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  1. - Top - End - #1
    Dwarf in the Playground
     
    Goblin

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    Mar 2019

    Default Making a setting - A specific case

    Okamigekido asked in another thread about making a setting for his game and we all threw out some advice. I thought I'd put a specific example out there and we could use it for specific details of good and bad. I'll start the savaging since it's my work. But I'll note that I regret nothing! :) It was fun and I can edit. No, really, I can.

    Nordbourg
    This is a 5e setting in my world. It's fairly low magic but not terribly so. There's a great big hostile forest to the West and North. Beyond that is the Vulkanwand (Vulcan's Wall), an enormous, continent-spanning wall of active volcanoes brought into existence by a past war of magic. Nordbourg is the Northernmost settlement in Das Eisenreich (The Iron Empire). The Empire is set in an area roughly equivalent to Southern Argentina with much more moisture. It's heavily human-centric with some halflings, some half-elves, and no elves or dwarves or gnomes or other species (there's background for that I won't go into).

    What did I do wrong?
    -To start with I put in way too much information. Way. Too. Much. Why is this bad? Because while I thought I was throwing in details that players could discover and enjoy, what I was really doing was telling a story WITHOUT the players. I wasn't opening doors, I was closing them. You'll see that most of my mistakes revolve around adding too much information.

    -The Calendar. That's a good example of too much information. I could have just named the months. Putting it together with a lunar calendar? Not needed.

    -The City. So much wrong. So much. Let's start with how inadvisable it is to build a city in a bend on a river that comes out of the mountains. Can you say "Flood much"? Sigh. And the river is way too narrow for floating log rafts down (which is kind of a big deal in my setting). Where are the bad guys? They're in the forest to the West. So perhaps I should have kept the river between them and the city? Ouch. You have to drive the lumber carts through the center of town? So very not a good idea. I don't have nearly enough farm land to support all these people. Maybe if I had put the city on the other side of the river? Yeah, that would have been smarter. Oh, and where do dead people go? Not a single freaking cemetery.

    -Organization. Try to quickly find a piece of information in this mess. Go on, I dare you. That's another casualty of excessive information. The less info you have the easier it is to find truly important details.

    -Coinage. Super cool (to me) information. Totally not needed. Far, far easier to simply use the coinage in the PHB along with the price tables. Changing from a decimal system to a base 12 system is simply going to be excessive complication for most players. I don't regret it and I'm keeping it but I recognize that it likely hinders more than it contributes.

    -The map key? The first list of key infrastructure (the castle, the town well, the granaries, etc...) makes sense. The subsequent ones do not. If I felt the need to provide more detail about what's where (and I do) I could simply list a few key items in an area and assign them a specific location if needed. I'm working on that now.


    What did I do right?
    -A picture is worth a thousand words. The maps are good, the pictures of half-timber buildings are better. Those pictures give a better feel for the town than all my other writing. I just pulled those out of a quick Google search. I really should have done the same for clothing as well.

    -The Calendar. I know, I said this was too much detail. But having the calendar and being able to keep track of time and being able to tie that to weather is important to me. It lets me provide some detail to players and keep things straight in my head and the names of the months feels like a *really* important piece of detail about the Empire.

    -The city. I used the online map generator. Which was smart because it saved me a ton of time. I modified it to add fields. The latest update of the generator adds some fields, but not nearly enough for me.

    -Demographics. This could use some improvement, primarily in presentation, but I feel this presents a lot of information without bogging down in excessive detail. Is it needed? Nope. But I'd keep this and I'd do it again. Particularly since the Medieval Demographics generator makes it so easy to create.

    -Notes. I took some notes about what needed to be corrected so I could start correcting those things.

    -Currents. I'm going to give myself the benefit of the doubt on this one. I'm struggling to present the ongoing political and social currents of the setting in an organized and concise fashion. This is stuff that's going on around the players. It isn't dependent upon them and creates opportunities for them to play.

    -Consistent naming/language strategies. I decided on a Germanic influence and took language and names from pre-existing sources. That makes it easy to generate new details on the fly.
    Last edited by jjordan; 2019-05-01 at 12:46 PM.

  2. - Top - End - #2
    Dwarf in the Playground
     
    Goblin

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    Mar 2019

    Default Re: Making a setting - A specific case

    So how could I have done this better? Here are my thoughts.

