident. I hope.

  15. - Top - End - #165
    Firbolg in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    Sorry guys. I didn't really finish up last night until 10 but that's no excuse. I'll still get it rolling now.

    68c

    69 b, d, a, rolling -
    69b - 35
    69d - 13
    69a - 81

    So we'll be tackling 69a.

    70d

    ACTION!

    With regards to putting on woman's clothes again --

    "I could not be happier. I feel more like myself."

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    It's been hard having to lie—not only about your name, but about your gender—this whole time. At least for a few hours, you'll be able to relax.

    You put on your costume while studying the script, reading your lines over and over, trying to memorize some of the more difficult speeches, or at least recognize where your cues are. But it's hopeless. There's too much, and you have no time to prepare.

    Morgan, wearing a very small hat on his large fox head, steps over to you.

    "I just want to say thank you for the vote of confidence," he says. "I know I can do a good job playing…" He looks at the script in his hands. "Alexis the clogmaker…no, sorry, clothmaker! Alexis the clothmaker. This script is confusing, is it not?"
    For YOU, I suppose it is

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    Flavia clears her throat for silence, and then steps before the Duke, quill still behind her ear. She curtsies low, and speaks: "Your Grace, we present to you, The Most Lamentable Pirate's Tragedy, or All Is Not Gold that Glisters."

    She then retires backstage, where she gnaws on her fingernails and paces.

    The audience hushes, as three shepherd musicians play a solemn, classically inflected tune, the sounds of the crumhorn, the viola de gamba, and the hautbois announcing the start of the play.

    The shepherd playing the Chorus steps forward, wearing some old and tattered robes. Holding a scroll, he raises his hands majestically and speaks the prologue.


    I am he who all men fear: I am Time.
    And when I speak, I always speak in rhyme.
    I urge you, then, to work your thoughts to sail
    Across the sea so filled with fish and whale.
    We hope to show you, with no fault or blemish,
    The kingdom of the ones they call the Flemish.
    And here we see the court: the king's lamenting.
    They all are lost in tears; there's no dissenting.
    To know why they all weep, we now shall show:
    So be prepared for fear and death and woe.
    Well, the actors certainly are, though perhaps we can change that.

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    The play begins, and on the stage, the shepherds playing the king and the court are all crying and wringing their hands. The audience, you can see, as you peek out from behind the stage, is beginning to be drawn in, and you are looking forward to your entrance, which will be any moment now.

    If you understood the scene right, you will be entering and pretending that you are a stranger to the Flemish king's court, when in fact, it was your home. There's also some sort of plot about a trial and an execution that you are a little hazy about, but you're sure that will be made clear.
    We speak our opening line thus:

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    "I am CONTENT, as always when I travel, to meet both common folk as well as lords," you smile, and you can see and hear the audience take in this interpretation of the character, stressing, above all, your contentment.

    You cross the stage and wave elegantly to the player lords and player king.

    Now you are supposed to have a discussion with the king—this is important exposition, in which you make a wager that you can defeat some rebels in the north.

    You begin to argue with the player king while the court looks on in dismay. Now you have a complex speech in which you have to boast about your accomplishments…
    We decide to forget the script and just make it up.

    SKILL TEST: ARTISTRY : PARTIAL SUCCESS

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    You are far more creative than any playwright. You'll just come up with something interesting to say and do.

    You smile at the king. "Well, your Majesty, today is certainly a nice day, isn't it? I was thinking of buying a new hat."

    "You do not need a new hat," the king says. "You need to tell me about the northern rebels, I suspect."

    "Not at all," you say. "I have no idea what you are talking about. What are we going to have for dinner?"

    "We are not having dinner. We are talking about the northern rebels," he stubbornly demands.

    The player king obviously has no idea how improvisation is supposed to work, as every attempt you make to get some interesting conversation going is met by his insistence that you talk about boring political things.

    Finally, you give up, and, frustrated, you stalk offstage to boos and shouts.
    FURY: 65[+6]

    Unfortunately, we fell squarely between the two stools. This particular option was an extremely hard skill test to achieve a total success with, but our artistry IS quite high so we didn't score low enough for a hilarious flop. So in this case partial success was actually the worst possible outcome. :(

    But do not despair. The play isn't over yet!

