The Order of the Stick: Utterly Dwarfed
The Order of the Stick: Utterly Dwarfed - Coming in December and available for pre-order now
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 41
  1. - Top - End - #1

    Default Beneath the Delirious Moon [Burning Wheel] (re-recruitment)

    Beneath the Delirious Moon

    An Adventure of Wild Horror


    by Jean-Francois Millet

    Mine are the night and morning,
    The pits of air, the gull of space,
    The sportive sun, the gibbous moon,
    The innumerable days.

    I hide in the solar glory,
    I am dumb in the pealing song,
    I rest on the pitch of the torrent,
    In slumber I am strong.

    – Henry David Thoreau, excerpt from “Song Of Nature”

    Greetings, and thank you for your interest in this adventure. Begun in February of this year, this journey has not been without its share of troubles – and suffering the natural attrition that all play-by-post games must endure, my original player stock has dwindled to a mere two souls. I am indeed very grateful for the dedication these two have displayed. As such, having now reached a suitable moment of pause within the campaign, I have decided to begin the recruitment process anew in hopes of finding a handful of players who may desire to participate. The big sixteen lies directly below.

    Spoiler: The Big Sixteen
    Show
    System: The Burning Wheel Gold (3rd Edition, 2011 release)

    Player Count: I am looking for at least one, but no more than three, new players.

    Style of Play: Roleplay-heavy, with a particular focus on courtly intrigue and survival (not merely in the literal sense), with elements of horror both mundane and supernatural. The characters will be plunged into a living world that will both react to their presence, and change with time, depending upon how said characters go about accomplishing their goals.

    Allowed Content: As the Burning Wheel Gold system is self-contained, it is the only book which the players shall require access to. However, I ask that players please limit their characters to Humans only among the available races. Humanity is a diverse enough people that there should be sufficient room to create a unique character, especially considering the Lifepath system.

    The following optional rules will be in effect: Anatomy of Injury; Armor and Shields; Bloody Versus; Circles et al; Distance et al; Resources; Sorcery; Steel; and Weapons. More complex rules, such as Fight!, Range and Cover, etc. shall be used sparingly, and only when the whole group feels ready to tackle them.

    Character Creation: Characters are allowed up to five Lifepaths, but may opt for as few as two if they so choose – provided their backstory can explain why such a young character would be present. No Lifepaths are strictly speaking disallowed, but I will be more closely scrutinizing some choices. There is no harm in asking if you are unsure whether something makes sense or not!

    Backstory: Backstories are a must, but there is no hard and fast rule regarding length – create as much or as little as you deem necessary. I do request that players complete “The Game of 20 Question” for their characters, which I shall address below The Big Sixteen.

    Ability Scores/Experience/HP/Wealth: These factors are components of The Burning Wheel’s character creation process and are addressed therein. I will note that whenever the Character Burner (the name of The Burning Wheel’s character creation process) asks any questions for attributes (such as Health, Steel, etc.) please note your answers in as great detail you believe is necessary.

    Alignment: Though The Burning Wheel does not include any particular metric for character alignment, do keep in mind that the law of causation is in effect: actions are followed by their natural consequences – a particularly villainous/selfish character may grate with others’. There is nothing specifically that I am ruling out, provided you are capable of effectively roleplaying your character.

    Other Notes: Firstly, please do not feel daunted! I am more than willing to work with anyone/everyone throughout the character creation process – do not hesitate to ask questions about the game, the themes, the setting, or whatever else comes to mind. I have always said: “RPGs are a game, and games are meant to be fun!” Some miscellany that did not fit neatly anywhere else: the “Exponent 6 Switch” is in effect, please do not select any Shade beside Black, and remember to enjoy yourself throughout this process.

    “The Game of 20 (13) Questions”

    Somewhat of a formality, this process is more for your sake as a player than for mine as GM. I originally discovered these questions when playing 7th Sea, and have adjusted them for the purpose of this game. All I ask is that you consider these questions while completing your character, and jotting down whatever comes to mind. Only add as much detail as you deem to be necessary.

    Spoiler
    Show
    1. What country is your character from? This question gives you a foundation upon which to build. When you understand your character’s culture, you will begin to understand your character. Imagine how his environment helped shape his personality. Your homeland stays with you no matter where you go.

    2. How would you physically describe your character? First off, is your character male or female? The Wüvd is a world where survival (at the individual and nation-scale) is paramount, and as such tends towards conservatism. That said – people are strange and come from many walks of life. Aside from sex, how does your character look? Start at their head and work your way down to their feet. Focus on the things that reflect their personality and the way they are treated by others.

    3. What is your character’s primary motivation? Your Beliefs and Instincts will be important when thinking about this question. What keeps your character going when fate deals them a sour hand?

    4. What is your character’s greatest strength? Greatest weakness? Is your character really good at one particular thing? Does your character have something they are terrible at? A character with no strengths is difficult to keep alive; one with no weaknesses is difficult to sympathize with. A character with both strengths and weaknesses has a more balanced personality and will develop into a richer roleplaying experience.

    5. What are your character’s most and least favorite things? Even small details can be important. You will face difficult choices beneath the delirious moon – what is it that you want? Simple wants though less critical than your character’s strongest motivations nonetheless color their decisions.

    6. What about your character’s psychology? Anger, desperation, grief, regret, sorrow, whimsy, etc. How does your character think? How do they react?

    7. What is your character’s single greatest fear? This can be something metaphysical or mundane, depending on just who your character is. They might fear growing old or growing weak, or perhaps they fear loneliness. It could be anything.

    8. Does your character have any prejudices? Traumatic childhood incidents can lead to a lifetime of hatred and prejudice that the character may never get over – or their distaste may be grounded in nothing rational at all. Do consider the players’ unity when making this decision, however.

    9. Where do your character’s loyalties lie? Does your character serve a certain nation? How do they regard their homeland? Maybe their loyalties lie with their family or spouse. Perhaps his first concern is looking out for himself, or maybe he serves a greater cause.

    10. Is your character in love? Is he married or betrothed? Do they have any children? Consider this, and any other familial matters, when determining your character’s Relationships and Circles.

    11. Is your character of any status? Noble, infamous or otherwise this pertains to your character’s Reputation and how they are viewed by the rest of society – what expectations fall upon them, how others will react to their presence, etc.

    12. How religious is your character? In later posts I will be providing an in-depth review of the Wüvd and just who lives there, including their religious practices. Your character’s belief regarding higher powers, damnation and salvation, and so on may be relevant. Your character’s opinion on witchcraft and sorcery could be included here as well.

    13. If you could, what advice would you give your character? This question is perhaps the most important of all, as it will lay the groundwork for how you (as the player) will mature (as your character). Circumstances may be such that your character does not follow your advice; travelling a darker path than would be best for them. Beneath the delirious moon, the line between virtue and sin may be blurred.

    A note I would like to add before delving into details regarding the setting and the current goings-on of the adventure: I have come to believe that the most important factor for having a good PBP experience is communication. I fully accept that I am not the best GM in the world; that real-life absolutely can and will intrude upon one’s ability to participate – I only ask that you be willing to voice these matters with me. I wish to provide the best RPG experience that I can, and to do that I will need your help too.

    Generally speaking, I have attempted to post new updates every few days, though as contributors of the PBP arena you are no doubt aware that delays do occur. Patience is of course a virtue, as is staunchness. So long as there are individuals who desire the game to continue, I shall strive to keep it afloat.