    Start small. I like to have a world map to start out with so I know where my forests and deserts and mountains are and which way the weather patterns move. Then I go down to a smaller scale. For a settlement my description could easily be:

    Nordbourg - Northernmost settlement of the Iron Empire.
    That simple. I don't really need more detail than that unless someone starts to look more closely at it. But I probably want a little more detail.

    Nordbourg - Northernmost settlement of Das Eisenreich. A frontier town bordered by a lush, dark forest and the Vulkanwand beyond that. Sends timber vital for ship construction South to the capitol via river and road. Also produces food items.
    Ninety percent of the settlements in my world will never need more detail than that. This is enough information to satisfy most casual inquiries. If I need more detail I can make it up. And because I am making it up I am free to include details that respond to the narrative of the campaign/story at that point in time.

    As it happens, I intend for this location to be the initial entry point for my campaign setting. I'm planning on having a couple of adventures here and, potentially, the entire campaign could center around this location. Keyword here is: could. I want more details but I don't want too much. Where's the line? That's up to you. In general, however, less is more.

    Nordbourg - Northernmost settlement of Das Eisenreich. A frontier town bordered by a lush, dark forest (Der Wald) and the Vulkanwand beyond that. Population: ~1,800. Buildings: ~300, half inside the walls, half-timber construction, 2 stories with a steep pitched roof making a 3rd story. Fortifications: Stone walls topped by wooden palisades, square stone towers. Industry: Lumber (particularly for ship masts and keels), agricultural goods (grains, vegetables, specialty flowers, specialty fruits), forest foraged goods (furs, herbs). Politics: Ruled by a noble lord (son of a court exile), administered by council of guilds. Military: Small body of professional sergeants leading a civic militia organized by guild membership.
    That's not bad, but now I've got enough information that it needs to be organized.

    Nordbourg - Northernmost settlement of Das Eisenreich. A frontier town bordered by a lush, dark forest (Der Wald) and the Vulkanwand beyond that.
    Population: ~1,800.
    Buildings: ~300, half inside the walls, half-timber construction, 2 stories with a steep pitched roof making a 3rd story.
    Fortifications: Stone walls topped by wooden palisades, square stone towers.
    Industry: Lumber (particularly for ship masts and keels), agricultural goods (grains, vegetables, specialty flowers, specialty fruits), forest foraged goods (furs, herbs).
    Politics: Ruled by a noble lord (son of a court exile), administered by council of guilds.
    Military: Small body of professional sergeants leading a civic militia organized by guild membership.
    I've also expanded the light a bit and need to include a little context and description of surrounding areas.

    Nordbourg - Northernmost settlement of Das Eisenreich. A frontier town bordered by a lush, dark forest (Der Wald) and the Vulkanwand beyond that.
    Population: ~1,800.
    Buildings: ~300, half inside the walls, half-timber construction, 2 stories with a steep pitched roof making a 3rd story.
    Fortifications: Stone walls topped by wooden palisades, square stone towers.
    Industry: Lumber (particularly for ship masts and keels), agricultural goods (grains, vegetables, specialty flowers, specialty fruits), forest foraged goods (furs, herbs).
    Politics: Ruled by a noble lord (son of a court exile), administered by council of guilds.
    Military: Small body of professional sergeants leading a civic militia organized by guild membership.

    Das Eisenreich - Situated on the Southernmost portion of one continent. Bordered to the West and North by Der Wald and the Vulkanwand. Bordered to the East by the Kingdom of Cerus and the Pirate Sea. Bordered to the South by the Frostlands (South Pole landmass).
    Design Notes:
    -Germanic/Alsace names/language inspiration.
    -Base 12 coinage system, coins have iron rims.
    -3 seasons (Spring, Summer, Winter) of 3 months (Bliss, Disease, Invasion, Deception, War, Famine, Sorrow, Rage, Steadfast) of 3 weeks (1st, 2nd, 3rd) each composed of 12 days.
    -Super strong hatred/distrust of elves that colors everything they do.

    Der Wald - The Woods. A lush, enormous forest fed by volcanic soils washed down from the Vulkanwand by moisture carried from the Pirate Sea and great lakes to the East. Unclaimed land populated by giant spiders, ents, dryads, Forest Kings (human or animal avatars of genius locii), assassin vines, ants, boars, leopard, bears, ravens, wolves, and the occasional desperate bandits. Considered a buffer territory by Das Eisenreich.