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    At last, the first scene has come to an end. You take a quick peek at the audience to gauge their reaction.

    You can see that, in general, they have been left unmoved by the first scene, and you anxiously look at Father to see what he thought.

    Father shakes his head and pointedly refrains from clapping. "I have seen far better," he says. "I doubt there is any amusement of quality on offer today."
    Perhaps, but he's not in a murderous mood so our earlier buffoonery has had a good effect on him. We're still just a bit ahead!

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    After a few more scenes, it is time for your next important scene: the scene that establishes the major love plot of the play. You and Morgan, playing Alexis the clothmaker, have fallen desperately in love, but both the pirate code and your conservative aristocratic upbringing make the match impossible. Together, you lament your unhappy fate.

    The scene takes place in the forest. This should be an exciting scene, and it has a big finish—a savage bear attacks Alexis. You can see Constable Growly standing offstage in his bear costume, ready for his entrance.

    You enter, whistling a cheerful tune.

    You gaze around, and then pretend to realize that you are alone.

    "Ah, where is my dear Alexis?"

    Morgan walks onstage, absurd fox head on full display in front of the audience, who applaud in delight, assuming this is a well-designed costume.

    "I am here, my Hyacinth," Morgan says, in a sort of snorting, bestial voice. "I had just been picking flowers and frolicking in the meadows, when I thought of you. I feared you loved me no longer."

    "How could you say that, my Alexis, how? I love you true."

    "Kiss me, my Hyacinth, here in the privacy of this glade."

    The script calls for you to chastise Alexis for his betrayal of you. It suddenly hits you that this plot strikes very close to home.

    Vote 71: How do you want to play this?

    Vote 71A: I'll follow the script and berate Morgan's character for his violation of my trust.

    Vote 71B: I'll start by following the script, but then break from it, and make it a story of forgiveness instead.

    Vote 71C: This scene might bring up bad feelings between me and Morgan. I'll ignore the script, and improvise some amusing dialogue.


    *Looks ahead*. I know many of you want to make this a comedy, and I've looked ahead. While 71C is just as tough a skill test as before, a partial success is actually a real success this time, not the worst possible case as before. Though obviously not as good as a complete success. Other options may be more or less difficult, and may offer better chance of complete success. I'll let you work out which is the toughest acting challenge, and decide how you want to play it.

    Have your votes in and we will continue on Wednesday, 2 May 2019, 5:30PM EDT. There's only one vote so we should have enough time, but if need be we can extend. It IS my fault for being nearly 12 hours late and for that I apologize .

    Respectfully,

    Brian P.
    Last edited by pendell; 2019-04-30 at 06:34 AM.
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid."

    -Valery Legasov in Chernobyl

  16. - Top - End - #166
    Orc in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    71A! Berate him! Berate him to the ground!
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  17. - Top - End - #167
    Firbolg in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    Berating away!

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    You step back from Morgan, holding your hands between you.

    "No, Alexis," you say. "You may be a skilled clothmaker, weaving your fabrics, but you will weave no more lies today. You have betrayed me. How can I trust you any more?"

    "Please, Hyacinth, please," Morgan begs.

    "When I look into your face, what do I see? Do I see the face of an honest man?"

    Someone in the audience starts to titter, and one child in the audience asks, loudly, "Mummy, why does that man have a fox head?"

    You may have to figure out how to work Morgan's enchanted head into the script if you want to keep this play serious.

    Vote 72: How should you do that?

    72A) I'll say that Alexis tried to cast a spell on me, but it failed, and the fox head is the result.

    72B)Simple—I'll say that Alexis has just come from a masquerade ball and hasn't taken the costume off yet.

    72C) It's better to milk this situation for comedy. I'll pretend I don't notice it to get the crowd laughing.


    I assume you'll work this out somehow and we'll move on to the next bit!

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    Continuing to follow the script, Morgan get down on his knees and begins to plead with you for forgiveness.

    "Never," you say. "I will never forgive you, you beast."

    "I meant no harm. You must believe me."

    This scene has the potential to get really emotional.


