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  1. - Top - End - #1
    Dwarf in the Playground
    Join Date
    Feb 2019

    Default [The Burning Wheel] Beneath the Delirious Moon [OOC & Dice Rolls]

    Beneath the Delirious Moon

    An Adventure of Wild Horror


    The Wüvd—a land of vast unconquered forests and bitter hills; a wilderness happened upon by pilgrims fleeing their crumbling home. A hateful land of hard earth, beaten into servitude by sweat and desperation; wrestled into a tenuous servitude. Though they build their towers tall and wield mastery o’er every beast that walks or crawls; though they fetter this wild with nationhood, they are mere stewards. Contentment shall become avarice and animosity once more—promising the return of death and its deadly night.

    Man never seemed so fragile as beneath the delirious moon.


    Spoiler: Reduced to avoid clutter
    Show
    Hello and thank you for your interest in this adventure. This game will be using The Burning Wheel system, with only certain optional rules in effect (more about that in the Big 16). As this is my own first expedition into the Burning Wheel system, please do not let allow lack of experience to concern you. I figure that we are more than capable of learning as we go and making any necessary corrections so that we might happily transfer this game into the play-by-post format. Now then, it is time to cover some details.

    I have purposefully chosen my tagline to evoke a certain atmosphere—this adventure will lean heavily on such themes as survival, intrigue, character progression, and roleplaying. Combat encounters will likely be few and far between, but are intended to carry a great deal of weight. The Wüvd (pronounced “oo-v-d”) is an unpredictable land that must be met with careful preparations, if one wishes to survive unscathed. I cannot (and will not) guarantee your character's survival, as I shall lay their fate firmly in your hands.

    As such a substantial quantity media has served to inspire this adventure, I would be remiss not to make note of some. Several selections include: the Stolen Land adventure path (PF); the Better Than Any Man adventure module (LotFP); Solomon Kane by Robert Howard; The Vvitch (2015 film); The Ritual (2017 film); and so on. Hopefully this context will stimulate the process of character creation. Without further ado:

    Spoiler: The Big Sixteen
    Show

    System: The Burning Wheel Gold (3rd Edition, 2011 release)

    Player Count: At least three but no more than five player, with as many as five seconds for safety’s sake.

    Style of Play: As mentioned previously—roleplaying and survival focused, with elements of horror both mundane and supernatural. The characters will be plunged into a living world that will both react to their presence, and change with time, depending upon how said characters attempt to accomplish their goals. There will be further information regarding the aforementioned setting in the immediately following post.

    Allowed Content: As the Burning Wheel Gold system is self-contained, it is the only book which the players shall require access to. However, I ask that players please limit their characters to Humans only among the available races. Humanity is a diverse enough people that there should be sufficient room to create a unique character from among their number, especially considering the Lifepath system.

    The following optional rules will be in effect: Anatomy of Injury; Armor and Shields; Bloody Versus; Circles et al; Distance et al; Resources; Sorcery; Steel; and Weapons. More complex rules, such as Fight!, Range and Cover, etc. shall be used sparingly, and only when the whole group feels ready to tackle them.


    Character Creation: Characters are allowed up to five Lifepaths, but may opt for as few as two if they so choose—provided their backstory can explain why such a young character would be present. No Lifepaths are strictly speaking disallowed, but I will be more closely scrutinizing some choices. There is no harm in asking if you are unsure whether something makes sense or not!

    Backstory: Backstories are a must, but there is no hard and fast rule regarding length—create as much or as little as you deem necessary. I will request that players complete “The Game of 20 Question” for their characters, which I shall address below The Big Sixteen.

    Ability Scores/Experience/HP/Wealth: These factors are components of The Burning Wheel’s character creation process and are addressed therein. I will note that whenever the Character Burner (the name of The Burning Wheel’s character creation process) asks any questions for attributes (such as Health, Steel, etc.) please note your answers in as great detail you believe is necessary.

    Alignment: Though The Burning Wheel does not include any particular metric for character alignment, do keep in mind that the law of causation is in effect: actions are followed by their natural consequences—a particularly villainous/selfish character may grate with others’. There is nothing specifically that I am ruling out, provided you are capable of effectively roleplaying your character.

    Other Notes: Firstly, please do not feel daunted! I am more than willing to work with anyone/everyone throughout the character creation process—do not hesitate to ask questions about the game, the themes, the setting, or whatever else comes to mind. I have always said: “RPGs are a game, and games are meant to be fun!” Some miscellany that did not fit neatly anywhere else: the “Exponent 6 Switch” is in effect, please do not select any Shade beside Black, and remember to enjoy yourself throughout this process. I expect to be capable of posting a minimum of once per day, with the exception of Sundays.


    * * *

    “The Game of 20 Questions”

    This is quite the simple process, which I first encountered playing 7th Sea; another fantastic roleplaying game. Once your character’s statistics are determined, merely answer the questions to better understand who they are. This is supplementary to your backstory, Lifepaths, and the questions the Character Burner will ask of you—it does not need to be particularly in-depth. These questions are as much for your sake as for mine, so that you can begin to better understand just who you are (playing as).

    Spoiler: The Thirteen Questions
    Show

    1. What country is your character from? This question gives you a foundation upon which to build. When you understand your character’s culture, you will begin to understand your character. Imagine how his environment helped shape his personality. Your homeland stays with you no matter where you go. The various nations and peoples of the Wüvd will be explained in the next post.

    2. How would you physically describe your character? First off, is your character male or female? The Wüvd is a world where survival (at the individual and nation-scale) is paramount, and as such tends towards conservatism. That said—people are strange and come from many walks of life. Aside from sex, how does your character look? Start at their head and work your way down to their feet. Focus on the things that reflect their personality and the way they are treated by others.

    3. What is your character’s primary motivation? Your Beliefs and Instincts will be important when thinking about this question. What keeps your character going when fate deals them a sour hand?

    4. What is your character’s greatest strength? Greatest weakness? Is your character really good at one particular thing? Does your character have something they are terrible at? A character with no strengths is difficult to keep alive; one with no weaknesses is difficult to sympathize with. A character with both strengths and weaknesses has a more balanced personality and will develop into a richer roleplaying experience.

    5. What are your character’s most and least favorite things? Even small details can be important. You will face difficult choices beneath the delirious moon—what is it that you want? Simple wants though less critical than your character’s strongest motivations nonetheless color their decisions.

    6. What about your character’s psychology? Anger, desperation, grief, regret, sorrow, whimsy, etc. How does your character think? How do they react?

    7. What is your character’s single greatest fear? This can be something metaphysical or mundane, depending on just who your character is. They might fear growing old or growing weak, or perhaps they fear loneliness. It could be anything.

    8. Does your character have any prejudices? Traumatic childhood incidents can lead to a lifetime of hatred and prejudice that the character may never get over—or their distaste may be grounded in nothing rational at all. Do consider the players unity when making this decision, however.

    9. Where do your character’s loyalties lie? Does your character serve a certain nation? How do they regard their homeland? Maybe their loyalties lie with their family or spouse. Perhaps his first concern is looking out for himself, or maybe he serves a greater cause.

    10. Is your character in love? Is he married or betrothed? Do they have any children? Consider this, and any other familial matters, when determining your character’s Relationships and Circles.

    11. Is your character of any status? Noble, infamous or otherwise this pertains to your character’s Reputation and how they are viewed by the rest of society—what expectations fall upon them, how others will react to their presence, etc.

    12. How religious is your character? In later posts I will be providing an in-depth review of the Wüvd and just who lives there, including their religious practices. Your character’s belief regarding higher powers, damnation and salvation, and so on may be relevant. Your character’s opinion on witchcraft and sorcery could be included here as well.

    13. If you could, what advice would you give your character? This question is perhaps the most important of all, as it will lay the groundwork for how you (as the player) will mature (as your character). Circumstances may be such that your character does not follow your advice; travelling a darker path than would be best for them. Beneath the delirious moon, the lines between virtue and sin may be blurred. Shadows grow long in the dark.


    Obviously I have modified the questions from their original version. If you are interested the original Game of Twenty Questions can be found here, taken from the 2nd edition of the 7th Sea RPG (I believe). When working your way through these questions you may deem it necessary to return and revise the character’s statistics or Lifepaths some—this is to be expected given the nature of character development.