    Vulkanwand - Vulkan's wall. A vast continent spanning range of towering volcanoes. Created by powerful magic and the home to bands of orcs and their fortresses. Lava flows, lava bombs, valleys full of poisonous gasses, pyroclastic flows, lakes of acid, giant insects, and other threats make this an inhospitable land.
    Do I need more than this? Yes, but not to start. Instead of filling in the blanks now I can wait until the players arrive and fill in the blanks in way that is responsive to their needs and the needs of the story/campaign. Would this town have an apothecary? Does the story need it have one? If yes then yes. Does the story need it to not have one? If yes then no. If it doesn't matter one way or the other then I can look at the online demographics chart and see that it's big enough to have one. So now it has one. I make a note of this as we move on with play.

    I usually want more than this. I noted above how this is usually a mistake as it fills in space before the players arrive so it removes more opportunity than it creates. It also creates a lot of opportunity for disappointment. If you build some really cool intricate details into your world and the players ignore 90% of them (and they will) then you run the risk of being really unhappy. Build the cool intricate details, but build them as needed. That way 100% of your work gets noticed and you have less opportunity to be disappointed.

  3. - Top - End - #3
    Dwarf in the Playground
     
    Goblin

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    Mar 2019

    Default Re: Making a setting - A specific case

    From the basic setting I now need to add some possible adventures or plot hooks. How to do this? To be honest, I'm not entirely sure. What I used to do was come up with a couple of adventure ideas based on what I thought the players were likely to do. So I'd put four or five options in front of them and see which way they decided to jump. This is better than having only one option, sort of.

    If you're playing a one-shot or part of a series of adventures designed to tell a larger story then you're agreeing to a reduced set of options. You are, in effect, signing up to play your part in the story. This approach works well for standardized sessions or very short sessions. When you introduce this into longer play sessions then it starts to feel like you're being railroaded. Particularly if the players are reacting to events in a way the GM/DM didn't anticipate. Or even if the dice simply start to roll funny.

    The alternative is to go with a more freeform, sandbox approach to the game. The players are free to plot their own courses, usually on the basis of goals they self-determine in their backstory. This takes a little more effort on the part of the DM but I feel it yields better results. It can sometimes feel a little aimless, however, and the players need something to do while they're preparing for the big fight to accomplish their goals.

    So I've been experimenting with currents. I define currents as the stream of events going on around the players in the world. Other people have desires/goals and plans. So life goes on around the players. It's tempting to have a single current. E.G. Banished evil power is recruiting servants in this world to facilitate his return and rise to power. In this example the players will obviously continue to encounter the plots and machinations of this power and his followers and be drawn into conflict with him leading to a final climactic confrontation. Unless they miss the signs and/or ignore them because they have to get back at that guy who beat them up in the random bar fight and follow him halfway across the continent. Because players.

    So I'm trying to create multiple currents. This simple complexity allows for the game/story to go in a lot of different directions and allows for players to have unexpected effects on the world. So maybe something like this:

    Nordbourg - Northernmost settlement of Das Eisenreich. A frontier town bordered by a lush, dark forest (Der Wald) and the Vulkanwand beyond that.
    Population: ~1,800.
    Buildings: ~300, half inside the walls, half-timber construction, 2 stories with a steep pitched roof making a 3rd story.
    Fortifications: Stone walls topped by wooden palisades, square stone towers.
    Industry: Lumber (particularly for ship masts and keels), agricultural goods (grains, vegetables, specialty flowers, specialty fruits), forest foraged goods (furs, herbs).
    Politics: Ruled by a noble lord (son of a court exile), administered by council of guilds.
    Military: Small body of professional sergeants leading a civic militia organized by guild membership.
    Currents:
    -The Lord of Nordbourg, as ambitious as his father ever was, has invited in a delegation of tieflings from the Kingdom of Cerus. His understanding is that they will aid him in his desire to expand his power.
    -A group of residents are seeking to build a new village North of the town, closer to the quarry and lumbering.
    -The forest has been more dangerous of late. With several trappers and herb-gatherers going missing.
    -The Kingdom of Bele'ath suspects that orcs are receiving their iron weapons from Nordbourg and has dispatched agents to stop this traffic.