    Now that with these severe subjects having been addressed, the more lighthearted matters of setting and story can be introduced! For your reference, the IC thread can be located HERE, and the OOC thread HERE. If you can find the time, I greatly recommend perusing at least the former, if not the latter as well. In the immediately following posts I will divulge all setting information, and a summary of the adventure so far thereafter. The deadline for submissions will be Saturday, September 21st – at which point I hope to surge forward, reinvigorated by the new blood!
    Last edited by Boethius Junior; 2019-09-07 at 12:32 AM.

  2. - Top - End - #2

    Default Re: Beneath the Delirious Moon [Burning Wheel] (re-recruitment)

    Spoiler: Cosmology
    Show
    A particular consequence of the Wüvd’s settlement is its now-dominant religion, which is titled quite simply Witticism. The pilgrims who arrived in the Wüvd were largely of the same faith already, and have continued to practice their belief in the time since—offering worship to the entity Wit; who quickens the mind and ennobles man over baser creatures. Within the context of its faith, Wit is both a literal figure to whom prayer is given and the metaphorical construct of the dignity of man. As this is a fantastical setting, I shall simply state that prayers are indeed answered—the rest is up to your personal interpretation.

    Witticism is practiced through ceremony involving light and song, wherein practitioners ask that their sins be sheered from their spirit; that they may be driven to good works in both mind and body. The priests of this faith are known by two names: the higher-ranked masters of song named Cantors; and lower-ranked masters of oration known as Celebrants. The teachings of Witticism regard highly what are thought to be distinctly human virtues: bravery, kindness, temperance, etc. Sins against Wit include excess in any form: when the body rules over the mind.

    Wit, despite being the central god of his own faith, has a rather complex genesis—Witticism teaches that there was an original Prime Mover, entitled THROM, who began the universe in motion:

    To begin all things—a solitary tone was struck. Thus THROM came screaming into being, alone before the emptiness. Without THROM there could have been nothing and nothing could have been without reference to THROM.
    – Excerpt from The Holy Dictate

    THROM was an entity of energy and motion: the inevitable beginning—the atom of all being, if you will. His existence precipitated all that would follow, and whose only purpose was to create. In the end THROM would birth his own executioner, as he would paradoxically create that which could undo him. This “Prime Ender” was named JIRAM:

    To end all things—an echo resounded and returned to its source. Thus JIRAM came mutely into being, the silhouette of THROM; the end of all things and the return to stillness. Brother fell upon brother in battle so fierce the heavens shook bare; that they stirred unheard winds and unleashed new thunders.
    – Excerpt from The Holy Dictate

    Their conflict would end with the death of both entities, leaving neither to reign supreme—though it is noteworthy that JIRAM perished first. Thus Witticism teaches that things may begin anew yet must always end. From their remains the Later Gods would be birthed, to administrate that which had begun and yet was still unfinished:

    From the corpse of slain JIRAM rose TURAS, who is time; FANAS, who is space; and RUD, who is matter. They sang as does an infant wail, but their voices were dissonant. With his dying breath THROM joined their choir and made beautiful resonance. Then he died, and from his entrails rose four figures anew: Ditheadh was born of his blood; Doineadh of his mettle; Foghadh of his bile; and finally Reothadh was of his phlegm. Their birthing song was harmonious with the children of JIRAM, but not so perfectly as THROM when whole.
    – Excerpt from The Holy Dictate

    Collectively the Later Gods are referred to as the Choir of Seven Chambers or merely the Seventh Choir. Their song will continue until finally reaching an unknowable, inescapable end—thereby fulfilling the dual purposes of their progenitors. The sound cosmic, as it is called, is very much a living being: able to grow and evolve. From it the physical world was shaped across time, within space, of matter, and governed by causation. This world is divided into five distinct elements and humors: air (sanguine), fire (choleric), earth (melancholic), water (phlegmatic), and quintessence—which is the particle of light, sound, and spirit.

    The first of life that walked the world were the Idh, or the stony-men. Silent automata, built from those materials old as they: rock and stone. The stony-men do not age, but bear the brunt of time without falter. Second were the Theadh, or Nephilim: wild beasts of chaos that spread like wildfire across the untamed earth. Finally came the Fehr—man himself.

    As a child’s mind grows with age, so too has the sound cosmic and thus Wit slowly coalesced. By the time mankind came into being, so too did Wit. Perhaps it is a result of their simultaneous conception, or there is some other unknown cause, yet the result was miraculous all the same. Wit fundamentally altered the sound cosmic with his birth; a ripple felt throughout all creation. The Idh were unaffected, being too solid. The Theadh though, were brittle: they shattered into a thousand pieces, some great and other small.

    Something much different occurred when Wit came upon mankind, for in the light he cast a shadow. Thus the spirit of man has been divided in two and so he is able to determine his own nature, unlike his elder cousins. Thus Witticism incorporate the principle of life after death: upon one’s passing the quintessence from which their soul was constructed shall be returned to the sound cosmic and become one with Wit in providence. Yet what of their shadow?

    Wit rejects that part of man—all of their crimes and wrongdoings are unfit to return. Instead they coalesce into a spirit of malice: the Kaun, which crawls forth from within their gut. These things are very much real, though in any virtuous individual the imp is too small and suffocates within its antecedent. Particularly horrid men may spawn larger, more fearsome things. Witticism teaches that the dead must be burnt, so that no Kaun may emerge.

    * * *

    Spoiler: Further Notes
    Show
    The Later Gods are not directly prayed to, but are regarded as endemic truths and representations of nature: the children of THROM represent the seasons (Ditheadh is spring, Doineadh is summer, Foghadh is autumn, and Reothadh is winter) and are figures associated with humourism. Likewise the children of JIRAM are conceptualized as the spheres (RUD is terra firma, FANAS the skies, and TURAS the heavens beyond). Wit is often equated with the sun; while the moon is regarded as an aberration, a remnant of something ancient, dark and deadly. To be found alone under its baleful light without the sign of Wit is dangerous indeed.

    There are religions besides Witticism: from pagan worship of esoteric nature-spirits to cult-like devotion of powerful Theadh-remnants. Some worship the stony-men as ancestral guardians. Though these do exist they are not as relevant as Witticism, being the dominant religion among the settlers of the Wüvd.

    The light of Wit is just that—light. Darkness is heavy and oppressive and thus vile things reside in deep, dead places. They squirming further downwards as though pulled toward the center of the earth. Gold is weighty; as is iron. Yet man was given the choice to value gold and iron or to eschew such base materials to search for something greater.

    Another note regarding Kaun: they are certain circumstance where they are never spawned. For example, pregnant women who perish before they are able to give birth will not produce a Kaun. Theologians argue over why this is. Furthermore, there are many different practices with regard to burning the dead: some sects argue that the Kaun must be extracted and destroyed before the body is cremated; others consider burning to be itself improper and bury their dead so deep the Kaun cannot reach the surface.

    * * *

    Spoiler: Regarding Magic
    Show
    At this point you may be curious as to how magic works in the Wüvd. The practice of magic takes two forms, which may be termed through the lens of religiosity as “holy” and “unholy”—or more accurately as “harmonic” and “dissonant”. Both require the use of the practitioner’s voice, though differ in their method and the consequence thereof.