    In the interest of preventing an information overload, I’ll return to the premise (holding off the inevitable setting divulgence for now) so that we might review in vagaries the circumstances of this adventure. I will explain my thinking: some concepts I have been particularly curious about lately are: “how do wars start?” and “what is it like being on the brink of war?” For this conversation let’s avoid modern politics—we are trying to play an RPG after all.

    My own knowledge of history is not particularly complete; which may actually lend me some fancy to this idea. Consider the circumstances prior to the Great War: tension abound throughout Europe, as a rising power begins to threaten an established global authority/status quo. The rumblings of conflict touch every ear—yet the kick-off comes from a single death; an assassination conducted by an organization with goals slighter in scope than international war. Ralph Waldo Emerson provides another such example:

    By the rude bridge that arched the flood,
    Their flag to April’s breeze unfurled,
    Here once the embattled farmers stood,
    And fired the shot heard round the world.
    − Emerson, "Concord Hymn"

    A particular favorite song of mine poses the question: “can you live on a knife-edge?” (Emerson, Lake & Palmer: Knife-Edge, self-titled, 1971). This may explain why the adventure module Better Than Any Man enticed me so—for you who may not be familiar, the adventure pits its players within a small region of Germany, already embattled in the Thirty Years War, something of which I know next to nothing. The Protestant Swedes are on the march, and the Catholic locals are descending into the worship of witches and demons as the crown leaves them to their fate. We begin in medias res: what shall you do?

    As for this adventure, war has not arrived just yet—but it just may, depending on what you, the players, decide. The Wüvd is large and is only nominally “conquered”; despite the founding of nations within this foundling land, ensuring the survival of its settlers is a challenge still. Water, wood and stone bear grudges far longer than men may comprehend. They too live in their own sense:

    Just now
    A rock took fright
    When it saw me.
    It escaped
    By playing dead.
    Norbert Mayer, “The New Berserkers”

    Your characters are going to be placed into an environment that is very much troubled; by hunger and the looming threat of another tough winter—by lords who care little, or care too much. Unkind neighbors and seemingly impossible labors; bandits and wolves. The forests shudder without wind—barrows yawn from the hills and tempt with untold riches, stowed in the hollow earth. You stand at the precipice of civilization, where the strong arm of man wrestles his challenger and strives still to make this home his.

    Your tasks shall be many: appraise these people and this land. Conduct diplomacy; prevent war at all costs. Root out corruption and punish those who seek to exploit. You shall have authority, but it is not ultimate: be prepared to get your hands dirty. You may find friends as you may make enemies. The delirious moon waxes bright and the wind blows cold. What shall you do?

    Now, let's dig into this setting.
    Last edited by Boethius Junior; 2019-03-02 at 01:42 AM. Reason: Formatting

  2. - Top - End - #2
    Dwarf in the Playground
    Join Date
    Feb 2019

    Default Re: [The Burning Wheel] Beneath the Delirious Moon [OOC & Dice Rolls]

    This World and Those Who Live There


    There was once a wildman with nary a care—born to no mother without father to spare.
    He shouted the wind and mountains reared—the hills his knuckles, the rivers his beard.
    O’er all of everything he was the great king—for nothing there was at all besides him.


    –Shambryfolk children’s rhyme


    We shall begin this brief gazetteer by discussing cosmology first. A particular consequence of the Wüvd’s settlement is its now-dominant religion, which is titled quite simply Witticism. The pilgrims who arrived in the Wüvd were largely of the same faith already, and have continued to practice their belief in the time since—offering worship to the entity Wit; who quickens the mind and ennobles man over baser creatures. Within the context of its faith, Wit is both a literal figure to whom prayer is given and the metaphorical construct of the dignity of man. As this is a fantastical setting, I shall simply state that prayers are indeed answered—the rest is up to your personal interpretation.

    Witticism is practiced through ceremony involving light and song, wherein practitioners ask that their sins be sheered from their spirit; that they may be driven to good works in both mind and body. The priests of this faith are known by two names: the higher-ranked masters of song named Cantors; and lower-ranked masters of oration known as Celebrants. The teachings of Witticism regard highly what are thought to be distinctly human virtues: bravery, kindness, temperance, etc. Sins against Wit include excess in any form: when the body rules over the mind.

    Wit, despite being the central god of his own faith, has a rather complex genesis—Witticism teaches that there was an original Prime Mover, entitled THROM, who began the universe in motion:

    To begin all things—a solitary tone was struck. Thus THROM came screaming into being, alone before the emptiness. Without THROM there could have been nothing and nothing could have been without reference to THROM.
    – Excerpt from The Holy Dictate

    THROM was an entity of energy and motion: the inevitable beginning—the atom of all being, if you will. His existence precipitated all that would follow, and whose only purpose was to create. In the end THROM would birth his own executioner, as he would paradoxically create that which could undo him. This “Prime Ender” was named JIRAM:

    To end all things—an echo resounded and returned to its source. Thus JIRAM came mutely into being, the silhouette of THROM; the end of all things and the return to stillness. Brother fell upon brother in battle so fierce the heavens shook bare; that they stirred unheard winds and unleashed new thunders.
    – Excerpt from The Holy Dictate

    Their conflict would end with the death of both entities, leaving neither to reign supreme—though it is noteworthy that JIRAM perished first. Thus Witticism teaches that things may begin anew yet must always end. From their remains the Later Gods would be birthed, to administrate that which had begun and yet was still unfinished:

    From the corpse of slain JIRAM rose TURAS, who is time; FANAS, who is space; and RUD, who is matter. They sang as does an infant wail, but their voices were dissonant. With his dying breath THROM joined their choir and made beautiful resonance. Then he died, and from his entrails rose four figures anew: Ditheadh was born of his blood; Doineadh of his mettle; Foghadh of his bile; and finally Reothadhwas of his phlegm. Their birthing song was harmonious with the children of JIRAM, but not so perfectly as THROM when whole.
    – Excerpt from The Holy Dictate

    Collectively the Later Gods are referred to as the Choir of Seven Chambers or merely the Seventh Choir. Their song will continue until finally reaching an unknowable, inescapable end—thereby fulfilling the dual purposes of their progenitors. The sound cosmic, as it is called, is very much a living being: able to grow and evolve. From it the physical world was shaped across time, within space, of matter, and governed by causation. This world is divided into five distinct elements and humors: air (sanguine), fire (choleric), earth (melancholic), water (phlegmatic), and quintessence—which is the particle of light, sound, and spirit.

    The first of life that walked the world were the Idh, or the stony-men. Silent automata, built from those materials old as they: rock and stone. The stony-men do not age, but bear the brunt of time without falter. Second were the Theadh, or Nephilim: wild beasts of chaos that spread like wildfire across the untamed earth. Finally came the Fehr—man himself.

    As a child’s mind grows with age, so too has the sound cosmic and thus Wit slowly coalesced. By the time mankind came into being, so too did Wit. Perhaps it is a result of their simultaneous conception, or there is some other unknown cause, yet the result was miraculous all the same. Wit fundamentally altered the sound cosmic with his birth; a ripple felt throughout all creation. The Idh were unaffected, being too solid. The Theadh though, were brittle: they shattered into a thousand pieces, some great and other small.

    Something much different occurred when Wit came upon mankind, for in the light he cast a shadow. Thus the spirit of man has been divided in two and so he is able to determine his own nature, unlike his elder cousins. Thus Witticism incorporate the principle of life after death: upon one’s passing the quintessence from which their soul was constructed shall be returned to the sound cosmic and become one with Wit in providence. Yet what of their shadow?

    Wit rejects that part of man—all of their crimes and wrongdoings are unfit to return. Instead they coalesce into a spirit of malice: the Kaun, which crawls forth from within their gut. These things are very much real, though in any virtuous individual the imp is too small and suffocates within its antecedent. Particularly horrid men may spawn larger, more fearsome things. Witticism teaches that the dead must be burnt, so that no Kaun may emerge.