    Vote 73: Are you going to subtly let Morgan know that you are just acting, or are you going to let some real anger at Morgan bleed through? Or are you too emotionally wrought to even continue?

    73A)I'll wink at him to let him know I'm just acting.

    73B) I'll take this opportunity to lash out at Morgan publicly through the medium of the play.

    73C) I have to find a way to stop this scene. It's hitting too close to home.

    73D) I'll start by following the script, but then break from it, and make it a story of forgiveness instead.

    73E) This scene might bring up bad feelings between me and Morgan. I'll ignore the script, and improvise some amusing dialogue.



    Just as we finish making up this scene (for better or for worse)

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    But before you can finish your words, you are thrown backwards by a loud bang and a flash of light that stuns you momentarily.

    Smoke wreathes Morgan's head, and when it clears, his head is back to normal. You suppose that the fairy enchantment responsible has worn off—or perhaps the Faerie Queene felt that Morgan had been humiliated long enough.

    Morgan rubs at his forehead as if dimly aware that something is different.

    The audience gasps, baffled by such an unearthly and impressive special effect. People look at each other in confusion, uncertain what they have just seen.

    "Is this unholy fairy magic?" thunders Father. "What in heaven's name have I just seen?"

    Morgan just stands there, in shock, running his hands over his face, and looking confused and alarmed. Clearly, it's up to you to respond.


    Vote 74: How should you deal with this tricky situation?

    74A) I'll tap into my own magical resources to cloud everyone's mind and make them forget what they just saw.

    74B) A distraction is the only way. I'll request that everyone stand and drink a toast in honor of the Duke.

    74C) I'll explain that all questions must take place after the performance.


    So let's see if we can make some decent scenes without any one being killed! Good luck! See you Friday, 3 May, 2019, 5 PM EDT !

    Respectfully,

    Brian P.
    Last edited by pendell; 2019-05-02 at 08:43 AM.
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid."

    -Valery Legasov in Chernobyl

  18. - Top - End - #168
    Orc in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    72C - I sense an opportunity for Merriment.
    73B - BERATE BERATE BERATE!
    74B - Just because I don't like the other two options.
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  19. - Top - End - #169
    Firbolg in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    Okay, our choices are:

    72C - Ignore the head, going for comedy.
    73B - Attack him under cover of the play.
    74B - Distraction!

    All right, let's do it!

    72C - It's better to milk this situation for comedy. I'll pretend I don't notice it to get the crowd laughing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    "You look different today," you say, gazing at Morgan with some interest. "Is that a new hat? No, no, do not tell me, I will get it eventually. New shoes?"

    You go for the easy laughs, and the audience responds.
    That worked, though no stat change.

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    Continuing to follow the script, Morgan get down on his knees and begins to plead with you for forgiveness.

    "Never," you say. "I will never forgive you, you beast."

    "I meant no harm. You must believe me."
    We lash out at Morgan through the medium of the play.

    SKILL TEST: COURAGE + ARTISTRY : FAIL

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    "I am really mad at you!" you say, more high-pitched and whiny than you intended. "Really, really mad, Morgan! I mean, Alexis!"

    Morgan looks at you in surprise.

    If foxes had eyebrows, you think Morgan would raise them.

    "I am angry at you in the play. My character is mad at your character," you clarify, so clouded by emotion that you barely think about what you are saying.

    The audience is gasping for air in delight at what they take to be a truly comic moment. As they laugh, you and Morgan share a look in which you let him know how hurt you are.
    At least we made 'em laugh

    MERRIMENT: 76 [+2]
    REPUTATION: MORGAN: 62[-6].

    We're definitely scoring on the comedy front, although I guess we shouldn't be surprised that we've hurt Morgan's feelings and our rep with him has suffered because of it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    here is a loud bang and a flash of light, stunning you momentarily.

    Smoke wreathes Morgan's head, and when it clears, his head is back to normal. You suppose that the fairy enchantment responsible has worn off—or perhaps the Faerie Queene felt that Morgan had been humiliated long enough.

    Morgan rubs at his forehead as if dimly aware that something is different.

    The audience gasps, baffled by such an unearthly and impressive special effect. People look at each other in confusion, uncertain what they have just seen.