    Harmonic magic necessitates a great deal of study and practice to produce results; the practitioner must, by vocal force alone, resonate with the sound cosmic—and in doing so may produce a desired result. The practitioner feeds and grows the sound cosmic through his song until it is capable of acting in accordance with his desires. This method is considered “holy” because it is thought to be only possible as a result of Wit’s existence. Not only that, the practitioner is temporarily joining the Seventh Choir to accomplish their task. The action of Harmonic magic is not in itself sinful, but may be utilized as an accessory to sinful acts.

    Harmonic magic is represented game-wise by Sorcery in the Burning Wheel system.

    Dissonant magic is very much the opposite process as its Harmonic cousin: rather than joining the Seventh Choir, the practitioner attempts to disrupt their song into producing a desired result, mostly by guided accident. Dissonant magic is considered to be a very bad thing indeed by most, and as an action itself is considered sinful. Dissonant magic tends to be chaotic, unpredictable, and violent—a form of witchcraft.

    Dissonant magic is represented game-wise by the Rituals of Blood and Night, with further homebrew involved. For this purpose it is possible for non-Orcs to receive the Void Embrace trait, but only under specific circumstances. I would have to hear a very good reason to allow a player character access to this trait—this is something that I will actively suggest you avoid for the purpose of party unity.
    Last edited by Boethius Junior; 2019-09-10 at 11:30 AM. Reason: Grammar

  3. - Top - End - #3

    Default Re: Beneath the Delirious Moon [Burning Wheel] (re-recruitment)

    Nations and Peoples

    Spoiler: The Shambry League
    Show
    The first state-entity to be formed in the settled Wüvd; composed of a great many confederated nobility, each of whom rules their own semi-autonomous estate. Some of the noble families have titles which survived the pilgrimage and thus sound odd and alien, while others have been claimed anew. A great council ostensibly rules the League, composed of representatives from each estate—though conflict among the smaller lords, the creation of vassal-entities and the swearing of allegiance. The Grand Council, as it is called, is a byzantine mess of bureaucratic procedure, leading to the formation of regional councils and committees.

    The Shambry people are characterized by their fierce appreciation for orderliness—an ordered house, an orderly country, and an orderly manner are ranked as their chief concerns. This practice has grown from their earliest settlements, which nearly descended into a deadly squalor of squabbling lords demanding the word become law. It was the Chamber of Criers, an order of monks, which provided the alternative of confederation rather than monarchy, and gave each lord one vote for his land. The Criers are messengers of the Grand Council and have the unique authority to advise (and even depose) the noble families.

    The Shambry is also home to another group of old families, known as the Picaroons—these familial lines are the surviving stock of those early homesteads destroyed by rampaging Fae and the other gruesome beasts native to the Wüvd. Their lives are pledged to the combat of such loathsome things, and they ride with impunity throughout the League to accomplish this goal. Their seasonal movements are recorded in the Picaroon Almanacs; prized possessions of many a beleaguered estate.


    Spoiler: The Independent of Quorthol
    Show
    The most prominent geological feature of the Wüvd is the mountain range known collectively as The Steeples, which spans the northern boundary of the region. The Steeples were too tall for the Shambry pilgrims to cross directly, so they skirted their edge and travelled south through their eastern foothills (The Dells). Unbeknownst to those travelers, another caravan trekked around the Steeples, entering the Wüvd from the west.

    These people had a much longer journey ahead of them, and so came to build their earliest homesteads later than the Shambryfolk would—they are thus credited as being the second settlers, a point of much contention between the two peoples. These people are called Chauns; they are descendant from another separate ethnic group from the Shambryfolk. They are stockier, being broader of shoulder and stomach, and have flattened faces. They are known for being loud and boisterous people: as quick to anger as they are to laugh. They are mostly adherents of Witticism, but have some cultural idiosyncrasies therein.

    The Shambryfolk revere the Criers because they served as the moral fortitude on their long pilgrimage—monks whose song uplifted their people and gave them the strength to carry on. The Chauns, on the other hand, were led by an individual: a prophet by the name of Quorthol, through whom Wit spoke. Quorthol was very long-lived, leading their column from the front despite his advanced age.

    The Independent of Quorthol is governed by an individual monarch entitled The Voice—who upholds their tradition of singular leadership a la Quorthol himself. The Voice is elected once each decade, or upon the death of the previous, from one of two camps: The Blood or The Providence. The former camp is entirely composed of their prophet’s descendants—the latter is meritocratic, embodying the supposition that Quorthol was uniquely qualified to lead their people.


    Spoiler: The Dells
    Show
    The eastern fringe of the Steeples are the Dells: an expanse filled with lumbering hills between which steep crevasses have been carved by glacial runoff, eventually flattening into the lowlands where the Shambryfolk would first settle. Pocked with tufts of woodland and dense undergrowth between, travel is easiest by means of the labyrinthine streams throughout—where the Wallapug tribesmen rule.

    Long of limb and lankily built the Wallapug excel at climbing and swimming; and waging war amongst themselves. Throughout the Dells are exposed beds of precious clay from which the Pugs mold their sturdy canoes. They light tall bonfires upon their beaches that last for days, until the vessels are finally complete. The clay beds are also the greatest source of bloody conflict between the tribes, over which many battles have been fought.

    The tribes themselves are technically matriarchal: the tribe’s nomadic movement is determined by the eldest wise-women, who are attuned to crossroads and ley-lines; seeking the best hunting-grounds and open beds of clay. Matters of war are determined by the men, who vote whether or not to enter conflict—each adult male who has seen combat being given a single vote. The Wallapugs revere their homeland above all else, and make offerings at locations of spiritual importance: where blood has been spilled; good fortune has been had; the grave of legendary figures and so on.

    The first encounters between the Shambryfolk and the Wallapug were violent, but soon the beleaguered travelers found solid allies in the tribesmen: the Pugs were eager traders, offering food and navigation for gunpowder and iron weaponry. As the Shambry League would grow, some Wallapug would leave the Dells and join with them—following the tributaries downstream until they unite into the furious Auth, king of rivers, who carves through the Wüvd’s lowlands. Trade is abundant to and from the Dells by means of the Auth: clay, lumber and furs are brought south while tools, weapons and more move north.

    With time some Wallapugs have converted from their pagan beliefs to Witticism, although the authority of their elders is absolute even beyond the Dells. Respected adherents of the old ways hold a great deal of influence over Wallapugs in all places, the most powerful of which refuse to leave the clay-beds of their homeland.


    Spoiler: The Grand Basilica
    Show
    When the Shambryfolk and the adherents of Quorthol discovered one another, they rejoiced immediately; for they had found their countrymen. For a time, the two groups unified thinking themselves similar enough for cohabitation in their newly settled land. Unfortunately, this would prove impossible.

    Their leaders thought to christen their newfound home by erecting a massive church, within which they might give worship to their eternal provider, Wit. This basilica would be built directly between the capitals of either group, and would become a site of pilgrimage. However, the structure would never be finished, as tensions flared over the authority of the Criers and recognition of the prophet Quorthol—an argument that would bloom into a violent, but thankfully brief, military conflict. The nations would remain distinct thenceforth.

    The Basilica is itself a massive, albeit unfinished, fortress and monastic enclave. Many orders of pilgrims, monks, and holy knights reside there in religious observance. The Basilica is recognized as neutral territory between all nations of the Wüvd and is thus utilized for diplomacy as much as for trade. The highest office in the Church of Witticism (His Eminence, the Grand Cantor of the Sound Cosmic) holds court there, though the decentralized nature of Witticism grants him little authority beyond spiritual matters.