    Spoiler: More Cosmological Notes for the Curious
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    The Later Gods are not directly prayed to, but are regarded as endemic truths and representations of nature: the children of THROM represent the seasons (Ditheadh is spring, Doineadh is summer, Foghadh is autumn, and Reothadh is winter) and are figures associated with humourism. Likewise the children of JIRAM are conceptualized as the spheres (RUD is terra firma, FANAS the skies, and TURAS the heavens beyond). Wit is often equated with the sun; while the moon is regarded as an aberration, a remnant of something ancient, dark and deadly. To be found alone under its baleful light without the sign of Wit is dangerous indeed.

    There are religions besides Witticism: from pagan worship of esoteric nature-spirits to cult-like devotion of powerful Theadh-remnants. Some worship the stony-men as ancestral guardians. Though these do exist they are not as relevant as Witticism, being the dominant religion among the settlers of the Wüvd.

    The light of Wit is just that—light. Darkness is heavy and oppressive and thus vile things reside in deep, dead places. They squirming further downwards as though pulled toward the center of the earth. Gold is weighty; as is iron. Yet man was given the choice to value gold and iron or to eschew such base materials to search for something greater.

    Another note regarding Kaun: they are certain circumstance where they are never spawned. For example, pregnant women who perish before they are able to give birth will not produce a Kaun. Theologians argue over why this is. Furthermore, there are many different practices with regard to burning the dead: some sects argue that the Kaun must be extracted and destroyed before the body is cremated; others consider burning to be itself improper and bury their dead so deep the Kaun cannot reach the surface.


    * * *

    On the Nature of Magic

    At this point you may be curious as to how magic works in the Wüvd. The practice of magic takes two forms, which may be termed through the lens of religiosity as “holy” and “unholy”—or more accurately as “harmonic” and “dissonant”. Both require the use of the practitioner’s voice, though differ in their method and the consequence thereof.

    Harmonic magic necessitates a great deal of study and practice to produce results; the practitioner must, by vocal force alone, resonate with the sound cosmic—and in doing so may produce a desired result. The practitioner feeds and grows the sound cosmic through his song until it is capable of acting in accordance with his desires. This method is considered “holy” because it is thought to be only possible as a result of Wit’s existence. Not only that, the practitioner is temporarily joining the Seventh Choir to accomplish their task. The action of Harmonic magic is not in itself sinful, but may be utilized as an accessory to sinful acts.

    Harmonic magic is represented game-wise by Sorcery in the Burning Wheel system.

    Dissonant magic is very much the opposite process as its Harmonic cousin: rather than joining the Seventh Choir, the practitioner attempts to disrupt their song into producing a desired result, mostly by guided accident. Dissonant magic is considered to be a very bad thing indeed by most, and as an action itself is considered sinful. Dissonant magic tends to be chaotic, unpredictable, and violent—a form of witchcraft.

    Dissonant magic is represented game-wise by the Rituals of Blood and Night, with further homebrew involved. For this purpose it is possible for non-Orcs to receive the Void Embrace trait, but only under specific circumstances. I would have to hear a very good reason to allow a player character access to this trait—this is something that I will actively suggest you avoid for the purpose of party unity.
    Last edited by Boethius Junior; 2019-03-02 at 01:43 AM. Reason: Formatting

  3. - Top - End - #3
    Dwarf in the Playground
    Join Date
    Feb 2019

    Default Re: [The Burning Wheel] Beneath the Delirious Moon [OOC & Dice Rolls]

    Nations and Peoples

    In the interest of not making things too complex, I have attempted to condense information of history, culture, and governance into digestible blocks from which you may insinuate a great deal about these different people. Questions are always welcome, as are additions of your own make—which I shall okay on a case by case basis.

    Spoiler: The Shambry League
    Show

    The first state-entity to be formed in the settled Wüvd; composed of a great many confederated nobility, each of whom rules their own semi-autonomous estate. Some of the noble families have titles which survived the pilgrimage and thus sound odd and alien, while others have been claimed anew. A great council ostensibly rules the League, composed of representatives from each estate—though conflict among the smaller lords, the creation of vassal-entities and the swearing of allegiance. The Grand Council, as it is called, is a byzantine mess of bureaucratic procedure, leading to the formation of regional councils and committees.

    The Shambry people are characterized by their fierce appreciation for orderliness—an ordered house, an orderly country, and an orderly manner are ranked as their chief concerns. This practice has grown from their earliest settlements, which nearly descended into a deadly squalor of squabbling lords demanding the word become law. It was the Chamber of Criers, an order of monks, which provided the alternative of confederation rather than monarchy, and gave each lord one vote for his land. The Criers are messengers of the Grand Council and have the unique authority to advise (and even depose) the noble families.

    The Shambry is also home to another group of old families, known as the Picaroons—these familial lines are the surviving stock of those early homesteads destroyed by rampaging Fae and the other gruesome beasts native to the Wüvd. Their lives are pledged to the combat of such loathsome things, and they ride with impunity throughout the League to accomplish this goal. Their seasonal movements are recorded in the Picaroon Almanacs; prized possessions of many a beleaguered estate.


    Spoiler: The Independent of Quorthol
    Show

    The most prominent geological feature of the Wüvd is the mountain range known collectively as The Steeples, which spans the northern boundary of the region. The Steeples were too tall for the Shambry pilgrims to cross directly, so they skirted their edge and travelled south through their eastern foothills (The Dells). Unbeknownst to those travelers, another caravan trekked around the Steeples, entering the Wüvd from the west.

    These people had a much longer journey ahead of them, and so came to build their earliest homesteads later than the Shambryfolk would—they are thus credited as being the second settlers, a point of much contention between the two peoples. These people are called Chauns; they are descendant from another separate ethnic group from the Shambryfolk. They are stockier, being broader of shoulder and stomach, and have flattened faces. They are known for being loud and boisterous people: as quick to anger as they are to laugh. They are mostly adherents of Witticism, but have some cultural idiosyncrasies therein.

    The Shambryfolk revere the Criers because they served as the moral fortitude on their long pilgrimage—monks whose song uplifted their people and gave them the strength to carry on. The Chauns, on the other hand, were led by an individual: a prophet by the name of Quorthol, through whom Wit spoke. Quorthol was very long-lived, leading their column from the front despite his advanced age.

    The Independent of Quorthol is governed by an individual monarch entitled The Voice—who upholds their tradition of singular leadership a la Quorthol himself. The Voice is elected once each decade, or upon the death of the previous, from one of two camps: The Blood or The Providence. The former camp is entirely composed of their prophet’s descendants—the latter is meritocratic, embodying the supposition that Quorthol was uniquely qualified to lead their people.


    Spoiler: The Dells
    Show

    The eastern fringe of the Steeples are the Dells: an expanse filled with lumbering hills between which steep crevasses have been carved by glacial runoff, eventually flattening into the lowlands where the Shambryfolk would first settle. Pocked with tufts of woodland and dense undergrowth between, travel is easiest by means of the labyrinthine streams throughout—where the Wallapug tribesmen rule.

    Long of limb and lankily built the Wallapug excel at climbing and swimming; and waging war amongst themselves. Throughout the Dells are exposed beds of precious clay from which the Pugs mold their sturdy canoes. They light tall bonfires upon their beaches that last for days, until the vessels are finally complete. The clay beds are also the greatest source of bloody conflict between the tribes, over which many battles have been fought.

    The tribes themselves are technically matriarchal: the tribe’s nomadic movement is determined by the eldest wise-women, who are attuned to crossroads and ley-lines; seeking the best hunting-grounds and open beds of clay. Matters of war are determined by the men, who vote whether or not to enter conflict—each adult male who has seen combat being given a single vote. The Wallapugs revere their homeland above all else, and make offerings at locations of spiritual importance: where blood has been spilled; good fortune has been had; the grave of legendary figures and so on.

    The first encounters between the Shambryfolk and the Wallapug were violent, but soon the beleaguered travelers found solid allies in the tribesmen: the Pugs were eager traders, offering food and navigation for gunpowder and iron weaponry. As the Shambry League would grow, some Wallapug would leave the Dells and join with them—following the tributaries downstream until they unite into the furious Auth, king of rivers, who carves through the Wüvd’s lowlands. Trade is abundant to and from the Dells by means of the Auth: clay, lumber and furs are brought south while tools, weapons and more move north.