    "Is this unholy fairy magic?" thunders Father. "What in heaven's name have I just seen?"

    Morgan just stands there, in shock, running his hands over his face, and looking confused and alarmed. Clearly, it's up to you to respond.
    DISTRACTION! Look, over there! A three-headed monkey!

    SKILL TEST: WIT: PARTIAL SUCCESS
    HIDDEN TEST: SHEPHERD'S ATTITUDE: FAIL.

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    "Good people, good people," you cry, stepping forward and holding your hands out for silence.

    "A toast! A toast to the Duke! Let us praise him!"

    At this, the Duke's men run around pouring out drinks. You reach down and accept a flagon. You hold it high.

    "Long may the Duke live! Long may he thrive! Long may he reign over our fair land!"

    "Never!" cry a great many shepherds, dashing their drinks to the ground.

    "What is the meaning of this insolence! Who said that!" Father tries to see, but his view from the bed is somewhat limited.

    "Nothing, Your Grace," you say. "They merely say that they will never see a duke as honorable as you."

    "We abhor the Duke!" a shepherdess cries, pointing at Father.

    "They adore you!" you say, and Father nods.

    "We hate the Duke and wish him a painful death by disembowelment!" shouts another shepherd. "We despise him utterly!"

    "Eh? Eh?" Father says.

    "Wonderful, wonderful!" you say. "What lovely sentiments! And now, back to our play."

    The audience seems unsettled, but at least nobody remembers why the play was interrupted in the first place.
    The shepherds hate the Duke, so that didn't go over quite as well as we would have hoped.

    MERRIMENT: 78 [+2].

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    This scene is a centerpiece of the play. The script calls for a savage bear to attack Morgan and then chase you away.

    Right on cue, Constable Growly, in full bear suit, leaps onstage, looking back and forth warily; the audience murmurs in anticipation. But unfortunately, Constable Growly is obviously trying to extend his onstage time to impress Flavia with his acting. He walks to center stage, yawns, and makes a big show of displaying his menacingly sharp claws.

    This has gone on long enough: he is spending too much time hamming it up.

    Vote 75: But how are you going to make him get on with it?

    75A) I give him a swift kick in the rump.

    75B) I shout, "Ah! That bear is attacking us, right now, at this very moment!" Surely Constable Growly will respond.

    75C) I tap into the magical energy of the forest to implant the thought, "Attack, now!" in Constable Growly's mind.


    There's a reason this is your only vote; you'll find out why on Monday, 6 May, 2019, 5PM EDT as we try to get this stupid bear to attack us

    ...

    Good luck with that!

    Respectfully,

    Brian P.
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid."

    -Valery Legasov in Chernobyl

  20. - Top - End - #170
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    BardGuy

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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    75A, for comedic value

    I have a nasty feeling about this though...

  21. - Top - End - #171
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    75A, indeed!
    EXPLOSIVE RUNES
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  22. - Top - End - #172
    Firbolg in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    Okay, we kick 'em in the center of gravity

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    Annoyed, you launch a swift kick at Constable Growly's shaggy hindquarters. Startled, he growls angrily and turns to face you.
    COURAGE: 32 [+10]

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    It is precisely at this moment that you happen to notice Constable Growly in the distance, his costume bear head under his arm, searching the perimeter of the clearing for clues. You look back at the furious bear in front of you.

    Slowly, a thought forms: if Constable Growly is over there by the forest, then this…must…be…
    Gulp.

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    …a real bear that happened to wander onstage!

    The bear gets up on its hind legs and growls loudly, as the audience looks on in wonder at its remarkable acting.

    The situation is dire.

    Vote 76: How can you rescue the scene and calm the bear?

    76A) I lead the bear to the refreshments table so it will gorge itself.

    76B) I wrestle it into submission.

    76C) The script says I need to run. I'll try to make it look like part of the play, not like I'm running for my life.



    So I'll see you Wednesday, 8 May, 2017 , 5:30 PM as we try to outwit this bear and not get eaten!

    Respectfully,

    Brian P.
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid."

    -Valery Legasov in Chernobyl

  23. - Top - End - #173
    Orc in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    76B for that sweet, sweet merriment
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  24. - Top - End - #174
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    76C

    Exit, pursued etc.