    People of all breeds and all walks of life can be found within the Basilica and its surrounding settlements, though the urban sprawl beyond its walls do not share the benefit of neutral ground.


    Spoiler: The Brazen Land and its Burnt King
    Show
    The Roiling Fell is the centermost region of the Wüvd, a vast stretch of open heath dominated by slowly undulating hills and tall protruding knolls, overblown with harsh winds and perilously fierce storms. Legend claims such weather is the work of giants; ancient Theadh fragments that wander the open country, bringing untold destruction with them. The wildlife is of the Fells is equally tough: herds of wiry aurochs wander the wasteland, and flocks of tall storks stalk their prey—unwelcome and inhospitable, this place denied all attempts at conquest.

    That is until an unnamed knight, brimming with holy fervor, led a troupe of his fellows out from the Basilica and into the Roiling Fell. This crusade was led only shortly after the fallout over the Basilica’s construction had concluded: the quest was nominally for redemption, seeking penance in righteous death combatting Nephilim. Apparently however, they were successful enough to gain a foothold in the wild land.

    The people of The Brazen Land are of unclear ethnic lineage, regarded as being of some combination of those Shambryfolk knights and a group of native people who resided within Roiling Fell, hidden from the outside world. These people are referred to as the Nabbernac, or simply the Brazen Men—they are small but sinewy and strong, and quite hairy. They do not keep written records, but have an extensive yet vague oral history that seems to blend the history of the Wüvd’s settlement with the natives’ old legend.

    The society of the Brazen Men is dominated by autonomous bands; chieftains are elected annually from among the band’s elders and possess executive and military powers. Bands are themselves semi-nomadic, travelling between established settlements built atop large hills throughout the Fell. Multiple bands may occupy these high-towns at any one point in time—mediation between bands follows their unwritten law.

    When peacekeeping is impossible between bands, or international negotiation (or war) is necessary, the bands turn to their Burnt King; a lifetime appointment from among the chieftains. The King is final arbiter of their law, the highest judge, and their unquestioned military commander. The Burnt King is never seen without the Black Helm, a relic of the Brazen Men which he wears constantly—the helm is ancient but is unmistakably that of a knight’s; burnt and warped as though struck by lightning.

    Curiously perhaps, the Brazen Men are devout adherent of Witticism, though they recognize neither the Criers nor Quorthol, favoring instead the authority of the Grand Cantor.


    Spoiler: The Guallamar Principalities
    Show
    There are three groups of humans native to the Wüvd: those people who would become the Nabbernac in the Roiling Fell; the Wallapug tribesmen of the Dells (we will get to them later); and finally the Guallamar, who predate all others. A mysterious people who live deep in the south, the Guallamar seem eerie to those unfamiliar with their practices. A placid and mild people, their society is dominated by a strict social hierarchy wherein the lowest classes are chattel before their masters.

    The castes are not merely hereditary—somehow the cruel Wüvd has touched their being. From least to greatest are servants, warriors, druids, and finally the princes. This final rank hold unquestioned authority over those below, who are incapable of resisting the commands of their betters; compelled by an unknown force. Only Guallamar children are able to resist the commanding presence of their lords.

    The princes wield other unnatural powers: they seem untouched by age, merely growing dimmer as years pass. When they eventually become so old as they can hardly think, they are lain to rest in barrows and tended by their many servants through their unending sleep. Some princes are said to kill with a stare or possess inhuman strength; or wield darker powers. Ancient princes roused from their slumber are terrible things indeed.

    The Guallamar are thoroughly pagan and offer sacrifice to powerful Theadh spirits in return for wealth or knowledge of unknowable things. Throughout the history of the Wüvd there have been numerous wars between the Guallamar and the settling pilgrims, though of late negotiation have been more the practice. The princes are rich in silver, gold, and precious stone, yet craft entirely with bronze—they covet iron and gunpowder more than anything, guiding many an avaricious merchant to their counsel.

    Perhaps you are starting to get the impression that the Guallamar would be an exceedingly difficult people to play, you would be correct and this is intentional. You could make the attempt, but would likely find better luck creating a character who has fled from their home, finding some degree of solace among the less authoritarian others. If you do choose to play as a Guallamar, please limit yourself to either the servant or warrior castes, whose functions are respectively domestic and military. Please also note that the castes are not strictly defined by sex; rather by lineage and twisted pragmatism.


    Spoiler: The Kettle
    Show
    I have previously mentioned witchcraft as a method for practicing magic, hence there must exist witches as well. Not belonging to any specific ethnic group, the terminology “witch” is quite broad in its application: encompassing everything from people unaffiliated with any nation to literal consorts of Theadh remnants. This section will address something closer to the latter.

    Very early in the settlement of the Wüvd, there were some pilgrims who willfully gave themselves unto their Theadh aggressors, and their descendants now possess blood both human and inhuman. They might appear as regular humans on the surface, but their nature is exposed by some standout characteristics: a furred tail, talon-like claws, pointed ears or scaled skin—there is no rhyme or reason to these changes. Some of their kind have embraced their ancestry and live savagely in the wilds, while others attempt to live hidden in plain sight. Either way, Theadh of all varieties can smell their kinship with such people and will tempt them back into their fold with offers of magical awareness or gifts of riches.

    The Kettle is a landmark intrinsically known to all witches—as some can discern true north, so do they unconsciously know the path that will return them home. Somewhere among the feet of the Steeples is a jutting cliff, at the base of which the rock splits open and leads far beneath the mountains’ roots. This meeting place is the Kettle, where the first witches were taken and known by their Nephilim suitors; where their children were born and from which they spread. Covens meet and conduct their business there still, coming and going by hidden passageways.

    The pilgrims brought with them stores of gunpowder to the Wüvd, but had lost the methods by which to create more during the long journey. Perhaps with the aid of Theadh, it was the witches who rediscovered the practice and who now sell their knowledge to the highest bidder, be they person or whole state. Do note that although gunpowder does exist within the Wüvd, it is limited in scope—think in terms of the harquebus at best; the matchlock would be only a recent innovation.


    What about Dwarves, Elves, and Orcs? Creatures such as elves or orcs do approximately exist in the Wüvd, though they are counted among the divisions of the Theadh and overall are distasteful of mankind. There are some exceptions that you may see during the course of the adventure, but I would prefer that players stick with humanity for this game.
    Last edited by Boethius Junior; 2019-09-07 at 12:31 AM.

  4. - Top - End - #4

    Default Re: Beneath the Delirious Moon [Burning Wheel] (re-recruitment)

    With that out of the way, we can now discuss the matter of the adventure to-date.

    The Fringe of Bás, or simply the Fringe, is a recently settled region of the Wüvd that has shown sufficient promise to be worth induction into the Shambry League as an estate in its own right. The characters have been sent in the company of one Lord Adolphus Crofte to act as an exploratory committee – with aim to appraise how the lands of the Fringe have been cultivated, and whether they are worthy of being granted title. Traveling into the region this company was notably refused the hospitality of some nobility; the Master of Gristing and the House Mull did not greet them. Eventually they arrived to the Abbey of Dom Doren, which would become the staging area for the group’s efforts. The Abbot of Dom Doren shared hidden communiques that suggested the Chamber of Criers favored Lord Mull in some capacity, perhaps in the eventual role of regional authority should elevation into the League occur. After a time was spent in research and preparations, a summit of the Fringe’s nobility was called.