    With time some Wallapugs have converted from their pagan beliefs to Witticism, although the authority of their elders is absolute even beyond the Dells. Respected adherents of the old ways hold a great deal of influence over Wallapugs in all places, the most powerful of which refuse to leave the clay-beds of their homeland.


    Spoiler: The Grand Basilica
    Show

    When the Shambryfolk and the adherents of Quorthol discovered one another, they rejoiced immediately; for they had found their countrymen. For a time, the two groups unified thinking themselves similar enough for cohabitation in their newly settled land. Unfortunately, this would prove impossible.

    Their leaders thought to christen their newfound home by erecting a massive church, within which they might give worship to their eternal provider, Wit. This basilica would be built directly between the capitals of either group, and would become a site of pilgrimage. However, the structure would never be finished, as tensions flared over the authority of the Criers and recognition of the prophet Quorthol—an argument that would bloom into a violent, but thankfully brief, military conflict. The nations would remain distinct thenceforth.

    The Basilica is itself a massive, albeit unfinished, fortress and monastic enclave. Many orders of pilgrims, monks, and holy knights reside there in religious observance. The Basilica is recognized as neutral territory between all nations of the Wüvd and is thus utilized for diplomacy as much as for trade. The highest office in the Church of Witticism (His Eminence, the Grand Cantor of the Sound Cosmic) holds court there, though the decentralized nature of Witticism grants him little authority beyond spiritual matters.

    People of all breeds and all walks of life can be found within the Basilica and its surrounding settlements, though the urban sprawl beyond its walls do not share the benefit of neutral ground.


    Spoiler: The Brazen Land and its Burnt King
    Show

    The Roiling Fell is the centermost region of the Wüvd, a vast stretch of open heath dominated by slowly undulating hills and tall protruding knolls, overblown with harsh winds and perilously fierce storms. Legend claims such weather is the work of giants; ancient Theadh fragments that wander the open country, bringing untold destruction with them. The wildlife is of the Fells is equally tough: herds of wiry aurochs wander the wasteland, and flocks of tall storks stalk their prey—unwelcome and inhospitable, this place denied all attempts at conquest.

    That is until an unnamed knight, brimming with holy fervor, led a troupe of his fellows out from the Basilica and into the Roiling Fell. This crusade was led only shortly after the fallout over the Basilica’s construction had concluded: the quest was nominally for redemption, seeking penance in righteous death combatting Nephilim. Apparently however, they were successful enough to gain a foothold in the wild land.

    The people of The Brazen Land are of unclear ethnic lineage, regarded as being of some combination of those Shambryfolk knights and a group of native people who resided within Roiling Fell, hidden from the outside world. These people are referred to as the Nabbernac, or simply the Brazen Men—they are small but sinewy and strong, and quite hairy. They do not keep written records, but have an extensive yet vague oral history that seems to blend the history of the Wüvd’s settlement with the natives’ old legend.

    The society of the Brazen Men is dominated by autonomous bands; chieftains are elected annually from among the band’s elders and possess executive and military powers. Bands are themselves semi-nomadic, travelling between established settlements built atop large hills throughout the Fell. Multiple bands may occupy these high-towns at any one point in time—mediation between bands follows their unwritten law.

    When peacekeeping is impossible between bands, or international negotiation (or war) is necessary, the bands turn to their Burnt King; a lifetime appointment from among the chieftains. The King is final arbiter of their law, the highest judge, and their unquestioned military commander. The Burnt King is never seen without the Black Helm, a relic of the Brazen Men which he wears constantly—the helm is ancient but is unmistakably that of a knight’s; burnt and warped as though struck by lightning.

    Curiously perhaps, the Brazen Men are devout adherent of Witticism, though they recognize neither the Criers nor Quorthol, favoring instead the authority of the Grand Cantor.


    Spoiler: The Guallamar Principality
    Show

    There are three groups of humans native to the Wüvd: those people who would become the Nabbernac in the Roiling Fell; the Wallapug tribesmen of the Dells (we will get to them later); and finally the Guallamar, who predate all others. A mysterious people who live deep in the south, the Guallamar seem eerie to those unfamiliar with their practices. A placid and mild people, their society is dominated by a strict social hierarchy wherein the lowest classes are chattel before their masters.

    The castes are not merely hereditary—somehow the cruel Wüvd has touched their being. From least to greatest are servants, warriors, druids, and finally the princes. This final rank hold unquestioned authority over those below, who are incapable of resisting the commands of their betters; compelled by an unknown force. Only Guallamar children are able to resist the commanding presence of their lords.

    The princes wield other unnatural powers: they seem untouched by age, merely growing dimmer as years pass. When they eventually become so old as they can hardly think, they are lain to rest in barrows and tended by their many servants through their unending sleep. Some princes are said to kill with a stare or possess inhuman strength; or wield darker powers. Ancient princes roused from their slumber are terrible things indeed.

    The Guallamar are thoroughly pagan and offer sacrifice to powerful Theadh spirits in return for wealth or knowledge of unknowable things. Throughout the history of the Wüvd there have been numerous wars between the Guallamar and the settling pilgrims, though of late negotiation have been more the practice. The princes are rich in silver, gold, and precious stone, yet craft entirely with bronze—they covet iron and gunpowder more than anything, guiding many an avaricious merchant to their counsel.

    Perhaps you are starting to get the impression that the Guallamar would be an exceedingly difficult people to play, you would be correct and this is intentional. You could make the attempt, but would likely find better luck creating a character who has fled from their home, finding some degree of solace among the less authoritarian others. If you do choose to play as a Guallamar, please limit yourself to either the servant or warrior castes, whose functions are respectively domestic and military. Please also note that the castes are not strictly defined by sex; rather by lineage and twisted pragmatism.


    Spoiler: The Kettle
    Show

    I have previously mentioned witchcraft as a method for practicing magic, hence there must exist witches as well. Not belonging to any specific ethnic group, the terminology “witch” is quite broad in its application: encompassing everything from people unaffiliated with any nation to literal consorts of Theadh remnants. This section will address something closer to the latter.

    Very early in the settlement of the Wüvd, there were some pilgrims who willfully gave themselves unto their Theadh aggressors, and their descendants now possess blood both human and inhuman. They might appear as regular humans on the surface, but their nature is exposed by some standout characteristics: a furred tail, talon-like claws, pointed ears or scaled skin—there is no rhyme or reason to these changes. Some of their kind have embraced their ancestry and live savagely in the wilds, while others attempt to live hidden in plain sight. Either way, Theadh of all varieties can smell their kinship with such people and will tempt them back into their fold with offers of magical awareness or gifts of riches.

    The Kettle is a landmark intrinsically known to all witches—as some can discern true north, so do they unconsciously know the path that will return them home. Somewhere among the feet of the Steeples is a jutting cliff, at the base of which the rock splits open and leads far beneath the mountains’ roots. This meeting place is the Kettle, where the first witches were taken and known by their Nephilim suitors; where their children were born and from which they spread. Covens meet and conduct their business there still, coming and going by hidden passageways.

    The pilgrims brought with them stores of gunpowder to the Wüvd, but had lost the methods by which to create more during the long journey. Perhaps with the aid of Theadh, it was the witches who rediscovered the practice and who now sell their knowledge to the highest bidder, be they person or whole state. Do note that although gunpowder does exist within the Wüvd, it is limited in scope—think in terms of the harquebus at best; the matchlock would be only a recent innovation.


    Spoiler: Reduced to avoid clutter
    Show
    What about Dwarves, Elves, and Orcs? I have just detailed quite a variety of different peoples from which you may choose, and there are still some more to come, listed haphazardly throughout the next section. Due note that these are general ethnic group of humans; much like in the real world the lines are blurred, though there are also recognizable traits among them. Creatures such as elves or orcs do approximately exist in the Wüvd, though they are counted among the divisions of the Theadh and overall are distasteful of mankind. There are some exceptions that you shall see during the course of the adventure, but I would prefer that players stick with humanity for this game.




    * * *

    Making the Best of a Bad Situation

    Struggling down the slope,
    There's not much hope.
    I begin to try to ride the scree
    but the rocks are tumbling all around me.