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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    76C
    Because this seems like a place where failure to wrestle the bear into submission will be lethal.
    Awesome avatar (Kothar, paladin of Tlacua) by Linkele!

    I do not "ninja."
    I pirate.
    Yarr!

    Quote Originally Posted by William Shakespeare, King Lear, IV.i.46
    'Tis the time's plague, when madmen lead the blind.
    My Nexus characters

  26. - Top - End - #176
    Firbolg in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    So we're going to run from the bear, which seems like an intelligent thing to do. I hope there's a wit bonus in it for us .

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    You jump offstage and run through the audience, the bear right behind you, growling and slashing the air with its claws.

    As you run, leaping through the audience, you bewail your fate, in character. Indeed, you get so into character that you forget for a moment that you are actually escaping a savage bear.

    "What have I done to deserve Nature rising up against me so?" you lament, as you duck under the bear's legs, roll under the refreshment table, and leap over three shepherds who are sitting on the ground.

    After about ten minutes of escapades involving climbing up the maypole and hiding under Father's bed, you manage to wear out the bear, who finally gives up, curls up in front of the stage, and falls asleep.

    You bow to the audience with a flourish, and they cheer loudly.
    NOBILITY: 79 [+2]
    FATHER'S FURY: 59 [-4]

    What, no int bonus? I feel strangely cheated.

    Quote Originally Posted by Midsummer
    Now that things are under control, you have some options.

    You can try to make a comic speech to get everyone to see the humor of the bear's appearance.

    Or you can try to offer a tragic speech, using the bear as an example or metaphor of some sort.

    Or perhaps most risky of all, you could take the opportunity to appeal directly to the audience, to get them in the mood you want.

    Making a speech could help you tilt the play in the direction that you want, but if your speech is ineffective, it might hurt the already tenuous integrity of the play.

    Vote 77:

    77A) Make a comic speech about your vast previous experience in the art of bear slaying.

    77B) Make a tragic speech, using well-crafted rhetoric to engage the audience in a tale of woe.

    77C) Step out of character and address the crowd.


    The rest of the story from this point is contingent on this decision, so I'll stop here. Have your votes in by Friday, 8 May, 2019, 5 PM EDT and we will see if we can't make this play one to remember!

    Also, what about that sleeping bear on stage? Do we just leave it there?

    Respectfully,

    Brian P.
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid."

    -Valery Legasov in Chernobyl

  27. - Top - End - #177
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    BardGuy

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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    77C

    I don't think we have the artistry to make this deliberate comedy. I guess we could try sticking to the script and hoping merriment kicks on

  28. - Top - End - #178
    Firbolg in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    Oops! Mistake on my part. I hate it when I get lazy.

    Let's have a follow-up question on 77C:



    Vote 77C.1: What do you want to say?

    77C.1.A: "I want to take a moment to offer my own gratitude to the Duke for coming here today, to watch our play."

    77C.1.B: "Let us pause to appreciate the natural beauty surrounding us. Let us gaze upon the forest and breathe this fresh air."

    77C.1.C: "I would like to thank the woman who made this play possible. Flavia, come out here and accept a round of applause!"


    Bear in mind we still haven't eliminated 77A or B as options yet, but it just occurred to me there might be a follow up question to 77C, this morning, and I don't see a reason to wait another two days to adjudicate that, do you?

    So, we have two votes: 77, and a followup on 77C if you choose that option, and let's have it all done Friday, 10 May 2019, 5 PM EDT. Thanks for your patience (assuming you have any!)

    Respectfully,

    Brian P.
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid."

    -Valery Legasov in Chernobyl

  29. - Top - End - #179
    Orc in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    Twinkle, twinkle little bear
    How you gave us quite a scare
    But now that you have up and gone
    It's time for this show to go on
    Twinkle Twinkle and a poke
    I hope the audience gets the joke

    77A
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  30. - Top - End - #180
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    BardGuy

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    Default Re: Let's Play: A Midsummer Nights Choice

    No worries....

    77C1C Flavia it is

    - - - Updated - - -

    Wait, did you just say"bear in mind"?

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