    Discussion began somewhat icily, as the characters probed the nobles for information regarding the well-being of their lands and peoples, the truth being difficult to discern from their words alone. The first of the day’s complications arrived when Lord Mull collapsed from poisoning, but not before claiming the Fringe to not be in fact divided among the nobles as had appeared – instead being chartered as one single entity. Only the Chamber of Criers would know, or be able to determine, the veracity of his final words.

    Narrowly avoiding a brawl and settling the fallout of the nobleman’s death, the characters determined that the poisoners were apt to be in hidden in the Abbey’s cellars (incidentally the same place as where the Abbot had stowed the secret messages) and struck forth to uncover the villains. They defeated an unnaturally matured kuan and found the corpse which birthed it; the second victim of the conspirators.

    Coming upon a band of suspiciously armed “monks” attempting to break into the vaults, they had found their assassins. Though able to convince some of them to surrender, their leader refused and plunged a blade into his own breast. With captives in tow they returned to the surface, once more diffusing a near riot, and potentially earning the ire of both the Abbot and the gruesome Lord Shawe in the doing.

    Certainly there may be details I am forgetting, but all can be found in the IC thread which is again HERE.

  5. - Top - End - #5
    Bugbear in the Playground
     
    WolfInSheepsClothing

    Join Date
    May 2017

    Default Re: Beneath the Delirious Moon [Burning Wheel] (re-recruitment)

    Throwing interest in! I have no experience with Burning Wheel but I enjoyed the hell out of Riddle of Stell (for the little I played) and I saw people drawing parallels between the two, so...

    As for concepts, I'll first look at the other characters (since I'd like to avoid stepping on another's toes) but as for now:

    - Some swashbuckler/bard/rogue type of guy (I'd work towards the Duelist lifepath, picking up Musical instruments, Stealth, Lockpicking, Persuasion, etc. along the way);
    - A very easygoing nobleman (possibly a bastard)
    - Some kind of spellcaster, if it's alright (although I've yet to look at how magic works) (I'd prefer if he was some wild mage with little in the way of academic training, but I must inform myself on the ties between sorcery and clergy)


    That's it, I guess. Off to read the info!

    EDIT: I've yet to read the OOC and the IC but I've red the spoilers and briefly the character sheets... How disruptive would be a Theadh blooded (from The Kettle spoiler)? Could it work? I was thinking with the Tainted Legacy trait or the Fey Blooded trait (preferably the first one)
    Last edited by Valmark; 2019-09-10 at 10:35 AM.
    I won an argument with my GM -15/08/2017- (20:32 GMT +1)

  6. - Top - End - #6

    Default Re: Beneath the Delirious Moon [Burning Wheel] (re-recruitment)

    Quote Originally Posted by Valmark View Post
    Throwing interest in! I have no experience with Burning Wheel but I enjoyed the hell out of Riddle of Stell (for the little I played) and I saw people drawing parallels between the two, so...

    As for concepts, I'll first look at the other characters (since I'd like to avoid stepping on another's toes) but as for now:

    - Some swashbuckler/bard/rogue type of guy (I'd work towards the Duelist lifepath, picking up Musical instruments, Stealth, Lockpicking, Persuasion, etc. along the way);
    - A very easygoing nobleman (possibly a bastard)
    - Some kind of spellcaster, if it's alright (although I've yet to look at how magic works) (I'd prefer if he was some wild mage with little in the way of academic training, but I must inform myself on the ties between sorcery and clergy)


    That's it, I guess. Off to read the info!
    Fantastic to see your interest! I am more than happy to help you develop your concept as you move through the preponderance of information. I understand that it is quite a great deal, so I would recommend focusing your efforts on the nations and IC stuff mainly, as the rest is less important.

    The swashbuckler may be something worth developing, though I will note that The Void Dragon's character Faust is already quite the handy swordsman - though subterfuge is not his specialty. Atlastrembles' is playing Brysen, a swarthy merchant who practically oozes charisma - yet he lacks perhaps the hands-on half of underhanded. A roguish thief may compliment them well, as could the nobleman idea. Adding that he is a bastard, or perhaps landless, could allow these two ideas to mix.

    The spellcaster is no less possible, but may require a more thorough examination. No doubt you have read the blurb about magic by now; it is indeed regulated through the Church of Wit, but not intrinsically so. Something along the lines of a hedge-wizard dabbler is indeed possible. Dipping into the world of sinful magic, i.e. the Theadh forms of the Dissonant Arts, is not impossible but improbable. There is a great deal of social stigma, not all of which is theologically unsound, associated with witchery...


    Quote Originally Posted by Valmark View Post
    EDIT: I've yet to read the OOC and the IC but I've red the spoilers and briefly the character sheets... How disruptive would be a Theadh blooded (from The Kettle spoiler)? Could it work? I was thinking with the Tainted Legacy trait or the Fey Blooded trait (preferably the first one)
    ...which makes me hesitant to say yes immediately. That said, neither will I immediately say no. Faust has a near-irrational hatred for all things Theadh. "Near" being appropriate: the fey are above all capricious beings and there are among their number some truly terrible, just as some are more akin to ancient nature-spirits. Your character's ancestry may be visible in a multitude of ways, yet might not gel with the zealous nature of your erstwhile companion. Perhaps all three of your ideas can work together? The rank of nobility, no matter how minute, could be sufficient to force the fanatic to bear this character's presence. Food for thought, if nothing else.

  7. - Top - End - #7
    Bugbear in the Playground
     
    WolfInSheepsClothing

    Join Date
    May 2017

    Default Re: Beneath the Delirious Moon [Burning Wheel] (re-recruitment)

    After reading the lifepaths I can't seem to find a satisfying course that would put together all of the concepts...

    Thus I think I'll avoid the Tainted legacy stuff and just focus on making a rogue with an innate skill for casting (still need to decide just how good he is in the latter) which may be/have been a noble

    EDIT: Scratch magic too. Now that I've actually red the magic rules in-dept I don't feel like risking the consequences xD

    I'm actually thinking Peasant-->Hunter-->Itinerary Performer-->Performer-->?

    I like this combination, I could get Lock Picking via the general skills and have all the... "questionable skills" (Lock Picking, Falsehoods, Stealthy, Sleight of Hand) plus fighting proficiencies (Bow, Javelin) and survival abilities. And it makes for an interesting and flavourful character, I think.

    I'm not sure if giving him that last lifepath or not. Or what to give him for that matter. I'm leanin towards duelist since I like the sound of it, but (A) I don't see him as a mercenary (as per trait) and (B) he's already a bowman and I assume Javelins can be used in a close-range fight, so...

    I'd like to get him Seduction, but with Lock Pick too maybe the general points for the skills aren't enough to perform decently in both from the start.

    Any advice?
    Last edited by Valmark; 2019-09-10 at 07:58 PM.
    I won an argument with my GM -15/08/2017- (20:32 GMT +1)

  8. - Top - End - #8

    Default Re: Beneath the Delirious Moon [Burning Wheel] (re-recruitment)

    Magic can indeed be burdensome to wield - nothing less than you might expect from bending to your will the very fabric of THROM's song! Additionally, it's use does require the Gifted trait, which is costly. Though everyone can sing, fewer can carry a tune, and fewer still take the opera stage. I do seem to recall a trait buried somewhere within the Codex which allows a smaller investment in the arcane arts, but I cannot seem to find it at this juncture. If your wanderings uncover the blasted thing, then you may find it worth considering.