    –Genesis: “Riding the Scree”, the Lamb Lies Down on Broadway, 1975

    Spoiler: Reduced to avoid clutter
    Show
    I commend you for soldiering through my excessive documentation of the peoples of the Wüvd; by now ideas are hopefully beginning to amalgamate. There are only a few minute matters left to address.

    Your character is being sent to The Fringe of Bás: a promising, if perilous, region of the Wüvd that has only just been entered into the Shambry League and granted titles of lordship. The High Council of the League has made an investment, and now desire to see the return—your characters are being sent as part of the entourage of one Ser Adolphus Crofte, Prelate to the High Council and Representative of their Will. Your character’s relationship to Ser Crofte is entirely up to you, as is your reason for making the journey to the Fringe. It may help to think of your character as equal parts government contractor and shareholder in this venture—you will stand to benefit greatly should success be achieved.

    Here are some final things to consider during character creation: why was your character chosen? By no means does your character need to be a native Shambryfolk, or necessarily of any import themselves. Do take into account this fundamental law of bureaucracy: “sh*t is like water; it flows downhill”. Who does your character know that set them on this path? Are they being gifted an opportunity, or an opportunity to get rid of them? Of course, it would be wise to take into consideration the reality of your situation: you have left one home for another—there are few ordinary folk who would uproot themselves so.

    Have you the strength to face these challenges?

    Have you the will to withstand the delirious moon?
    Last edited by Boethius Junior; 2019-09-07 at 12:28 AM. Reason: Formatting

  4. - Top - End - #4
    Dwarf in the Playground
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    Default Re: [The Burning Wheel] Beneath the Delirious Moon [OOC & Dice Rolls]

    A Basic Map of the Wüvd

    Spoiler
    Show


    While I certainly am not much of a cartographer, these scribblings are hopefully sufficient to orient. This map is oriented from the perspective of the Grand Basilica - the structure built at the Auth's midpoint. To its east is the League, while the Independent is westward - the Brazen Land due north. The map fades to uncertainty throughout where exploration has been stymied by greater concerns at home. Do note the heavy swaths of southlands owned by Guallamar Princes. You will also catch the Fringe further east, back upstream from where the original Shambry pilgrims traveled.

    You may notice the giants looming over the Steeples, and an empty-headed stony-man bearing a boulder in the east. Additionally, one of the mountains is marked with the Kettle's location.


    * * *

    A Basic Map of the Fringe

    Spoiler
    Show


    The same conditions apply; please bear with my limited mapping skills. The river which dominates the north-eastern border is a tributary of the Auth, curling out from among south-western periphery of the Dells. We are still rather far north, so the climate is only just temperate - winters tend to be harsh. Your characters know the Fringe is divided into five "estates", though they are not true members of the League yet. In order from oldest to most recently settled, they are: Udwald, Scawic, Wodengard, Stathes' Crossing, and Gristing. Some would dispute this order, though the Abbey of Dom Doren is unequivocally the most recent addition, completed six winters prior.

    Settlement occurred from by means of the Ud-Auth, daughter of this Auth-tributary, then south across the centermost ridges. Affer's Bridge was the earliest settlement founded in the southern half, as the barren hills initially blocked entrance from the east, being populated by Guallamar barbarians; long since driven off. The highlands through the Fringe's center were originally more densely forested with old growth, but in no small part to the efforts of the Wodengard they have (apparently) been tamed.

    You will surely notice there is a coastline far to the west. Your characters will have never seen an ocean before, only having heard of them in old legends. The Wüvd has no outlets to the sea, barring for this potential - your characters can only assume this is why the region was deemed so desirable.


    * * *

    The Honorable Lord Adolphus Crofte
    The Flower of June

    Spoiler
    Show
    The aged Lord Adolphus Crofte is an emblematic figure of the inconsistent and oft-unpredictable precedential nightmare that is the Shambry League; at once a much beloved sovereign, and yet all the same an irremovable impediment whose rule endangers his own countrymen. Lordship came to Adolphus in youth - the beautiful Primrose, whose bounty is fruits and wine, lost its previous master to some petty border skirmish now long forgotten. His mother had passed many winters prior and the boy stood miserably alone at his dying father's bedside, awaiting the inevitable decision. The Chamberlain of Primrose summoned his Criers, intent to elect an aristocracy anew.

    Yet they did not. Primrose remained under the rule of the name Crofte, whose words are: 'Vermillion, the color of thy drink.' The Grand Council and the Chamber of Criers had granted the charter of Primrose to the Crofte family on the auspice of their ability to tend its vineyards - and had signed said foundational documents that, so long as they could ever provide their crimson liquor, the land would be theirs. The dying Lord of Primrose filled a goblet with his own blood, and offered the Chamberlain to taste. Legend, rumor, and unsubstantiated talk swear the glass was nectar-sweet. Naturally this cannot be confirmed, but the ruling stood, provided that young Adolphus bleed for his home too.

    That he did, though he has never been succeeded. The border wars that began his troubles were conquered in short order, as was acclaim won in service against rogue Guallamar agents, and glory in battle with the Independent of Quorthol. In his prime Adolphus was heralded one of the finest duelists the whole Wüvd abroad, and adored for his many victories. Though he was never an especially accomplished horseman, he set unprecedented records in both the melee and contests on foot at the Council's Retreat (biennial League tournament/festival). Of generous temperament, yet filled with righteous fervor, he was an active and enthusiastic Lord; the spitting image of the noble ideal - but he is old now, and he imperils Primrose with his lack of heirs. When he should finally die, the fallout will be catastrophic.

    In light of this concern, why exactly he decided to champion this excursion to The Fringe of Bás is unclear. Whispers claims he shares a kindred spirit with the people of the Fringe; their worth still uncertain to the League. Others believe he desires one last adventure. Whatever the reason may be, Lord Adolphus Crofte has shown his willingness to make this endeavor, and the Grand Council has granted him nominal authority in the effort, alongside yourselves.
    Last edited by Boethius Junior; 2019-03-02 at 01:48 AM. Reason: Formatting

  5. - Top - End - #5
    Dwarf in the Playground
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    Default Re: [The Burning Wheel] Beneath the Delirious Moon [OOC & Dice Rolls]

    Some final notes that I felt should mention:

    I would prefer if all dice rolls were completed in this thread, and then updated in the IC afterwards. Given that the Burning Wheel requests statements of Intention and the Task to be completed before any dice are rolled - not to mention the principle of Letting It Ride - I believe this method will help the gameplay flow more smoothly.

    You begin play with one (1) point of Persona and Fate ARTHA. We shall hold votes to award ARTHA at the end of every month. If that seems too infrequently, then we can adjust later. Trait Votes will be held upon the completion of significant milestones within the adventure. I imagine strawpoll will be useful for these matters.

    For NPC speech, I am going to be coloring my text with "Red". If you would like to color yours, please feel free. I find that it can be helpful when looking back to determine specifically what another character/NPC said.

    Re: posting time - you have surely noticed that I have difficulties with posting regularly. My work schedule has me busy Thursday through Sunday, wherein I will be incapable of exceeding one post a day, though I intend to accomplish always this much at least. Monday through Wednesday I may post with much greater regularity. I understand however that life does interrupt, so we shall move forward at the best pace we may manage.

    I will add to this list as necessary, though this should be sufficient information for now.


    * * *

    Links


    I have uploaded the maps to the Google Drive in the Adventure Documents Folder, for those who were unable to view them embedded. I shall see if I can fix that problem with my image-hosting in the future.

    * * *

    Repository of Tests
    Character Ability/Skill Exponent Obstacle Difficulty
    Faust Persuasion 8 6 Difficult
    Brysen Rumour-Wise 7 Graduated Routine
    Faust Doctrine 2 Graduated Routine
    Faust Steel 7 5 Difficult
    Brysen Steel 5 6 Challenging
    Faust Orienteering 2 Graduated Routine
    Brysen Observation 6 ? Difficult
    Faust Observation 1 ? Challenging
    Brysen Rumour-Wise 3 1 Routine
    Brysen Steel 4 6 Challenging
    Faust Steel 7 5 Difficult
    Brysen Perception 6 1 Routine
    Brysen Persuade 7 ? Difficult
    Brysen Steel 4 6 Challenging
    Faust Steel 7 5 Difficult
    Last edited by Boethius Junior; 2019-09-20 at 09:37 AM. Reason: Updated Test Repository

  6. - Top - End - #6
    Barbarian in the Playground
     
    Tentreto's Avatar

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    Default Re: [The Burning Wheel] Beneath the Delirious Moon [OOC & Dice Rolls]

    Spoiler: Iald
    Show
    Iald Brigson

    Iald is a young Herald from Shambryville, who has spent time as a courier travelling between estates.