    Das Eisenreich - Situated on the Southernmost portion of one continent. Bordered to the West and North by Der Wald and the Vulkanwand. Bordered to the East by the Kingdom of Cerus and the Pirate Sea. Bordered to the South by the Frostlands (South Pole landmass).
    Design Notes:
    -Germanic/Alsace names/language inspiration.
    -Base 12 coinage system, coins have iron rims.
    -3 seasons (Spring, Summer, Winter) of 3 months (Bliss, Disease, Invasion, Deception, War, Famine, Sorrow, Rage, Steadfast) of 3 weeks (1st, 2nd, 3rd) each composed of 12 days.
    -Super strong hatred/distrust of elves that colors everything they do.
    -Capitol is an enormous, industrial, iron-mining town.
    Currents:
    -The Empire hasn't directly fought the elves in over three hundred years. A war faction is pushing to take the fight to the elves and has the support of the Crown Prince. The Emperor, however, believes the trade routes through the Frostlands must be secured and that means a big campaign to crush the Frost Giants.
    -Immigrants from the Kingdom of Cerus are crossing the Eastern border in increasing numbers to settle Imperial lands. They bring with them their worship of a Lawful Evil devil and his Tiefling acolytes and demands for social change in line with their beliefs.
    -Groups of semi-nomadic half-elves have been fleeing the increasingly rigid laws of the Kingdom of Cerus and entering the Empire. There have been several violent incidents where they have been attacked by locals on suspicion of being elvish agents.

    Der Wald - The Woods. A lush, enormous forest fed by volcanic soils washed down from the Vulkanwand by moisture carried from the Pirate Sea and great lakes to the East. Unclaimed land populated by giant spiders, ents, dryads, Forest Kings (human or animal avatars of genius locii), assassin vines, ants, boars, leopard, bears, ravens, wolves, and the occasional desperate bandits. Considered a buffer territory by Das Eisenreich.
    Currents:
    -The continued expansion of the Empire into the forest has angered the genius locii and they are beginning to stir themselves to active resistance.
    -There are fell magics stirring within the woods. Powers and creatures long hidden, long forgotten are re-emerging.

    Vulkanwand - Vulkan's wall. A vast continent spanning range of towering volcanoes. Created by powerful magic and the home to bands of orcs and their fortresses. Lava flows, lava bombs, valleys full of poisonous gasses, pyroclastic flows, lakes of acid, giant insects, and other threats make this an inhospitable land.
    Currents:
    -The Kingdom of Bele'ath, a human and halfling kingdom to the North of the Vulkanwand and an elvish satrapy, has been pushing hard into the Vulkanwand to attack orcish bands. They have recently crushed several bands and destroyed an orcish stronghold. This has thrown off the balance of power between the various orcish groups.
    -One of the dormant volcanoes has re-awakened and lands that were safe are no longer. Orcs and other creatures are on the move. The landscape has changed. Things that were hidden have been brought back to the daylight.
    Do I need entries for the Kingdom of Cerus and the Pirate Sea? Not really. If they come up I can make up some details about them. If the players really start to look at them I can come up with more. And the barest mentions of those two entities put ideas in your head, didn't they?

    The currents produce events and suggest possible adventures rather than the other way around as I had been doing in the past. Players are now free to have their characters act and alter some of those currents. Or to have those currents swelling around them Maybe they'll be drinking in a bar and listening to how a rag-tag group of adventurers defeated a great evil. Or maybe they'll be hearing about how they failed and their flayed corpses are being carried at the head of an army of conquest headed their way. Plot hook? I think so. But my players might not, and that's okay.

  4. - Top - End - #4
    Dwarf in the Playground
     
    Goblin

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    Mar 2019

    Default Re: Making a setting - A specific case

    I'm moving this over to World Building. It should have been there from the start. I posted here because the thread I was responding to was posted here.

  5. - Top - End - #5
    Pixie in the Playground
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    Default Re: Making a setting - A specific case

    Woah, this has actually answered many of my questions! I love the way you organize your ideas, as well. I never exactly thought of the general population, and what type of government they lead/and how. These are details I never would've considered. I hadn't even thought of the type of weather, or the type of names/features they'd have due to the location they live. Yet-how exactly do you decide these points just based on the location? My location is sort of a jungle area, with a river running through the back-ends of its forestry. And, the fields are across the river on the other side which-now seems like it was quite the dumb idea from what I can think of now. So how would you-decide the speaking, personality, and living habits of a rugged jungle town? I understand the "thinking it up" aspect, but creating it-seems a bit different for me? (Sorry if this is alot)
    Last edited by Okamigekido; 2019-05-03 at 10:02 AM. Reason: Spelling errors

  6. - Top - End - #6
    Dwarf in the Playground
     
    Goblin

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    Default Re: Making a setting - A specific case