    Alternatively, going the route of wilderman is thematically appropriate and lends many useful skills. Your progression does appear to appropriately move between settings, though I am somewhat concerned about how this individual would fit into the adventure. The current players are of not insubstantial station - think knights, ranked priests, and nobles of at least some means or title. Much of the campaign to-date has been political maneuvering, and I worry that a layman may be overwhelmed against the furor of the well-born. To that end, I would prefer all the characters be at least approaching like status.

    Historically, among the great varieties of feudal peerages there do appear lordly titles granted upon the basis of merit rather than birth. Perhaps work towards a such a name from that angle? There are a number of Noble Setting Lifepaths which do not actually require Born Noble. Alternatively, return the Bastard concept from before: Born Noble > Bastard > Itinerant Performer > Performer > ... ?

    As our current characters are in somewhat of a difficult spot and seemingly bereft of allies, there is leeway for the recruitment of newcomers beyond their stately preferences. The aid of even a prodigal son cannot be refused, so to speak. Just something to keep in mind going forward.

  9. - Top - End - #9
    Bugbear in the Playground
     
    WolfInSheepsClothing

    Join Date
    May 2017

    Default Re: Beneath the Delirious Moon [Burning Wheel] (re-recruitment)

    I don't know if this is what you were suggesting, but I've found in the codex the "practical" magic- it still requires the Gifted trait (I think, nothing says it doesn't) but instead of using real spells it uses the Sorcery skill as a substitute for other skills, depending on the magic schools at one's disposal. This way it would also be easier to get the skills I want (for example, I can get Sleight of Hand and Pick Locks as long as one of the lifepaths lists a skill of the Special category as first skill OR I purchase the magic school with resource points)

    It feels like it would be easy to have a lot of skills all together at much less cost by my understanding, so I'm not sure it's ok. Still it's closer to my original idea! Also on the codex I found Apt Pupil which I'd be glad to take- as one of his traits is Tainted Legacy and it can be added to the Noble Court subsetting.


    This way I could go Noble Born-->Bastard-->Apt Pupil-->?-->? And take Tainted Legacy, plus Gifted if the Practical magic is ok'ed (maybe restricted to only certain schools? Or all the schools must be purchased?)
    I think it's noteworthy to point out that neithet Noble Born nor Bastard give additional magic schools, so it would all depend on the next lifepaths.

    Last question: it says in tainted legacy that one can take a single trait from a variety of monsters... whom I can't seem to find? Is the monster burner another completely different manual?
    I won an argument with my GM -15/08/2017- (20:32 GMT +1)

  10. - Top - End - #10

    Default Re: Beneath the Delirious Moon [Burning Wheel] (re-recruitment)

    Practical Magic is actually a different system of magic altogether, which I had not intended to use in this game -largely because I was not aware of it at the time. In retrospect, I think it fits well with the concept of the Sound Cosmic, but since I have already made this decision I would be remiss to change that now.

    Apt Pupil and the other Lifepaths of the Wizard Burner were indeed the options I was referring to! That said, having now read the rules for Tainted Legacy, I believe that Fey Blood is more appropriate. Individuals upon whom the touch of the Theadh is so great would be apt to live miserable lives, far away from the world of politic the characters are currently immersed in. A subtler mark is more easily hidden, and may explain an extraordinary proclivity for the Art as well. You may freely replace Tainted Legacy for Fey Blood from among the available traits of your character's Lifepaths for this purpose.

  11. - Top - End - #11
    Bugbear in the Playground
     
    WolfInSheepsClothing

    Join Date
    May 2017

    Default Re: Beneath the Delirious Moon [Burning Wheel] (re-recruitment)

    After consulting the books I think I've settled on either of these paths:

    Born noble-->Lord-->Courtier-->Huntsman

    I was thinking of him being a lord of one of the families sent to Mull's court to woo the daughter.

    He'd either be part of Mull's entourage or could meet the PC's if they go meet his daughter.

    Being an hunter he could also be one of... Zarboch's sons I think? The one that invited them and said that his sons probably already hunted most of the wolves in the forests. Probaby the younger, since those lifepaths total up to 25 years (which by the age table is pretty much the peak performance)

    In case, what grade would be required to be son to one of the regent families? (I mean the traits called "Your Lordship" etc.)


    In all of this he'd have 5 general points that he could spend on Falsehoods, Pick Locks or Sleight of Hand, or a combination of these.
    I honestly was thinking of giving him Pick Locks and Sleight of Hand, which would be various pranks that he did as a kid and boy (not that he didn't keep the habit, but he has a better grasp of consequences and responsabilities)



    The other one is Born Peasant-->Apt Pupil-->Wizard of War-->Court sorcerer

    I know, I like young characters. In this case I'd focus him entirely on the magic path and make a dedicated spellcaster (no half-assing things) but I'm undecided on what trait from the other stocks to take- any advice?
    One idea I had was to take the essence of earth elven trait, which leads him to be immortal. That way I could make him older freely. May I ask for the age category to remain the same? (If I didn't miscalculate the change would one less physical point)

    As a Court Sorcerer he could be wherever they go at that point. And he wouldn't even be an heretic! And Faust would have a reason to not jump at his throat immediately (or at least a reason to not hate him outright)

    With the general points I'd take Summoning, I like it actually it makes more sense to take a final lifepath as a Court Summoner (from the wizard burner) or as a Court Enchanter (...still from the wizard burner). Probably spending the three general points on a skill unrelated with the sorcerous ones.
    Last edited by Valmark; 2019-09-12 at 06:43 AM.
    I won an argument with my GM -15/08/2017- (20:32 GMT +1)

  12. - Top - End - #12

    Default Re: Beneath the Delirious Moon [Burning Wheel] (re-recruitment)

    Quote Originally Posted by Valmark View Post
    Born noble-->Lord-->Courtier-->Huntsman
    I like this progression you've selected, since it lends both the appropriate status as well as useful skills. Being a suitor to Mull's daughter could work nicely as well, as it gives a reason for why you would join the party, why your character lends value to the cause, etc. The sudden death of your would-be father-in-law lights an appropriate fire in your heart, I should think.

    Plus, being a native of the Fringe will give the group an inside-look into local politics, happenings, and history. The Fringe, much like anywhere else in the Shambry League, is chock with landless nobility and petty knights; leaders of manor-houses and small crofts - being one of there number, and vassal or council to a higher authority lends its own impressive station. Perhaps consider adding some military experience too? This land is no stranger to martial conflict.

    I will have to rule out being one of Zarboch's sons though, as they have a role to play already - should you and yours cross paths with them that is.


    Quote Originally Posted by Valmark View Post
    Born Peasant-->Apt Pupil-->Wizard of War-->Court sorcerer
    This path is more dubious in identify place, but no less viable. Practiced mages are a valuable commodity, and you would find yourself in high demand among all the noble courts of the land, no matter the station of your birth. With Court Sorcerer or any of the alternatives especially so. I so no great difference between them, so I would say choose them at your whim.

    As for the Fey Blood trait, the options from among Elves and Dwarves do seem to have the most interesting implications, and the least severe drawbacks socially. Essence of the Earth (in which case yes, make him more aged as you desire) or First Born seem particularly appropriate for a fey-enhanced magician. Replacing Born Peasant with Gifted Child could hammer this theme home, if you'd like.