    From a young age, Iald was around horses, his parents owning a stable on the outskirts of Shambryville. Throughout his childhood, he helped run the stable with his brothers, as well as learning about the various customers and riders who came by. As the youngest brother, Iald was in no position to be more than a hand in the future, so on the advice of a friendly traveller, began to work as a courier, firstly in the city itself, then out in the countryside. He quickly proved adept at riding, and continued being a courier for many years across the League, once even converying a message to the Brazen Lands. He learned much about the nobles across the land, and quickly picked up their various crests and emblems.

    This proved helpful when a noble house with a lackluster reputation refused to pay or quarter him for bringing in news from the Council. As he returned, he was beset by bandits , but managed to outride them, and noticed the markings and stock of their horses. All of this combined proved enough for the house to be investigated, however briefly for its conduct, and Iald was contacted by the army to put his talents to use as a herald.

    Iald proved to be good at his job, and although he had yet to face a battle, did help his superior to find the various nobles around the camp and their status compared to his house's rank, which helped ensure his safety. Iald however had failed to endere himself to the soldiers, being useless in a fight, and was a out of his usual social circles, only sometimes returning to the taverns where his fellow couriers frequented. He also had a deal of emnity with some of the other heralds, notably those from noble houses themselves, who considered a commoner beneath the dignity of the role. These insults would have been easier to bear if the majority of the nobles had been useless as heralds, but most showed some competency.

    This emnity kept growing to the extent that small rumours began to spread about Iald, while the noble who he had served under retired back home, giving him no cover. With Ser Crofte organising an expedition, Iald saw it as an opportunity to get away from the worsening environment, and hopefully set himself up for the future.

    This decision immediately stopped the rumours and even got him a small amount of respect from both the nobles and soldiers for at least choosing to travel, even if some still saw it as a fools task.

    Spoiler: The Thirteen Questions
    Show

    1. What country is your character from? This question gives you a foundation upon which to build. When you understand your character’s culture, you will begin to understand your character. Imagine how his environment helped shape his personality. Your homeland stays with you no matter where you go. The various nations and peoples of the Wüvd will be explained in the next post.

    Iald is from the Shambry League, and has lived his entire life there, though he has travelled across it and to nearby lands twice.

    2. How would you physically describe your character? First off, is your character male or female? The Wüvd is a world where survival (at the individual and nation-scale) is paramount, and as such tends towards conservatism. That said—people are strange and come from many walks of life. Aside from sex, how does your character look? Start at their head and work your way down to their feet. Focus on the things that reflect their personality and the way they are treated by others.

    Iald is male. Iald has frazzled blonde hair, which he often combs with his hands, especially as he often has the hood of his cloak over his hair. He has soft blue eyes and a fairly flat nose. Iald is light skinned, although less so on his hands and face which are a shade darker due to exposure to the sun. His hands are calloused, though not as much as a labourer, as they still retain some dexterity. Iald usually wears a dark green hooded claok on his travels which has been worn down from use, but is certainly still functional. Iald often wears leather boots though he keeps a pair reserved for fast riding with spurs, as well as a smarter pair. Around his neck is a small necklace with a centerpiece of black and white feathers woven together into a ball. This is obviously a keepsake as the feathers have been treated with something. Iald isn't particularly handsome, though no one call him plain or ugly.

    3. What is your character’s primary motivation? Your Beliefs and Instincts will be important when thinking about this question. What keeps your character going when fate deals them a sour hand?

    Iald wants enough land to be able to support a family, though he would take more if able, especially to prove himself to those who set him on this path. He also wants to stay away from conflict when possible, prefering to set himself up where there is little competition. What keeps him going is his perserverence against the odds and his skill at getting out of trouble.

    4. What is your character’s greatest strength? Greatest weakness? Is your character really good at one particular thing? Does your character have something they are terrible at? A character with no strengths is difficult to keep alive; one with no weaknesses is difficult to sympathize with. A character with both strengths and weaknesses has a more balanced personality and will develop into a richer roleplaying experience.

    Iald is a very good rider, especially at sheer speed. He also has a good memory, being able to remember the many families and their crests in the League. He is not exactly determined, but he doesn't easily give up. For someone who is city-born, he knows a lot about the country, which makes him good at telling stories in taverns, though his knowledge of city streets is fairly bad, and he knows it (which is another reason he struck out) Possibly his two greatest deficets is that firstly he never really learned how to fight, and has managed to avoid them so far. Secondly, he never really could engrain himself in a group outside of the couriers, as he was not around the city for enough time to know its secrets, while only exchanging pleasentries with the peasants, and jibes with the other heralds. As he had trained to be a herald attatched to an army, not a court one, he did himself no favours by not knowing how to fight.

    5. What are your character’s most and least favorite things? Even small details can be important. You will face difficult choices beneath the delirious moon—what is it that you want? Simple wants though less critical than your character’s strongest motivations nonetheless color their decisions.

    Iald favorite things are riding fast, seeing the various different nobles, their demeanour and their crests and some camaradiance. He also likes strong tasting food, horses and a room to himself.

    Iald hates being hurt or ill, being lost, and being refused help when it is needed. He doesn't like dogs too much, nor too weak drink.

    6. What about your character’s psychology? Anger, desperation, grief, regret, sorrow, whimsy, etc. How does your character think? How do they react?

    Iald keeps himself collected and moving foward. He has a touch of jealousy and envy at those who have received a good position and waste it. His general rule of life is to take it as it comes, unless you know what is coming will break you. This is what has kept him moving on his path and on this expedition. He is conflict averse, and tends to resolve things peacefully, though even he wouldn't begrudge a person fighting back. This would be a problem if he was ever blackmailed.

    7. What is your character’s single greatest fear? This can be something metaphysical or mundane, depending on just who your character is. They might fear growing old or growing weak, or perhaps they fear loneliness. It could be anything.
    Having no other options in life but to starve and waste away. Primarily through poverty, though a degree of loneliness has certainly crept in.

    8. Does your character have any prejudices? Traumatic childhood incidents can lead to a lifetime of hatred and prejudice that the character may never get over—or their distaste may be grounded in nothing rational at all. Do consider the players unity when making this decision, however.

    Iald doesn't like dogs, though he will tolerate them. He does not have good thoughts on the Brazen men, as a tribe refused to pay him the one time he delivered a message between tribes.

    9. Where do your character’s loyalties lie? Does your character serve a certain nation? How do they regard their homeland? Maybe their loyalties lie with their family or spouse. Perhaps his first concern is looking out for himself, or maybe he serves a greater cause.

    Iald is loyal to his homeland, and does trust in its ranks and authority for the most part. He does consider some of the nobles, especially the younger ones as being a bit useless at times, cushing on their position, so he would pay little more than lip service to them. Beyond that he looks out for himself, but keeps an eye on his friends, and would probably give them the benefit of the doubt in a bad situation.

    10. Is your character in love? Is he married or betrothed? Do they have any children? Consider this, and any other familial matters, when determining your character’s Relationships and Circles.

    He wants a family eventually, but he wants to secure some land first. He has two other brothers, both of whom work at a stable just outside a city, which his parents owned beforehand.

    11. Is your character of any status? Noble, infamous or otherwise this pertains to your character’s Reputation and how they are viewed by the rest of society—what expectations fall upon them, how others will react to their presence, etc.

    No born status. He is a herald, which gives him some perceived status above the crowd, but no more. He is a direct line helping the Council work with and remember the nobles, and could in theory hold some degree of power in the future, but thats far in the future. He is generally expected as a herald to know almost every crest, mark and emblem in the League, as well as their neighbours, and cry it ou to large crowds. While there are limits that everyone must respect, he is expected to do his job well, and promptly, especially in an army setting. He is generally seen as a little exotic and a touch pompous as someone who in theory works with those in power as well as those who command, at least to the commoners. Nobles would view him as useful, but mostly part of the background, with the council giving a little more notice. Soldiers would see him as only being useful in identifying what groups are, and which knights are in attendance, which is only truly useufl in large engagements. Especially as he can't fight, soldiers would tolerate him, but joke behind his back.

    12. How religious is your character? In later posts I will be providing an in-depth review of the Wüvd and just who lives there, including their religious practices. Your character’s belief regarding higher powers, damnation and salvation, and so on may be relevant. Your character’s opinion on witchcraft and sorcery could be included here as well.

    Iald is not particulalry religious, having spent most of his life on the road, with his amulet being only a periphory to Witticism. He does consider it worth pursuing virtue, and does know the various rites, but not much beyond that which a commoner would know. As he has never seen magic or a Kaun, and has not become fully aware of his own mortality, he has no current drive towards it.

    13. If you could, what advice would you give your character? This question is perhaps the most important of all, as it will lay the groundwork for how you (as the player) will mature (as your character). Circumstances may be such that your character does not follow your advice; travelling a darker path than would be best for them. Beneath the delirious moon, the lines between virtue and sin may be blurred. Shadows grow long in the dark.

    Learn how to defend yourself, the Wuvd is Wild! Do perservere though, you have survived so far despite some trying to get rid of you so you can do it again. Finally, you need friends and people to watch your back.



    Heres Iald's character stuff. I shall go with bold 'dark green' for my colour.
    Avatar by the wonderful Ceika.
    King of Caligonia in Empire 3. Crusaded into the sunset

    Playing as The Whitefeather Kingdom in Empire 4



  7. - Top - End - #7
    Halfling in the Playground
     
    Kobold

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    Default Re: [The Burning Wheel] Beneath the Delirious Moon [OOC & Dice Rolls]

    Well, in that case, I shall be Fire Brick.

  8. - Top - End - #8
    Ogre in the Playground
     
    Henry the 57th's Avatar

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    Default Re: [The Burning Wheel] Beneath the Delirious Moon [OOC & Dice Rolls]

    Adalric will speak in Regal Purple.

    My character sheet is in the drive, but here are my 13 Questions:
    Spoiler: Adalric di Torre
    Show
    1. What country is your character from?
    Adalric hails from the Shambry League, son of the the Lord of the di Torre Estate, which covers, appropriately enough, the mid-sized city of Torre itself as well as a good few farming villages and swathes of unpopulated countryside. A relatively provincial part of the League, Torre boasts productive fields and quality game in its forests and little else, to the chagrin of its nobility. Unfortunately not long ago it also boasted a plague. Minor in the scheme of things with only a few dozen casualties, it struck at the heart of the dominion when it laid low Adalric's older brother and the heir apparent.

    2. How would you physically describe your character? First off, is your character male or female? The Wüvd is a world where survival (at the individual and nation-scale) is paramount, and as such tends towards conservatism. That said—people are strange and come from many walks of life. Aside from sex, how does your character look?
    Adalric is tall, handsome-looking man just past the prime of his youth. With his family's characteristic blonde hair and well-defined cheekbones, he would look almost heroic were it not for a pampered-looking smoothness that betrays a life of comparative ease. He has obviously never gone hungry or done much physical labor, resulting in a soft look somewhat unbefitting a man of his age.

    3. What is your character’s primary motivation? Your Beliefs and Instincts will be important when thinking about this question. What keeps your character going when fate deals them a sour hand?
    Adalric's primary motivation is the awareness that fate has called him to greatness, and he must measure up in all things or else be a failure in the eyes of his god and the spirits of his ancestors.

    4. What is your character’s greatest strength? Greatest weakness? Is your character really good at one particular thing? Does your character have something they are terrible at?
    Adalric's greatest strength is his scholarly mind, which enables him to quickly absorb knowledge and gain insight into almost any academic or legal situation. He also is familiar with the principles of command and effect use of rhetoric, thanks to years spent organizing the Church of Wit in the Torre Estate as its Arch-Prelate of Canticles. However, his unfamiliarity with the practical protocol and intrigues of the noble courts can leave him struggling to keep up in his sudden role as ruler of the Estate and its delegate to Shambryville. Physically speaking he lacks martial training and cannot really endure pain very well. He relies on others to fight on his behalf.

    5. What are your character’s most and least favorite things?
    Adalric's most favorite thing is his treasured library, filled with all sorts of knowledge and rare tomes. His least favorite is likely his horse, not only does he not care much for riding atop something with a mind of its own he swears that it tries to make his rides as uncomfortable and nerve-wracking as possible.

    6. What about your character’s psychology?
    Adalric is rather conservative and cautious by nature, reluctant to step into waters he's unsure of for fear of making some catastrophic mistake. He sits back and tries to stay quiet and learn whenever he's unsure about the situation. When he feels confident he has a handle on it, though, he's quick to leap into action and try to turn whatever is going on to his benefit by the strength of his mind and his sharp tongue.

    7. What is your character’s single greatest fear?
    Failure. Adalric is quite conscious that he has been entrusted with a great deal, and he immensely fears letting down either his god or his family by ruining the Church or Estate with poor management.

    8. Does your character have any prejudices?
    As a lifelong devotee of Wit, Adalric does not look well on heathens in general, or on those that fail to show the Church its proper respect.

    9. Where do your character’s loyalties lie?
    They are, admittedly, somewhat torn. While he was raised to revere the Church of Wit, he has recently been thrust into the role of Lord of Torre. He is very conscious of the weight pressed on his shoulders, and should the interests of his Estate and his Church ever come into opposition he isn't sure where his loyalties might go. Fortunately, that hasn't happened yet. He strives to honor god and ancestors every day.

    10. Is your character in love?
    Not really. His marriage to Geinire di Torre was a rather hastily-thrown together affair, arranged over the span of mere months by his then-ailing father as he rushed to prepare his second son for lordship. He finds her pleasant enough company and bears some affection for their infant son, but he hadn't really expected to be wed and so has little idea how he is supposed to go about it. He tries as best he can, though.

    11. Is your character of any status?
    Very high status. As both the Lord and Arch-Prelate of Canticles of the Torre Estate, he combines the role of secular and religious leader into one.

    12. How religious is your character?
    Very. While he was always quite devoted to his god, recently his fervor has only intensified as he seeks divine aid for the dual burdens now laid upon him.

    13. If you could, what advice would you give your character?
    A noble should have some ability to fight, you ought to learn if for no other reason that to deal with potential duels. Also, you really should consider spending less time with your books and more time trying to grasp the intricacies of noble life.
    Last edited by Henry the 57th; 2019-03-03 at 12:00 AM.
    "All generalizations are false."
    -Me

    Please remeber the impotence of poofreading everything you right.

    Avatar by Emperor Ing.

  9. - Top - End - #9
    Barbarian in the Playground
     
    Planetar

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    Default Re: [The Burning Wheel] Beneath the Delirious Moon [OOC & Dice Rolls]

    Brysen Mock'll speak in dark blue

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    Dwarf in the Playground
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    Default Re: [The Burning Wheel] Beneath the Delirious Moon [OOC & Dice Rolls]

    Good that nearly everyone has checked in! May I ask if the map images are coming through clearly at this time? Hopefully uploading them to the Public Drive has worked as well, though I was uncertain last night if the sharing functions were setup properly or not. If there are any problems, let me know and I will address them.
    Last edited by Boethius Junior; 2019-03-02 at 11:35 PM. Reason: Grammar

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    Default Re: [The Burning Wheel] Beneath the Delirious Moon [OOC & Dice Rolls]

    Hey, is it okay if I say Adalric is traveling accompanied by a small retinue befitting a lord, or is it too late to do that?

    Also, I see the map fine now.
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    Default Re: [The Burning Wheel] Beneath the Delirious Moon [OOC & Dice Rolls]

    Excellent that the map is working! As for your request, I had already assumed that collectively the entire band was accompanied by some number of footmen, grooms, scribes, etc. We can surely guarantee that some are your personal attendants - just as Brysen Mock may have the following of those from his merchant company, Faust might have indentured servants, and so on for the rest of you all.