    Quote Originally Posted by Okamigekido View Post
    Woah, this has actually answered many of my questions! I love the way you organize your ideas, as well. I never exactly thought of the general population, and what type of government they lead/and how. These are details I never would've considered. I hadn't even thought of the type of weather, or the type of names/features they'd have due to the location they live. Yet-how exactly do you decide these points just based on the location? My location is sort of a jungle area, with a river running through the back-ends of its forestry. And, the fields are across the river on the other side which-now seems like it was quite the dumb idea from what I can think of now. So how would you-decide the speaking, personality, and living habits of a rugged jungle town? I understand the "thinking it up" aspect, but creating it-seems a bit different for me? (Sorry if this is alot)
    Frankly, I'd overthink it by filling my brain up with all sorts of info related to jungle settlements. I'd start with looking at historical examples of jungle settings (Angkor Wat, Chichen Itza, Mayapan, etc...) to see how they were set up. I'd consider what they grew for food, how productive this was, how much land was required. How they managed the water. I'd look at clothing styles. I'd look at when writing emerged and how they handled the advent of iron. Then I'd decide what my town was for and where it was and start drawing and writing. Twenty pages later I'll be trying to organize and reduce.

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    Barbarian in the Playground
     
    BardGuy

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    Nov 2017

    Default Re: Making a setting - A specific case

    This topic pleased me.

    Yes, there is a case for a strong editor to 'tone down the enthusiasm', as it were. Keeping it pithy yet evocative is an art unto itself. That said, it reads like the collation of a lot of brainstormed material.

    It looks way beyond an initial outline (if we were to take the analogy of familiar procedure on 'how to form an essay'). Would you say it is at the second or third draft stage? Do you find knowledge of geography principles help speed up the brainstormed tropes process?

  8. - Top - End - #8
    Dwarf in the Playground
     
    Goblin

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    Mar 2019

    Default Re: Making a setting - A specific case

    Quote Originally Posted by opaopajr View Post
    It looks way beyond an initial outline (if we were to take the analogy of familiar procedure on 'how to form an essay'). Would you say it is at the second or third draft stage? Do you find knowledge of geography principles help speed up the brainstormed tropes process?
    Using your analogy I'd say this is still in the research notes stage. I was figuring out formatting tricks in Google Docs and I'm still not happy with how some of the information is presented. I could move this to first draft in a few hours.

    Geography is a tough one. If I'm being honest I don't think it's necessary 99% of the time. You can have whatever you want for your setting/story. I find the basic geographic principles to be an essential tool for building a consistent setting. I build my world/setting and that tells me where the earthquakes and volcanoes and other things are. Then I apply simple weather patterns and I know where my jungles, forests, grasslands, deserts, and rivers are. It also gives me temperatures. Then I can build specific locations. This is kind of a pain the first time you do it. After that it's pretty simple.

  9. - Top - End - #9
    Dwarf in the Playground
     
    Goblin

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    Mar 2019

    Default Re: Making a setting - A specific case

    Cleaning up by consolidating:

    With a general setting in place and some general currents propelling events I can start to play. But this is a long-format game, not a one shot. In my mind that means this is more like cooperative storytelling/improv (everyone is working together to build a story) than playing a part in a scripted movie. Which means I need to take the input of my players into account. The best, and easiest, way to do this is by reading their backstories.

    WotC has a good article on backstories online. I'll look it up and add the link at some point. What I took away from that somewhat lengthy article was that I want a backstory to include at least one motivation/goal, and two connections. Players can use the tables in the PHB or XG to randomly generate these but it's better if they make them up. Read the backstory and add details and currents to your setting based on these. Maybe they'll never come up, but if they do they'll mean a lot to the players because you've taken the time to read their work (and that's all any writer really wants) and incorporate them into the world. The other benefit is that they will have cool ideas. Remember the joke meme that a savvy DM can just listen to the paranoid speculations of the players and get 90% of the campaign from them? If you take the maliciousness out of that joke it's actually pretty good advice because the players will feel a closer connection to the game because they'll understand it. And you get to do a little less work and come across as a genius.

    So let's say a player says they are a male half-orc. Their mother was raped in one of the many orcish raids. The child was given up at birth to a religious order. The religious order is dedicated to the idea of balance between order and chaos and the peaceful resolution of conflict. They thought they could make him an emissary the orcs would listen to. He was trained with the other students but they resented him and plotted to kill him. Shortly after they graduated his fellow students put their plot into action and he maimed several of them. Rather than throwing him out the order granted him the status of wandering scholar and sent him out into the world with the expectation that he would never trouble the order again.

    Okay, cool. I'm going to add an organization that produces monkish negotiators. I'll make them a fairly small order but widespread. They've got negotiators, wandering scholars, acolytes, and students. They help large powers negotiate so they've got some pull at high levels. I'll make a note that this half-orc might encounter some of his order at courts and wherever there are conflicts. He's got a connection to this order that might be hostile at times (perhaps encountering a former classmate or instructor) or it might prove helpful. Fitting this into my setting I'd need to work with the player to determine if he's from Bele'ath or Cerus because that will factor into my building. See how the backstory created a mini-conversation between the DM and a player and resulted in the world changing? Hold on to that.

    So how do I annotate this?

    The Church of Balance - A small monastic order with a HQ in Bele'ath that espouses the idea that there must be a balance between order and chaos in order for good to flourish. Too much of either results in situations in which evil is encouraged to grow and good is suppressed. They take in orphans and train them in this ideology, incidentally teaching them martial arts and acrobatics, and send them out into the world to work as facilitators and negotiators.

    Current - Church negotiators are working to end the cycle of violence between Bele'ath and the orcbands in the Vulkanwand.

    Note: Negotiators and wandering scholars may turn up from time to time (particularly where there is conflict and leaders trying to resolve that conflict). Most will be indifferent to the former student. Some will act to hinder him. Others will act to assist out of respect for the order. The name of the order is known at high levels and membership may open some doors.
    On to the next player!
    Last edited by jjordan; 2019-05-05 at 08:57 AM.

  10. - Top - End - #10
    Dwarf in the Playground
     
    Goblin

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    Mar 2019

    Default Re: Making a setting - A specific case

    What sort of adventures can I set here? Pretty much anything I want to. My choices are going to be informed by the backstories of the characters. With just the setting I can think of:

    -Farmers hired a passing wizard to make a better scarecrow and he gave them a Scarecrow. They need someone to destroy it without destroying their crops. (Investigative problem solving and combat)

    -Orc refugees from the Vulkanwand seeking a place to settle. (Political/Social problem solving)

    -Series of murders carried out by a shadow. (Investigation and combat)

    -Shadow Council wants a couple of aspiring pimps to no longer be in town. (Social interaction and possibly combat)

    -Summer Harvest interlude (games of contest, social interaction)

    -Stumbling across a clandestine enterprise. Elvish spy ring, criminals smuggling weapons north to the orcs, apparent sinister conspiracy that's actually an elaborate prank. (Social interaction, political investigation, maybe some combat)

    The forest provides for several possible adventures:

    -Hired as muscle by one of the local rangers to help him investigate disappearances in the forest. (Guided exploration, investigation, and combat)

    -Hired as muscle by a group of herb gatherers to protect them in the forest. (Exploration and combat)

    -Hired to retrieve an herb, animal.

    -Tracking and eliminating a threat that attacked out of the forest: pack of wolves, ents, boars rooting up crops, maddened bear, blights.

    The Vulkanwand was created in an elvish civil war so the very fertile land that supports the forest covers old settlements in a Pompeii-style. I'm thinking a few smaller 'dungeons' and then a mega-dungeon. Dark elves, dark halflings, unspeakable horrors, monstrosities, myconids, and lots of fun.

    Beyond that the social and political currents can provide for a lot of change and the early adventures can lead to later adventures. I don't want to plan those because I don't want to force the players into any situations. And the setting can shift. To Cerus? The Vulkanwand? Eisenbourg, the capital of the Empire? Bele'ath? The Frostlands? Kind of up to the players and there's lots of adventure to be found.

  11. - Top - End - #11
    Dwarf in the Playground
     
    Goblin

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    Mar 2019

    Default Re: Making a setting - A specific case

    How do I make my world? I use Azgaar's Map Generator to make a custom map. I turn off most of the options (political and tribal boundaries) and I edit the heck out of the map to get all the features I want. Then I save it in multiple formats. I use the GIMP application to overlay an image of how the winds blow. Something like this. That shows me where moisture blows. Anywhere the wind hits high mountains it drops lots of moisture and the area on the far side is dry. Water flows from high to low. I use a layer in GIMP to overlay rivers, forests, deserts, and so on. That's pretty quick after the first two times.

    That's pretty much all of it. If I need a history I can add it. Usually I just make up the political and social groups and make up whatever history I need to justify it.

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