  13. - Top - End - #13
    Bugbear in the Playground
     
    WolfInSheepsClothing

    Join Date
    May 2017

    Default Re: Beneath the Delirious Moon [Burning Wheel] (re-recruitment)

    After finally finding where the spells are (I'm an idiot and looked last in the Mannish Resources) I've settled on the spellcaster.

    I'm not taking Gifted Child because with 5 lifepaths I can't find a way to get 2 free trait points and mantain the Wizard of War-->Court Sorcerer line.

    I'll either go Peasant/Village-->Hunter-->Apt Pupil (soldier)-->Wizard of War-->Court Sorcerer
    Or Peasant/Village-->AP-->WW-->CS-->Courtier

    I think that someone who gets to live at court would naturally spend time as a Courtier and I also really like the Hunter lifepath as a young'un.

    I see him as having been found by a wizard, part of a military company, that took him in for his untapped potential.
    He learned under him with real fights, distinguished himself and got invited at court (which court I've yet to decide).
    I'd say to take Courtier though. He could be native of the fringes nonetheless? That way he'd still be able to give the party inside knowledge.
    Last edited by Valmark; 2019-09-13 at 09:22 AM.
    I won an argument with my GM -15/08/2017- (20:32 GMT +1)

  14. - Top - End - #14
    Dwarf in the Playground
     
    Kobold

    Join Date
    Feb 2019

    Default Re: Beneath the Delirious Moon [Burning Wheel] (re-recruitment)

    You best be using the Sound Cosmic for your magic, is all I'm going to say. And don't take it personally if Faust keeps an eye on your character. A close one. Not an especially effective one, but a close one.

  15. - Top - End - #15
    Pixie in the Playground
    Join Date
    Sep 2019

    Default Re: Beneath the Delirious Moon [Burning Wheel] (re-recruitment)

    I'll join, if its still ongoing. I can play a sage/ walking textbook. Divine caster is also appropriate. Probably from Quarthal. Open to politicking of all stripes.

  16. - Top - End - #16
    Bugbear in the Playground
     
    WolfInSheepsClothing

    Join Date
    May 2017

    Default Re: Beneath the Delirious Moon [Burning Wheel] (re-recruitment)

    Quote Originally Posted by The Void Dragon View Post
    You best be using the Sound Cosmic for your magic, is all I'm going to say. And don't take it personally if Faust keeps an eye on your character. A close one. Not an especially effective one, but a close one.
    Yeah, I planned on it being legal magic pretty much because of Faust!
    I won an argument with my GM -15/08/2017- (20:32 GMT +1)

  17. - Top - End - #17
    Pixie in the Playground
    Join Date
    Nov 2018

    Default Re: Beneath the Delirious Moon [Burning Wheel] (re-recruitment)

    I'd like very much to join this, if it is still possible, as the setting and system looks like it would be quite interesting to play. I haven't looked into the system yet but i'll be doing that as soon as possible. As someone who is completely new to the system I hope you will be patient with me.
    Last edited by Holiday Warlock; 2019-09-12 at 06:33 PM.

  18. - Top - End - #18
    Bugbear in the Playground
     
    WolfInSheepsClothing

    Join Date
    May 2017

    Default Re: Beneath the Delirious Moon [Burning Wheel] (re-recruitment)

    Regarding starting health: Does having Essence of Earth count for the unnatural health in the questions? The trait says that the character doesn't age, doesn't fall ill and has a stronger resistance to poisons.

    Also, living at court counts as a "really clean and happy place"? I... Don't think so, but I'll ask nonetheless.


    Another question: I haven't got the slightest idea of how life at court worked. Should I purchase Either Rent or Properties to have a house? Or does he have a room as long as he stays there? I'm for the latter, since he's been a soldier before landing that job, I figure they gave him his own personal room
    Last edited by Valmark; 2019-09-13 at 08:38 AM.
    I won an argument with my GM -15/08/2017- (20:32 GMT +1)

  19. - Top - End - #19

    Default Re: Beneath the Delirious Moon [Burning Wheel] (re-recruitment)

    Quote Originally Posted by Valmark View Post
    After finally finding where the spells are (I'm an idiot and looked last in the Mannish Resources) I've settled on the spellcaster.

    I'm not taking Gifted Child because with 5 lifepaths I can't find a way to get 2 free trait points and mantain the Wizard of War-->Court Sorcerer line.

    I'll either go Peasant/Village-->Hunter-->Apt Pupil (soldier)-->Wizard of War-->Court Sorcerer
    Or Peasant/Village-->AP-->WW-->CS-->Courtier

    I think that someone who gets to live at court would naturally spend time as a Courtier and I also really like the Hunter lifepath as a young'un.

    I see him as having been found by a wizard, part of a military company, that took him in for his untapped potential.
    He learned under him with real fights, distinguished himself and got invited at court (which court I've yet to decide).
    I'd say to take Courtier though. He could be native of the fringes nonetheless? That way he'd still be able to give the party inside knowledge. I'd use the three general points to give him a weapon, relying only on magic would be terrible.

    Can I purchase the Facets for Abstracted Magic? They allow for modifications of basic spells or to craft one on the fly (admittedly with an higher difficulty)
    Splendid plan, overall! Personally I prefer your second path, as that brings him into the fold of arcane lore as early as possible - though the choice is ultimately yours. As for which court, my vote would be between Gristing or Stathes' Crossing. They are of the most modern sensibilities among the Fringe, though that would place you squarely upon one side of the local politic. The more neutral Udwald could be a third, if less certain, choice. Please refrain from Wodengard or Scawic, however.

    Let's avoid Abstracted Magic for the same reason as the Practical. Besides, church-approved magic is quite restricted in its form, as there are already registries of spells/songs considered to be holy. Working outside those confines tends to draw the ire of priestly types.


    Quote Originally Posted by Harken! View Post
    I'll join, if its still ongoing. I can play a sage/ walking textbook. Divine caster is also appropriate. Probably from Quarthal. Open to politicking of all stripes.
    An excellent concept! I assume you will be working towards some of the higher echelons of the Religious subsetting? Divine magic, such as it is, is worked through the Faith mechanic - so keep an eye out for the Faithful trait while selecting your Lifepaths.

    Quote Originally Posted by Holiday Warlock View Post
    I'd like very much to join this, if it is still possible, as the setting and system looks like it would be quite interesting to play. I haven't looked into the system yet but i'll be doing that as soon as possible. As someone who is completely new to the system I hope you will be patient with me.
    It is indeed still possible! I am looking for between one and three new players, of which you are now the third to express interest. Do not worry so much about the matter of experience, since this is to my knowledge the first time any of us have ever played Burning Wheel! So far we have been able to muddle our way through, and I expect this will be no different. Do any concepts spring to mind that you might like playing?

    Quote Originally Posted by Valmark View Post
    Regarding starting health: Does having Essence of Earth count for the unnatural health in the questions? The trait says that the character doesn't age, doesn't fall ill and has a stronger resistance to poisons.

    Also, living at court counts as a "really clean and happy place"? I... Don't think so, but I'll ask nonetheless.

    Another question: I haven't got the slightest idea of how life at court worked. Should I purchase Either Rent or Properties to have a house? Or does he have a room as long as he stays there? I'm for the latter, since he's been a soldier before landing that job, I figure they gave him his own personal room
    I think it is fair to apply Essence of the Earth for the purpose of unnatural health, as your character does appear by all accounts to be of mystical vigor. Life at court would be about as "clean and happy" an upbringing can be given the circumstances, but your character was not Born Noble, so it is a moot point. I believe the question requires you having been raised in such conditions to receive the bonus to Health.