    One dozen aides per character, accountable to each of you specifically, sounds appropriate to me. They may be of whatever styling seems most proper to you. The rest of your train, which numbers shall we say thirty, receive their directives from Lord Crofte - they are a mix of his own countrymen and council envoys.

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    Default Re: [The Burning Wheel] Beneath the Delirious Moon [OOC & Dice Rolls]

    I guess I'll pick Dark Gray for my speech.

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    Kobold

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    Default Re: [The Burning Wheel] Beneath the Delirious Moon [OOC & Dice Rolls]

    When I open the public drive, I don't even see the files for the maps. But that might be due to me using mobile.
    Also, Boethius Jr., do we state Intent in the IC thread? And when is it appropriate to do so in a conversation?
    Last edited by The Void Dragon; 2019-03-03 at 12:32 PM.

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    Default Re: [The Burning Wheel] Beneath the Delirious Moon [OOC & Dice Rolls]

    In the Public Drive, the maps are located within a folder entitled Adventure Documents, which should be shared publicly. So far as I know that should be accessible on mobile as on desktop.

    To your other point, yes - Intent and Tasks should be stated within this OOC thread, as they are required so that I may determine which skill shall be utilized and the subsequent obstacle. These are only relevant when making skill tests, however.

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    Dwarf in the Playground
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    Default Re: [The Burning Wheel] Beneath the Delirious Moon [OOC & Dice Rolls]

    A note here - you all have three days before the summit of lords to do with as you see fit. When collectively you feel ready to move forward, to how you make use of this time or to the summit directly, we can do so.

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    Default Re: [The Burning Wheel] Beneath the Delirious Moon [OOC & Dice Rolls]

    Adalric, assuming no one else is seeking his attention, will spend a few hours just surveying the grounds and seeing how everything holds up compared to the temples and monasteries back home. He's looking for any signs of deviant or unorthodox worship while checking with his more militarily experienced knights for any signs that this place may at all be prepared for violence. Basically checking to see if everything really is as peaceful and devout as the Abbot makes it out be. Is that something I would need to roll for?
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    Default Re: [The Burning Wheel] Beneath the Delirious Moon [OOC & Dice Rolls]

    Iald will also survey the grounds, although he will focus on the buildings and the surrounding lands so he has an idea of how it lies, and if anything jumps out at him. He will walk with Brysen unless their goals require them to move in different locations.
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    Default Re: [The Burning Wheel] Beneath the Delirious Moon [OOC & Dice Rolls]

    Krasimir will follow Iald for a time, to get a sense of the land. He'll then inspect the gardens more closely to see the quality of soil and plants.

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    Default Re: [The Burning Wheel] Beneath the Delirious Moon [OOC & Dice Rolls]

    Brysen will want to find out more about the products produced by the Abbey, who their primary trade partner is, and converse more with the Abbot to get a better understanding of the political/power dynamics in the Fringe.

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    Dwarf in the Playground
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    Default Re: [The Burning Wheel] Beneath the Delirious Moon [OOC & Dice Rolls]

    So if I'm understanding properly, Adalric is walking the grounds with two of his entourage, while Brysen, Iald, and Krasimir are doing the same together - eventually splitting to follow their respective interests? No rolls are necessary for the moment, as you are all well acquainted with your respective fields.

    I post the results of your efforts in a little while, to give The Void Dragon time to decide what Faust is up to.

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    Default Re: [The Burning Wheel] Beneath the Delirious Moon [OOC & Dice Rolls]

    I went ahead and posted in the IC, assuming that Faust will be moving with the group for the time being. If there is anything I missed, or more that you would like to do with the time, please let me know and I can update the post.

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    Default Re: [The Burning Wheel] Beneath the Delirious Moon [OOC & Dice Rolls]

    Iald is going to attempt to suss what is in the wine. I think it would be a beginners luck with a possible fork form Country-side wise (for knowing what is generally around vineyards). Just to make sure, I'll leave rolling till you confirm it.
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    Default Re: [The Burning Wheel] Beneath the Delirious Moon [OOC & Dice Rolls]

    Yes, Beginner's Luck with Wine-wise as the primary skill. FORKing to Countryside-Wise seems perfectly reasonable to me. This will be a Graduated Test; more successes, more information.

    I'll post in response to the various talk at hand right now, with more to come depending upon your roll.

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    Default Re: [The Burning Wheel] Beneath the Delirious Moon [OOC & Dice Rolls]

    Here, Faust is trying to use Etiquette to suss out details about Mull,the purpose of avoiding a major faux pas at the summit later serving as the polite excuse. Hopefully, it won't backfire spectacularly. Can't really think of any applicable forks, though.
    Last edited by The Void Dragon; 2019-03-08 at 12:19 AM.

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    Default Re: [The Burning Wheel] Beneath the Delirious Moon [OOC & Dice Rolls]

    Well, first roll of the campaign. Lets see how well the future holds:

    BL Wine-Wise (maybe wine tasting? Both use perception anyway...). Fork Countryside-wise. 5+1=6 dice.

    (1d6)[3]
    (1d6)[1]
    (1d6)[5]
    (1d6)[6]
    (1d6)[3]
    (1d6)[3]
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  27. - Top - End - #27
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    Default Re: [The Burning Wheel] Beneath the Delirious Moon [OOC & Dice Rolls]

    Quote Originally Posted by The Void Dragon View Post
    Here, Faust is trying to use Etiquette to suss out details about Mull,the purpose of avoiding a major faux pas at the summit later serving as the polite excuse. Hopefully, it won't backfire spectacularly. Can't really think of any applicable forks, though.
    Persuasion is the skill you should test, to convince the Abbot to reveal more - presumably with the help of Adalric for +1 die. As this is not per se a courtly scenario, and this is not an official request, but merely conversation. Obstacle 3 in this case, due to the delicate nature of such diplomacy. Note any FORKs you are making use of.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tentreto View Post
    Well, first roll of the campaign. Lets see how well the future holds:

    BL Wine-Wise (maybe wine tasting? Both use perception anyway...). Fork Countryside-wise. 5+1=6 dice.

    [roll0]
    [roll1]
    [roll2]
    [roll3]
    [roll4]
    [roll5]
    I completely missed that Wine-tasting is its own skill; that would have been more appropriate indeed. Anyhow, two success will reveal plenty about the wine: the grape you are unfamiliar with, thus suggesting it is a native breed. The wine has been spiced with cloves, and aged for at least four years in oak barrels prior to bottling.

  28. - Top - End - #28
    Barbarian in the Playground
     
    Planetar

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    Default Re: [The Burning Wheel] Beneath the Delirious Moon [OOC & Dice Rolls]

    Quote Originally Posted by Boethius Junior View Post
    Persuasion is the skill you should test, to convince the Abbot to reveal more - presumably with the help of Adalric for +1 die. As this is not per se a courtly scenario, and this is not an official request, but merely conversation. Obstacle 3 in this case, due to the delicate nature of such diplomacy. Note any FORKs you are making use of.
    Would Brysen Mock's Rumour-wise skill come in handy here? He also has points in Persuasion if that helps as well.
    Last edited by atlastrembles; 2019-03-08 at 12:58 PM.

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    Default Re: [The Burning Wheel] Beneath the Delirious Moon [OOC & Dice Rolls]

    Brysen could certainly assist, if he would so desire. Since Faust broached the topic first, he is making the test, though your help would lend another die his way.

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    Default Re: [The Burning Wheel] Beneath the Delirious Moon [OOC & Dice Rolls]

    Quote Originally Posted by Boethius Junior View Post
    Persuasion is the skill you should test, to convince the Abbot to reveal more - presumably with the help of Adalric for +1 die. As this is not per se a courtly scenario, and this is not an official request, but merely conversation. Obstacle 3 in this case, due to the delicate nature of such diplomacy. Note any FORKs you are making use of.



    I completely missed that Wine-tasting is its own skill; that would have been more appropriate indeed. Anyhow, two success will reveal plenty about the wine: the grape you are unfamiliar with, thus suggesting it is a native breed. The wine has been spiced with cloves, and aged for at least four years in oak barrels prior to bottling.
    Do I need to roll anything to be helpful or is it just a passive benefit I confer?
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