    At court you would indeed have dressing chambers, though they would not be technically yours, rather occupied by you (as Court Wizard). You need not spend resources on that, but do list it as a place of lodging so long as you retain your position. If you have spare points, I would consider purchasing a Reputation of some sort. The unlearned are likely to be in awe of your presence, after all...

  20. - Top - End - #20
    Bugbear in the Playground
     
    WolfInSheepsClothing

    Join Date
    May 2017

    Default Re: Beneath the Delirious Moon [Burning Wheel] (re-recruitment)

    Very well, everything as I assumed.

    Though I want to clarify one point regarding magic, since I gather none of us has experience with it. By browsing the internet and checking the spells I realized that one miscast (either failure of a spell or getting interrupted) can easily lead to... apocalypses. To quote one guy "Adventuring with a 5 lifepath sorcerer is suicidal".

    I'm trying to reduce the chances by having a high starting sorcery (B6) and hoping to fork it pretty much always with Sing and possibly Astrology plus purchasing low ob spells (at the start, we'll see later in game about serious spells), but just in case I wanted to make it clear in case you want to veto it, I wouldn't want to ruin someone's fun with a failed roll.
    I should read up more regarding Enchantments, to see if I can support Sorcery with the other school.


    Aside from that, I'm making the sheet (I'm at purchasing spells coincidentally) and, barred any major change, it should be up soon.
    I won an argument with my GM -15/08/2017- (20:32 GMT +1)

  21. - Top - End - #21
    Barbarian in the Playground
     
    Planetar

    Join Date
    Oct 2017

    Default Re: Beneath the Delirious Moon [Burning Wheel] (re-recruitment)

    Exciting to see interest picking up for this game. I play Brysen, Wallapug Auth Trader and Merchant of Some Repute. Basically a diplomat/ship captain/merchant who uses all three of those roles as a way to, essentially, be a spy. He's not so much a combat character as the "face" of the party so far.

    Looking forward to all of you joining in!

  22. - Top - End - #22

    Default Re: Beneath the Delirious Moon [Burning Wheel] (re-recruitment)

    Quote Originally Posted by Valmark View Post
    Very well, everything as I assumed.

    Though I want to clarify one point regarding magic, since I gather none of us has experience with it. By browsing the internet and checking the spells I realized that one miscast (either failure of a spell or getting interrupted) can easily lead to... apocalypses. To quote one guy "Adventuring with a 5 lifepath sorcerer is suicidal".

    I'm trying to reduce the chances by having a high starting sorcery (B6) and hoping to fork it pretty much always with Sing and possibly Astrology plus purchasing low ob spells (at the start, we'll see later in game about serious spells), but just in case I wanted to make it clear in case you want to veto it, I wouldn't want to ruin someone's fun with a failed roll.
    I should read up more regarding Enchantments, to see if I can support Sorcery with the other school.

    Aside from that, I'm making the sheet (I'm at purchasing spells coincidentally) and, barred any major change, it should be up soon.
    Good to hear about the sheet. Regarding the dangers of miscasts: on the one hand, there should be some (potentially dire) consequences to flubbing attempts at controlling the Sound Cosmic. That said, failed sorcery should not be so calamitous an event as to endanger the lives everyone within the unfortunate wizard's vicinity. I imagine that I will mostly be dictating these rare events by GM fiat. Alternately, I was thinking of allowing the sorcerer the option to accept double the miscasted spell's Tax in return for a re-roll of the Die of Fate regarding the failure.

    To everyone else - keep churning forth! I am more than willing to assist in the character creation process as I have for Valmark. Pitch your ideas and we can discuss them.

  23. - Top - End - #23
    Dwarf in the Playground
     
    Kobold

    Join Date
    Feb 2019

    Default Re: Beneath the Delirious Moon [Burning Wheel] (re-recruitment)

    As our Face has introduced himself, I suppose I should Describe Faust in more certain terms. He is a noble from Quorthal, quite skilled with the blade and somewhat knowledgeable about matters of faith and wilderness survival. So far has proven to be good at eviscerating monsters and being the bad cop to Brysen's good cop. Having re-read the IC thread, it is safe to say that he is also quite mercurial in nature.

  24. - Top - End - #24
    Dwarf in the Playground
     
    Kessler's Avatar

    Join Date
    Oct 2009

    Default Re: Beneath the Delirious Moon [Burning Wheel] (re-recruitment)

    Hi. I apologize for dropping out of the game. Would it be possible to rejoin it?

  25. - Top - End - #25

    Default Re: Beneath the Delirious Moon [Burning Wheel] (re-recruitment)

    You'll understand my apprehension at immediately saying yes. It is a moot point anyway since I am looking for no more than three new players, and three have already extended interest. At best I could offer a place as an alternate.

  26. - Top - End - #26
    Pixie in the Playground
    Join Date
    Nov 2018

    Default Re: Beneath the Delirious Moon [Burning Wheel] (re-recruitment)

    Could you please correct me if i am wrong, but lifepaths are a representation of the things you've done, how your life has changed and the skills you've picked up along the way? Are duels a common thing in the setting? I was thinking about playing a professional duelist, a champion hired by nobility to fight their duels for them? Would that be acceptable?

  27. - Top - End - #27
    Dwarf in the Playground
     
    Kobold

    Join Date
    Feb 2019

    Default Re: Beneath the Delirious Moon [Burning Wheel] (re-recruitment)

    Your interpretation of life paths is correct.

    Sorry, Faust does his own duels. Only cowards hire champions.

  28. - Top - End - #28

    Default Re: Beneath the Delirious Moon [Burning Wheel] (re-recruitment)

    Quote Originally Posted by Holiday Warlock View Post
    Could you please correct me if i am wrong, but lifepaths are a representation of the things you've done, how your life has changed and the skills you've picked up along the way? Are duels a common thing in the setting? I was thinking about playing a professional duelist, a champion hired by nobility to fight their duels for them? Would that be acceptable?
    As The Void Dragon explained, yes you are correct - Lifepaths will help craft your characters background, and represent their "class(es)" insofar as they provide your character with their skills and abilities. As for your idea, a sword for hire is always an appreciable course. Is this character a native of the fringe, or are they from abroad? Faust is himself a duelist, but having more characters able to wield a sword is not itself a poor idea.

    Duels are themselves a common means of deciding arguments or righting wrongs, especially among nobility. They are not usually to the death, however those fought between the Brazen Men are an exception to this. Within the League, you would need to have some kind of noble or bestowed title to "properly" declare challenges; otherwise you risk being simply ignored. Nobles do have the right to a champion, however.

  29. - Top - End - #29
    Dwarf in the Playground
     
    Kessler's Avatar

    Join Date
    Oct 2009

    Default Re: Beneath the Delirious Moon [Burning Wheel] (re-recruitment)

    Quite understandable, the fault is with me here. If you decide, you can consider me as an alternate.

  30. - Top - End - #30
    Barbarian in the Playground
     
    Planetar

    Join Date
    Oct 2017

    Default Re: Beneath the Delirious Moon [Burning Wheel] (re-recruitment)

    Quote Originally Posted by The Void Dragon View Post
    Your interpretation of life paths is correct.

    Sorry, Faust does his own duels. Only cowards hire champions.
    Cowards, or those with a sense of self-preservation and coin to burn. ;)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •